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    Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn told a panel of state senators she anticipates the state will receive an additional $2.3 billion to $2.6 billion in federal education funds in a third round of federal COVID-19 relief. Any new funding would be in addition to $1.4 billion in education money already allocated to Tennessee through the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act and a second round of stimulus passed in December, bringing the state’s total federal education funding to an estimated $4.5 billion. “We will have about $4.5 billion coming into this state, and a significant portion, congressional intent, is supposed to go through outside learning time. And that includes again, summer school, tutoring, extended school days, extended school years,” Schwinn told members of the Senate Finance Committee on Tuesday. “There is no shortage of money,” she said. Tennessee received $260 million last spring in...
    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Interim New York Education Commissioner Betty Rosa was given the job permanently Monday in a unanimous vote by the policy-setting Board of Regents. Rosa has been interim commissioner since August 2020. The state's Education Department has been without a permanent chief since MaryEllen Elia stepped down in August 2019. She is the first Latina woman to serve in the position. The commissioner oversees more than 700 school districts with 2.6 million students, as well as 7,000 libraries, 900 museums and more than 50 licensed professions. “Our state, our nation and the world are at a crossroads,” she said during a video meeting. “We must rebuild in new ways and on many levels. I submit that investing in education is foundational to our recovery and the future of our state and nation.” Vice Chancellor T. Andrew Brown credited Rosa with providing stability to the Education Department during...
    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky Education Commissioner Jason E. Glass is planning a virtual listening tour across the state this spring, officials said. The tour is scheduled to kick off on April 6 in Louisville and wind down on May 6 in Ashland, a statement from the Kentucky Department of Education said. Glass will be gathering input from the public on long-term aspirations for the state's education system, the statement said. A total of nine sessions, about 90 minutes each, will be held over the monthlong period. Other sessions are planned in Murray, Bowling Green, Richmond, Lexington, Cold Springs, Shelbyville and Hazard. “I hope to see many stakeholders engaged in these virtual meetings and I look forward to the Thrich dialogue that will inform our continuous improvement efforts,” Glass said. A list of dates and times and a link to pre-register for any session is on the Education Department's website....
    Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona appeared before the Senate’s education committee on Wednesday, Feb. 3 for a confirmation hearing after being nominated to serve as the United States' Education Secretary by President Joe Biden. Cardona, a lifelong Meriden resident, was announced as a choice to join Biden’s Cabinet as Education Secretary in late December. If nominated, the 45-year-old Cardona will be tasked with overseeing one of Biden’s key goals for his first 100 days by re-opening the majority of the nation’s elementary and middle schools for in-person learning. Before delivering his opening statement to the Education Committee, Cardona was introduced by Connecticut senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy. Cardona served as co-chairperson of the Connecticut Legislative Achievement Gap Task Force as well as co-chairperson of the Connecticut Birth to Grade Three Leaders Council. He also taught for four years as an adjunct professor at the University of Connecticut in...
              A lawsuit alleged that Commissioner Penny Schwinn favored certain textbook vendors without merit at the expense of more qualified vendors. Textbook and educational materials publishing company Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (HMH) filed the suit against the Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE) in November of 2019. Consequently, HMH noted that the sale of all other grade levels of reading materials offered by HMH were jeopardized, since they are designed to be implemented together from K-12 curriculum. The Tennessee State Board of Education acted on the recommendation of an advisory panel appointed by the Textbook and Instructional Materials Quality Commission to not adopt HMH’s third grade reading material. HMH claimed that the advisory panel’s process was disrupted after Schwinn appointed Dr. Lisa Coons as TDOE Assistant Commissioner for Standards and Materials. Thereafter, HMH claimed that the panel re-reviewed and failed HMH’s material, while TDOE adopted programs offered by competitors...
              Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn warned Metro Nashville Public School officials this week that serious consequences await if they do not account for $110 million in federal aid. Schwinn warned MNPS officials in a letter dated Monday. “MNPS has significant balances available that have not been drawn down since last summer (2020), as well as federal funding still available from the previous fiscal year,” Schwinn wrote. “These balances are close to $110 million when reviewing all federal funds together.” Schwinn said that MNPS officials have not utilized grants for the purposes that federal officials intended. She also said that federal officials intended that these funds serve students in vulnerable populations, including students with disabilities and students who attend high-risk schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to Schwinn’s letter, state education agencies cannot continue to award money to subrecipients who do not comply with...
    President Biden has tapped Miguel Cardona to lead the Education Department, and he'll soon have the chance to make his case for the job before the Senate during a confirmation hearing.  If confirmed, Cardona will step into the hot seat after Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who was the bitter target of Democratic scorn for her changes to Title IX, her support of school choice and charter programs, and for changes to Obama-era student loan borrowing policies. Here's everything to know about Cardona, 45, Connecticut's education commissioner: He was an ESL learner in Connecticut public schools  Cardona grew up in Meridien, Connecticut, speaking Spanish from birth with his Puerto Rican parents. He struggled to learn English in kindergarten. Supporters have said he "understands the challenges" of English second language learners in schools. He was raised in a housing project in Meridien and graduated from a technical high school as part of the...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – As the organization overseeing the SAT test changes the exam’s format to relax requirements amid the COVID-19 pandemic, a group advocating for students learning English in Florida is asking the state to delay a yearly assessment. Sunshine State students who are learning to speak English are set to be tested on their English-language proficiency starting on Monday. But Alianza Center, a non-profit organization that advocates for Puerto Ricans and other Hispanics in the state, and LULAC Florida have launched a petition urging state Department of Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran to postpone the in-person assessments due to coronavirus safety concerns. “Students are administered the speaking section of the test one-on-one with a teacher. The listening, reading, and writing sections may be administered in a group setting,” Johanna López, an Orange County school board member who is also executive director of Alianza Center, told the News Service. The petition...
            by Thomas Catenacci  President-elect Joe Biden is poised to select Miguel Cardona, the current Connecticut education commissioner, to lead the Department of Education in his administration, CNN reported. Miguel Cardona, who has served as head of the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE) since August 2019, will be President-elect Joe Biden’s choice to lead the federal government’s education department, multiple sources told CNN. Cardona would be the latest Latino to receive a high-ranking position in the incoming Biden administration. “My friend Miguel Cardona is everything you would want in a Secretary of Education,” Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy tweeted Monday night. “A classroom teacher, a fighter for educational equity, a consensus builder. He has risen quickly through the ranks for a reason.” Cardona began his career in education as a public school teacher in Meriden, Connecticut before he served as a school principal, according to his official bio. After...
    President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCongress passes .3T coronavirus relief, government funding deal House conservatives huddle at White House to plan challenging election results House passes massive spending deal, teeing up Senate vote MORE on Tuesday formally announced Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona as his nominee to head the U.S. Department of Education. Cardona, who is the first Latino education commissioner in Connecticut, has worked as an elementary school teacher, principal and assistant superintendent, fulfilling Biden’s promise to tap someone with experience in public education. His nomination also adds to the diversity the president-elect vowed to have in his administration, being the third Latino Cabinet nominee.  “In Miguel Cardona, America will have an experienced and dedicated public school teacher leading the way at the Department of Education — ensuring that every student is equipped to thrive in the economy of the future, that every educator has the resources they need to do...
    President-elect Biden chose Connecticut's education commissioner and longtime public school teacher, Miguel Cardona, to serve as his education secretary on Tuesday. Cardona, 45, worked as a public educator for two decades in Connecticut, before becoming the state’s top education official in 2019.  As education commissioner, Cardona has been a vociferous advocate of sending children back to school for in-person learning amid the coronavirus pandemic, noting the low transmission rate among children and the devastating setbacks of remote learning.  If confirmed, Cardona would be able to push for reopenings nationwide, as Biden has pledged to have most schools reopened by his 100th day in office.  DEVOS PLEADS WITH EDUCATION DEPARTMENT STAFF TO 'BE THE RESISTANCE'  Under the leadership of Cardona and Gov. Ned Lamont, Connecticut was a rare blue state to express a strict preference for in-person learning amid the rise and fall of coronavirus cases in the state.  Ultimately, the decision...
    Miguel Cardona President-elect Joe Biden is nominating Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona to be his education secretary. Cardona is a former teacher and school principal, meeting Biden’s pledge to pick an educator for the role—unlike Donald Trump’s choice of Betsy DeVos. In the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, Cardona made it a priority to get kids across the state access to laptops and the internet. More recently, he has pressed for in-person education, citing concerns about educational inequities with remote learning. That concern is in line with his longstanding focus on English language learners and racial achievement gaps. In a 2019 interview, Cardona cited his own experience as a child who arrived in kindergarten having spoken only Spanish at home. He also opposed tying teacher performance evaluations to test scores, saying “Not reducing a teacher to a test score and bringing the voices of teachers and leaders into the process of...
    (Reuters) - President-elect Joe Biden is set to name Connecticut's Commissioner of Education Miguel Cardona as his pick for U.S. Secretary of Education, according to a transition team source. Cardona, a veteran teacher and school administrator, would be another Latino addition to Biden's Cabinet. Biden's transiton team did not immediately respond to requests for comment. (Reporting by Jarrett Renshaw and Simon Lewis; Editing by Chizu Nomiyama) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States, Connecticut, education
    President-elect Joe Biden is poised to select Miguel Cardona, the current Connecticut education commissioner, to lead the Department of Education in his administration, CNN reported. Miguel Cardona, who has served as head of the Connecticut State Department of Education (CSDE) since August 2019, will be President-elect Joe Biden’s choice to lead the federal government’s education department, multiple sources told CNN. Cardona would be the latest Latino to receive a high-ranking position in the incoming Biden administration. “My friend Miguel Cardona is everything you would want in a Secretary of Education,” Democratic Sen. Chris Murphy tweeted Monday night. “A classroom teacher, a fighter for educational equity, a consensus builder. He has risen quickly through the ranks for a reason.” (RELATED: We Asked Teachers Unions Nationwide Why They Oppose Reopening Schools. Here’s What They Said) Cardona began his career in education as a public school teacher in Meriden, Connecticut before he served...
    President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCongress passes .3T coronavirus relief, government funding deal House conservatives huddle at White House to plan challenging election results House passes massive spending deal, teeing up Senate vote MORE is set to nominate Connecticut Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona to be his education secretary, according to multiple reports.  The nomination is likely to be one of Biden's last nominations before the Christmas holiday and continues the trend of Biden seeking to have a diverse Cabinet. Cardona, who is Latino, has held a number of educations posts in Connecticut. Prior to serving as the state's education commissioner, Cardona worked as an elementary school teacher, principal, and assistant superintendent.   Tags Joe Biden
    BOSTON (CBS/AP) — The top education official in Massachusetts is urging public school districts in the state’s three largest cities to bring high-needs students back to the classroom for in-person learning. Jeffrey Riley, commissioner of elementary and secondary education, ordered the Boston, Worcester and Springfield school districts in letters released Friday to submit within 10 days their plans to bring students with disabilities and special needs back to school. “For these particularly vulnerable groups of students, it is vital to have a plan for providing in-person instruction as soon as possible,” Riley wrote. Riley did not specify when he would like classrooms to reopen. Unsatisfactory responses could spark an audit “to assess overall efforts to provide in-person instruction and to ensure your remote learning program is consistent with state and federal laws and regulations,” according to the letter. Boston is providing in-person learning for fewer than 200 students at four...
    Photo via AdobeFlorida students will be able to continue to learn remotely through the second half of the school year as the state grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic, Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran said Wednesday. “From the top down in this state, that will absolutely happen. There is no flexibility for anything but that,” Corcoran told the State Board of Education. The reopening of brick-and-mortar classrooms, which were shuttered during the early stages of the pandemic this spring, became a political flashpoint after Corcoran ordered school districts to offer in-person instruction five days a week or be penalized financially. Gov. Ron DeSantis and Corcoran have maintained that families need to have the option of choosing face-to-face instruction or distance learning for children, arguing that keeping students away from school can have damaging impacts on students’ physical safety, mental health and educational progress. The Florida Education Association teachers union sued the state...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) – Florida students will be able to continue to learn remotely through the second half of the school year as the state grapples with the COVID-19 pandemic, Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran said Wednesday. “From the top down in this state, that will absolutely happen. There is no flexibility for anything but that,” Corcoran told the State Board of Education. The reopening of brick-and-mortar classrooms, which were shuttered during the early stages of the pandemic this spring, became a political flashpoint after Corcoran ordered school districts to offer in-person instruction five days a week or be penalized financially. Gov. Ron DeSantis and Corcoran have maintained that families need to have the option of choosing face-to-face instruction or distance learning for children, arguing that keeping students away from school can have damaging impacts on students’ physical safety, mental health and educational progress. MORE FROM CBSMIAMI.COM Miami-Dade Public Schools Reconvenes Its...
    SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. (CBSNewYork) — Gov. Phil Murphy nominated Dr. Angelica Allen-McMillan to serve as New Jersey’s new education commissioner. She is currently interim executive county superintendent. The governor announced her nomination Tuesday morning, with both acknowledging the unique challenges she will face during the pandemic. MORE: Head Of University Hospital Says New Jersey’s Second Wave Is Here: ‘This Is About To Get Worse’ “With all that we continue to battle with COVID-19, I know Angelica will bring a steady hand, a cool head and a strong heart to our fight,” said Murphy. “We have been knocked down and will continue to stumble on occasion as we work to stand tall in our fight against COVID-19,” Dr. Allen-McMillan added. Dr. Allen-McMillan’s nomination will now have to be approved by the State Senate. MORE FROM CBS New York Stimulus Package Update: Is Time Running Out On A Possible Second Stimulus...
    SOUTH ORANGE, New Jersey (WABC) -- New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Tuesday he was nominating Angelica Allen-McMillan to be the state's next education commissioner.The appointment comes as the states' more than 600 school districts work through the COVID-19 outbreak, with many holding online-only or hybrid lessons."A product of New Jersey's public schools, Angelica has worked at all levels of education and knows exactly what our teachers and students need to succeed," Murphy said. "She is an exemplary educator, and I'm confident she is the leader we need to carry our school communities through the remainder of this pandemic and beyond."Related: New Jersey's coronavirus cases on the rise, sparking concern and actionAllen-McMillan will succeed Lamont Repollet, who announced his plan to leave over the summer to take the top post at Kean University."I am a proud product of New Jersey's magnificent public education system, and I have dedicated my career...
    SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Tuesday he was nominating Angelica Allen-McMillan to be the state's next education commissioner. The appointment comes as the states' more than 600 school districts work through the COVID-19 outbreak, with many holding online-only or hybrid lessons. Allen-McMillan will succeed Lamont Repollet, who announced his plan to leave over the summer to take the top post at Kean University. Kevin Dehmer has been serving as interim commissioner since Repollet's departure. Allen-McMillan currently serves at the superintendent of Morris County schools. The state's education commissioner must be confirmed by the state Senate. The commissioner oversees the state Education Department, conducts statewide tests and is in charge of doling out billions of dollars in state aid to school districts. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: New Jersey, Associated Press
    SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. (AP) – New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Tuesday he was nominating Angelica Allen-McMillan to be the state’s next education commissioner. The appointment comes as the states’ more than 600 school districts work through the COVID-19 outbreak, with many holding online-only or hybrid lessons. Allen-McMillan will succeed Lamont Repollet, who announced his plan to leave over the summer to take the top post at Kean University. Kevin Dehmer has been serving as interim commissioner since Repollet’s departure. Allen-McMillan currently serves at the superintendent of Morris County schools. The state’s education commissioner must be confirmed by the state Senate. The commissioner oversees the state Education Department, conducts statewide tests and is in charge of doling out billions of dollars in state aid to school districts.   Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. MORE FROM CBS3: Stimulus Package Update: What Happens To The Economy Without A Second Stimulus? 3...
    MALDEN (CBS) – Massachusetts students can expect to take the MCAS tests next spring, state education commissioner Jeff Riley said Tuesday. Riley made the announcement at the Board of Education’s monthly meeting in Malden. “The federal government has signaled that they will likely not be allowing a waiver for any testing. We have told superintendents very clearly that we do anticipate administering the MCAS tests this spring,” he said. “It is likely we are going to be pushing back the makeup tests that we typically do in the fall until later in January.” Massachusetts lawmakers have been debating a bill that would suspend the MCAS exams for four years because of the coronavirus pandemic. The bill, which was introduced in June by State Senator Jo Comerford of Northampton, would put a pause on the MCAS graduation requirement through the 2023-2024 school year. Supporters argue students should not have to worry...
    State lawmakers aired grievances over missteps by the Tennessee Department of Education to Commissioner Penny Schwinn as she appeared before the House Education Committee on Tuesday to provide an update on school reopening. Broadly, legislators criticized the department for communication breakdowns and stressed the importance of improving students’ performance in reading and math. “There has to be trust between you and this committee,” said Rep. Scott Cepicky, R-Culleoka, addressing Schwinn directly. “We have to know that, philosophically, we're on the same page. There has to be cooperation between us, you, and Gov. (Bill) Lee. There's a million kids who are depending on us to get this right.” Cepicky outlined missteps the department made in the rollout of the Child Wellbeing Checks toolkit. “I don't ever want to be blindsided by something like this again, OK?” Cepicky said. “I'm just telling you, as representative of District 64....
    Under the leadership of Commissioner Penny Schwinn, Tennessee’s Department of Education and its affiliates have experienced turnover of one-third of its employees, department data shows. Since Schwinn took office as commissioner in February 2019, a total of 405 employees, or roughly 33 percent, have left the department. The vast majority of employees leaving the department have resigned – about two-thirds of the total number. Since last February, 116 employees have resigned from the department’s central office, 19 have retired and 26 were terminated. As of this month, 391 employees remain in the department’s central offices. A total of 244 employees left the departments' subsidiaries, including the Achievement School District, State Board of Education, the Energy Efficient Schools Initiative, School Support Services program and the Tennessee Early Intervention System. In the first nine months of Schwinn’s leadership, the turnover rate at the agency was about 18 percent,...
              Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE) Commissioner Penny Schwinn and her leadership skills have created a toxic work environment and driven too many talented state workers away and into the private sector, said three former TDOE employees. These are the same three sources who criticized Schwinn in an article that The Tennessee Star published Wednesday. Those sources spoke on condition of anonymity. They said the problems within the department started when Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee appointed Schwinn. And the sources also said the difficulties began not despite Schwinn — but because of her. Schwinn’s staff did not return our request for comment Thursday. Neither did anyone in Lee’s office. One source said Schwinn created “a fairly abysmal” work environment. “I think about the constant upheaval she has created in the department, from my perspective as a former employee, and the mental health toll it...
              Three former high-level Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE) officials who left the department voluntarily criticized their former boss, Commissioner Penny Schwinn, in exclusive interviews with The Tennessee Star. The former officials spoke with The Star on the condition of anonymity. Their criticisms of Schwinn are withering, and include the following allegations: Schwinn mocked and ridiculed Gov. Bill Lee, her boss, at a staff meeting last year. Schwinn gave government records to a reporter that she knew contained false information. Schwinn lied to Lee to avoid appearing in public with U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. The Tennessee Star contacted Lee’s public information officers for comment about this story last Wednesday and hoped they would answer. By Tuesday of this week, no one in that office would respond. We also contacted Schwinn’s public information officers on the same day last week. They...
              Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn interned for U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) almost 20 years ago, according to a resume that Schwinn posted online. Schwinn posted that resume to a document more than 10 years ago. Schwinn’s LinkedIn profile, however, does not mention this internship as a part of her official resume. Tennessee Department of Education officials did not return The Tennessee Star’s request for comment on the matter Friday. Schwinn submitted the resume to the Sacramento City Unified School District in January 2010 as part of a document for the Capitol Collegiate Academy, geared for kindergarten through eighth-grade students. In her resume, Schwinn said she worked for Feinstein from 2001 through 2002 as a senior intern. Her duties included managing incoming communications and creating project designs and procedures for the senator. Schwinn also said she represented Feinstein’s office with constituents and other...
              Tennessee Education Commissioner Penny Schwinn may have lost the confidence of some influential people in Tennessee, at least according to a new editorial that the Professional Educators of Tennessee (PET) published this week. The Nashville-based PET is a statewide professional association of educators, according to its website. PET cited, among other things, a high turnover rate within the Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE) under Schwinn’s leadership. Members of the group also cited a growing number of assistant commissioners making six-figure salaries and the way Schwinn has managed state education during the COVID-19 pandemic. The PET editorial said members of the Tennessee General Assembly might consider submitting a letter to Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee expressing no confidence in Schwinn’s leadership. No one in either Lee’s office or the TDOE returned The Tennessee Star’s requests for comment Thursday. “Legislators, especially those that champion limited government,...
              Tennessee Department of Education (TDOE) Commissioner Penny Schwinn is a leftist and a statist who wants the government to have too great of a role developing public school students, according to a video one organization released this week. Gary Humble, speaking for Tennessee Stands, criticized Schwinn and the TDOE for proposing that state officials go to people’s homes to perform wellness checks on children. Humble said that a lot of people had a problem with that proposal, and that’s why state officials put the program on hold. “That program was an incredibly progressive and invasive statist program that left a lot of us scratching our heads thinking ‘How in the world did that get here in the state of Tennessee?’” Humble asked in the video. Humble then played clips of Schwinn that he took from various YouTube videos, where she used words...
    Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran is urging local school officials to be “very surgical, not sweeping” when responding to coronavirus cases, which he acknowledged are likely to occur as classes resume this month. “If you have a COVID-19 case or you have (COVID-19) symptoms, don’t panic,” Corcoran told school superintendents in a conference call Thursday. “Communicate with everybody and be open and transparent about it. We are going to have cases, and that’s OK.” Corcoran asked superintendents to check in with with top officials in the state Department of Education before shutting down a classroom or school, and said symptomatic individuals should be sent home. He also stressed that school officials should communicate with parents whenever a symptomatic individual attends school. “Even though it is not required, we would suggest dismissing the class for that day. Clean it, hyper-clean it, and let the parents know you hyper-cleaned the class,” Corcoran added. ...
    Speaking before state legislators recently, New Hampshire Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut said it was unlikely remote instruction would resume on a statewide basis this fall, but some schools may need to incorporate it based on specific concerns. In comments published in the Concord Monitor, Edelblut said with the COVID-19 pandemic continuing to evolve, it would be difficult to predict what may happen in the future. “But my sense today would be that we will not find ourselves again in the circumstance where statewide we have to go to remote instruction and support,” he said. “I suspect … that there may be incidences that happen in our institutions that will result in a transition to some type of remote instruction model. And that could be for some kind of a classroom or wing of a classroom, or perhaps even a school building.” Following the Department of Education’s...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Shannon Tahoe, the interim commissioner for the state’s education department, is resigning and will officially step down from her position on Aug. 13.  A statement from Board of Regents Chancellor Betty Rosa and Vice Chancellor Andrew Brown released Friday morning confirmed the news first reported by Politico yesterday. State education officials did not provide a reason for Tahoe’s departure eight months after stepping into the state’s highest education position.  “The Board and I thank Interim Commissioner Tahoe for her leadership during this unprecedented time. When Ms. Tahoe took over the position, no one could have imagined that a global pandemic was on the horizon, ” wrote Rosa and Brown. “Ms. Tahoe capably led the Department through one of its most challenging times and proved herself as a dedicated and personable leader.” ...
    The state’s interim education commissioner is leaving her post next month – just weeks before the uncertain start of the new academic year. Shannen Tahoe, who filled the role when MaryEllen Elia stepped down last year, will be leaving on August 13. Officials said a replacement will be named prior to her departure. “When Ms. Tahoe took over the position, no one could have imagined that a global pandemic was on the horizon,” said Board of Regents Chancellor Betty Rosa. “Ms. Tahoe capably led the Department through one of its most challenging times and proved herself as a dedicated and personable leader.” State education officials released reopening guidelines last week and Gov. Cuomo said he will make a final decision on the fraught issue in the first week of August. City schools are in the process of developing reopening plans but Mayor de Blasio cautioned that the matter won’t be...
    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky's new education commissioner, Jason Glass, was given a four-year contract Wednesday with an annual salary of $260,000 by the Board of Education. Glass's contract begins Sept. 14. The Brandenburg, Kentucky, native has been superintendent of Colorado’s second largest school district, Jeffco Public Schools in the metro Denver area, since 2017. He will oversee Kentucky’s K-12 school system and its 650,000 students. Glass was previously superintendent of Eagle County school district in rural Colorado and director of education in Iowa. His appointment comes several months after Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear disbanded the state’s school board and installed 11 new members on his first day in office. A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit by the former board members in June. Glass will receive the same benefits as all Kentucky Department of Education employees as well as a trust account contribution and capped relocation expenses. Copyright 2020 The Associated...
    Florida schools must reopen for students in August under an executive order issued by the states education commissioner Monday, with few exceptions such as the local health department declaring it is not safe due to the novel coronavirus. Education Commissioner Richard Corcorans order said the schools must be open for students five days a week and specified requirements that needed to be met if a school was to offer a remote instruction option, the Tallahassee Democrat reported. The announcement comes on the day President Donald Trump tweeted – in all caps – "SCHOOLS MUST OPEN IN THE FALL!!!" It also comes a week after the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended schools reopen and policy considerations "should start with the goal of having students physically present in school." Local health officials can override the states mandate, but Department of Education spokeswoman Cheryl Etters told the Democrat it will difficult to justify without...
    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Three remaining candidates for Kentucky education commissioner have been identified and will be interviewed next week in Louisville. The Board of Education released the names of the three on Wednesday. They are Jason Glass, superintendent and chief learner for Jeffco Public Schools in the metro Denver area; Julian Vasquez Heilig, dean of the College of Education and professor of educational policy studies and evaluation at the University of Kentucky; and Felicia Cumings Smith, assistant superintendent of teaching and learning in Jefferson County Public Schools in Kentucky. The board will meet Monday and Tuesday to conduct second-round interviews. The board narrowed the search to four candidates in June. Three chose to continue with the second round of interviews, the Department of Education said in a news release. Kevin C. Brown has been serving as interim commissioner since Dec. 18. A new commissioner is expected to be chosen...
    JEFFERSON COUNTY, Colo. (CBS4) – The superintendent of JeffCo Public Schools is a finalist for the Commissioner of Education position in Kentucky. Dr. Jason Glass was named a finalist on Wednesday. Second-round interviews will take place Monday and Tuesday, July 6th and 7th, according to a press release from the Kentucky Department of Education’s online publication, Kentucky Teacher. Jason Glass (credit: CBS) The Kentucky Board of Education released the names online on Wednesday. Besides Glass, two other candidates are finalists including the University of Kentucky College of Education Dean and the Assistant Superintendent of Teaching and Learning in Jefferson County Public Schools in Kentucky. Glass has served as the Jeffco Public Schools superintendent since 2017. Before his move to the metro area, he served as the superintendent of Eagle County Schools and as the Iowa Director of Education. He has served in several positions with the Colorado Department of Education, as well....
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