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    JOE Biden reportedly issued an order to "immediately release all" undocumented migrants in Texas custody, according to an email obtained by Fox News. The memo, from the Department of Homeland Security to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), was sent out after the new president signed an executive order on his first day in office calling for a 100-day pause in deportations, according to the outlet. 6Joe Biden signed several executive orders during his first few days as US PresidentCredit: Reuters 6The claims that Biden ordered all undocumented migrants in Texas to be released, were made on Tucker Carlson tonightCredit: Fox News "Tucker Carlson Tonight" has since obtained an internal email sent Thursday to ICE officers in Texas that shows how the order was enacted, according to reports. "As of midnight tonight, stop all removals," the email reads.  "This includes Mexican bus runs, charter flights and commercial removals (until further notice) ... all...
    When federal prosecutors leveled corruption charges against a North Carolina insurance executive this year, they submitted reams of evidence showing how the executive tried to bribe regulators for more favorable treatment of his companies. And while not central to the case, one little-noticed email filed with the court pulls back the curtain on a totally unrelated scheme to funnel undisclosed money into American elections. The email was between Greg Lindberg, who is now serving seven years in prison on bribery and wire fraud charges, and an executive at one of his companies, Global Bankers. In it, they discussed various potential political contributions that Lindberg might make, and how those contributions could be structured. One potential beneficiary of their political largesse was former Rep. Scott Taylor, a Republican from Virginia who lost his reelection bid in 2018 and lost again last month after running to represent his old seat.
    During an October 16 press conference, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, joined by Denver Department of Public Health and Environment Executive Director Bob McDonald, announced two new public-health orders intended to help mitigate spiking data related to COVID-19. The first calls for the wearing of face coverings in most outdoor locations. The second reduces the approved limit for gatherings in many, but not all, settings from ten to five. The order related to mask usage is open-ended, while the gathering limitations will last for the next thirty days. Both go into effect immediately. "We want to raise the flag and sound the alarm," Hancock said.Related Stories How Estes Park Is Handling Tourists Who Don't Love Masks DU Swim Team Members Bounced Over Unsafe Gathering Still Partying? Denver Cites Walmart and More for Violating COVID-19 Health Orders Statistics shared by McDonald underscored the worsening stats related to the novel coronavirus, including...
    Newly obtained emails provide more details about Hunter Biden’s purported overseas business dealings dating back to 2015, including alleged efforts to secure a lucrative relationship with a Chinese energy firm and discussions with top Burisma executive Vadym Pozharskyi. One email, dated May 13, 2017 and obtained by Fox News, includes a discussion of “remuneration packages” for six people in a business deal with a Chinese energy firm. The email appeared to identify Biden as “Chair / Vice Chair depending on agreement with CEFC,” in an apparent reference to now-bankrupt CEFC China Energy Co. TRUMP SLAMS BIDEN OVER REPORTS HUNTER BIDEN INTRODUCED BURISMA EXEC TO VP DAD: 'TOTALLY CORRUPT'  The email includes a note that “Hunter has some office expectations he will elaborate.” A proposed equity split references “20” for “H” and “10 held by H for the big guy?” with no further details. VideoThe second email, dated Aug. 2, 2017...
    Twitter suspended White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany’s personal account on Wednesday after she tweeted copies of an email from a Burisma executive to former Vice President Joe Biden’s son Hunter Biden. McEnany shared emails that were obtained and published by the New York Post on Wednesday afternoon. “Email from Ukrainian executive to Hunter Biden asks Hunter to “use his influence” on behalf of the firm paying him $50K/mo in email with subject “urgent issue,” McEnany wrote. She also shared a copy of the email earlier Wednesday morning. “Hunter introduced Joe Biden to a top executive at the Ukrainian energy firm he received $50K/month from!” she wrote. “Joe Biden LIED. PERIOD!!” Twitter removed both tweets and suspended her account, claiming that she broke the rules of sharing “hacked material” on the platform. A screenshot of Twitter’s suspension notice to McEnany was shared by the Trump campaign. BREAKING: Twitter has locked...
    The Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee will investigate newly released emails that revealed Hunter Biden introduced his father, former Vice President Joe Biden, to an executive at Ukrainian gas firm Burisma. Sen. Ron Johnson (R-WI), the chairman of the committee, told Fox News that the committee had contacted the source who provided the emails. The New York Post revealed that Hunter Biden introduced a Burisma executive to Joe Biden less than a year before he lobbied Ukrainian government officials to fire Ukrainian prosecutor Viktor Shokin, who was investigating the company. Johnson said: We regularly speak with individuals who email the committee’s whistleblower account to determine whether we can validate their claims. Although we consider those communications to be confidential, because the individual in this instance spoke with the media about his contact with the committee, we can confirm receipt of his email complaint, have been in contact with the...
    Racial minorities are significantly overrepresented among those experiencing homelessness in metro Denver, a new study shows. "We need to address this if we want to make meaningful progress on homelessness," says Matt Meyer, executive director of the Metro Denver Homeless Initiative, which just released its State of Homelessness 2020 Report. The report, which pulls from multiple data sources to help quantify the number of people experiencing homelessness in the metro area, indicates that Black and Native American individuals are represented disproportionately in the groups of those who are homeless or using services related to homelessness.Related Stories Denver Hit by Federal Class-Action Lawsuit Over Homeless Camp Sweeps Denver Safe-Camping Site Model Will Open to Public This Weekend Homelessness Crosses Borders: It's a Challenge for Metro Denver The report also notes that those experiencing homelessness in metro Denver are mostly male, usually have been homeless before, and often have higher rates...
    During an October 12 press conference, Mayor Michael Hancock confirmed that COVID-19 numbers that have become more troubling across Colorado are impacting the Mile High City as well. And Denver Public Health & Environment executive director Bob McDonald warned that if those numbers keep getting worse, restrictions that have been loosened in recent months could be tightened again, with a shutdown of all but essential services among the possibilities. "What could happen is that businesses of all types — gyms, your favorite salon, your favorite restaurant — could all be restricted, and we could all have to stay home," McDonald said. "Or we could have reduced capacities for a wide range of retailers. To avoid those things, we want to, at the local level, implement more public-health controls to double down on face coverings and physical distancing to the extent we can implement things, so we don't have those harsh economic...
    This week is a real free-for-all, with virtual events bringing the world to you. Take a serious or silly look at the upcoming election, meet artists and learn the latest on COVID-19. Then on Saturday, get out of the house for World Archaeology Day. Here are the ten best free things to do this week. COVID-19 Webinar: Colorado Six Months in Monday, October 12, 8:30 a.m. What has Colorado learned about the coronavirus since March? How has the state's response evolved since that first wave of cases in the spring, and what insights have we gained about communication, testing, tradeoffs and the efficacy of public-health guidance? During this free public webinar presented by the Colorado School of Public Health, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, and the Institute for Science & Policy, Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and Kacey...
    Like all local companies, Benchmark Theatre had to close down in March because of the coronavirus, but co-founder and producing artistic director Haley Johnson managed nonetheless to be productive. In April, with her partner Marcus Pirozzoli, she gave birth to a son, Mason. In so many ways, this changed everything. Still, Johnson and Rachel Rogers, Benchmark co-founder and executive artistic director, were able to absorb the shock of closure, figure out how to make sure the company survives and plan for the future. Benchmark’s 2020 season will begin this fall with what the directors term “bite-size programming” that still cleaves with this year’s original theme: Hopes and Fears. Benchmark is a relatively new company that took up residence in the Lakewood venue once occupied by Rick and Patty Yaconis’s Edge Theater. Over the past two years Johnson and Rogers have created some memorable productions, from A Kid Like Jake, about...
    Burger fans didn't hesitate to dish up opinions about the imminent arrival in Denver of California fast-food chain In-N-Out Burger. Social media lit up with exclamations of both joy and disgust — but the discussion wasn't limited to the quality of the food. During a fierce and ugly presidential election season, people are also paying attention to the politics of restaurant owners. "’Bout time we get another conservative company out this way!!" said one fan on Facebook, while someone not quite as excited countered with "Mediocre christian burgers," a reference to the company's habit of printing Bible verses on its packaging. Talk of In-N-Out boycotts fired up in 2018, when media outlets reported that some of the company's executives were generous GOP contributors. Since In-N-Out had not publicly endorsed a specific candidate or party, did it matter who its management might support? Should private individuals steer clear of political statements...
    Ten homeless individuals and the advocacy organization Denver Homeless Out Loud are suing the City of Denver and more than fifty individuals, agencies and organizations over the sweeps of encampments that have occurred in Denver thus far this year. "The sweeps are inhumane and must end. To take away our homeless neighbors' only possessions, during a global pandemic, is cruel. Today, we say 'enough is enough' and tell Denver to stop stealing its citizens' belongings," says Andy McNulty, the Killmer, Lane and Newman attorney who crafted the complaint. Today, October 5, the eleven plaintiffs, all represented by McNulty, filed a class-action lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of Colorado alleging that the sweeps violate provisions of the Fourth and Fourteenth amendments and also aspects of the Colorado Consitution.Related Stories City Sweeps Homeless Camp by Morey Middle School Homelessness Crosses Borders: It's a Challenge for Metro Denver Judge Determines Denver Camping...
    Has the pandemic made you crafty? Are your creative juices flowing? Two current competitions allow you to share your arty interests. Doors Open Denver, the annual celebration of this city's built environment, has launched its third annual photography contest, "Y/OUR Denver." To participate, simply find and photograph your favorite areas of Denver (focusing on architectural imagery), and submit your photos. “‘Y/OUR Denver’ has become a favorite part of our annual Doors Open Denver event,” says Pauline Herrera, executive director of the Denver Architecture Foundation, which puts on Doors Open Denver. “Every year we have an opportunity to see Denver architecture through the lens of these contest entries, providing a unique perspective of buildings featured in Doors Open Denver and beyond.” We Believe Local Journalism is Critical to the Life of a City Engaging with our readers is essential to Westword's mission. Make a financial contribution or sign...
    Get out and discover Denver this weekend...even if you never leave your home. Programs both in-person and virtual will cover everything from youth violence to Alexander Hamilton to the architecture of Denver. In fact, the Denver Architecture Foundation and the Colorado Photographic Arts Center have launched the third annual Doors Open Denver Photography Competition, “Y/OUR Denver,” encouraging you to find and photograph your favorite part of Denver, and then enter the picture in a juried competition. “‘Y/OUR Denver’ has become a favorite part of our annual Doors Open Denver event,” says Pauline Herrera, DAF executive director. “Every year we have an opportunity to see Denver architecture through the lens of these contest entries, providing a unique perspective of buildings featured in Doors Open Denver and beyond.” Marijuana Deals Near YouThe contest closes October 29; find out more here. Keep reading for more information on Doors Open Denver, as well as...
    Governor Jared Polis has used a new executive authority to automatically pardon 2,732 low-level marijuana possession convictions effective today, October 1. His authority to do so comes from a new law allowing Colorado's governor to pardon convictions for possession of two ounces of marijuana or less. According to Polis, his move has rolled back state convictions for marijuana possession up to 2012, when voters approved Amendment 64, and dating back as far as fifty years. Because one person can have multiple marijuana possession convictions, the governor doesn't know the exact number of people he's pardoned, but he estimates it to be "thousands of people." "It's off their records. If they have a background check at work, or want a concealed weapons permit or a student loan, this will no longer hold anybody back," Polis says. "And it's also symbolically important, because it shows that as a state and nation, we're coming to...
    ELLEN DeGeneres apologized to her staff via e-mail, saying she's "not perfect" following the firing of three top producers. The comedian reached out to the show's staffers after executive producers Ed Glavin and Kevin Leman and co-executive producer Jonathan Norman were ousted amid "toxic" workplace allegations. 2Ellen apologized to her staff in an email following the firing of three producers Credit: Getty Images Ellen, in a note obtained by The Hollywood Reporter, said: "I’m so so sorry for what this has become. I’ve left this to be a well-oiled machine, and I realize it’s not a machine…its human beings. "I apologize for anyone who’s feelings I’ve hurt. I’m not perfect. I’m multi-layered and I learn from my mistakes. I care about each and every one of you. I’m grateful for each and every one of you." 2In the note she said she isn't 'perfect'Credit: EllenTube According to Variety, news of...
    Tech giant Google has been accused of squeezing out rival search engines due to fears that it would “lose relevance” based on recently released internal emails. The Telegraph reports that tech giant Google alleged forced out rival search engines due to fears that it would “lose relevance” according to leaked internal emails. Messages between company executives suggest that the company developed its own comparison search engines for flights, hotels, and shopping despite knowing that their systems would not be as accurate and efficient as Expedia.com and other dedicated travel sites. The emails which form part of the House Judiciary’s investigation into Google’s parent company Alphabet over antitrust allegations show that Google was regularly chasing businesses that were popular on its search engine to remain relevant with its users. Google feared that it may not always be the first port of call for users searching online, according to emails dated between 2005...
    Don’t count Ellen out. Scooter Braun may be the only celebrity in her corner right now, but embattled talk show host Ellen DeGeneres is not going down without a fight. She’s also going back to work this month, according to an internal email from the show’s executive producers obtained by the Post. Reports of her career death — stemming from recent scathing stories about the “toxic,” “sexist” and “racist” workplace culture at the “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” — have been greatly exaggerated, sources close to the 62-year-old star told the Post Saturday. Despite her career collapsing around her, DeGeneres has no intention of walking away from her signature talk show or game show. She plans to report to work Aug. 24 for “Ellen’s Game of Games” and to the set of the “Ellen Show” when it premieres Sept. 9, according to the internal email. “We know that these last...
    Don’t count Ellen out. Scooter Braun may be the only celebrity in her corner right now, but embattled talk show host Ellen DeGeneres is not going down without a fight. She’s also going back to work this month, according to an internal email from the show’s executive producers obtained by the Post. Reports of her career death — stemming from recent scathing stories about the “toxic,” “sexist” and “racist” workplace culture at the “The Ellen DeGeneres Show” — have been greatly exaggerated, sources close to the 62-year-old star told the Post Saturday. Despite her career collapsing around her, DeGeneres has no intention of walking away from her signature talk show or game show. She plans to report to work Aug. 24 for “Ellen’s Game of Games” and to the set of the “Ellen Show” when it premieres Sept. 9, according to the internal email. “We know that these last few...
    President Trump took a victory lap after signing four executive orders aimed at reducing the cost of prescription drugs. “Yesterday I signed four measures that will massively reduce the prices of prescription drugs, in many cases by more than 50%. Nothing like this has ever been done before because Big Pharma, with its vast power, would not let it happen,” Trump said in a tweet Saturday. “Expensive Insulin went from big dollars to virtual pennies. Epi-pens went from their incredibly high, jacked up prices, to lower than their original give away bargains,” he continued. “Biggest price reductions in history, by far! Nothing like this has ever for our citizens, especially our Seniors. REMEMBER YOUR FAVORITE PRESIDENT!” Most notable among the provisions is a new requirement prohibiting drug companies from charging Medicare more than what they charge other nations for the same drugs. A slew of big pharma execs are expected...
    President Trump on Friday unveiled what he called four “sweeping” and “revolutionary” executive orders to dramatically lower prescription costs. Trump said he was “unrigging the system that is many decades old” and that “some very rich people are not gonna like me very much today.” The president’s orders seek to lower the cost of insulin and epipens, allow states and pharmacies to buy drugs overseas, slash pay to medical middlemen and make sure other countries don’t pay less for American drugs. Trump said banning the government from paying more for drugs than other countries was “the granddaddy of them all,” but won’t take effect until Aug. 24. Pharmaceutical executives will visit the White House on Tuesday and Trump said they must agree to slash drug prices substantially or the order will take effect. “We incredibly and foolishly bear the full cost of all research and development,” Trump said. “You think...
    Apple has given a series order to “Shining Girls,” a metaphysical thriller based on Lauren Beukes’ 2013 best-selling novel “The Shining Girls,” starring and executive produced by Elisabeth Moss, and executive produced by Leonardo DiCaprio’s Appian Way. MRC Television is the studio. Writer-creator Silka Luisa (“Strange Angel”) will pen the adaptation, executive produce and serve as showrunner. “The Shining Girls” book centers on a time-traveling Depression-era drifter who must murder the “shining girls” in order to continue his travels. Moss will star as a Chicago reporter who survived a brutal assault only to find her reality shifting as she hunts down her attacker. Moss will executive produce via her Love & Squalor Pictures, alongside Lindsey McManus. DiCaprio will executive produce through Appian Way alongside Jennifer Davidson. Beukes and Alan Page Arriaga will also serve as executive producers on the project. We hear Apple landed the rights to “Shining Girls” late...
    ABC News, a Walt Disney Co. unit, has fired senior executive Barbara Fedida after an independent investigation alleged she had made racially insensitive comments and used inappropriate language, according to a company email. Fedida also managed in a rough manner and would not return to ABC, Disney executive Peter Rice told staff in an email which ABC shared with Reuters. Fedida, the networks former senior vice president for talent, editorial strategy and business affairs, denied the allegations when they surfaced in media reports in June, describing them as "incredibly misleading." She said she had been a champion of diversity with a track record of hiring and promoting journalists of color. Reuters was unable to reach Fedida for comment Monday. Disney did not immediately reply to a request for comment. The investigation found no basis for allegations Fedida was the subject of dozens of HR complaints, Rice said. He also said...
    President Trump is expected to sign an executive order that will officially forbid illegal immigrants from being included in the 2020 United States census. It is unclear when the order will officially come down, according to Reuters, which first reported the news. The decennial count of the US population plays an enormous role in determining how federal money is spent and in deciding the allocation of representation in the 50 states. Population shifts between the decades can have significant consequences. New York and Ohio lost two members of the House of Representatives after the 2010 census, while Texas picked up four. The Trump administration has long sought to prevent Mexicans in the US illegally from influencing the official count. An original plan to ask 2020 census respondents their immigration status was thrown out by the Supreme Court. The order, when it comes, will likely face a legal challenge from Democrats....
    President Trump on Friday pledged to sign an executive order creating a “road to citizenship” for “Dreamer” immigrants — although a press secretary later backpedaled on the plan and some experts say he’s not authorized to do so. Trump told Telemundo anchor Jose Diaz-Balart that the order would lead to citizenship for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients. “One of the aspects of the [order] is going to be DACA. We are going to have a road to citizenship,” Trump said. But immigration experts and his fellow Republicans said Trump would have to go through Congress for such a sweeping immigration policy. “There is ZERO constitutional authority for a President to create a ‘road to citizenship’ by executive fiat,” tweeted Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. “It was unconstitutional when Obama issued executive amnesty, and it would be a HUGE mistake if Trump tries to illegally expand amnesty.” White House deputy...
    HBO Max has given a series commitment to a drama set in the Gotham police department from Matt Reeves and Terrence Winter, Variety has learned. The untitled series will be set in the world Reeves is creating for the feature film “The Batman,” with the intent being to launch a new Batman universe across multiple platforms. It is said to build on the film’s examination of the anatomy of corruption in Gotham City. It is the first project announced under Reeves’ new overall deal with Warner Bros. Television Group. “This is an amazing opportunity, not only to expand the vision of the world I am creating in the film, but to explore it in the kind of depth and detail that only a longform format can afford — and getting to work with the incredibly talented Terence Winter, who has written so insightfully and powerfully about worlds of crime and corruption,...
    A reboot of “The Wonder Years” has landed a pilot production commitment at ABC. The new half-hour comedy series would focus on how a black middle class family in Montgomery, Alabama in the turbulent late 1960’s made sure it was The Wonder Years for them too.  That puts the new show in the same time period as the original series, which was set between 1968 and 1973. A mini writer’s room for the show will be opened once ABC approves a pilot script. Saladin K. Patterson will write and executive produce. Lee Daniels and Marc Velez will executive produce via Lee Daniels Entertainment. Fred Savage, the star of the original series, will direct the pilot and executive produce. Neal Marlens, the co-creator of the original series, will serve as consultant. 20th Century Fox Television will produce, with both Patterson and Daniels currently under overall deals at the studio. The original...
    President Trump is preparing to sign executive orders on a wide range of topics, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said Monday. Meadows said in a Fox News interview that the orders will address China, immigration, manufacturing jobs and the cost of prescription drugs. “This president will do more in the next four weeks than Joe Biden and his team did in the last 40 years,” Meadows said. But the chief of staff gave few details during the interview or a subsequent discussion with reporters on the White House driveway. Meadows, a former North Carolina congressman, said the executive orders are necessary because Congress left town for the July 4 holiday and won’t return soon. “They’re disappearing for almost three weeks, I don’t know that in this particular environment that you can just stand by and say, ‘We can just take a three-week vacation,” Meadows said. “Most Americans don’t...
    Coty on Thursday named former L’Oreal executive Sue Nabi as chief executive officer, the cosmetics maker’s fifth since its multibillion-dollar deal with Procter & Gamble nearly five years ago. The company’s shares, which have lost more than 60 percent this year, rose about 5 percent in early trading, although they were up only 1.1 percent shortly after noon. Nabi will take over from Peter Harf, who was appointed to the top job in June, a move that placed the fortunes of the company squarely in the hands of its largest shareholder JAB Holdings, in which Harf is a partner. Harf was brought in to rescue the company from a series of CEO departures after years of slowing sales and mounting debt as it struggled to integrate the brands acquired from Procter & Gamble. “This was unexpected… We thought Harf would stay,” D.A. Davidson analyst Linda Bolton Weiser said. Harf will...
    A high-powered Facebook executive has defended the company’s response to hate speech, arguing that it is almost impossible to catch every case of it. Steve Hatch, the social network’s boss for the UK and Northern Europe, went on BBC Tuesday to hit back at the harsh criticism Facebook has received in recent weeks saying that it has not done enough to police its platform, arguing that Facebook does an excellent job of weeding out hate. “Our systems now detect and remove 90 percent [of hate speech] automatically,” Hatch said. “Now that’s not perfect, but we do know it’s up from 23 percent a couple of years ago.” When the BBC host raised arguments made by critics that Facebook magnifies hateful content in order to increase usage and rake in ad revenue, Hatch said “there is no profit to be had in content that is hateful.” Indeed, according to Hatch, the...
    Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf on Thursday criticized the Supreme Court’s decision on the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, accusing the high court of failing to deliver certainty to recipients of the program, and of usurping the authority of the executive branch. The court ruled Thursday in a 5-4 decision that Trump’s push to end the program, which gave protection from deportation to illegal immigrants who came to the country as children,­ was in violation of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA) — which sets out rulemaking procedures for federal agencies. “DACA recipients deserve closure and finality surrounding their status here in the US. Unfortunately, today’s Supreme Court decision fails to provide that certainty,” Wolf said in a statement. “The DACA program was created out of thin air and implemented illegally. The American people deserve to have the Nation’s laws faithfully executed as written by their representatives...
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