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    By The Associated Press Albany Times Union. February 27, 2021. Editorial: A misguided push for tests THE ISSUE: The federal government insists on standardized school tests. THE STAKES: In the midst of a pandemic, they will divert resources and serve little if any useful purpose. Sure, the U.S. Department of Education can force New York’s public schools to give kids standardized assessment tests this year. Administrators can squeeze some data out of them and feel like they’re doing something, being accountable, seeing “how far kids have come” or “how far they’ve fallen.” But they shouldn’t. Not at all. Testing will not produce meaningful data because it’s likely to miss the children who have been hurt most by school shutdowns. And it’s a mistake to demand districts devote resources to testing when so many schools are struggling to provide kids with even the basics under the cruel weight of the pandemic....
    New York : Hillary Rodham Clinton, one of the most famous followers of mystery novels, now wrote one. The former presidential candidate and former secretary of the United States collaborates with the Canadian writer Louise penny in a ‘thriller’ fictional politician on the challenge of rebuilding American leadership in the world after terrorist attacks, as announced by publishers Simon & Schuster and St. Martin’s Press. “We are pooling our experiences to explore the complex world of high-stakes diplomacy and treason,” Clinton said of the project. “Not everything is what it seems,” he reiterated in the editorial statement. The plot has as its protagonist a secretary of state who joins the government of her rival, a president who assumed after four years the loss of influence of the US leadership in the world, the editorial advanced in the same writing. While it does not explicitly refer to Donald trumpBut...
    By The Associated Press Hartford Courant. February 25, 2021. Editorial: There is sound logic in Connecticut’s new age-based COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan, but Gov. Lamont cannot lose sight of equity issues Gov. Ned Lamont upended Connecticut’s COVID-19 vaccine rollout plan Monday, tossing aside CDC guidance and shifting to a far simpler plan that will prioritize vaccine eligibility based on one criterion: age. The change promises to get more vaccine into more people’s arms faster but has sparked serious concerns on two fronts. First, in setting aside priority for most frontline essential workers, which includes grocery store employees among others, the new plan sidelined a group with a relatively high representation of Black workers. That is a serious issue in a state that has significantly lagged when it comes to equitable distribution of the lifesaving COVID-19 vaccine. It also moved down the priority list people under the age of 55 with...
    The New York Times editorial board is calling on senators to convict former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE over his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, reiterating the argument from House impeachment managers this week that a similar event "can happen again" unless the former president is convicted. In a Friday opinion piece, the Times board wrote that in voting to convict Trump, senators should not “limit their concerns solely to the events of Jan. 6, when a mob of Trump supporters sacked the U.S. Capitol, but also to act with an eye toward safeguarding the nation’s future.” “To excuse Mr. Trump’s attack on American democracy would invite more such attempts, by him and by other aspiring autocrats,”...
    The left-wing New York Times editorial board supported President Biden's campaign and celebrated his victory, but mild criticism of his spate of executive actions drew a rebuke from Biden's communications director Thursday morning. Chummily headlined, "Ease up on the Executive Actions, Joe," the editorial board admonished him against relying too heavily on executive orders. Biden has signed dozens since taking office last week, addressing issues from climate change to coronavirus to overseas abortions to cancelling the Keystone Pipeline. "But this is no way to make law," the board wrote. "A polarized, narrowly divided Congress may offer Mr. Biden little choice but to employ executive actions or see his entire agenda held hostage. These directives, however, are a flawed substitute for legislation. They are intended to provide guidance to the government and need to work within the discretion granted the executive by existing law or the Constitution ... [T]hey are not meant...
    More On: media ink Digital media survivors’ urge to merge Oops! Star and In Touch run advertorials as news Fashion ‘bible’ WWD loses two top editors amid COVID pandemic woes Debate brews ahead of meeting to possibly rescind New Yorker award Roughly 100 staffers of The New Yorker magazine walked off their jobs on Thursday in protest of pay disparities. The walkout started at 6 a.m. Thursday and included copywriters, web production staff and other union employees. It’s scheduled to last until 6 a.m. on Friday and didn’t include bylined staff writers, who aren’t members of the union. Still, the protest stands to interrupt production of the prestigious title helmed by longtime editor-in-chief David Remnick, including its digital platform. And it suggests trouble brewing over contract talks between the union, News Guild of New York, and management at the Conde Nast-owned weekly as they continue to hash out...
    New York has not administered about two-thirds of its coronavirus vaccines, sparking outcry from residents. “Once again, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and Mayor Bill de Blasio prove their ineptitude as New York’s leaders — all talk and little action,” the New York Post’s editorial board wrote of vaccine distribution. “A Bloomberg News analysis finds that New York state has administered only 32 percent of the vaccines provided. In New York City, it’s even worse: 25.4 percent,” it added. As of last week, over 600,000 vaccines have been sent to the state, but only 203,000 vaccines were administered. “We are far, far behind where we need to be,” Councilman Mark Levine, chairman of the New York City Health Committee, told the New York Post. De Blasio vowed just before the holiday weekend that 1 million vaccines will be administered this month. “We’re going to vaccinate 1...
    New York (CNN Business)President Donald Trump's favorite newspaper has turned against him.The New York Post, in an editorial that got the front-page, giant-font treatment on Monday, told Trump he needs to give up his baseless fight to overturn the presidential election result."Mr. President ... STOP THE INSANITY," read the front page of the tabloid, famous for outlandish headlines. "You lost the election -- here's how to save your legacy." The Post says: Give it up, Mr. President — for your sake and the nation's https://t.co/uTh5Vm1dlR pic.twitter.com/HLTCl5ulzy— NY Post Opinion (@NYPostOpinion) December 28, 2020 If that wasn't clear enough, the top of the editorial got right to the point:"Mr. President, it's time to end this dark charade," the Post's editorial board wrote. "You're cheering for an undemocratic coup."Read MoreThe editorial from the Post, owned by Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. (NWS), is hardly the first time a Murdoch-owned news outlet has distanced...
    Savannah Rychcik December 28, 2020 0 Comments The New York Post is calling on President Donald Trump to shift his focus from his efforts to overturn the election to Georgia’s runoff races.  “Mr. President, it’s time to end this dark charade. We’re one week away from an enormously important moment for the next four years of our country,” The New York Post’s editorial board wrote in an op-ed published on Monday.  It added, “On Jan. 5, two runoff races in Georgia will determine which party will control the Senate — whether Joe Biden will have a rubber stamp or a much-needed check on his agenda.”  The Post accused Trump of being “obsessed” with Jan. 6, when Congress will certify the Electoral College vote.  It criticized Trump for cheering for an “undemocratic coup.” The Post provided two examples of how Trump’s investigation into the election has failed, including recounts in...
    The New York Post urged President Donald Trump on Monday to stop contesting the 2020 election, warning him of a future legacy of madness. “Mr. President, it’s time to end this dark charade,” the newspaper wrote in an editorial on Monday that was given a cover page. “We understand, Mr. President, that you’re angry that you lost,” the paper continued. “But to continue down this road is ruinous.” The Post warned the president that he is careening toward a legacy of Shakespearian-level madness. “Democrats will try to write you off as a one-term aberration and, frankly, you’re helping them do it,” the outlet wrote. “The King Lear of Mar-a-Lago, ranting about the corruption of the world.” The paper scorched the president for paying attention to lawyers continuing to contest the election, saying it amounts to an “undemocratic coup.” “Sidney Powell is a crazy person. Michael Flynn suggesting martial law is...
    The New York Post's editorial board, which long supported President Donald Trump, has blasted his longshot attempts to overturn the election in a scathing editorial. The Post, which endorsed Trump in 2016 and 2020, issued the blistering rebuke in a front-page editorial for Monday's edition, calling his continued election fraud claims a 'dark charade.' The blaring front-page 'wood,' as it is known in tabloid parlance, pleaded for Trump to 'stop the insanity' and told him bluntly: 'You lost the election.'  The editorial said Trump was 'cheering for an undemocratic coup' with his call for Republicans in Congress to prevent the certification of the Electoral College vote on January 6. The New York Post's editorial board, which long supported President Donald Trump, has blasted his longshot attempts to overturn the election in a scathing editorial Trump is seen returning to Mar-a-Lago on Sunday following a day at the golf course RELATED...
    Rupert Murdoch has long been an ally of Donald Trump, but now one of the media mogul’s flagship newspapers is telling the president to “stop the insanity” and admit that he lost the election. The New York Post on Sunday previewed a front-page editorial telling Trump to “Stop The Insanity” of his futile attempts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election. The report noted that Trump has become obsessed over the January 6 vote when Congress will certify the Electoral College vote and officially make Biden the next president, taking to Twitter to call on Republicans to have “courage” and challenge the tally. The editorial went on to say that the time for legal challenges had come to an end, and now Trump must accept the outcome of the race and put his energy into helping the Republican Party hold two key Senate seats in Georgia. The seats...
    The New York Post’s editorial board called on President TrumpDonald TrumpPost office to be named after oldest Pearl Harbor veteran Federal agents search residence in Antioch in connection with Nashville explosion Sunday shows preview: COVID-19 relief waiting on Trump's signature; government continues vaccine roll out MORE to “start thinking” about the Georgia runoff races and to “stop thinking” about overturning the election results.  The Post promoted its editorial board’s piece, which pleaded with the president to “end this dark charade” of “cheering for an undemocratic coup” to change the 2020 election results, on the front page of its Monday paper. The newspaper’s editorial board labeled the Georgia Senate runoff election as “an enormously important moment for the next four years of our country” as the races will determine which party controls the U.S. Senate.  Addressing Trump, the editorial board wrote, “Unfortunately, you’re obsessed with the next day, Jan. 6, when...
    The New York Post endorsed President Donald Trump both in an editorial and on the front cover of its print newspaper on Monday. The editorial reads: We can return to the explosive job creation, rising wages, and general prosperity we had before the pandemic. We can have economic freedom and opportunity and resist cancel culture and censorship. We can put annus horribilis, 2020, behind us and make America great again, again. We can do all this — if we make the right choice on Nov. 3. The editorial praises Trump’s record of economic success, a change in foreign policy and free trade, and tougher immigration and law enforcement. “He’s defended pride in American values against those who slander our entire nation as a racist enterprise,” it continues. The editorial also defends Trump’s handling of the coronavirus but warns that former Vice President Joe Biden has no real solutions. “Joe Biden...
    One of the nation's most prominent conservative-leaning newspapers endorsed Joe Biden for president on Sunday, marking the first time the publication has endorsed a Democratic presidential candidate in over 100 years. The New Hampshire Union Leader, which is based in Manchester, first deviated from its near-century streak of endorsing only Republican presidential candidates in 2016 when it chose to endorse Libertarian Gary Johnson over now President Trump, according to Axios. The paper endorsed Biden on Sunday just hours before Trump visited the Granite State for a rally. JOE BIDEN 'HAS BEEN CAUGHT ON REPEATED LIES OVER BIDEN INC,': SEN. JOHNSON In its editorial, the Union Leader declared, “President Trump is not always 100 percent wrong, but he is 100 percent wrong for America.” It first pointed to Trump’s reaction to losing the newspaper’s endorsement before his first term, recalling that they “were hopeful with Trump’s win that he might change,...
    New York (CNN Business)The New Hampshire Union Leader, a conservative-leaning newspaper, has endorsed Democratic candidate Joe Biden for president, despite its century-long history of backing Republicans. In backing Biden, the newspaper endorsed its first Democratic candidate in over 100 years. "Building this country up sits squarely within the skill set of Joseph Biden. We have found Mr. Biden to be a caring, compassionate and professional public servant," the Union Leader editorial board wrote on Sunday. "He has repeatedly expressed his desire to be a president for all of America, and we take him at his word."The paper's editorial board did however highlight what it calls "significant" policy disagreements with Biden, which the board says it expects to spend a "portion of the next four years disagreeing with.""Joe Biden may not be the president we want, but in 2020 he is the president we desperately need," the editorial continued. "He will...
    Breaking from a century of tradition, the conservative-leaning New Hampshire Union Leader endorsed Democratic nominee Joe Biden on Sunday. The Manchester-based paper, the most widely circulated in the state, has not endorsed a Democrat for president in more than 100 years, according to Axios. The paper endorsed libertarian Gary Johnson over then-candidate Donald Trump in 2016. The editorial board endorsed Amy Klobuchar in the 2020 primary. In an editorial, the Union Leader wrote that Trump has been admirable in his foreign policy achievements and positions on tax policy and the Second Amendment, "despite many in the media and Congress working to stop him at every opportunity." But, the paper cited skyrocketing debt, Trump's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, and the president's rhetoric on social media as factors for their support for his Democratic challenger, about whom they also cited issues regarding his stance on gun control and his response to...
    The New Hampshire Union Leader has endorsed Democrat Joe BidenJoe BidenObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Trump makes his case in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin Brad Pitt narrates Biden ad airing during World Series MORE for president in a blow to President TrumpDonald John TrumpObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Trump makes his case in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin Pence's chief of staff tests positive for COVID-19 MORE, who is set to visit the state on Sunday. While the president has had an antagonistic relationship with the Union Leader, he had seen New Hampshire as one of a few states that Democrat Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Ballot initiatives in Colorado, Louisiana could restrict abortion access Trump mocks Joe Biden's drive-in rallies at North Carolina...
    The New York Times editorial board called President Trump's reelection prospects the “greatest threat to American democracy since World War II.” The editorial was first published online on Friday and will appear in this weekend’s special section of the Sunday Review. It is accompanied by several other critical opinion articles about Trump’s presidency running the gambit from foreign policy to race economics. “Mr. Trump’s ruinous tenure already has gravely damaged the United States at home and around the world. He has abused the power of his office and denied the legitimacy of his political opponents, shattering the norms that have bound the nation together for generations,” the editorial board wrote. “He has subsumed the public interest to the profitability of his business and political interests. He has shown a breathtaking disregard for the lives and liberties of Americans. He is a man unworthy of the office he holds.”...
    Brad Reed October 16, 2020 8:35PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Raw Story The New York Times editorial board on Friday dropped a massive essay that outlines the case against re-electing President Donald Trump to a second term. The essay does not hold back in describing Trump's presidency in apocalyptic terms, and it begins by saying he "poses the greatest threat to American democracy since World War II." : The editors then cycle through a list of grievances against the president, whom they accuse of having "gravely damaged the United States at home and around the world," as well as having "abused the power of his office and denied the legitimacy of his political opponents, shattering the norms that have bound the nation together for generations." The editors also eviscerate Trump for drawing no lines between the public office he holds and his private business interests, as well as his "breathtaking...
    The embattled New York Times editorial board has declared President Trump’s re-election “the greatest threat to American democracy since World War II.”  The newspaper’s editorial page has come under fire in recent months for a series of events that ultimately led to now-former editorial page editor James Bennet stepping down amid internal chaos when the paper’s liberal staffers objected to a an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., earlier this year.   NY TIMES WRITERS IN 'OPEN REVOLT' AFTER PUBLICATION OF COTTON OP-ED, CLAIM BLACK STAFF 'IN DANGER' The New York Times editorial board declared that President Trump’s re-election would be “the greatest threat to American democracy since World War II.” The internal unrest caused now-former Times opinion columnist and editor Bari Weiss to step down, saying she was bullied by colleagues in an "illiberal environment," weeks after she declared there was a “civil war” inside the paper.  The editorial board’s latest piece urges Americans to “end our national crisis” and vote Trump out of...
    The New England Journal of Medicine published an editorial critical of the Trump administration’s coronavirus response. The article, which accused U.S. leaders of undercutting “trust in science” and praised China’s response to the pandemic, was the prestigious journal’s first partisan article in its 208-year history, The New York Times reported. “The administration has turned to uninformed ‘opinion leaders’ and charlatans who obscure the truth and facilitate the promulgation of outright lies,” the editorial said. The New England Journal of Medicine published an editorial Wednesday critical of the U.S. government’s coronavirus response, which it called a failure. The editorial entitled “Dying in a Leadership Vacuum” does not specifically name President Donald Trump nor did it endorse Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden, but it strongly criticized the Trump administration’s policies during the pandemic and praised measures taken by the Chinese government to fight COVID-19. The article was signed by dozens...
    (CNN) — In an unprecedented move, the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday published an editorial written by its editors condemning the Trump administration for its response to the Covid-19 pandemic — and calling for the current leadership in the United States to be voted out of office. “We rarely publish editorials signed by all the editors,” said Dr. Eric Rubin, editor-in-chief of the medical journal and an author of the new editorial. The editorial, which Rubin said was drafted in August, details how the United States leads the world in Covid-19 cases and deaths. So far, more than 7.5 million people in the United States have been diagnosed with Covid-19 and more than 200,000 people have died of the disease. “This crisis has produced a test of leadership. With no good options to combat a novel pathogen, countries were forced to make hard choices about how to respond....
    The New England Journal of Medicine has published an editorial calling for the current leaders of the United States to be voted out of office. The editorial, “Dying in a Leadership Vacuum,” declares: Covid-19 has created a crisis throughout the world. This crisis has produced a test of leadership. With no good options to combat a novel pathogen, countries were forced to make hard choices about how to respond. Here in the United States, our leaders have failed that test. They have taken a crisis and turned it into a tragedy. … The response of our nation’s leaders has been consistently inadequate. The federal government has largely abandoned disease control to the states. Governors have varied in their responses, not so much by party as by competence. But whatever their competence, governors do not have the tools that Washington controls. Instead of using those tools, the federal government has undermined them. The...
    The New England Journal of Medicine made a rare political move Wednesday, publishing an editorial by dozens of U.S. editors who denounced the Trump administration's handling of the coronavirus pandemic and said this election "gives us the power to render judgment."  The editorial, titled "Dying in a Leadership Vacuum," does not explicitly endorse former Vice President Joe Biden, but the editors' message is clear — the current leadership must change. "Our current leaders have undercut trust in science and in government, causing damage that will certainly outlast them. Instead of relying on expertise, the administration has turned to uninformed 'opinion leaders' and charlatans who obscure the truth and facilitate the promulgation of outright lies," the editorial says.  Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "Anyone else who recklessly squandered lives and money in this way would be suffering legal consequences," the editorial added. "Our leaders have largely claimed immunity...
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images The New England Journal of Medicine has posted a stunning and unprecedented editorial blasting the failures of President Donald Trump’s administration on the coronavirus and saying Americans should vote them out in November. The editors write that the U.S. has failed a crucial test of leadership during the pandemic, saying, “The magnitude of this failure is astonishing”: Why has the United States handled this pandemic so badly? We have failed at almost every step. We had ample warning, but when the disease first arrived, we were incapable of testing effectively and couldn’t provide even the most basic personal protective equipment to health care workers and the general public. And we continue to be way behind the curve in testing. While the absolute numbers of tests have increased substantially, the more useful metric is the number of tests performed per infected person, a rate that puts us far...
    The New York Times has endorsed Democratic nominee Joe Biden for president, billing him as an experienced politician with the “entire nation’s interests at heart.” “Mr. Biden knows that there are no easy answers. He has the experience, temperament and character to guide the nation through this valley into a brighter, more hopeful future,” the Times editorial board wrote. “He has our endorsement for the presidency.” The Grey Lady backed Biden as the leader willing to grapple with a “trifecta of crises:” the coronavirus pandemic, a shattered economy and civil unrest. “When they go to the polls this year, voters aren’t just choosing a leader. They’re deciding what America will be,” the Times wrote in its endorsement. “They’re deciding whether they favor the rule of law, how the government will help them weather the greatest economic calamity in generations,” the paper went on, “whether they want government to enable...
    The New York Times editorial board endorsed Joe BidenJoe BidenState Department revokes visa of Giuliani-linked Ukrainian ally: report Biden says he should not have called Trump a clown in first debate Biden inquired about calling Trump after coronavirus diagnosis MORE's White House bid on Tuesday, throwing its support behind the former vice president four weeks before Election Day. The paper cast a potential Biden presidency as a jolt back to normalcy that could tap into decades of experience in Washington to unite a country riven with division. “Mr. Biden has…vowed to ‘restore the soul of America.’ It is a painful reminder that the country is weaker, angrier, less hopeful and more divided than it was four years ago. With this promise, Mr. Biden is assuring the public that he recognizes the magnitude of what the next president is being called upon to do,” the editorial board wrote.  “In the midst of unrelenting chaos,...
    Denver has a new voice offering old takes on pot. Before the Denver Gazette launched on September 14, we anticipated that the digital news source, backed by billionaire conservative Phil Anschutz, would continue the streak of weed-bashing exhibited by Anschutz's Colorado Springs Gazette. The Gazette's reputation of hating the plant was earned through years of questionable editorial decisions, dating back to a 2015 series of articles co-authored by Christine Tatum, the wife of Dr. Christian Thurstone, one of Colorado's most prominent physicians to oppose recreational pot legalization. (The series disclosed Tatum's relationship with Thurstone, but didn't point out that she herself was a longtime opponent of marijuana who once suggested that the Boston Marathon bombing and Columbine High School killings were both linked to marijuana use.) Since then, the Colorado Springs Gazette has continued to be the state's most prominent anti-marijuana media voice.Related Stories Phil Anschutz's Denver Gazette: Inside Billionaire's News...
    Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) have both dropped out of the New Yorker festival in solidarity with the New Yorker Union — which has been planning a digital picket line over a labor dispute. Both politicians were scheduled to appear as keynote speakers at the event, but have pulled out just a week before. The New Yorker is fighting a labor battle with The New Yorker Union because the group proposed including a “just cause” provision in their contracts, which would illustrate a standard that employers have to meet before disciplining or terminating their employees. “We don’t want to have to do these types of actions, but we feel like we have no voice because they are not hearing our pleas at the table,” Natalie Meade, a New Yorker editorial staffer and a unit chair of the New Yorker union, said of the digital picket. The union...
    Click here for a complete list of our election recommendations. It’s a rare thing in municipal elections: Every Antioch City Council seat is on the ballot for the Nov. 3 election. That leaves voters with a chance to install a completely new set of leaders. But we wouldn’t recommend it. Instead, voters should elect Councilman Lamar Thorpe as mayor, Councilwoman Joy Motts in District 1, real estate broker Michael Barbanica in District 2, homeless advocate Nichole Gardner in District 3, and Councilwoman Monica Wilson in District 4. This is the first time the city has used district elections. Other cities making the transition from at-large have generally phased in district elections over two election cycles. But Antioch is doing it all at once. Elections in Districts 1 and 4 will be for two-year terms this year and then four-year terms staring in 2022. This years’ elections for mayor and...
    Click here for a complete list of our election recommendations. Earlier this year, the master developer chosen for the massive Concord Naval Weapons Station project bailed after the City Council refused to shield the company from trade unions’ excessive demands for labor concessions. Hope Johnson (Jose Carlos Fajardo/Bay Area News Group) It’s the second time a developer has bailed on Concord because it couldn’t deal with the city’s backroom politics. It should have been an embarrassing moment for the council. The loss of the master developer sets the $1 billion-plus project, which covers an area half the size of the city of Pleasant Hill, back nearly seven years, when Concord officials started the laborious selection process. Then, last week, came the jaw-dropping moment when Concord City Councilwoman Carlyn Obringer, who joined the unanimous decision to let the deal collapse, told us that she should be reelected because she had “a...
    Well, that was fast: Robert Mujica, the state budget director, reached out Friday to clarify that the pork-barrel spending discussed in that morning’s editorial (“Cuomo’s Shameful Top Priority”) will not be going out the door this year after all. More, he has instructed the Dormitory Authority, through which some of New York’s most egregious pork outlays flow, not to enter into contracts without explicit approval from the Division of the Budget. The Empire Center first reported Tuesday that grants — 226 of them, totaling $46 million, to recipients selected by the governor and individual state lawmakers — seemed to still be going ahead. That info was shocking, because the state has quite properly withheld $4 billion in non-pork funds for local governments to balance its pandemic-devastated books. But we relayed the news without confirming with Mujica’s office, which had not commented publicly on the Empire release. Now the budget director...
    Click here for a complete list of our election recommendations. For the better part of a decade, Cupertino has developed a well-deserved reputation for having one of the most dysfunctional city councils in the Bay Area. Failing to meet state-mandated housing targets. Supporting Friends of Better Cupertino’s needless, drawn-out, costly lawsuits over the future of the former Vallco Mall site. Ill-prepared council members contributing to meetings dragging on into the wee hours of the night. (The Aug. 20 meeting didn’t conclude until 4:25 a.m. and, as the mayor noted at adjournment, “that was not a record.”) Five candidates are vying for two seats on the council. Rod Sinks, one of Cupertino’s most knowledgeable and effective council members, is termed out. Steven Scharf, a leader of the head-in-the-sand, anti-growth Friends of Better Cupertino group, is seeking reelection and needs to be replaced. Voters in the Nov. 3 election should elect...
    Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images The New York Times editorial board called out the Trump administration for providing “little incentive” for companies to protect their employees from the coronavirus in an op-ed. “Just $15,615. That’s how much a $52 billion meatpacking company was fined by the federal government for unsafe conditions that led to the deaths of eight workers,” the editorial board declared in an article on Monday, accusing the Occupational Safety and Health Administration of being “asleep at the wheel” despite the coronavirus “infecting 6.5 million Americans and killing nearly 200,000.” The editorial board noted that OSHA “has issued only guidelines, rather than establish enforceable rules, for businesses that rushed to reopen when they were deemed essential early in the pandemic, putting hundreds of thousands of employees in workplaces where the virus could easily spread,” and claimed it “has failed to act on thousands of coronavirus-related complaints, relying largely on self-reporting...
    Sarah Palin's defamation lawsuit against The New York Times is moving forward and headed to trial after a federal judge ruled Friday that a jury will decide whether the newspaper acted with "actual malice" when it published a false editorial pointing to Palin as the motivation behind the 2011 assassination attempt on former Rep. Gabby Giffords (D-Ariz.). What are the details?Palin sued The Times in 2017 over a piece that linked materials distributed by the former Alaskan governor's political action committee and the Tucson, Arizona, mass murder at a Giffords event that left six people dead and Giffords injured. An excerpt from the editorial — which was later corrected — read:Was this attack evidence of how vicious American politics has become? Probably. In 2011, Jared Lee Loughner opened fire in a supermarket parking lot, grievously wounding Representative Gabby Giffords and killing six people, including a 9-year-old girl. At the time,...
    Gray scores 27 points, Sparks control 4th quarter to top Sun 5 warning signs youre drinking too much milk Sarah Palin Gets Trial Date in New York Times Defamation Suit (Bloomberg) -- Former Republican Vice Presidential candidate Sarah Palin and the New York Times are headed for trial over her claim that the paper libeled her in an editorial that linked her to the 2011 shooting of former U.S. Representative Gabby Giffords. © Bloomberg Sarah Palin, former governor of Alaska, speaks to members of the media in the spin room after the third U.S. presidential debate in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. Donald Trump is trying another wild-card play in the third and final presidential debate with Hillary Clinton in perhaps his last chance to reverse his campaign's spiral and halt his Democratic rival's rising electoral strength. In a ruling Friday in federal court in...
    U.S. Judge Jed S. Rakoff, a Bill Clinton appointee, allowed Sarah Palin’s defamation lawsuit against the New York Times to proceed, saying that a jury should decide whether editorial page editor James Bennet acted with “actual malice” in writing that Palin was responsible for “political incitement” that led to the mass shooting in Tuscon, Arizona, in January 2011. The Times published the editorial in the wake of a June 2017 mass shooting by a deranged leftist who targeted Republican members of Congress at their baseball practice. The Tuscon shooter was mentally disturbed; accusations against Palin had long since been disproved. The Times issued a correction, but Palin sued. Rakoff dismissed the lawsuit, but it was reinstated by the Second Circuit. (Ironically, Bennet recently resigned as editorial page editor under pressure from “woke” reporters.) In his ruling Friday, Rakoff rejected efforts by Palin’s legal team to argue that the tough “actual malice” standard for public figures should...
    A federal judge on Friday rejected the New York Times bid to dismiss Sarah Palins defamation lawsuit over a 2017 editorial she said falsely linked her to a mass shooting. U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff in Manhattan said that while much of Palins case was circumstantial, it was strong enough for a jury to find the Times and former editorial page editor James Bennet acted with "actual malice by clear and convincing evidence." in publishing the editorial. Rakoff scheduled a Feb. 1, 2021 trial. "Were disappointed in the ruling but are confident we will prevail at trial when a jury hears the facts," Times spokeswoman Danielle Rhoades-Ha said in an email. Palin, the 2008 Republican vice presidential candidate and former Alaska governor, sued over a June 14, 2017 editorial published after an Alexandria, Virginia, shooting that wounded four people, including then-House Majority Whip Steve Scalise. The editorial referred to...
    A New York Times security guard who shot to viral fame last year over her enthusiastic run-in with Joe Biden formally endorsed him at the 2020 Democratic National Convention on Tuesday night. Star-struck Jacquelyn Asbie, 31, escorted the former vice president in the elevator of the Times’ Midtown office as he headed to a meeting with the editorial board in January, ahead of their primary endorsement. “I love you,” she had told Biden. “I do. You’re like my favorite.” The pair then snapped a selfie together. The fleeting exchange — captured in the Times’ FX show “The Weekly” — was enough to snag Asbie a spot at the televised convention. “Joe Biden has room in his heart for more than just himself,” she said. Jacquelyn Asbie and Joe Biden2020 Democratic National Convention/Pool via REUTERS “We’ve been through a lot,” Asbie said, “and we have tough days ahead. But nominating someone...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City For 400 years, New York has been hit by one major crisis after another, and persisted — draft riots, depressions, world wars, near-bankruptcy, suburban flight, fires, terrorist attacks, hurricanes, pandemics, the list goes on and on. Here’s what we’ve gone through in just the last two decades: A massive, coordinated terrorist attack on Sept. 11, 2001 that killed three thousand people and caused our two tallest buildings to collapse. A devastating economic crisis in 2008 that put two of the city’s biggest investment firms — Bear Stearns and Lehman Brothers — out of business and brought our lucrative financial sector to its knees. Superstorm Sandy in 2012 wiped out low-lying areas in Brooklyn, Queens, Manhattan and Staten Island, leaving our city with much to rebuild. The current COVID-19 pandemic, which killed...
    The New York Post editorial board is pleading for people to run against Mayor Bill de Blasio to “save New York.” “There’s no denying it: The city’s in trouble. Big trouble. Mayor de Blasio is now a lame-duck figurehead, with less than 1¹/₂ years left in office. And the crop of candidates looking to replace him is anything but promising,” the board stated Sunday evening in an editorial. “New York needs fresh blood. So today we’re asking — pleading, actually: Won’t anyone step up and save New York?” The board went on to highlight the issues facing the city in recent months, such as gun violence, anti-police rioting, coronavirus restrictions, a financial downturn, and the increasing homeless population on the streets. “Even before the virus hit, pols like de Blasio (with help from Albany) had left Gotham on shaky ground, with 'reforms' that ensured more crime, vagrants swamping...
    Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images The New York Post Editorial Board condemned President Donald Trump’s “nasty words” about Democratic Vice Presidential nominee Kamala Harris, claiming they hurt his chance of getting reelected. In a Thursday editorial entitled, “Lose the nasty words, Mr. President — it does you no good,” the New York Post called Trump “his own worst enemy” for referring to Harris as a “mad woman.” “That doesn’t promote his agenda. It doesn’t help him with women. It doesn’t shore up his image as worthy of the nation’s highest office,” the Post claimed, adding, “making everything personal is unbecoming.” The Post went on to ask the president why he doesn’t focus on Harris and Joe Biden’s policies “instead of resorting to callous insults,” before concluding, “Your goal is to get re-elected, right?” Trump called Harris a “mad woman” during an interview with Fox Business on Thursday. “Now you have sort of...
    President Trump reacted Friday to an editorial in The Post about New Yorkers fleeing the city — saying the Big Apple had been “showing signs of future problems.” In a tweet linking to the editorial headlined “A mad rush for the exits as New York City goes down the tubes,” the president added that Gotham “was so good when I left 4 years ago.” The editorial describes how the coronavirus pandemic was the “last straw” that prompted residents to ditch the city – amid the shootings, lootings, homelessness, high taxes and “the sheer obliviousness of pols like Mayor Bill de Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo.” In an exclusive interview with The Post on Thursday, the commander in chief said his campaign is “putting New York in play” against Democrat Joe Biden in the 2020 election. Trump said he believes a surge in violent crime and sky-high taxes can help him...
    The New York Times on Monday called for all members of Congress to be tested for the novel coronavirus in the wake of Rep. Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertRep. Raúl Grijalva tests positive for COVID-19 Overnight Health Care: Five takeaways from Fauci's testimony | CDC: Children might play 'important role' in spreading COVID-19 | GOP leader wants rapid testing at Capitol GOP leader wants to make rapid testing available at Capitol MORE's (R-Texas) diagnosis last week. While more than a dozen members of Congress had already tested positive for the virus, “something about the diagnosis of Mr. Gohmert, who has belligerently flouted public health recommendations such as mask wearing and social distancing, prompted a convulsion of rage on Capitol Hill,” the newspaper’s editorial board wrote. “From maintenance workers to legislative aides, employees came forward with anonymous accounts of how the patchwork of precautions — each lawmaker’s office operates with its own...
    A union representing some 1,200 New York Times employees is urging that articles be subjected to “sensitivity reads.” The News Guild of New York said its reps recommended the extra layer of vetting during a meeting with the Grey Lady’s leadership earlier this month over how to make the paper “more diverse and equitable.” The meeting came in response to a newsroom uproar over Republican Sen. Tom Cotton’s controversial op-ed. “Diversity, inclusion and equity is not a static goal. It is an ongoing commitment that must be implemented in every facet of the company,” the Guild wrote in a memo. The suggestions include diversifying the paper’s workforce, annually publishing data that includes information on demographics in hiring, promotion, and retention and investing in mentorship programs for people of color. But one proposal raised some eyebrows on social media. “Get it right from the beginning: sensitivity reads should happen at...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City The COVID-19 pandemic ravaged New York City’s population and left its economy devastated. The public health crisis also blindsided the city’s unprecedented $40million organizing initiative to ensure a complete and accurate count of all residents in the Census 2020 that empowered 157 community-based organizations to engage in historically undercounted communities. Just weeks after the count got underway, the coronavirus emergency struck the city making it too dangerous to perform outreach and as a result, after four months nearly half of all New York City residents have failed to complete their census forms. So far, more than 62% of households across the country have self-responded to the census, but here in New York City response rate is under 54%. Now, with less than 100 days remaining, officials at every level of government...
    Donald Trump’s propensity to “spit on graves” makes him “constitutionally incapable of uniting the nation,” The New York Daily News wrote in a blistering editorial. In the unsigned op-ed, the newspaper’s editorial board pointed to this particular personality trait of the 45th president as evidence that, were he to be reelected and serve four more years as POTUS, there would be “a tone from the top of bitterness and bile” under which “America is doomed to spiral ever apart.” The piece begins by referencing the recent death of John Lewis. The longtime Representative and civil rights icon died earlier this month, and as lawmakers from both sides of the aisle paid their respects, Trump deliberately did not, instead sending Vice President Mike Pence and Second Lady Karen Pence in his stead. Asked about whether or not he’d be visiting Lewis’ body while it lay in state, Trump gave an answer...
    Back in February, New York was removed from the federal government’s trusted traveler program. But on Thursday, July 23, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security moved to reinstate New York’s access to the program. And in a scathing editorial published on July 27, the Washington Post’s editorial board slams the Trump Administration for removing New York from the program — denouncing it as one of the Administration’s “most brazen recent acts of political retaliation.” The Post states, “The New York Times reported the government admitted in court papers filed Thursday that Homeland Security officials had made false statements about their February decision to cut off New Yorkers from the trusted traveler program, which allows prescreened Americans expedited passage through border checks when reentering the United States from abroad.” Trump’s allies, according to the Post’s editorial board, had one thing in mind when New York was cut off from the trusted...
    MOSCOW (Reuters) - A group of journalists who quit a top Russian business newspaper last month after accusing their new editor-in-chief of introducing pro-Kremlin censorship said on Monday that they were setting up a new rival media outlet. Five senior editors resigned last month from Vedomosti after complaints at the newspaper that acting editor-in-chief Andrei Shmarov was censoring coverage critical of President Vladimir Putin and had threatened to fire staff who broke his rules. At least four of those editors and several other journalists said they were setting up an online media outlet called VTimes that would launch later this year and cover many of the same areas as Vedomosti. "We believe Russia like never before needs independent sources of information that can be trusted, it needs platforms for the free exchange of opinions and for professional expertise," they said in a statement on the new outlet. Shmarov denies threatening...
    The Wall Street Journal editorial board told readers Thursday that “these pages won’t wilt under cancel-culture pressure” after a letter signed by hundreds of staff members criticized the paper’s op-ed section. After readers expressed concerns about a letter that 280 WSJ colleagues signed criticizing the news outlet’s opinion section, the editorial board responded in a note to readers. “It was probably inevitable that the wave of progressive cancel culture would arrive at the Journal, as it has at nearly every other cultural, business, academic and journalistic institution,” the WSJ editorial board said. “But we are not the New York Times. Most Journal reporters attempt to cover the news fairly and down the middle, and our opinion pages offer an alternative to the uniform progressive views that dominate nearly all of today’s media,” the WSJ editorial board said. (Related: ‘Partisan Opportunism’: WSJ Disputes Liberals’ Coronavirus Comparisons Of US And Europe) The...
    Disgruntled WSJ Reporters Rip WSJ’s Conservative Op-Ed Pages. Editorial Board Fires Back, ‘We Are Not The New York Times’
    On Thursday evening, the New York Post editorial board accused Joe Biden’s campaign of using “Trumpian slogans” to cover for Barack Obama-era policies in his new economic plan, “Build Back Better.” The editorial board noted that the plan conflicts with Biden’s political history of supporting the North American Free Trade Agreement and Trans-Pacific Partnership. “Now he wants to spend $400 billion over four years on having Uncle Sam ‘buy American,’ plus $300 billion in R&D for progressive pet projects such as electric vehicles,” the board wrote. The board pointed to the plan’s various slogans — “Make it in America,” “Buy American,” “Stand up for America,” — and noted their similarity to the language of the Trump campaign. Despite the similarities between Biden’s plan and Trump’s economic approach, the New York Post editorial board claims that it differs in its Obama-era approach to taxation. “It’s an Obama-plus program — including lots...
    New York (CNN Business)New York Times opinion columnist Bret Stephens is defending the newspaper's controversial op-ed by Senator Tom Cotton that has drawn criticism from dozens of the paper's own staff and from corners of the internet. In a Friday op-ed titled, "What the Times Got Wrong," Stephens argued that a free press should be allowed to air views expressed by half the country."Last week's decision by this newspaper to disavow an Op-Ed by Senator Tom Cotton is a gift to the enemies of a free press — free in the sense of one that doesn't quiver and cave in the face of an outrage mob," Stephens wrote. "What kind of paper will The Times be if half the nation doesn't get to be even an occasional part of that conversation?"Stephens, who won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for commentary for columns written when he worked at The Wall Street Journal,...
    Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton said that “woke children” now run the New York Times Monday following backlash over an op-ed he wrote that was published by the paper. Cotton’s op-ed, published June 3, called for the U.S. military to possibly be deployed as backup in an effort to squash violent protests following George Floyd’s death. NYT employees openly protested the decision on social media, claiming the opinion piece put black coworkers in danger. Former NYT editorial page editor James Bennet defended the decision to run the op-ed on Twitter June 3. The NYT later apologized, announcing that a rushed editorial process” resulted in publishing a piece “that did not meet our standards.” Bennet resigned, effectively immediately, from his position as editorial page editor Sunday. Cotton spoke on “Fox & Friends” Monday about the situation, noting that the NYT asked him “to explain in further detail” previous comments he made regarding possibly...
    James Bennet resigned on Sunday from his job as the editorial page editor of The New York Times, days after the newspaper’s opinion section, which he oversaw, published a much-criticized op-ed by a U.S. senator calling for a military response to civic unrest in American cities. “Last week we saw a significant breakdown in our editing processes, not the first we’ve experienced in recent years,” said A.G. Sulzberger, the publisher, in a note to the staff on Sunday announcing Bennet’s departure. In a brief interview, Sulzberger added: “Both of us concluded that James would not be able to lead the team through the next leg of change that is required.” At an all-staff virtual meeting on Friday, Bennet, 54, apologized for the op-ed, saying that it should not have been published and that it had not been edited carefully enough. An editors’ note posted late Friday noted factual inaccuracies and...
    On Sunday, The New York Times announced that their editorial page editor has resigned after blowback erupted because the paper published an op-ed by Arkansas Republican Senator Tom Cotton arguing that the government should “send in the troops” as a last resort in response to the wave of riots and looting that swept the country. The Times had already issued a statement on Thursday saying that they should have never published Cotton’s op-ed. “We’ve examined the piece and the process leading up to its publication,” a spokesperson said. “This review made clear that a rushed editorial process led to the publication of an Op-Ed that did not meet our standards. As a result, we’re planning to examine both short-term and long-term changes, to include expanding our fact-checking operation and reducing the number of Op-Eds we publish.” The resignation of the editorial page editor triggered Texas GOP senator Ted Cruz to...
    The New York Times‘ Editorial Page Editor James Bennet has resigned after the publication of an editorial by Sen. Tom Cotton advocating that the military be deployed to end racial injustice protests throughout the United States. Bennet had been the head of the Times‘ editorial pages since 2016. The Times faced immediate and furious backlash for publishing the op-ed, including from within the Times itself. After repeatedly defending the decision to run Cotton’s anti-American screed, it came out that the Times‘ editors had themselves solicited for Cotton to make his case—and that Bennet had not even read the piece before publishing it. The Times has long ignored critics of their editorial policies, but the internal fury over Cotton’s call for “no quarter” against fellow Americans proved too much for Bennet to weather. He is expected to remain with the paper, but in a “new role in the newsroom.”
    This is a terrible day for The New York Times – and freedom of expression everywhere. On Sunday afternoon, the Times announced that James Bennet, its editorial page editor, would resign, and Jim Dao, his deputy, would be reassigned. Their crime: publishing an opinion piece from a United States senator Times staffers and readers did not like. DAN GAINOR: NEW YORK TIMES SURRENDERS TO STAFF REVOLT OVER COTTON OP-ED AS EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR RESIGNS Last Wednesday the Times ran an op-ed from Senator Tom Cotton, R-Ark., suggesting American soldiers should be used to quell protests and violence related to the killing of George Floyd. To be clear, I thought Cotton’s op-ed was wrong. Last week I tweeted that invoking the Insurrection Act, which would allow active-duty soldiers to patrol in the United States, “is not a good idea.”More from OpinionRep. Ken Buck: First lockdowns, then riots – here's how left's hypocrisy added...
    New York Times editorial page editor James Bennet resigned, the paper announced Sunday. Bennet faced considerable criticism over the Times' handling of an op-ed written by Senator Tom Cotton. The Arkansas Republican encouraged the U.S. to "send in the troops" in response to the violence that has accompanied largely peaceful protests across the U.S. over the police killing of George Floyd. "Last week we saw a significant breakdown in our editing processes, not the first we've experienced in recent years," New York Times publisher A. G. Sulzberger said in an email sent to the paper's staff. "James and I agreed that it would take a new team to lead the department through a period of considerable change." This August 16, 2017, file photo shows James Bennet. Larry Neumeister / AP The paper also said "Katie Kingsbury, who joined The Times in 2017, has been named as acting editorial page editor through...
    The New York Times editorial page editor James Bennet has resigned following major backlash over an op-ed written by Republican Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton, the paper announced Sunday. Bennet was criticized after allowing Cotton’s op-ed, which called for the U.S. military to be deployed as backup in an effort to squash violent protests following George Floyd’s death, to be published. The publication saw many of its employees openly protest the decision on social media, claiming the opinion piece put black coworkers in danger. Bennet defended the decision to publish the piece following backlash, although it came out later that he had not read Cotton’s article himself. The Times reportedly pitched Cotton on writing the op-ed, too, according to Business Insider’s Patrick Coffee. “The journalism of Times Opinion has never mattered more than in this time of crisis at home and around the world, and I’ve been honored to be part...
    The New York Times announced on Sunday that editorial page editor James Bennet has resigned from his post — following controversy over the publication of an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton. The Grey Lady’s statement made no mention of the strife stemming from the publication of Cotton’s essay, urging President Trump to employ the US military to crack down on protesters. “James is a journalist of enormous talent and integrity who believes deeply in the mission of The Times,” Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger said in the statement. “He oversaw a significant transformation of the Opinion department, which broadened the range of voices we publish and pushed us into new formats like video, graphics and audio. I’m grateful for his many contributions.” Bennet, who became editorial page director in May 2016, said in a statement that “The journalism of Times Opinion has never mattered more than in this time of crisis...
    New York (CNN)The editor of The New York Times' editorial page, James Bennet, has resigned, publisher A.G. Sulzberger announced Sunday. Bennet's resignation comes after the publication of a controversial op-ed from Republican Sen. Tom Cotton earlier in the week drew significant criticism, including from dozens of the newspaper's staffers.Sulzberger also said that Jim Dao, a deputy editorial page editor who had publicly taken responsibility as overseeing the editing of the piece, would be stepping off the masthead and reassigned to the newsroom. Katie Kingsbury, another deputy editorial page editor, will oversee the editorial page through the 2020 election.The tectonic restructuring capped a week of turmoil inside the nation's paper of record, with staff engaging in debate over the publication of Cotton's op-ed and grilling The Times' leadership over the process that led up to it."While this has been a painful week across the company, it has sparked urgent and important...
    Sen. Tom Cotton slammed the New York Times for surrendering “to a woke child mob” by backtracking on whether it stood by publishing his op-ed supporting the use of the US military to crack down on protests. “The New York Times editorial page editor and owner defended it in public statements but then they totally surrendered to a woke child mob from their own newsroom that apparently gets triggered if they’re presented with any opinion contrary to their own, as opposed to telling the woke children in their newsroom this is the workplace, not a social justice seminar on campus,” Cotton told Fox News’ “Sunday Morning Futures” on Sunday. The Times initially defending its decision to run the piece, but after backlash from staffers said it “did not meet our standards” and was published due to a “rushed editorial process.” Cotton, however, said that he believes his op-ed “far exceeded”...
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