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    By The Associated Press NAIROBI, Kenya — South Sudan has joined a growing list of African countries reimposing COVID-19 pandemic restrictions as infections rise again. A statement by the national COVID-19 task force bans all social gatherings including religious and sporting events, and it closes schools. Businesses attracting crowds including bars and nightclubs are closed, and public transport is limited to half capacity. All incoming air passengers must show proof of a negative coronavirus test. And law enforcement officers have been told to take immediate action to impose the order. South Sudan has more than 3,900 confirmed virus cases but has limited testing capacity. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: — Study finds COVID-19 vaccine may reduce virus transmission — WHO team in Wuhan says discussions open, meetings frank — Gulf Arab states launch new restrictions over virus fears — In parts of east London, the pandemic has hit much harder than...
    By Natalie Thomas LONDON (Reuters) - Governments and developers around the world are exploring the potential use of "vaccine passports" as a way of reopening the economy by identifying those protected against the coronavirus. Those developing the technologies however, say such tools come with consequences such as potentially excluding whole groups from social participation, and are urging lawmakers to think seriously about how they are used. The travel and entertainment industries, which have struggled to operate at a profit while imposing social distancing regulations, are particularly interested in a way of swiftly checking who has protection. Among those developing passports are biometrics company iProov and cyber security firm Mvine which have built a vaccine pass now being tested within Britain's National Health Service after receiving UK government funding. iProov founder and chief executive Andrew Bud believes such vaccine passports only really need to hold two pieces of information. "One is,...
    NAIROBI, Kenya — South Sudan has joined a growing list of African countries reimposing COVID-19 pandemic restrictions as infections rise again. A statement by the national COVID-19 task force bans all social gatherings including religious and sporting events, and it closes schools. Businesses attracting crowds including bars and nightclubs are closed, and public transport is limited to half capacity. All incoming air passengers must show proof of a negative coronavirus test. And law enforcement officers have been told to take immediate action to impose the order. South Sudan has more than 3,900 confirmed virus cases but has limited testing capacity. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: — Study finds COVID-19 vaccine may reduce virus transmission — WHO team in Wuhan says discussions open, meetings frank — Gulf Arab states launch new restrictions over virus fears — In parts of east London, the pandemic has hit much harder than...
    China reported just 25 new cases of the coronavirus on the mainland Tuesday, according to the state-affiliated People’s Daily newspaper. That’s compared to more than 116,000 cases in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (At around 1.4 billion people, China’s population dwarfs the U.S.’ nearly 330 million.)  The Chinese government has been widely accused of downplaying the virus when it first came out of Wuhan in late 2019, and of trying to hide its origin and suppress its numbers. But is the country still lying? Stanley Rosen, a University of Southern California professor who specializes in Chinese politics, told Fox News in an email that any inaccuracies would likely be coming from local officials who report to the central government.    "I would think that even if the statistics are not completely accurate, they do suggest that China is doing a reasonably good job of controlling further outbreaks,"...
    (CNN)There could be up to 534,000 Covid-19 deaths by February 27, according to an ensemble forecast by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- which would amount to about one death for every minute of the pandemic.The US recorded its first death from coronavirus on February 29, and since then the toll has reached at least 450,681 people, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Wednesday's forecast of another 80,000 people dying over this month comes as health experts race to ramp up vaccinations to get ahead of the more transmissible variant strains, which they fear could send cases surging once again.The best way to prevent variants from dominating the pandemic, said director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci, is to prevent the replication of the virus through quick vaccination and health measures to prevent spread.Theres no need to delay second dose...
    LONDON (AP) — Taxicab driver Gary Nerden knows colleagues who got seriously ill from COVID-19. He knows the area of east London where he lives and works has among the highest infection rates in the whole of England. But since he can’t afford not to work, he drives around picking up strangers for up to 12 hours a day, relying on a flimsy plastic screen to keep him safe. “I’ve got people telling me they won’t wear a mask, saying they’re exempt,” said Nerden, 57. “I’ve got diabetes, I have to look after myself. I wipe the handles, the seat belt, after every customer, but that’s all I can do, really.” Nerden and his wife, a hospital administrative worker, live in the outer London borough of Redbridge, which in mid-January had the country’s second-highest rate of residents testing positive for the coronavirus: 1,571 cases per 100,000 people. Official figures...
    BERLIN (Reuters) - The German parliament must decide in coming days how to finance continuing measures to soften the impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Finance Minister Olaf Scholz said when asked if the so-called debt brake must be suspended next year. The Social Democrat, who is his party's candidate to succeed conservative Chancellor Angela Merkel in a national election this year, was asked if the totemic constitutional borrowing ceiling should be suspended for a third year in a row. "In coming days we will have to decide very concretely on how we deal with the new challenges," he told German public broadcaster Deutschlandfunk on Thursday. "We are very glad to have a good healthcare system. It would be crazy to cut that. "And it would be economically wrong to adopt austerity politics and cut investment. So the question is how do we mobilise the funds that we need to have...
    BOSTON (CBS) – According to researchers at Johns Hopkins University, 1.7% of people who have been infected with COVID-19 in the United States have died from the virus. In Massachusetts, more than 14,000 people have lost their lives to COVID-19 over the past year. More than half of them, about 7,600, had been hospitalized and more than half had pre-existing conditions. Dr. Mallika Marshall said the death rate is falling and that is probably due to a combination of factors. Most people getting infected now are young and less likely to get really sick. In addition, healthcare providers have learned a lot over the past year about how to keep patients out of the hospital and how to treat them once they enter. Monoclonal antibodies are designed to attack the coronavirus itself and can be given in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 symptoms who are at high...
    As thousands of high school football players in California languish with little hope for a spring season in many parts of the state, their counterparts further up the West Coast this week got the green light to start play in short order, with football practices set to begin in most of Western Washington in the final week of February. Meanwhile, in California, high school athletics officials and advocacy groups are meeting almost daily with Gov. Gavin Newsom’s office and staff at the California Department of Public Health. But, as leagues around the state refuse to budge the mandated April 17 end date for football, this week could prove decisive in their fight for a spring season. If football isn’t moved out of the orange tier — or sports detached from the tiered system entirely, as a collection of coaches and parents are calling for — few schools would...
    Getting reinfected with the novel coronavirus may not be as rare as previously believed, a new study suggests. Researchers found that among young Marine Corps recruits who had previously tested positive, more than 10 percent had a second positive test during a six-week follow-up. What's more, the group that became infected again had lower antibody levels than those who wee infected for the first time and most lacked detectable neutralizing antibodies against COVID-19. The team - from the Naval Medical Research Center in Silver Springs, Maryland, and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City - says the findings provide evidence that antibodies induced by an initial infection are largely protective, but don't guarantee immunity against a subsequent infection. Researchers looked at 3,249 Marine Corps recruits between ages 18 and 20 during a 14-day quarantine and six-week basic training, 189 of whom had previously been infected...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. MinnPost provides updates on coronavirus in Minnesota Sunday through Friday. The information is published following a press phone call with members of the Walz administration or after the release of daily COVID-19 figures by the Minnesota Department of Health. Here are the latest updates from February 3, 2021: 463,766 cases; 6,234 deaths Nursing home cases drop as 81 percent of residents take vaccine Article continues after advertisement Twenty-four more Minnesotans have died of COVID-19, the Minnesota Department of Health said Wednesday, for a total of 6,234. Of the people whose deaths were announced Wednesday, one was over 100 years old, eight were in their 90s, five were in their 80s, three were in...
    Rapid, less intrusive coronavirus breath tests are set to roll out in the Netherlands, health officials there said.  Starting this week, testing facilities in Amsterdam began to use the so-called SpiroNose, a machine that works similarly to a breath alcohol test. A person simply breaths into the machine, which can detect a coronavirus infection within minutes, Reuters reported.  The machine is most reliable in detecting a negative test, Mariken van der Lubben, an infectious disease expert with Amsterdam’s municipal health services, told the outlet.  "If you are negatively tested, then it’s a very reliable outcome and you can go," Van der Lubben said, noting that a positive test should be followed up with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. Comparing the two will help researchers get a better understanding if the machine can distinguish between different types of viruses. CDC COULD POSSIBLY RECOMMEND DOUBLE MASK USE, FAUCI SAYS "That’s a...
    (CNN Español) – La Sputnik V, la vacuna rusa contra el coronavirus, tiene una efectividad de casi el 91,6% para prevenir el coronavirus sintomático. Los resultados se dieron a conocer este martes en una publicación en la revista médica The Lancet. En este episodio, el doctor Huerta repasa la polémica que generó esta vacuna desde su anuncio por el presidente de Rusia, Vladimir Putin. También analizamos los resultados del Instituto Gamaleya publicados este martes. Puedes escuchar este episodio en Apple Podcasts, Spotify o tu plataforma de podcast favorita, o leer la transcripción a continuación. Hola, soy el Dr. Elmer Huerta y esta es su diaria dosis de información sobre el nuevo coronavirus. Información que esperamos sea de utilidad para cuidar de su salud y la de su familia. El desarrollo de las vacunas contra el covid-19 sigue a pasos agigantados. Al momento de escribir este episodio, y según un análisis...
    In a country where up to a third of health-care workers decline the COVID vaccine, all four nurses at a rural Kansas county health department have taken the unreasoning distrust of science a step further by refusing even to give the shots to those who want them. “My staff is not comfortable with that,” Health Department administrator Lindsay Payer told the Coffey County Board of Commissioners at a meeting earlier this month. A video of the meeting in the county courthouse shows that all five commissioners were wearing masks, but Payer was not. A majority of the board had deemed that to be her right when they voted to opt out of a statewide mask mandate in late November. A majority of Americans had just voted not to give Trump a second term at least in part because of his disastrous handling of the pandemic. But the anti-science alternate universe...
    Prince Harry has announced that his Invictus Games have been postponed again due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. The Paralympic-style competition for wounded veterans and servicemen and women was supposed to occur in the Netherlands this year from May 29 to June 5. It was originally postponed last spring due to the virus. The event will now take place in The Hague, Netherlands in Spring 2022. "To the key workers on the frontlines in the battle against the pandemic, we are with you," said the Duke of Sussex and his friends in an Instagram video posted on Tuesday. "And when the world is ready, we will compete with all we have, with all we are," shared the 36-year-old. PRINCE HARRY SAYS TRAVEL BAN AMID THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC HAS LED TO ‘ACUTE HARDSHIP’ AMONG INDUSTRY WORKERS Britain's Prince Harry, who served in the army for more than 10 years, started...
    Dr. Anthony Fauci’s advice to avoid potentially contracting or spreading coronavirus this weekend is for NFL fans to enjoy watching the Super Bowl with only "your family or with people that are in your household." Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, said every time the nation celebrates a holiday or occasion, a spike in coronavirus cases follows. "As you mentioned, Super Bowl is a big deal in the United States," he said Wednesday while appearing on TODAY. "Enjoy the game, watch it on television, but do it with the immediate members of your family the people in your household." A mix of fans and vaccinated health care workers will attend this year's game. (iStock) A mix of vaccinated health care workers and fans will be in attendance to watch the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Kansas City Chiefs face off on Sunday. But outside the stadium walls, public health measures remain in place...
    Aides to President Biden and Democrats on the Hill are pushing him to take a harder line for a big coronavirus relief package than he otherwise would, surprising some in the White House orbit, according to a report. Politico reported Wednesday that one Biden adviser was taken aback by the White House's Monday night statement that took a harsh line against a coronavirus relief proposal from a group of 10 Republican senators. The statement followed a meeting between the Republicans and Biden to discuss their ideas. The Republicans' proposal is just over $600 billion while Biden's is $1.9 trillion.  White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said that "Congress must respond boldly and urgently, and noted many areas which the Republican senators’ proposal does not address... he will not slow down work on this urgent crisis response, and will not settle for a package that fails to meet the moment." But one Biden adviser told Politico...
    By Michael Nedelman and Laura Smith-Spark | CNN The Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine appears to substantially reduce transmission of the virus, rather than simply preventing symptomatic infections, UK researchers have suggested. The rate of positive PCR tests declined by about half after two doses, according to preliminary results by researchers at the University of Oxford that have yet to be peer reviewed. Their analysis, released as a preprint Tuesday, also supports spacing out doses and estimates good efficacy after just one shot of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine. The study did not measure transmission directly — for example, by tracing contacts who were infected by study volunteers. But the researchers did collect regular nasal swabs from some participants and found that the rate of positive PCR tests fell by half after two doses of the vaccine. After one dose only, the rate of positive tests fell by 67%. “While transmission studies per se...
    Coronavirus lockdowns have stripped the world of democratic freedoms, with 2020 returning the worst scores in the 15-year history of an annual democracy index. The United Kingdom slipped two places, while France and Portugal joined the US in the 'flawed democracies' categories compiled in the Economist's Democracy Index. Norway, Iceland and Sweden were unchanged at the top, the Central African Republic, the Congo and North Korea, stayed bottom. But overall the democracies were dented throughout the world as draconian measures were introduced to control the pandemic.  Police officers patrol near the Eiffel Tower during a government enforced quarantine on March 17. The French and Portuguese democracies were the most dented in Europe because of their extreme lockdowns, the report said While repressions were most extreme in authoritarian states, the report said 'the removal of individual liberties in development democracies was the most remarkable feature of 2020.' The index's top...
    Tina Fey and Amy Poehler will host the Golden Globes together from opposite sides of the country amid the coronavirus pandemic. The 78th Golden Globes will, for the first time, be held bicoastally. Although details still need to be worked out, Fey will appear live in New York while her co-host, Poehler, hosts from the usual Globes spot in Beverly Hills, Calif. The Hollywood Foreign Press Association announced the bold plan on Tuesday noting that it is a further effort to keep presenters and award recipients safe during the pandemic.  Fey and Poehler, who have hosted the Globes together in the past, had previously been set to emcee again. This time, though, they will be forced to do so without actually appearing on the same stage together. Fey will host from New York’s Rainbow Room, while Poehler will be at the Globes’ usual home at the Beverly Hilton. It’s expected that nominees will...
    Oxford University and AstraZeneca plan to have a new Covid vaccine ready by the autumn to tackle new variants of the coronavirus, they confirmed today. Growing evidence suggests that a mutation first found in the South African variant of the virus, and now cropping up elsewhere, can reduce how well current vaccines work because it changes the shape of the spike protein that the jabs target. And to overcome this, vaccine-makers say they are already working on updating their jabs because they need to be extremely specific to offer the best protection. The Oxford/AstraZeneca team, makers of one of the world's most advanced vaccines so far, say they will have theirs ready and manufactured before the end of 2021. Oxford's Professor Andrew Pollard, who is leading studies of the jab, said it would be a 'short process' compared to making the original vaccine from scratch.  The update could be used...
    The Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Kansas City Chiefs are both clear through two rounds of coronavirus testing. According to a Tuesday night report from Tom Pelissero, both teams have zero positive tests through the second round of testing prior to the Sunday game. (RELATED: David Hookstead Is The True King In The North When It Comes To College Football) The Chiefs have two players on the coronavirus list because of close contact with a barber, but they’ll be able to play Sunday if they continue to test negative. You can watch Pelissero break it all down below. All clear for the #Chiefs and #Bucs on two rounds of COVID test results today as this unusual Super Bowl week rolls on here in Tampa. @nflnetwork @NFLTotalAccess pic.twitter.com/UsO2bC0ztD — Tom Pelissero (@TomPelissero) February 3, 2021 This is great news for the league and all the players involved. This game is happening Sunday no matter what...
    By The Associated Press SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean health officials say they have detected the first local transmissions of what are feared to be more contagious forms of the coronavirus first identified in Britain and South Africa. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency said Wednesday said it found four local cases of the British variant and one local case of the South African variant. Since October, health workers have found 39 cases of new variants of the virus that causes COVID-19, also including a form that was first identified in Brazil. The previous cases were found in people arriving from abroad. In all five of the locally transmitted cases, the virus carriers had been infected from relatives who recently arrived from abroad, the agency said. The KDCA said it is expanding contact tracing to determine whether the new variants could have circulated further. It also called for...
    SEOUL, South Korea — South Korean health officials say they have detected the first local transmissions of what are feared to be more contagious forms of the coronavirus first identified in Britain and South Africa. The Korea Disease Control and Prevention Agency said Wednesday said it found four local cases of the British variant and one local case of the South African variant. Since October, health workers have found 39 cases of new variants of the virus that causes COVID-19, also including a form that was first identified in Brazil. The previous cases were found in people arriving from abroad. In all five of the locally transmitted cases, the virus carriers had been infected from relatives who recently arrived from abroad, the agency said. The KDCA said it is expanding contact tracing to determine whether the new variants could have circulated further. It also called for administrative officials to strengthen...
    Hong Kong (CNN)A team of World Health Organization investigators in Wuhan are visiting a laboratory Wednesday that has been the focus of conspiracies and speculation about the origin of the coronavirus pandemic. The WHO investigators began research in the central Chinese city last week, after a 14-day quarantine and bureaucratic delays. Their work has been subject to intense scrutiny and political pressure from both within China and outside the country. Few places they are visiting are as controversial as a laboratory run by the Wuhan Institute of Virology, which officials in former US President Donald Trump's administration suggested, without providing evidence, could have been the origin of the coronavirus. The lab in question, which is affiliated with the central government-run Chinese Academy of Sciences, is the only one in mainland China equipped for the highest level of biocontainment, known as Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4).BSL-4 labs are designed to study the...
    WUHAN, China (AP) — WHO team visits research center in Wuhan that has been the subject of speculation about the coronavirus origins. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — An over-the-counter, at-home coronavirus test kit is coming soon. “This is something people are going to be able to pick up, do the test themselves, and they’ll know immediately if they have the virus,” says Dr. Brian Lamb, a primary care internist at the Allegheny Health Network. “If you can take a real-time test and realize I have it, it’s going to keep you from going to work, it’s going to keep you from going to family events, and it’s going to keep you from going to any large gatherings,” he added. To use the $30 test, consumers take a nasal swab and put the sample in a cartridge. The cartridge hooks up with a smartphone, and an app displays results in 15 minutes. “The more things cost, and the more technology involved, we’re not going to get it to everyone who needs the test,” says Dr....
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. MinnPost provides updates on coronavirus in Minnesota Sunday through Friday. The information is published following a press phone call with members of the Walz administration or after the release of daily COVID-19 figures by the Minnesota Department of Health. Here are the latest updates from February 2, 2021: Eight more Minnesotans have died of COVID-19, the Minnesota Department of Health said Tuesday, for a total of 6,210. Article continues after advertisement Of the people whose deaths were announced Tuesday, one was in their 90s, three in their 80s, two in their 70s, one in their 40s, and one in their 30s. Three of the eight people who died were residents of long-term care facilities. MDH also said Tuesday there have been...
    LONDON (AP) – Capt. Tom Moore, the World War II veteran who walked into the hearts of a nation in lockdown as he shuffled up and down his garden to raise money for health care workers, has died after testing positive for COVID-19. He was 100. His family announced his death on Twitter, posting a picture of him behind his walker in a happy moment, ready for an adventure. “The last year of our father´s life was nothing short of remarkable. He was rejuvenated and experienced things he´d only ever dreamed of,´´ the family´s statement said. “Whilst he´d been in so many hearts for just a short time, he was an incredible father and grandfather, and he will stay alive in our hearts forever.´´ Captain Tom, as he became known in newspaper headlines and TV interviews, set out to raise 1,000 pounds for Britain´s National Health Service by walking 100...
    Captain Sir Tom Moore smiles as he launches his autobiography book 'Tomorrow will be a Good Day' at his home in Milton Keynes, Britain September 17, 2020. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez/File Photo Captain Sir Tom Moore, a 100-year-old veteran who raised millions for UK healthcare workers, has died.  Moore was being treated for pneumonia and tested positive for COVID-19 in the days before his death.  He was hospitalized on Sunday because he was having trouble breathing.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Captain Sir Tom Moore, a 100-year-old veteran who raised millions of dollars for healthcare workers in the UK by walking laps in his garden, has died after being hospitalized with COVID-19, his foundation announced on Tuesday. Moore, a British World War II veteran also known as "Captain Tom," raised money for the UK's National Health Service at the start of the coronavirus pandemic amid a country-wide campaign...
    Dolly Parton says it was her faith that fueled her decision to donate a whopping $1 million donation to coronavirus research. The country music icon stunned fans in 2020 when she donated $1 million to COVID-19 research being done at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn.  According to the New England Journal of Medicine, the donation made by Parton and the work done by researchers at Vanderbilt during trial phases directly led to Moderna announcing it had produced a coronavirus vaccine that is nearly 95% effective. Speaking of her donation to the Associated Press, the songstress said: "Well, I follow my heart. I’m a person of faith and I pray all the time that God will lead me into the right direction and let me know what to do." DOLLY PARTON TWICE DECLINED THE PRESIDENTIAL MEDAL OF FREEDOM: REPORT "When the pandemic first hit, that was my first thought, 'I need to do something to try to...
    FBI: 2 agents killed, 3 wounded while serving warrant in violent crimes against children case NYC restaurant workers should get COVID vaccines, de Blasio says Best & Worst Refinance Mortgage Companies of 2021 Ad Microsoft Seniors Are Getting These Unsold 2020 SUVs For Dirt Cheap Ad Microsoft A slam dunk if you need a balance transfer Ad Microsoft
    By The Associated Press The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ The NHL has postponed tonight’s game between the Buffalo Sabres and New York Islanders because of travel and weather-related concerns linked to coronavirus protocols. The snowstorm that hit the East Coast postponed the Sabres’ flight until game day, which altered COVID-19 testing and contact tracing and led to the postponement. The Sabres played two games this past weekend against the New Jersey Devils, who were shut down through at least Saturday with 10 players on the league’s COVID protocols list. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press
    The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ The NHL has postponed tonight’s game between the Buffalo Sabres and New York Islanders because of travel and weather-related concerns linked to coronavirus protocols. The snowstorm that hit the East Coast postponed the Sabres’ flight until game day, which altered COVID-19 testing and contact tracing and led to the postponement. The Sabres played two games this past weekend against the New Jersey Devils, who were shut down through at least Saturday with 10 players on the league’s COVID protocols list. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Ministers should consider vaccinating children against coronavirus to protect them from getting 'long Covid', top scientists said today. Dr Anthony Costello, a paediatrician and member of Independent SAGE, warned experts are still baffled by the long-term complications of the disease, which poses little threat to youngsters.  He described children as a 'very special risk area' because there was a chance they may face effects that last for decades as a result of the mysterious illness. Children are not currently on No10's vaccine priority list because the jabs approved are only proven to block symptomatic illness and severe bouts of the disease that may prove fatal.  Youngsters barely get ill and statisticians have calculated they face a greater risk of being hit by lightning than dying of Covid. Dr Costello said studies the Government should consider vaccinating children to protect them from long Covid. He said studies suggested that 15 per...
    HeadStrong: How Wizards dealt with adversity of the coronavirus originally appeared on NBC Sports Washington   As the NBA began its 2020-21 season without a bubble amid the coronavirus pandemic, many saw positive cases, outbreaks and postponements as inevitable. It would all depend on how teams were able to work through that adversity. In early January, the Washington Wizards became one of the first teams to face the major challenge after an outbreak led to numerous players entering protocol and missing time, and six games being postponed. Unlike prepping for an opponent or trying to build a roster around an injury, this was something that Washington could not gameplan against. “This virus is real and it’s creative and it figures out a way to penetrate and hit us, and it’s hit us pretty bad,” head coach Scott Brooks said. Download and subscribe to the Wizards Talk Podcast For...
    Papu Gomez swapped Atalanta for Sevilla. Getty/Fran Santiago The financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic on Europe's soccer clubs was clear to see in this year's January transfer window.  Premier League clubs spent $219 million less than last year, while across the German, Spanish, French and Italian top-flights, spending was down by $560 million. While there was no mega-money transfers, however, there were still a number of noteworthy deals which went under the radar, which Insider have listed below.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic on Europe's soccer clubs was clear to see in this year's January transfer window.  English Premier League clubs spent just $96 million throughout the whole month, the lowest spend for nine years and $219 million down from last year.  Across the German, Spanish, French and Italian top-flights, spending was down on last year by $560 million. Deloitte says...
    (CNN)A newly 75-year-old Dolly Parton is eligible to be inoculated against Covid-19 but hasn't gotten a shot yet, she told CNN, even though she donated $1 million to vaccine development."I'm going to get it, though," she said Thursday. "I didn't want to jump line. I didn't donate the money so I could be protected. I did it for everybody."In typical Parton style, she gave the seven-figure sum to help partly fund creation of the Moderna vaccine. It was a sideline effort by the county music legend, not unlike another project Parton spoke about with CNN: reworking her famous song, "9 to 5," as "5 to 9" for website building and e-commerce platform Squarespace's Super Bowl ad. Dolly Parton turns 75Indeed, the commercial centers around how many people have side gigs and are grinding beyond the usual office hours.Read More"I thought, well, why not?" she said of recasting the lyrics to...
    Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia If there's one lesson most Democrats took away from the economic crisis at the outset of Barack Obama's presidency, it's that letting Republicans dictate your stimulus response is a good way to hamstring an economic recovery and delay the relief people urgently need. That was the sentiment White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki expressed Monday in describing President Biden's concerns about the rescue package.  "The risk is not that it is too big, this package," Psaki explained, "the risk is that it is too small." And it was a sentiment echoed by West Virginia's Republican governor Monday on CNN. "If we throw away some money right now, so what!?” said Gov. Jim Justice, a former Democrat who flipped allegiances in 2017. "We have really got to move and get people taken care of, and get people back on balance," Justice added, noting the magnitude...
    SEX And The City fans have already vowed to boycott the long-awaited HBO Max spin off for what they brand its "f**king insensitive" focus on the coronavirus pandemic. The Sun Online recently reported how loyal SATC viewers have already flagged their "most hated" episode yet the reboot, entitled And Just Like That, may well top them all. 10Sex And The City viewers have vowed to boycott the HBO Max spin off - before it has even airedCredit: Handout Carrie Bradshaw actress Sarah Jessica Parker confirmed a brand new series of the show this month, with a teaser trailer uploaded to her Instagram page. While the next Sex And The City instalment will not feature Samantha Jones actress Kim Cattrall, it will hone in on and reflect the real-life coronavirus pandemic currently sweeping across the globe. Speaking to Vanity Fair, Sarah Jessica, 52, revealed the show will reflect the current times we live...
    Key Companies Covered in the Europe Underfloor Heating Market Research Report Are Uponor Corporation, Danfoss, Siemens, Honeywell International Inc., nVent, Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Emerson Electric Co., Warmup and others key market players. New York, Feb. 02, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Owing to the COVID-19 pandemic, restrictions on international trade and travel were imposed to limit the spread of the virus, which severely impacted the import and export of several types of goods since January 2020, further hampering the trade flow of underfloor heating systems in the region. The fall in business resulted in low revenues of the key market players, which further enforced them to adopt cost-cutting measures. However, as per the key players, this market condition is anticipated to normalize by 2023 and is likely to witness an uptrend thereafter. During the 2nd Quarter of 2020, the market across the nations in Europe witnessed a decline as compared to...
    (CNN)If she'd waited to get vaccinated until it was her "tier's" turn, Isabela Medina wouldn't have gotten the Covid-19 vaccine until late summer. Medina, a healthy 25-year-old, moved across the United States to live with her parents on the East Coast after her work in the film industry dried up. Anxious to return to work safely, she decided in mid-January to go "vaccine dumpster diving."Rather than dig through a hospital's garbage for vials, Medina staked out a grocery store pharmacy. She wanted to score a leftover vaccine.She and a friend arrived in the early afternoon, prepared to wait. A line formed behind them. Hours later, when the day's appointments were done, pharmacy staff offered up eight leftover vaccines. Medina and her friend gleefully claimed two of them, Scottie Andrew and Alisha Ebrahimji report. "Vaccine hunters" like Medina are a byproduct of a chaotic vaccination rollout in the US, defined by...
                                     Presented by Facebook     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Tuesday! We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators. Readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 441,324; Tuesday, 443,355. President Biden signaled on Monday that he remains prepared to move ahead with his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief plan with only Senate Democrats as he met with a group of centrist Senate Republicans who are urging bipartisan compromise.     Biden and Vice President Harris met Monday night in the Oval Office...
    VIENNA — Austria is toughening entry requirements in an effort to prevent the spread of contagious coronavirus variants. Interior Minister Karl Nehammer said Tuesday that the country will require weekly tests for cross-border commuters, who also will have to register under a “pre-travel clearance system,” the Austria Press Agency reported. It also will scrap the possibility for new arrivals to cut their 10-day quarantine short by testing negative. Nehammer also said that checks by police and health officials in Austrian ski resorts will be stepped up after authorities discovered visitors in illegally booked accommodation. On Friday, police in St. Anton checked 44 properties and filed complaints against 96 people, among them Britons, Danes, Swedes, Romanians, Germans, Australians, Poles and Irish citizens. While ski slopes are open to locals in Austria, hotels are closed to tourists. Austria plans to loosen some coronavirus restrictions next week, opening schools, museums, hairdressers and nonessential...
    By The Associated Press VIENNA — Austria is toughening entry requirements in an effort to prevent the spread of contagious coronavirus variants. Interior Minister Karl Nehammer said Tuesday that the country will require weekly tests for cross-border commuters, who also will have to register under a “pre-travel clearance system,” the Austria Press Agency reported. It also will scrap the possibility for new arrivals to cut their 10-day quarantine short by testing negative. Nehammer also said that checks by police and health officials in Austrian ski resorts will be stepped up after authorities discovered visitors in illegally booked accommodation. On Friday, police in St. Anton checked 44 properties and filed complaints against 96 people, among them Britons, Danes, Swedes, Romanians, Germans, Australians, Poles and Irish citizens. While ski slopes are open to locals in Austria, hotels are closed to tourists. Austria plans to loosen some coronavirus restrictions next week, opening schools,...
    (CNN)Scientists have identified an "escape mutant" that may decrease the efficacy of Covid-19 vaccines. The mutation -- called E484K -- has been found in a variant of the coronavirus first spotted in South Africa two months ago. That variant has now spread to 12 other countries. Penny Moore, associate professor at the National Institute for Communicable Diseases in South Africa, called the mutation "alarming." Read More "We fear this mutation might have an impact, and what we don't know is the extent of the impact," she said. E484K is called an "escape mutant" because it's been shown it might be able to escape some of the antibodies produced by the vaccine. "I'm worried," said Alex Sigal, a virologist at the Africa Health Research Institute. Sigal, Moore, and other scientists who are studying the E484K mutation still have to complete their work in the lab to see if the...
    Transportation agencies wrestle with new federal mask mandate Tim Ryan expected to seek Ohio Senate seat Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson talked about the uncertainty of being pregnant in a pandemic days before testing positive for the coronavirus © Provided by INSIDER Shawn Johnson, pictured here while pregnant with her first child, Drew, in 2019, just tested positive for COVID-19. Paul Archuleta/Getty Images On Sunday, Shawn Johnson shared that she'd tested positive for the coronavirus. The retired gymnast recently told Insider about the "uncertainty" of being pregnant in the pandemic. Johnson, who won gold at the 2008 Olympics, said she has a sore throat, cough, and headache. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Days before sharing that she'd tested positive for the coronavirus, former Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson opened up to Insider about the "uncertainty" of being pregnant during a pandemic. "My husband and I got...
    Shawn Johnson, pictured here while pregnant with her first child, Drew, in 2019, just tested positive for COVID-19. Paul Archuleta/Getty Images On Sunday, Shawn Johnson shared that she'd tested positive for the coronavirus. The retired gymnast recently told Insider about the "uncertainty" of being pregnant in the pandemic. Johnson, who won gold at the 2008 Olympics, said she has a sore throat, cough, and headache. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Days before sharing that she'd tested positive for the coronavirus, former Olympic gold medalist Shawn Johnson opened up to Insider about the "uncertainty" of being pregnant during a pandemic. "My husband and I got nervous when we got pregnant. What's it going to look like to give birth in a hospital? What are the protocols these days?" Johnson told Insider on January 26 while promoting her partnership with Eggo. "That made us nervous and just the general...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. MinnPost provides updates on coronavirus in Minnesota Sunday through Friday. The information is published following a press phone call with members of the Walz administration or after the release of daily COVID-19 figures by the Minnesota Department of Health. Here are the latest updates from February 1, 2021: 462,528 cases; 6,202 deaths Minnesota will vaccinate more seniors through providers 462,528 cases; 6,202 deaths Two more Minnesotans have died of COVID-19, the Minnesota Department of Health said Monday, for a total of 6,202. Article continues after advertisement Of the people whose deaths were announced Monday, one was in their 90s and one was in their 50s. One of the two people whose deaths announced Monday was a resident of a...
    By The Associated Press WASHINGTON — The White House is tamping down expectations for a potential boost in vaccine distribution if Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 shot is approved by federal regulators. Andy Slavitt, the White House’s deputy COVID-19 coordinator, told reporters that the single-dose shot would undoubtedly help the Biden administration meet its goal of 300 million vaccinated Americans by the end of summer. But he says: “The expectation should not be that there’s an immediate, dramatic shift.” The pharmaceutical company reported strong results for the efficacy of its vaccine on Friday and is expected to file for emergency use authorization from the Food and Drug Administration in the coming days. Johnson & Johnson is contracted to provide 100 million doses by the end of the second quarter. Slavitt says he did not anticipate an even distribution, but that most doses “would come towards the end of that contract.” ___...
    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) have awarded $230 million to help a company scale up production of the first at-home coronavirus test. The test, made by Australian manufacturer Ellume, was authorized by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in December. It comes with a nasal swab analyzer that connects to an app on users' smartphones and can provide results within 15 minutes. Andy Slavitt, acting administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, revealed on Monday that, under the deal, Ellume will produce 19 million test kits per month by the end of the year - 8.5 million of which are guaranteed to the federal government. Currently, the company is expected to deliver 100,000 test kits to the U.S. per month between February and July.   On Monday, the HHS and DOD announced they were awarding $230 million...
    The Denzel Washington-led thrilled  "The Little Things" topped the U.S. box office over the weekend despite it being available to stream at home for HBO Max subscribers.  During its debut weekend, "The Little Things" scored an estimated $4.8 million from 2,171 locations throughout North America, according to Entertainment Weekly. Although the total earnings would represent a dismal showing in normal times, it’s actually a relatively impressive showing in the age of the coronavirus, which has forced many theaters to either close or operate at a limited capacity.  It also flies in the face of conventional wisdom that indicates audiences wouldn’t go see a movie in theaters if they can stream at home for a fee that’s lower than a ticket price in some parts of the country. Despite HBO Max adding the film to its roster of 2021 films that will release simultaneously in theaters and on streaming, one release...
    Two patients in Brazil have tested positive for more than one strain of coronavirus at the same time in what is believed to be the world's first double Covid infection.  Researchers at Feevale University made the discovery after swabbing 90 infected people in Rio Grande do Sul, southern Brazil.  One of the patients tested positive for two Brazilian strains which evolved separately in different states, known as P.1 and P.2.  P.1 has caused international alarm because it appears to be somewhat resistant to vaccines, which has led to Britain banning all travel from South America. Another patient tested positive for P.2 and the B.1.91 strain, which first appeared in Sweden, at the same time.   Fernando Spilki, the lead researcher on the study, said he feared the co-infections would 'generate combinations and generate new variants even more quickly'. Dr John McCauley, director of the Worldwide Influenza Centre at the Francis Crick...
    Prince Harry believes there is a better way to travel, especially after the coronavirus pandemic. In a foreword for the latest Travalyst report, the Duke of Sussex acknowledged how the industry has taken a major hit in the last year. "The global health crisis continues to hold many in its grip, forcing communities and nations into one of the most difficult times in modern history," the 36-year-old wrote.  "Those working in and relying on travel and tourism have experienced acute hardship over the past year," the British royal shared. "In tourism, destinations have experienced an abrupt halt to the consistent flow of visitors seen in recent years. PRINCE HARRY ACCEPTS APOLOGY IN UK LIBEL SUIT, WILL DONATE DAMAGES TO CHARITY Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, launched Travalyst in 2019. (Photo by Karwai Tang/WireImage/Getty Images) "If anyone needed reminding, this has shown us just how vital the industry is to...
    Americans should get vaccinated as quickly as possible when their turn comes, and shouldn’t wait for the next generation of vaccines in hopes for more protection against variants, said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s leading infectious disease expert. "You need to get vaccinated when it becomes available, as quickly and as expeditiously as possible throughout the country," Fauci said during a White House COVID-19 Response Team briefing on Monday. "The reason for that is that there is a fact that permeates virology, and that is, that viruses cannot mutate if they don’t replicate." Widespread vaccination prevents the SARS-CoV-2 virus from having an "open playing field," Fauci said. Prompt vaccinations can protect people against disease, infection and prevent emerging strains in the U.S. and overseas.  UK LAUNCHES MASS CORONAVIRUS TESTING IN EFFORT TO CONTAIN SOUTH AFRICAN VARIANT CASES Early data suggests vaccines will remain effective against variants, though one strain, in particular,...
    To view past editions of The Hill's 12:30 Report, click here: http://bit.ly/1M1mIfw  To receive The Hill's 12:30 Report in your inbox, please sign up here: http://bit.ly/1Tt4hqN --> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.* *Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically.   The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Group of GOP senators meet with Biden today |  Discuss COVID relief package |  Unveil $618 billion counter offer |  Biden tests Senate negotiation skills | How it all depends on Manchin |  Trump’s legal team leaves |  Attorneys focused on impeachment legality, Trump wanted to argue election was stolen |  Trump’s replacement legal team announced |  500+ snowball fight on the National Mall (yes, there’s video) |  DC pandas enjoy snow day   HAPPENING TODAY Hello, sharks! We looked at the $1.9 trillion package and thought, *gestures widely* ‘there’s gotta be a better way!’ Well, sharks, we cut that price tag into a...
    Michigan Gov. Gretchen WhitmerGretchen WhitmerLegislators go after governors to rein in COVID-19 powers Suspect in Michigan governor kidnapping plot pleads guilty The Hill's Morning Report - President Biden, Vice President Harris begin work today MORE (D) said on Monday that her state was able to partially restore indoor dining "because of the strong position that we're in." “This virus poses a unique threat to places that are indoors where you mix households and people take off their masks. It’s not the restaurant industry’s fault that they are the place where this virus can spread fast," Whitmer said on CNN's "New Day." "But that is in fact the case. And that’s why we’ve been trying to get Congress to give us more support so we can help these struggling businesses.” She also credited a “strategic, targeted and temporary pause’ in November for Michigan’s numbers dropping “precipitously.” "We are now 46th...
    Sunday on FNC’s “Fox Report,” Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) slammed the White House’s proposed $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief plan. Scott, noting the proposal was led by socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), said the bill “makes no sense.” He added it is “just a payback to the liberal left.” “[L]et’s remember this is all being led by Bernie Sanders who’s now the Democrat head of the budget committee, all right? This is all Bernie Sanders’ idea of where we should go. Republicans believe in targeted relief. Now, let’s remember — just about a month ago … we committed over almost a trillion dollars, and in the last 12 months, we’ve spent or committed $4.5 trillion. We have no idea how much of that money has not been spent. So let’s helped people who have lost their jobs, let’s help our small businesses get open, let’s make sure we get this vaccine...
    THIS graphic reveals the most common symptoms plaguing long Covid sufferers. It comes from a study that found eight in ten people who have had the coronavirus still battle at least one long-term side effect lasting more than two weeks. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 1The most common symptoms plaguing long Covid sufferers, as revealed by a research paper The analysis of all current evidence on the topic found more than 50 symptoms in so-called “long haulers”. Researchers in the US ranked each symptom based on how common they were in the 47,910 patients studied. The five most common symptoms were fatigue (58 per cent), headache (44 per cent), attention disorder (27 per cent), hair loss (25 per cent), and shortness of breath (24 per cent). Some of the less frequent problems were paranoia, PTSD, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes and...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Johnson & Johnson is expected to ask the FDA this week for emergency use authorization for its COVID-19 vaccine. The vaccine has the advantage of being a single dose, but it also has the lowest efficacy rate of any of the vaccines so far. Is that a concern? The short answer is that you have to look beyond the hceadline. Dr. Matthew Moffa, an infectious disease specialist at Allegheny Health Network says he would take it. Watch as KDKA’s John Shumway reports:   Dr. Moffa points out that the new vaccine uses only simple refrigeration as well. As other vaccines come out, people may get to have the choice of which they get, but Dr. Moffa’s message is simple — take whatever you can get as soon as you can. While the efficacy numbers for Johnson & Johnson;s vaccine are lower than others, Dr. Moffa said he has...
    BOSTON (CBS) — February 1 marks the first anniversary of the first coronavirus case in Massachusetts. Since then, more than 498,000 people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and more than 14,000 people have died from the virus in the state. Here is a look at what has happened in Massachusetts over the past year due to the COVID-19 pandemic: Feb. 1, 2020: A man returning to Boston from Wuhan, China tests positive for COVID-19. The man, who is in his 20s, studies at UMass Boston. and sought medical attention when he felt sick shortly after arriving at Logan Airport. This case is the eighth in the country. Feb. 26-27, 2020: Biogen holds an international business conference at the Long Wharf Marriott in Boston. It is later determined that this conference can be connected to between 205,000 and 300,000 coronavirus cases. A study estimates the conference is responsible for about 1.6% of all...
    (CNN)To the 28-year-old high school teacher, the expectation of a return to relative normalcy that came with mass coronavirus vaccination efforts is fading fast."There was that sense of hope and then, all of a sudden -- I'm not saying that it's been dashed -- but it feels like everything is still up in the air," said the public school teacher, who asked that his name not be used.New coronavirus variants keep popping up. Heres what we know about them"No matter how much we want it to end ... there's still so much we don't know," he said of the pandemic.January saw a record number of coronavirus deaths, with even more predicted by the end of February. Vaccines have arrived and others are on the way, yet more contagious variants of the virus have emerged. As tens of millions of Americans await vaccinations, lagging inoculation numbers and vaccine shortages temper expectations...
    MATT Hancock will address the nation today to update the nation on the battle against Covid-19. The Health Secretary will address the nation this evening (February 1). ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 1Matt Hancock is leading the coronavirus press conference todayCredit: Reuters What time is Matt Hancock's speech tonight?  Health Secretary Matt Hancock will give a press conference from Number 10 Downing Street today, February 1, it has been announced. The press briefing from No 10 this evening will air at 5pm, with Hancock flanked by scientific and medical advisors. He will address the nation before fielding questions, live on BBC News, Sky News, and other TV channels and media. What is the Health Secretary expected to say?  Hancock is expected to detail the vaccination rollout and its progress, as the Covid lockdown continues across the country. Based on the latest figures,...
    TOKYO — A Japanese vice education minister has been dismissed from his Cabinet post over his recent visit at an expensive Tokyo hostess club, defying an ongoing coronavirus state of emergency. Taido Tanose told reporters Monday that Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga reprimanded and dismissed him as vice education minister over the hostess bar visit. He then submitted his resignation from the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, along with two other senior LDP lawmakers who were clubbing with him, including former National Public Safety Commission chief Jun Matsumoto who stepped down from a top party post last week in the scandal. Earlier Monday, another senior lawmaker, Kiyohiko Toyama, announced his resignation as legislator to take responsibility for a separate Tokyo hostess club visit last month. He belongs to Komeito, a junior partner of Suga’s ruling coalition. The four lawmakers defied an ongoing coronavirus state of emergency request for the people to restrain...
    (CNN)The US is in an "absolute race against time" to vaccinate as many people as possible before new Covid-19 variants take hold of the country, one expert said Sunday. "We have a little breathing room right now, but if these new variants become dominant in our country, we are going to be right back where we were in November and December and perhaps even worse," emergency physician Dr. Megan Ranney told CNN.Ranney's warning has been echoed by several experts recently who say while Covid-19 numbers may be trending in the right direction for now, the next few weeks could be a different story unless Americans double down on safety measures and vaccinations ramp up. Homeland Security gives TSA workers authority to enforce Bidens mask mandateAt least 32 states have found cases of a variant first identified in the UK, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Experts have...
    President Biden invited a group of Republican senators to the White House in the hope of reinvigorating a bipartisan deal on another coronavirus relief package. Biden extended the invitation Sunday after 10 Republican senators sent him a letter outlining a $600 billion counterproposal to his $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan. Biden had already spoken to one of the senators, Susan Collins of Maine, and offered to host the group at the White House "early this week for a full exchange of views," said White House press secretary Jen Psaki. “With the virus posing a grave threat to the country, and economic conditions grim for so many, the need for action is urgent, and the scale of what must be done is large," Psaki wrote in a statement. The other Republican senators are Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia, Jerry Moran of Kansas, Lisa Murkowski of...
    More On: Coronavirus FDNY firefighter who responded to Ground Zero dies of COVID-19 Bill would require minimum staffing levels in NY nursing homes, hospitals US COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations down for two straight weeks Infectious disease expert warns double-masking ‘can do more harm’ President Biden contends that there is “nothing we can do to change the trajectory of the pandemic in the next several months” — which is the exact opposite of what presidential candidate Joe Biden promised voters during the 2020 campaign. Candidate Biden’s plan said that “the trajectory of COVID-19 in America is headed in the wrong direction,” and only he could fix it. The Biden “plan” amounted to a slew of nebulous promises that would be implemented to correct the “Trump fiasco,” such as accelerating the development of a vaccine, producing more masks and pressuring governors to sign mask mandates. Biden repeatedly promised to alter the trajectory...
    By The Associated Press PERTH, AustraIia — The city of Perth has been locked down for five days after Western Australia state’s first case of local COVID-19 infection in almost 10 months. The city of 2 million people and coastal towns to the south were locked down from Sunday night until Friday night. This followed a security guard who worked at a Perth quarantine hotel contracting a highly contagious British variant of the virus. Overseas travelers who arrive in Perth must isolate in hotel quarantine for 14 days. The last previous known case of someone being infected with COVID-19 within Western Australia was on April 11. Western Australia, Australia’s largest state by area, has remained virus-free for months by enforcing the nation’s toughest border restrictions in an elimination strategy. Those within the state have enjoyed some of Australia’s least restrictive pandemic measures because of the low risk. All Perth residents...
    By The Associated Press JERUSALEM — The Israeli Cabinet has voted to extend a nationwide lockdown for at least five more days as it struggles to bring a raging coronavirus outbreak under control. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s office announced early Monday that the restrictions, which have forced nonessential businesses and most schools to remain closed for the past month, will remain in effect until at least Friday. A ban on nearly all incoming and outgoing flights will remain in effect for another week. The Cabinet is to meet on Wednesday to decide whether to extend the restrictions even longer. Israel has launched one of the world’s most aggressive vaccination campaigns, inoculating more than one-third of its population in just one month. But the vaccine has had little effect so far in controlling the outbreak, which has spread quickly with the arrival of foreign variants of the coronavirus and continued violations...
    Steven Brandenburg, the Wisconsin pharmacist who sabotaged hundreds of does of coronavirus vaccines, believed that the sky was a shield created by the government to prevent people from seeing God, The Daily Beast reported. The publication highlighted an unsealed FBI search warrant that it obtained, which revealed Bradenburg’s far-out beliefs, including that the Earth is flat. Elsewhere, the report highlighted one co-worker who told investigators that Brandenburg believed that the “microchipped” vaccine was designed to “turn off people’s birth control and make others infertile.” Brandenburg — who reportedly believed that “Judgment Day” is coming — also allegedly carried a.45-caliber handgun to work in case the military came to detain him. In an interview with FBI agents, Brandenburg admitted that he spoiled the vaccines because he believed they had the ability to alter human DNA. He apologized for his actions and pointed to his “contentious divorce” as a significant influence on...
    By The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — California on Sunday reported another 481 coronavirus deaths, a day after the statewide death toll topped 40,000 even as the rates of new infections and hospitalizations continue to fall. The state said that the number of people in the hospital with COVID-19 slipped below 14,850 — a drop of more than 25% in two weeks. The 18,974 new confirmed cases are about one-third the mid-December peak of 54,000. With hospitalizations and confirmed cases falling, health officials are optimistic that the worst of the latest surge is over. Deaths remain staggeringly high, however, with more than 3,800 in the last week. It took six months for California to record its first 10,000 deaths, then four months to double to 20,000. In just five more weeks the state reached 30,000. It then took only 20 days to get to 40,000. On Sunday deaths rose to...
    By The Associated Press NEW YORK — New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is acknowledging that Black and Latino New Yorkers are receiving COVID-19 vaccines at far lower rates than white or Asian residents. Data released by the city’s health department shows that 48% of the city residents who have gotten at least one vaccine dose are white. That’s far higher than the roughly one-third the city’s population that is non-Hispanic white. Just 11% of vaccine doses administered to New York City residents went to Black people and 15% to Latinos. The vaccine numbers are incomplete because about 40% of people who have been vaccinated in the city haven’t provided demographic information. Still, the figures mirror vaccination data from other cities and states. “Clearly, we do see a profound disparity that needs to be addressed aggressively and creatively,” de Blasio said in a conference call with reporters. “We’ve got...
    This is a rush transcript from "Fox News Sunday" January 31, 2021. This copy may not be in its final form and may be updated. CHRIS WALLACE, FOX NEWS ANCHOR:  I'm Chris Wallace.New fears of market fallout as the little guys send a message to WallStreet and Washington argues over COVID relief.(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)WALLACE (voice-over):  Amateur traders seize on little-known stocks in acoordinated pushback over what they say is an uneven playing field.Meanwhile, 16 moderate senators look for common ground on President Biden'srescue plan for people and businesses hit by the coronavirus.JOE BIDEN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:  We need to make this investmentso the economy can grow.SEN. JOHN THUNE (R-SD):  I would hold that they would, again, reach out toRepublicans to find common ground.WALLACE:   We'll ask Jared Bernstein, a top White House economic advisor,and Republican Bill Cassidy, a member of the Senate's sweet 16, about WallStreet jitters and the president's...
    By The Associated Press LIMA, Peru — Peru began what was supposed to be a severe lockdown Sunday to combat surging COVID-19, but the order was widely ignored in the nation’s capital. President Francisco Sagasti went on television urging Peruvians “to make an extra effort to contain the growing wave of infections and deaths.” His government told people in the capital and nine other regions to limit trips outside the home to 60 minutes and it closed churches, gymnasiums, museums, libraries and other institutions. But marketplaces were crowded. Even some bus drivers ignored mandatory face mask rules. Seventy percent of Peruvians have no income if they stay home. The government says it will give $165 each to 4 million families — but only after the two-week quarantine. Hundreds of people crowded bus stations in Lima to head for less-restricted rural regions before terminals close later this week. Flights from Brazil...
    Sarah Jessica Parker confirmed that the upcoming "Sex and the City" revival will indeed see the characters tackle the coronavirus in New York City.  It was announced earlier this month that HBO Max is bringing back the iconic dramedy series with a new chapter titled, "And Just Like That..." which will feature Parker (Carrie Bradshaw), Cynthia Nixon (Miranda Hobbes), and Kristin Davis (Charlotte York). Kim Cattrall, who played Samantha Jones, will not be returning.  Speaking to Vanity Fair in a recent interview, Parker noted that she has not been given a script for the series yet, but is in full contact with the writers' room. She confirmed that, because it was such a momentous event in New York City, the show will tackle the COVID-19 pandemic.  SARAH JESSICA PARKER ADDRESSES RUMORED FEUD BETWEEN HER AND'SEX AND THE CITY' CO-STAR KIM CATTRALL: 'THIS ISN'T A CATFIGHT' The star told the outlet that...
    By The Associated Press ATHENS, Greece — Greek authorities have confirmed the first detection of the South African variant of the new coronavirus in the country, prompting top health officials to fly to the area where it was found for meetings on Sunday. The minister leading the government response to the pandemic and the head of the country’s public health body met with doctors and the local bishop in the northern city of Thessaloniki. The variant is believed to be more contagious than the original type and it was detected in a 36-year-old deacon in a suburb of the city. “We will be doing screenings to isolate the persons who have been in contact with the patient,” said Panayiotis Arkoumaneas, head of the National Public Health Organization. There have also been 173 cases of people affected with a variant first detected in the U.K., authorities said Sunday. Authorities announced 484...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. MinnPost provides updates on coronavirus in Minnesota Sunday through Friday. The information is published following a press phone call with members of the Walz administration or after the release of daily COVID-19 figures by the Minnesota Department of Health. 461,807 cases; 6,200 deaths Thirteen more Minnesotans have died of COVID-19, the Minnesota Department of Health said Sunday, for a total of 6,200. Of the people whose deaths were announced Sunday, four were in their 90s, three were in their 80s, three were in their 70s, one was in their 60s and two were in their 50s. Seven of the 13 people whose deaths announced Sunday were residents of long-term care facilities. Article continues after advertisement On Saturday, MDH reported 1,072 new...
    THE Covid outbreak started in China in October 2019 - months before Beijing alerted the world - US scientists claim. Researchers at the Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia also claimed that the virus "definitely" began in China, the Mail on Sunday reported. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 4Researchers have claimed that Covid-19 dates back to October 2019. Pictured: An engineer shows a plastic model of the coronavirus at a lab in BeijingCredit: AFP or licensors 4A health worker draws a dose of the AstraZeneca's coronavirus vaccineCredit: Reuters The scientists analysed thousands of samples of Covid patients. They traced how Sars-Cov-2 - the strain of coronavirus that causes the bug - evolved from a "progenitor" genome. According to their research, the progenitor dates from mid-October to November 2019. Sergei Pond, one of the researchers involved in the...
    By The Associated Press BRUSSELS — Belgian protesters denouncing coronavirus restrictions staged a demonstration on Sunday in central Brussels and local media say police arrested about 300 people who tired to join the unauthorized action. Brussels police on Twitter repeatedly called on people not to gather and later dispersed the demonstration, which ended peacefully. Authorities had warned that riots in the Netherlands over coronavirus restrictions could spark similar protests in neighboring Belgium. Belgium’s tough lockdown includes a 9 p.m. curfew and a ban on nonessential travel in and out of the country, which has had one of Europe’s worst outbreaks. Authorities have reported over 21,000 confirmed virus deaths in a nation of 11 million. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: — Thousands flout virus restrictions at Israel funeral — Anxiety grows as long-term facilities await COVID-19 vaccines — Fans who’ve been to every Super Bowl making plans again this year — Even...
    VULNERABLE Brits could die if teachers jump the coronavirus vaccine queue, cabinet minister Liz Truss warned today. The International Development secretary denied calls to give teachers the jab in a bid to reopen schools in weeks. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3Liz Truss said vulnerable Brits could die if teachers jump the coronavirus vaccine queue 3There are growing calls for teachers to be vaccinated in order to reopen schoolsCredit: PA:Press Association Speaking to Sky's Sophy Ridge, Ms Truss warned that giving teachers the jab ahead of the four priority groups for vaccination could put the vulnerable at risk. She said: "The issue is that for every person you vaccinate who isn't in the most vulnerable group, that's somebody in the most vulnerable group who isn't getting their vaccine and who is more likely to die in the next few weeks and months....
    (CNN)Joshua Embry took over as public health director in Grayson County, Kentucky just weeks before US officials announced the first case of coronavirus in the country. In the past 12 months, Embry and his staff have worked tirelessly to protect their community and promote measures to curb the spread of Covid-19. Yet their service has come with an unexpected price: They've received warnings -- often from a small but loud part of the community upset at public health guidelines -- and Embry has received a death threat. "There was a time when I really needed the role of my spouse. I came home and I was like, 'I don't know if I can keep doing this,'" said Embry, who reported the death threat to his supervisors. "You have a lot of responsibility on your shoulders. And then to not know what's going to happen when you're walking to your car...
    ISLAMABAD — Pakistan’s planning minister says the country will receive 17 million doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine under the WHO’s COVAX Facility, out of which up to 7 million would arrive by March. Asad Umar in his Saturday night tweet said also a plane is being sent to China to bring the first tranche of half a million doses of Sinopharm’s vaccine — enough to inoculate 250,000 out of 400,000 health workers. He said the rest of the AstraZeneca vaccine would be delivered in the second half of the year. Dr. Faisal Sultan, the prime minister’s special aide on health, said the vaccination will start next week. Pakistan reported 34 additional deaths amid 1,599 new cases. It has so far confirmed 544,813 cases with 11,657 deaths. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: — UK sees smooth vaccine supplies after EU addresses ‘mistake’ — CDC requires face masks on...
    By The Associated Press The Los Angeles Times reports that one of the largest vaccination sites in the nation temporarily shut down Saturday because dozen of protesters blocked the entrance, stalling hundreds of motorists who had been waiting in line for hours. Officials say the Los Angeles Fire Department shut the entrance to the vaccination center at Dodger Stadium about 2 p.m. as a precaution. The protesters had members of anti-vaccine and far-right groups. Some of them carried signs decrying the COVID-19 vaccine and shouting for people not to get the shots. There were no incidents of violence. ___ Follow all of AP’s pandemic coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic, https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-vaccine and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: An AP analysis finds racial disparities in the US vaccination drive. California surpasses 40,000 coronavirus deaths. New Mexico tribe sues US over hospital closure amid pandemic. WHO team visits second Wuhan hospital in virus investigation. CDC...
    Martha Stewart, Joan Collins and Sir David Attenborough are among the growing list of A-list celebrities to have received the COVID-19 vaccination. But for 'natural' medicine advocate Olivia Newton-John, 72, getting a jab isn't on the cards.    Speaking to The Herald Sun with her daughter Chloe Lattanzi, 34, on Sunday, the pop icon said she has no plans to get vaccinated against the deadly virus.   'Not at this point, no': Olivia Newton-John, 72, (pictured) revealed she WON'T take the coronavirus vaccine in an interview with The Herald Sun on Sunday  'Not at this point, no,' said Olivia, who is suffering from stage-four breast cancer.   RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next Olivia Newton-John is releasing another duet with daughter... Olivia Newton-John's daughter Chloe Lattanzi shows her... Olivia Newton-John shares sweet throwback of her gorgeous... Sealed with a kiss! Olivia Newton-John locks lips with her......
    By The Associated Press SANTA FE, N.M. — New Mexico reported 752 additional known COVID-19 cases and 17 deaths on Saturday, increasing the state’s pandemic totals to 173,539 cases and 3,265 deaths. The number of infections is thought to be far higher than reported because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick. The counties with the most additional cases were Bernalillo (255), Sandoval (70), Dona Ana (70), McKinley (54), San Juan (41) and Santa Fe (32). The number of infections is thought to be far higher than reported because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick. New Mexico’s seven-day rolling average of daily new cases dropped in the past two weeks while the rolling average of daily deaths was nearly flat. Santa Fe’s school superintendent announced...
    (CNN)A new forecast from the University of Washington's pandemic forecasting team is frightening. Even in a best-case scenario, close to another 200,000 Americans are likely to die between now and May 1.More than 430,000 Americans have already died in the pandemic, and even if the entire population started doing everything right -- wearing masks, avoiding gatherings, staying two arms' lengths away from one another -- the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation predicts at least 130,000 more people would die in the next three months.And now the new variants are here. Virologists predicted from the beginning that the coronavirus would change, and two more contagious variants are now spreading in the US. "This virus will continue for certain to evolve and mutate," Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said during a call with reporters on Friday.New coronavirus variants keep popping up. Heres what...
    Health officials have ordered the Coachella music festival scheduled for April to be canceled due to the coronavirus pandemic. It’s the third time the pandemic has forced the annual outdoor festival that draws hundreds of thousands of fans to the California desert to be postponed or canceled. “The Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival and the Stagecoach Country Music Festival currently scheduled for April 2021 are hereby canceled,” Riverside County Health Officer Dr. Cameron Kaiser said in an order issued Friday. Kaiser’s order also canceled the Stagecoach Country Music Festival, also scheduled for April. Due to the pandemic, Public Health Officer Dr. Cameron Kaiser today (Jan. 29) signed a public health order canceling Coachella Valley Music and Arts, Stagecoach Country Music festivals planned for April 2021. We look forward to when the events may return. https://t.co/YAIn8uTea9 — Dr. Cameron Kaiser (@RivCoDoc) January 29, 2021 “This order is intended...
    By The Associated Press HAVANA — Cuban authorities say they will tighten measures against the spread of COVID-19 to require tourists and other visitors to isolate at their own expense for several days until tests for the new coronavirus come out negative. The announcement Saturday by Dr. Francisco Durán, Cuba’s director of epidemiology, came as the country announced 910 new infections of the new virus detected Friday, as well as three additional deaths. Duran said that as of Feb. 6, arriving tourists and Cubans who live abroad will be sent to hotels at their own expense to wait for the results of a PCR test for the new coronavirus, which will be given on their fifth day in the country. A similar measure was imposed in the spring, and apparently helped stem the spread of the virus. Cubans returning home from abroad will be housed in other centers at government...
    By The Associated Press BOSTON — Starting Monday, 500 vaccinations per day will be administered at Fenway Park. The goal is to reach as many as 1,250 eligible residents per day under Massachusetts’ vaccination plan. The site at the home of the Boston Red Sox is expected to stay open through the start of baseball season in early April. Appointments are open for those people under Phase 1 of the state’s vaccine distribution plan and those 75 and older, who will start getting shots on Monday as the rollout moves into Phase 2. Health care workers started receiving the vaccine at Fenway this week. The state’s first mass vaccination site at Gillette Stadium – home of the New England Patriots — opened this month. State officials aim to open more than 100 public vaccination sites throughout Massachusetts. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: AP analysis: Racial disparity in US vaccination drive. California...
    PIERS Morgan has revealed his parents have finally had their coronavirus vaccine after they battled the virus last year. The Good Morning Britain presenter shared his joy on Twitter tonight after mum Gabrielle and stepdad Glynne were struck down with Covid-19 in November. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3Piers Morgan with his mum Gabrielle Piers, 55, said: "Another 489,934 covid vaccines were administered in the UK yesterday...the 2nd highest daily total to date. Brilliant news... and I’m even happier that today’s figure will include my parents who got jabbed this morning. Keep up the great work @NHSuk@nadhimzahawi" The TV star spoke of the "psychological trauma" of coming up against coronavirus in his family last year and said it had brought down his elderly mother Gabrielle and stepdad Glynne "like dominos". He said on GMB: "I would just like to say something to my parents who...
    By The Associated Press COLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina is reporting its first known case of the Britain-based variant of the coronavirus. The Department of Health and Environmental Control says the agency was notified Friday that a sample from an adult in the Lowcountry “with an international travel history” had tested positive for the variant. On Friday, 434 cases of the U.K. variant had been reported in the U.S. This week, health officials reported the first two U.S. cases of a South African coronavirus variant in South Carolina. Health experts say both variants possibly spread more easily and protective measures of wearing masks, social distancing and avoiding large gatherings are recommended. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: AP analysis: Racial disparity in US vaccination drive. California surpasses 40,000 coronavirus deaths. New Mexico tribe sues US over hospital closure amid pandemic. WHO team visits second Wuhan hospital in virus investigation. CDC orders say...
    More On: capitol riot Capitol fence wars: Police, residents at odds over permanent barriers Accused Capitol rioter said she wanted to shoot Pelosi ‘in the friggin’ brain’ Busted in Capitol riot, ‘Cowboys for Trump’ founder now acting up in jail: judge Slain Capitol Police officer to lie in honor in Washington A top Republican donor and heiress to the Publix supermarket fortune provided much of the funding for the Washington DC rally that ended in the Jan. 6 riot at the US Capitol, fundraising documents reveal. Longtime Trump supporter Julie Jenkins Fancelli kicked in $300,000 to help the “Stop the Steal” group stage the event at the Ellipse, where then-President Trump exhorted the crowd to “fight like hell” against election results that gave Joe Biden the presidency, the Wall Street Journal reported Saturday. His rhetoric led to an impeachment vote this month, as House Democrats accused the president...
    A morgue attendant at the Pretoria branch of the South African funeral and burial services company Avbob stands still next to the body of a patient deceased of COVID-19 related illnesses as a coffin ig borough along ahead of his burial on January 22, 2021. MARCO LONGARI/AFP via Getty Images In 20 years, Gregory Burrell, owner of Terry Funeral Home in Philadelphia, has laid over 6,000 people to rest. Almost all of them were Black. Since the coronavirus pandemic, he said traditional funerals are taken away from families, especially Black Americans who have been hit hardest during the pandemic. "Not being able to have the traditional funeral is not only devastating physically and emotionally, but it's also frustrating," Burrell told Insider. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. When Gregory Burrell's wife passed away almost two years ago, 600 people attended her funeral. Now, during a pandemic that...
    By The Associated Press LOS ANGELES — California surpassed 40,000 coronavirus deaths as the state’s steepest surge of cases begins to taper. The tally by Johns Hopkins University shows the state passed the milestone Saturday with 40,240 deaths. The deaths are surging at a record pace after recent declines in cases and hospitalizations. It took six months for California to record its first 10,000 deaths, then four months to double to 20,000. In just five weeks, the state reached 30,000 and needed only 20 days to get to 40,000. New York leads the U.S. with more than 43,000 confirmed deaths, followed by California, Texas at 36,000 and Florida at 26,000. ___ THE VIRUS OUTBREAK: AP analysis: Racial disparity in US vaccination drive. New Mexico tribe sues US over hospital closure amid pandemic. WHO team visits second Wuhan hospital in virus investigation. CDC orders say travelers must wear masks on public...
    OAKLAND — The search to find solutions for high school athletes could lead to basketball games on outdoor courts in the Oakland Section, the second smallest of the 10 members of the California Interscholastic Federation. Playing outside is one of the ideas under consideration as section officials began planning for a two-season sports calendar after California officials loosened restrictions implemented to help stop the transmission of COVID-19. But basketball on concrete courts can wait. Commissioner Franky Navarro is focused on Season 1 sports of cross-country, football and girls volleyball. Alameda County is in the purple tier in California’s reopening system. Only cross-country is allowed in the strictest level of the state’s four-tier system. But with a trend of decreasing case rates and ramping up of vaccine distribution, public health officials hope counties can move into the less restrictive red and orange tiers in the coming months. ...
    BERLIN — Germany says drugmakers will deliver at least 5 million doses of coronavirus vaccines to the country in the next three weeks. The Health Ministry says on Twitter that Germany has already received 3.5 million doses in the past five weeks and administered 2.2 million shots. Health Minister Jens Spahn says the new figures for deliveries from Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca were “good news after a difficult start.” Germany has given the first shot to about 2.2% of its 83 million population. Nearly half a million people had received both shots by Saturday. It’s recommended the second shot be given 21 to 28 days after the first. Chancellor Angela Merkel has summoned the governors of Germany’s 16 states, which are responsible for organizing the vaccine drive, to discuss the slow rollout on Monday. In her weekly video address Saturday, she acknowledged families have had a particular burden in the...
    TWO friends were slapped with £200 Covid lockdown fines for an "unnecessary" trip to the park. The pair were fined a total of £400 for breaching coronavirus regulations yesterday on their visit to Bede Park in Leicester. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 2Police officers in Bede Park, Leicester, handed out £200 Covid fines to people breaching the rulesCredit: BPM Media Police officers spoke to the two people at the park at about 6.30pm - and fined them after they admitted their journey was "unnecessary." Officers stopped and spoke to more than ten people at Bede Park - but those two were the only people fined. A Leicestershire Police spokesman said: “On Thursday 28 January officers carried out routine patrols in Bede Park, Leicester. “More than 10 people were spoken to regarding Covid-19 regulations and they were engaging and understanding with officers....
    Pregnant women who develop COVID-19 antibodies often transfer them to their babies in the womb, a new study shows. More than 1,400 mothers and newborns were studied, and researchers found antibodies were transferred across the placenta in 72 of 83 infected or previously infected pregnant women, according to the study by the Journal of the American Medical Association’s JAMA Pediatrics published on Friday. “Our findings demonstrate the potential for maternally derived SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies to provide neonatal protection from coronavirus disease 2019,” the study says. Babies born to COVID-19 positive mothers did not develop an infection, and 60 percent of women who had coronavirus antibodies reported no symptoms, according to the researchers. The finding also recommends expecting mothers should also get vaccinated against other viruses such as influenza so they can protect themselves and their babies.
    More On: Coronavirus CDC orders transportation mask mandate amid COVID-19 surge Tony Award voting to begin in March though no official ceremony date confirmed Iowa woman spits, bites customers for criticizing her about mask: cops Over 1,000 COVID-19 vaccines ruined after Florida worker turns off fridge Pregnant women who develop COVID-19 antibodies often transfer them to their babies in the womb, a new study shows. More than 1,400 mothers and newborns were studied, and researchers found antibodies were transferred across the placenta in 72 of 83 infected or previously infected pregnant women, according to the study by the Journal of the American Medical Association’s JAMA Pediatrics published on Friday. “Our findings demonstrate the potential for maternally derived SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies to provide neonatal protection from coronavirus disease 2019,” the study says. Babies born to COVID-19 positive mothers did not develop an infection, and 60 percent of...