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Trump’s acquittal:

    This week on the What’s In it For Us? podcast, our hosts Dr. Christina Greer and Elie Mystal discuss Trump’s second impeachment, the prison uprising in St. Louis, and indoor dining across America during a pandemic. It’s no doubt 2021 started out with a bang and continues to push the unpredictable dial forward. Amidst everything we don’t know and have yet to know, the question always on our minds is: what’s in it for us? Read More: ‘What’s In It For Us’ podcast talk Trump’s 2nd impeachment, congressional confrontation with Niambi Carter “The fact that this is a white supremacy insurrection started in the name of Donald Trump was a point that should have been made repeatedly during the trial,” Mystal to Dr. Greer. The acquittal of Trump is as unsurprising as it is political negligence. Both Mystal and Dr. Greer pointed out that similar to the first impeachment,...
    Trump's Senate acquittal doesn't clear his path for a 2024 run. Here's why.
    Senate Television/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Last week, the Senate voted to acquit former president Donald Trump of the charge of inciting the insurrection on January 6 that left five people dead and more than 100 law enforcement officials with injuries. To say the president was not guilty in the face of the overwhelming evidence presented by the impeachment managers was no easy feat. Long-time Trump enabler turned apostate Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) joined others in voting to acquit based on the fact that Trump wasn’t president any longer, even though the former majority leader is the one who delayed the trial. But he quickly followed his vote up with a lengthy (but ultimately, hypocritical) speech excoriating Trump. It hardly matters. The acquittal, though seemingly inevitable, has marked the...
    By MARK SHERMAN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's acquittal by the Senate in his impeachment trial may not be the end of the line for efforts to keep him from seeking the presidency again. If Trump chooses to run for the White House in 2024, opponents are likely to call on a constitutional provision adopted after the Civil War to try to stop him. The Supreme Court could have the final say. The Constitution's 14th Amendment disqualifies from future office any former elected officials and military officers who “shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion” against the United States. Ratified in 1868, the language in Section 3 of the amendment was aimed at former Confederate civilian and military leaders. It could be applied to people who incited or took part in the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, legal scholars said, noting that a congressional commission...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump’s acquittal by the Senate in his impeachment trial may not be the end of the line for efforts to keep him from seeking the presidency again. If Trump chooses to run for the White House in 2024, opponents are likely to call on a constitutional provision adopted after the Civil War to try to stop him. The Supreme Court could have the final say. The Constitution’s 14th Amendment disqualifies from future office any former elected officials and military officers who “shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion” against the United States. Ratified in 1868, the language in Section 3 of the amendment was aimed at former Confederate civilian and military leaders. It could be applied to people who incited or took part in the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, legal scholars said, noting that a congressional commission to investigate the attack and...
    Organizers of the biggest annual gathering of conservatives say they have invited President Donald Trump to speak at their conference in Florida next week. The Conservative Political Action Conference is due to start next Thursday in Orlando and already features some of the biggest names from the Trump administration, including former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and former White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders. Chairman of the American Conservative Union Matt Schlapp said he had extended an invitation to Trump himself. “I’d love to see him come to CPAC next,” he told the Washington Examiner. TRUMP DESCRIBES RELATIONSHIP WITH LIMBAUGH Trump has begun reemerging into public life since being acquitted by the Senate last weekend of a House impeachment charge of “inciting insurrection." Although he remains deprived of his Twitter and Facebook platforms, he released a blistering attack by email on Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday. A day later...
    Despite his acquittal by the Senate, former President TrumpDonald TrumpFederal prosecutors investigated Proud Boys ties to Roger Stone in 2019 case: CNN Overnight Defense: One-third of service members decline coronavirus vaccine | Biden to take executive action in response to Solar Winds hack | US, Japan reach cost sharing agreement Trump 'won't say yet' if he's running in 2024 MORE’s legal problems may not be over. He’s already been hit with one lawsuit connected to allegations he incited last month’s riot at the U.S. Capitol, and faces the possibility of more to come. Shortly after the Senate voted against convicting Trump in his impeachment trial Saturday, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump 'won't say yet' if he's running in 2024 On The Trail: Trump threatens a Tea Party redux Trump to appear on conservative networks in wake of Limbaugh's death MORE (R-Ky.) argued that impeachment was not the...
    WASHINGTON - As president, Donald Trump was immune from criminal prosecution and civil liability. But now that he is a private citizen, he no longer enjoys the cloak of presidential immunity — and his legal troubles are starting to pile up. On Tuesday, just three days after the Senate acquitted him of an impeachment charge of inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, Trump was sued over the riot in federal court by a prominent U.S. Democratic representative. The suit by Congressman Bennie Thompson of Mississippi, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, accuses Trump, his personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and two far-right groups of conspiring to incite the riot to prevent congressional certification of Democrat Joe Biden’s presidential election victory. The lawsuit is likely to be the first of many. But Trump’s legal troubles are not limited to his role in the riot. Ongoing investigations in...
    President Biden is hoping playing the blame game will boost his White House as the new administration braces for its first 100 days assessment. The Biden team tried to avoid mentioning former President Donald Trump during its post-election transition, after a campaign of drawing stark contrasts. But Biden's aides will continue casting his predecessor as a political foil as they face growing pressure over his coronavirus pandemic response before the April 30 marker, including over his COVID-19 vaccine distribution and school-opening goals, as well as his proposed $1.9 trillion relief package. The Biden camp's tactic likely will keep Trump's name in circulation and alienate his supporters, while the 45th president retains his iron grip on the Republican Party, which he made clear he intends to keep with a scathing Tuesday statement blasting Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell as an unskilled and "unsmiling political hack." The blame game messaging...
    On Presidents’ Day, hundreds gathered on a Florida street corner with flags and signs. But they weren’t there to celebrate the current democratically elected president, nor American presidents in general. The crowd was dedicating the holiday to Donald Trump, the twice-impeached political exile who passed through the demonstrators in his motorcade and flashed a thumbs-up. Trump has been out of office for nearly a month, but some of his most diehard supporters remain convinced, falsely, that he won re-election—or at least that he will run again in 2024. Last week, after senators acquitted the ex-president of inciting the deadly mob that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6, Trump issued a statement suggesting he would re-enter the public eye. “Our historic, patriotic, and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun. In the months ahead, I have much to share with you,” the statement read. That was exciting...
    President Joe Biden dodged questions Tuesday on Donald Trump's impeachment trial, saying he didn't want to talk about his predecessor in the Oval Office anymore. Biden dismissed Trump with a quick quip during his CNN town hall meeting in  Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  'Look – for four years, all that's been in the news is Trump. The next four years, I want to make sure all the news is the American people. I'm tired of talking about Trump,' he said. He refused to talk about Republicans who voted to acquit the former president in his second impeachment trial, refusing to answer if he felt they were 'cowards' as Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested.  'I'm not going to call names out,' the president said. President Joe Biden dodged questions on Donald Trump's impeachment trial, saying he didn't want to talk about his predecessor in the Oval Office anymore 'Look – for four...
    Worldwide reactions to the Republican Party's acquittal of Donald Trump—even after Trump and his underlings helped to organize, finance, promote, and incite a mob for the explicit purpose of nullifying a United States presidential election—are trickling in, and few of them are good. The world has enough experience with collapsing democracies to know what one looks like, and political writers from other countries are not bound by the usual American journalistic conventions of faux-neutrality to the point where fact and fiction are blurred and unknowable. Even before the crowd turned violent, it had been assembled by Trump to intimidate Congress into nullifying an election based on provably false propaganda. And both before and after the mob turned from intimidation to violent insurrection, the plan to erase the results of the November election had majority support among Republican lawmakers—147 of them voted to erase the electoral votes of Biden-won states using the same...
    Savannah Rychcik February 16, 2021 0 Comments Former President Donald Trump is not holding back on his criticism of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) just three days after the Senate acquitted him on the charge of inciting an insurrection. “The Republican Party can never again be respected or strong with political ‘leaders’ like Sen. Mitch McConnell at its helm… Mitch is a dour, sullen, and unsmiling political hack, and if Republican Senators are going to stay with him, they will not win again,” Trump said in a statement on Tuesday. He added, “He will never do what needs to be done, or what is right for our Country. Where necessary and appropriate, I will back primary rivals who espouse Making America Great Again and our policy of America First. We want brilliant, strong, thoughtful, and compassionate leadership.” Trump suggested without him, McConnell would have never won his election....
    TREVOR Noah likened Donald Trump to OJ Simpson after the impeachment acquittal, but joked the former president is "responsible for more deaths." The Daily Show host slammed the former president and Senate Republicans on Monday after the Senate voted to acquit Trump for a second time. 5Trevor Noah likened Trump to OJ Simpson for his acquittal recordCredit: AP:Associated Press 5OJ Simpson was acquitted in the murder of his wife and her friend in 1995Credit: Getty - Pool The Senate voted 57-43 to find Trump not guilty of inciting the January 6 attack on the US Capitol on Saturday, falling 10 votes short of the supermajority needed to convict. The results were expected, since a two-thirds vote was needed to convict Trump and the Senate is split 50-50 down the party line, but was still met with much backlash. "This dude just love losing the popular vote," Noah cracked, before...
    By Michael R. Sisak and Jim Mustain | Associated Press NEW YORK — Acquitted by the Senate of inciting the U.S. Capitol insurrection last month, former President Donald Trump faces more fallout from the unrest, including a lawsuit from a congressman Tuesday. But his biggest legal problems might be the ones that go much further back. In one of what is expected to be many lawsuits over the deadly riot, Democratic U.S. Rep. Bennie Thompson accused Trump on Tuesday of conspiring with far-right extremist groups that were involved in storming the Capitol. Trump, who made a fiery speech to supporters prior to the riot, could also be hit with criminal charges — though courts, wary of infringing free speech, have set a high bar for prosecutors trying to mount federal incitement cases. But riot-related consequences aren’t the only thing Trump has to worry about. With his historic second Senate trial...
    US Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, Democrat of New York, speaks during a press conference at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, January 6, 2021.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images With former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial behind them, Democrats are moving to pass another coronavirus relief package within weeks. The Senate on Saturday acquitted Trump of inciting an insurrection against the government after five days of proceedings. Both Democratic-held chambers of Congress and President Joe Biden will now turn their full attention to pushing a $1.9 trillion aid bill through before key unemployment programs expire on March 14. On Tuesday, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., told lawmakers to prepare to work through Feb. 26 and into the ensuing weekend in order to pass the relief bill. House Democratic Caucus Chair Hakeem Jeffries will hold calls this week with members of committees putting together the legislation, NBC...
    It was widely expected that former President Trump would remain quiet during his second Senate impeachment trial. And Trump lived up to expectations. POLLS SHOWING TRUMP'S CONTINUED STRENGTH WITH REPUBLICANS HURDLE TO THOSE TRYING TO MOVE GOP PAST FORMER PRESIDENT But since the former president was acquitted on Saturday of one count of inciting the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by right-wing extremists and other Trump supporters aiming to disrupt congressional certification of President Joe Biden’s Electoral College victory, he’s stayed mostly under the radar. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump board Air Force One at Joint Base Andrews before boarding Air Force One for his last time as president on Jan. 20, 2021, in Joint Base Andrews, Md. (Pete Marovich - Pool/Getty Images) After his acquittal in his impeachment trial on Saturday, Trump touted in a statement that "our historic, patriotic and...
    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. -- Former President Donald Trump on Monday made his first public appearance since his Senate acquittal over the weekend, greeting supporters from his motorcade as he passed them by in West Palm Beach, Florida.He gave his trademark thumbs-up to cheering supporters waving Trump flags and one holding a "Happy Presidents' Day" sign.It was one of just a few public sightings of Trump off the golf course since he left the White House and relocated to his new home state on Jan. 20.The small gathering of what appeared to be a few hundred Trump supporters was live-streamed by the pro-Trump YouTube channel Right Side Broadcasting Network.Organizers billed the event as the "Presidents' Day "Peaceful and Patriotic" Pro-Trump Rally," an apparent reference to Trump's words at the end of his Jan. 6 rally just ahead of the attack on the Capitol.EMBED More News Videos The Senate has acquitted...
    Photograph: Greg Lovett/AP If the 2024 Republican presidential primary were held today, Donald Trump would be the clear favorite to win big. That was the message from a Politico-Morning Consult poll released on Tuesday, three days after Trump’s acquittal in his second impeachment trial, on a charge of inciting the insurrection at the US Capitol on 6 January. Related: Wall Street Journal warns Republicans: ‘Trump won’t win another election’ Among Republican voters, 59% said they wanted Trump to play a prominent role in their party, up a whopping 18 points from the last such poll, taken in the aftermath of the Capitol riot. A slightly lower number, 54%, said they would back Trump in the primary. Tens of thousands of Republicans left the party after the Capitol insurrection, and a majority of Americans have told other pollsters they would like to see Trump banished from politics. Though the 45th...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday said he was defending the U.S. Constitution, and not Donald Trump, by voting to acquit the former president of an impeachment charge of inciting an insurrection. McConnell, R-Ky., in an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal Tuesday called the Jan. 6 Capitol riot a "shameful day" but argued that Article II, Section 4 of the Constitution bars senators from impeaching former officials. MCCONNELL RIPS TRUMP, SAYS ACTIONS 'UNCONSCIONABLE' BUT TRIAL WAS UNCONSTITUTIONAL "There is no question former President Trump bears moral responsibility," McConnell wrote, saying his supporters stormed the Capitol because of the "unhinged falsehoods he shouted into the world's largest megaphone." McConnell called Trump's behavior during and after the riot "unconscionable" and said he was "as outraged as any member of Congress." "But senators take our own oaths. Our job wasn't to find some way, any way, to inflict a punishment," he wrote. "The Senate's first and foundational...
    Donald Trump Jr says his father will keep pushing their 'America First' agenda by backing candidates who believe in his message rather than 'establishment guys'. Speaking after the former president's second impeachment acquittal, Donald Jr said his family will continue their efforts to rebrand the Republican party. Speaking to Sean Hannity on Fox News, Donald Jr said of his father: 'He is going to keep pushing that America First agenda, fighting for the American worker. Watch the latest video at foxnews.com Fox News Privacy Policy Donald Trump Jr says his father will keep pushing their 'America First' agenda by backing candidates who believe in his message rather than 'establishment guys' 'He's going to be pushing for candidates who will do that, not the random establishment guys that have sat there for years, have done absolutely nothing and get total support from the establishment base.  'We're going to do exactly...
    Madison Summers February 16, 2021 0 Comments Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is weighing in on the Senate’s acquittal of former President Donald Trump. The Kentucky senator is declaring that the acquittal vindicated the Constitution, not Trump, he wrote in a Wall Street Journal op-ed published Monday evening. After calling Jan. 6 a “shameful day” when a “mob bloodied law enforcement and besieged the first branch of government,” McConnell said, “There is no question former President Trump bears moral responsibility.” His remarks come shortly after the Senate acquitted Trump on the charge of “incitement of insurrection” with a 57-43 vote on Saturday, as IJR reported. That fell 10 votes short of convicting him and seven Republicans joined Democrats. “His supporters stormed the Capitol because of the unhinged falsehoods he shouted into the world’s largest megaphone,” McConnell wrote. “His behavior during and after the chaos was also unconscionable, from...
    "The Daily Show" host Trevor Noah bashed Donald Trump, Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans following the acquittal of the former president in his second impeachment trial.  On Saturday, the Senate voted 57-43 to find Trump guilty. However, despite seven Republicans breaking from their other party members, the vote fell 10 short of reaching the supermajority needed to convict. "This dude just loves losing the popular vote," mocked Noah during Monday’s episode of "The Daily Show."  Noah noted that the vote may be heartbreaking for some who were hoping to see Trump face punishment over the Jan. 6 riots at the U.S. Capitol building. He explained, however, that it’s not surprising given how influential the former president still is on Republicans.  'DAILY SHOW WITH TREVOR NOAH' SLAMMED FOR WONDERING IF FLORIDA COULD BE BLASTED OFF THE MAP Trevor Noah mocked Republicans for voting to acquit Donald Trump in his second impeachment...
            by Andrew Trunsky  More lawmakers are backing an independent 9/11-style commission into the Capitol riot on January 6 following the Senate’s acquittal of former President Donald Trump on a charge of inciting the deadly insurrection that took place. Congressional investigations were already scheduled after this week’s recess, but lawmakers from both parties have called for a holistic investigation following Trump’s acquittal on Saturday afternoon. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also asked retired Army Gen. Russel Honoré in January to lead oversee a thorough review of the Capitol’s security in order to prevent something similar from occurring in the future. “There should be a complete investigation about what happened,” said Louisiana Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy on Sunday. “What was known, who knew it and when they knew, all that, because that builds the basis so this never happens again.” After voting that the trial was unconstitutional in January, Cassidy voted...
    Following former President Donald Trump’s second impeachment acquittal, his future will be dedicated to preserving his brand of conservatism and supporting the American people, Donald Trump Jr. told Fox News’ "Hannity" on Monday. "[Trump] is going to keep pushing that America First agenda, fighting for the American worker," said the former president's eldest son. "He’s going to be pushing for candidates who will do that, not the random establishment guys. "And we’re going to continue doing to conservatism what my father has done, which is bring it from the dead back into real life with people who love this country and who are willing to go to bat for her." Trump Jr. shared his reaction to the Senate impeachment trial and pointed out that the hypocrisy in politics is only empowered by Republican leaders who refuse to push back. TRUMP DRIVES PAST JUBILANT SUPPORTERS AT IMPROMPTU RALLY IN FLORIDA Video"Republican...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Memo: Trump is tainted but not done The trials and tribulations of impeachment Congressional Democrats say Trump acquittal was foregone conclusion MORE (R-Ky.) in a new Wall Street Journal op-ed Monday defended the Senate's decision to acquit former President TrumpDonald TrumpSix people who guarded Roger Stone entered Capitol during attack: NYT Cassidy pens column explaining vote to convict Trump Puerto Rico governor: Congress 'morally obligated' to act on statehood vote MORE but clarified that it, "vindicated the Constitution, not Trump." In his op-ed, McConnell echoed sentiments he shared after the Senate acquittal on Saturday saying Trump is "morally responsible" for the Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6 and that he was "outraged" by Trump's actions at the time. "There is no question former President Trump bears moral responsibility. His supporters stormed the Capitol because of the unhinged falsehoods he shouted into the world’s largest megaphone,"...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- For President Joe Biden's first 100 days in office, Eyewitness News will have a special election edition of "The Countdown" to get you caught up with all of the day's political and campaign news.You can watch it online, on the ABC7NY app or on our Connected TV apps for Fire, Roku, Apple TV and Android TV. Click here to learn more.Monday, Feb. 15Pelosi says independent commission will examine Capitol riotHouse Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday that Congress will establish an independent, Sept. 11-style commission to look into the deadly insurrection that took place at the U.S. Capitol. Pelosi said the commission will "investigate and report on the facts and causes relating to the January 6, 2021, domestic terrorist attack upon the United States Capitol Complex ... and relating to the interference with the peaceful transfer of power."Trump looks to reassert himself after impeachment acquittalDonald Trump took...
    (CNN)Donald Trump's acquittal in the Senate's impeachment trial -- and the backlash now facing Republicans who voted to convict him -- have exposed the deepening rift within the GOP over whether to continue to fully embrace the former President or seek to move past his divisive brand of politics.The immediate aftermath of Trump's trial has underscored just how difficult it will be for the GOP to break from Trump as the party charts its path forward. The round of recriminations over Trump has Republicans who are tasked with winning back the House and Senate in the 2022 midterm elections concerned it could distract from the party's ability to focus on defeating Democrats and regaining power in WashingtonSenate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky is vowing to focus on electability over loyalty to Trump as the party faces a slate of races to control the Senate in the states where the...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that former President Donald Trump could play a “constructive” role for Republicans after his acquittal for allegedly inciting the Capitol riot. “I don’t rule out the prospect that [Trump] may well be supporting good candidates,” McConnell (R-Ky.) told the Wall Street Journal when asked what role he saw for Trump in GOP politics. “I’m not assuming that, to the extent the former president wants to continue to be involved, he won’t be a constructive part of the process.” McConnell tore into Trump on Saturday, despite voting for acquittal, and said he was “practically and morally responsible” for the violence on Jan. 6. But McConnell voted to acquit Trump on constitutional grounds and has sought to avoid Republican in-fighting. McConnell told the Journal that he cares most about supporting electable Republicans in 2022 as he hopes to reclaim the Senate, which is...
    More On: mitch mcconnell McConnell sets sights on retaking Senate control with focus on electability Republicans divided on Trump impeachment acquittal, impact on future Mitch McConnell tells fellow GOP senators he will vote to acquit Trump Senate votes Congressional Gold Medal for Capitol cop Eugene Goodman Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that former President Donald Trump could play a “constructive” role for Republicans after his acquittal for allegedly inciting the Capitol riot. “I don’t rule out the prospect that [Trump] may well be supporting good candidates,” McConnell (R-Ky.) told the Wall Street Journal when asked what role he saw for Trump in GOP politics. “I’m not assuming that, to the extent the former president wants to continue to be involved, he won’t be a constructive part of the process.” McConnell tore into Trump on Saturday, despite voting for acquittal, and said he was “practically and morally responsible”...
    Former Sen. Jeff FlakeJeffrey (Jeff) Lane FlakeCongress must step up to restore accountability to national security policy Iowa, New Hampshire Republicans grapple with setting post-Trump tone South Carolina GOP votes to censure Rep. Rice over impeachment vote MORE (R-Ariz.) condemned the Senate's acquittal of former President TrumpDonald TrumpSix people who guarded Roger Stone entered Capitol during attack: NYT Cassidy pens column explaining vote to convict Trump Puerto Rico governor: Congress 'morally obligated' to act on statehood vote MORE in an op-ed published Monday, calling the vote the final "normalization" of a president who should never be considered normal. In the op-ed published on CNN.com, the Arizona Republican wrote that his own party should have voted to convict Trump and bar him from running for federal office, writing: "We didn't convict him. We should have, but we didn't." "Let's not compound the grievous injury to the country and our party by...
    Legal proceedings or commission of inquiry: acquitted by the Senate in an impeachment trial, Donald Trump could still be held accountable for the events of January 6 on Capitol Hill. “Still responsible” Before the Senate, Democratic prosecutors sought to demonstrate that the 45th President of the United States had incited violence with months of “lies”, denying his presidential defeat on November 3 against Joe Biden, then his speech in front of thousands of supporters in Washington on the day of the assault on Capitol Hill. “Fight like devils,” he told them, while parliamentarians certified the victory of his Democratic rival. Donald Trump denies any responsibility for these events, and his lawyers stressed that he had, on one occasion during this speech, called for “peaceful” demonstrations. Although he acquitted him in the Senate because he felt the upper house lacked the competence to try him, the powerful Republican leader Mitch...
    By Jill Colvin | Associated Press WASHINGTON — Donald Trump took in the win at Mar-a-Lago, surrounded by friends and family. His lawyers celebrated with hugs and smiles. One joked, “We’re going to Disney World!” Now acquitted in his second Senate impeachment trial, Trump is preparing for the next phase of his post-presidency life. Feeling emboldened by the trial’s outcome, he is expected to reemerge from a self-imposed hibernation at his club in Palm Beach, Florida, and is eyeing ways to reassert his power. But after being barred from Twitter, the former president lacks the social media bullhorn that fueled his political rise. And he’s confronting a Republican Party deeply divided over the legacy of his jarring final days in office, culminating in the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol. Searing video images of the day played on loop during his impeachment trial, which ended Saturday. Trump remains...
    The only way to save her future is to take Republican power away. The founding fathers, chafing under the malign thumb of Britain's monarchy, most definitely envisioned the potential for a Donald Trump. Alexander Hamilton pretty much nailed Trump in 1792: "When a man unprincipled in private life[,] desperate in his fortune, bold in his temper … despotic in his ordinary demeanour—known to have scoffed in private at the principles of liberty—when such a man is seen to mount the hobby horse of popularity—to join in the cry of danger to liberty—to take every opportunity of embarrassing the General Government & bringing it under suspicion—to flatter and fall in with all the non sense of the zealots of the day—It may justly be suspected that his object is to throw things into confusion that he may 'ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.'" Thus we have the tool of impeachment and...
    DONALD Trump is reportedly ready to rebuild the Republican Party and reassert power after his impeachment acquittal. Now acquitted in his second Senate impeachment trial, Trump is preparing for the next phase of his post-presidency life. 6Trump is set to rebuild the Republican partyCredit: AFP or licensors Feeling emboldened by the trial's outcome, he is expected to reemerge from a self-imposed hibernation at his club in Palm Beach, Florida, and is eyeing ways to reassert his power. But after being barred from Twitter, the former president lacks the social media bullhorn that fueled his political rise. And he's confronting a Republican Party deeply divided over the legacy of his jarring final days in office, culminating in the January 6 storming of the Capitol. Searing video images of the day played on loop during his impeachment trial, which ended on Saturday. Trump remains popular among the GOP base,...
    More lawmakers are backing an independent 9/11-style commission into the Capitol riot on Jan. 6 following the Senate’s acquittal of former President Donald Trump on a charge of inciting the deadly insurrection that took place. Congressional investigations were already scheduled after this week’s recess, but lawmakers from both parties have called for a holistic investigation following Trump’s acquittal on Saturday afternoon. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also asked retired Army Gen. Russel Honoré in January to oversee a thorough review of the Capitol’s security in order to prevent something similar from occurring in the future. “There should be a complete investigation about what happened,” said Louisiana Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy on Sunday. “What was known, who knew it and when they knew, all that, because that builds the basis so this never happens again.” After voting that the trial was unconstitutional in January, Cassidy voted differently once the trial began, and...
    MSNBC Contributor Charlie Sykes said Monday that “2022 is going to be a Republican Civil War” when he spoke about former President Donald Trump’s acquittal. “There is a gap between the institutional Republican Party led by Mitch McConnell, which has decided to move on from Trump, and the base, which for the moment I think is sticking with Donald Trump,” Sykes, the founder and editor-at-large at The Bulwark, said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” “But 2022 is going to be a Republican Civil War. And I think they’re going to have a problem with the general elections if they continue down this path,” he continued. The Senate voted 57-43 on Saturday in favor of acquitting Trump during his second impeachment trial. The House previously voted 232-197 on Jan. 13 to impeach the former president again, charging him with a single article of “incitement of insurrection.” (RELATED: These Seven Republicans Voted To...
    Former President Donald Trump on Saturday, after the Senate acquitted him of the impeachment charge against him, teased a return to the political arena in his post-presidency -- but he may still face efforts to punish him for the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol by his supporters.  The Senate failed to reach the 67-vote threshold to convict Trump on inciting an insurrection as charged in the House's article of impeachment. There were 57 votes to convict and 43 "not guilty" votes.  "Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun," Trump said in a statement following the vote. "In the months ahead I have much to share with you, and I look forward to continuing our incredible journey together to achieve American greatness for all of our people." But in the coming weeks and months, Trump could also be facing continued efforts to hold him...
    WASHINGTON -- Donald Trump took in the win at Mar-a-Lago, surrounded by friends and family. His lawyers celebrated with hugs and smiles. One joked, "We're going to Disney World!"Now acquitted in his second Senate impeachment trial, Trump is preparing for the next phase of his post-presidency life. Feeling emboldened by the trial's outcome, he is expected to reemerge from a self-imposed hibernation at his club in Palm Beach, Florida, and is eyeing ways to reassert his power.But after being barred from Twitter, the former president lacks the social media bullhorn that fueled his political rise. And he's confronting a Republican Party deeply divided over the legacy of his jarring final days in office, culminating in the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol. Searing video images of the day played on loop during his impeachment trial, which ended Saturday.Trump remains popular among the GOP base, but many Republicans in Washington have...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — After former President Donald Trump’s acquittal at his second Senate impeachment trial, bipartisan support appears to be growing for an independent Sept. 11-style commission into the deadly insurrection that took place at the U.S. Capitol. Investigations into the riot were already planned, with Senate hearings scheduled later this month in the Senate Rules Committee. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has asked retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré to lead an immediate review of the Capitol’s security process. Lawmakers from both parties, speaking on Sunday’s news shows, signaled that even more inquiries were likely. The Senate verdict Saturday, with its 57-43 majority falling 10 votes short of the two-thirds needed to convict Trump, hardly put to rest the debate about the Republican former president’s culpability for the Jan. 6 assault. “There should be a complete investigation about what happened,” said Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy, one of seven...
    The president, Joe Biden, recognized that the acquittal of Donald Trump in the impeachment trial against him shows that “democracy is fragile” and, therefore, asked all Americans “to defend the truth and defeat lies.” Only by using the truth, Biden argued, will the United States be able to end the “non-civil war” between Democrats and Republicans and “heal the soul of the nation.” “This sad chapter in our history has reminded us that democracy is fragile. That you always have to defend it. That we must always be alert. That violence and extremism have no place in the US. And each of us has the duty and responsibility as Americans, and especially as leaders, to defend the truth and defeat lies, “he said. Biden, who came to power on January 20, took a position in a statement after the US Senate cleared Trump of “inciting an insurrection” in the January...
    By HOPE YEN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — A day after former President Donald Trump won his second Senate impeachment trial, bipartisan support appeared to be growing for an independent Sept. 11-style commission into the deadly insurrection that took place at the U.S. Capitol. Investigations into the riot were already planned, with Senate hearings scheduled later this month in the Senate Rules Committee. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has asked retired Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré to lead an immediate review of the Capitol’s security process. Lawmakers from both parties, speaking on Sunday's news shows, signaled that even more inquiries were likely. The Senate verdict Saturday, with its 57-43 majority falling 10 votes short of the two-thirds needed to convict Trump, hardly put to rest the debate about the former president’s culpability for the Jan. 6 assault. “There should be a complete investigation about what happened,” said Louisiana Sen. Bill...
    Support grows for Capitol riot inquiry after Trump acquittal Trump looks to reassert himself after impeachment acquittal Impeachment isn’t the final word on Capitol riot for Trump 2 impeachment trials, 2 escape hatches for Donald Trump Biden to speak at virtual meeting of world’s major economies After impeachment acquittal, Trump remains dominant in GOP Analysis: Impeachment proves imperfect amid US polarization Biden White House seeks to turn page on Trump ‘Obamacare’ sign-ups reopen as Democrats push for more aid Biden order reestablishes faith-focused White House office Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    (CNN)With the Senate impeachment trial behind us, Covid-19 relief is set to become the dominant issue in Washington again as Democrats work to advance key parts of President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus proposal. The state of play. The House Ways and Means Committee and the House Education and Labor Committee have each advanced their portions of the bill.But there are 12 House committees writing pieces of the relief legislation, and the House Budget Committee is set to put the pieces together this week to form a single bill. The timeline. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said during her news conference last week that she wants the package passed in the House by the end of February and on the President's desk before March 14, when some unemployment benefits are set to expire.A political tightrope. Pelosi can only afford to lose five Democrats in the process, and Senate Majority...
    Savannah Rychcik February 14, 2021 0 Comments Sen. Chris Coons (D-Del.) is suggesting former President Donald Trump was acquitted because of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.). “As lead manager, Jamie Raskin recognized right after the trial they could have had 500 more witnesses. It wasn’t going to change the outcome,” Coons said during an appearance on ABC’s “This Week.” He continued, “Once Mitch McConnell made it clear he intended to acquit, even despite the compelling evidence, what the House managers needed wasn’t more witnesses or more evidence. What we all needed was more Republican courage.” Coons expressed his gratitude for the seven Republicans who did vote to convict Trump. “I, frankly, at that time, did not think that spending months fighting over additional witnesses would have changed the outcome of this trial one bit,” he explained. Watch his interview below: Host George Stephanopoulos asked Coons if the...
    Reuters February 14, 2021 0 Comments U.S. President Joe Biden said on Saturday that the Senate’s acquittal of former President Donald Trump for inciting an insurrection was a reminder that democracy was fragile, and every American had a duty to defend the truth. “This sad chapter in our history has reminded us that democracy is fragile,” Biden said in a statement issued hours after the Senate failed to muster the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump. Biden noted that a 57 senators – including a record seven Republicans – voted to find Trump guilty, following a bipartisan vote by the House of Representatives to impeach the Republican former president. “While the final vote did not lead to a conviction, the substance of the charge is not in dispute. Even those opposed to the conviction, like Senate Minority Leader (Mitch) McConnell, believe Donald Trump was guilty of a ‘disgraceful dereliction of duty’ and ‘practically and morally responsible for provoking’ the violence unleashed...
    By JILL COLVIN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump took in the win at Mar-a-Lago, surrounded by friends and family. His lawyers celebrated with hugs and smiles. One joked, "We’re going to Disney World!” Now acquitted in his second Senate impeachment trial, Trump is preparing for the next phase of his post-presidency life. Feeling emboldened by the trial's outcome, he is expected to reemerge from a self-imposed hibernation at his club in Palm Beach, Florida, and is eyeing ways to reassert his power. But after being barred from Twitter, the former president lacks the social media bullhorn that fueled his political rise. And he's confronting a Republican Party deeply divided over the legacy of his jarring final days in office, culminating in the Jan. 6 storming of the Capitol. Searing video images of the day played on loop during his impeachment trial, which ended Saturday. Trump remains popular among...
    WASHINGTON - The political fortunes of former U.S. President Donald Trump are now an open question, even after the Senate acquitted him of allegations that he incited insurrection last month by urging hundreds of his supporters to confront lawmakers at the U.S. Capitol as they were certifying his election loss to Democrat Joe Biden.   Moments after the Senate voted 57-43 on Saturday to convict Trump but falling short of the required 67 votes needed to do so, the former president said he was not done with political life. Trump gave no explicit hint that he might attempt another run for the presidency in 2024, as he suggested he might when he left office last month. The House of Representatives impeached Trump in January on the single charge of “incitement of insurrection.”   Trump called the impeachment case against him “another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the...
    The Republican Party continues to belong to Donald Trump. After Trump incited a deadly assault on the federal Capitol last month, the party considered removing the rebellious former president. But in the end, only seven of the 50 Republican senators voted Saturday to convict Trump in his historic second impeachment trial. For Trump loyalists, the acquittal is a kind of vindication, and a reconnection with the ex-president’s combative fan base. And for Trump opponents it is an alarming indication that the party is moving further in a dangerous direction, with little interest in reconnecting with the voters Trump alienated: moderates, women and college graduates. Ultimately, the impeachment resolution leaves on the table the divisions in the Republican party that leaders, donors and voters will have to manage in their efforts to retake control of Congress in the mid-term elections next year and to recover the White House in 2024....
    Democratic members of Congress said on Sunday that the acquittal of former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE at the conclusion of his second impeachment trial one day earlier had been a foregone conclusion. Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinPelosi rules out censure after Trump acquittal Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made the call' Liberals howl after Democrats cave on witnesses MORE (D-Md.), the lead House impeachment manager, said he had “no regrets” about the trial, however. “[W]e have no regrets at all. We left it totally out there on the floor of the U.S. Senate, and every senator knew exactly what happened. And just go back and listen to McConnell’s speech,” Raskin said on NBC's "Meet the Press," referencing Senate...
    (CNN)Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham said Sunday that he spoke to former President Donald Trump after his acquittal in his second impeachment trial and that Trump is "excited" about the midterms in 2022."I spoke to him last night; he was grateful to his lawyers. He appreciated the help that all of us provided. You know, he's ready to move on and rebuild the Republican Party," Graham told Chris Wallace on "Fox News Sunday." "He's excited about 2022. And I'm going to go down to talk with him next week, play a little golf in Florida. And I said, 'Mr. President this MAGA movement needs to continue, we need to unite the party.' "As Trump was seen golfing Sunday at his course in West Palm Beach, Florida, the Republican Party is grappling with how the former President fits into the future of the GOP. The Senate vote on Saturday highlighted the dilemma...
    Minutes after voting to acquit former President Donald Trump of a charge that he incited the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell took to the floor and delivered a blistering speech explaining his decision. Saying that he found Trump "practically and morally responsible for provoking the events of that day," the Kentucky Republican explained that he did not feel the former president was constitutionally eligible for conviction. The text of his remarks follows: January 6th was a disgrace. American citizens attacked their own government. They used terrorism to try to stop a specific piece of democratic business they did not like. Fellow Americans beat and bloodied our own police. They stormed the Senate floor. They tried to hunt down the Speaker of the House. They built a gallows and chanted about murdering the vice president. They did this because they had been fed...
    Democratic Senator Chris Murphy said Sunday that Republicans were 'deathly afraid' to vote against Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial due to his prevailing influence over the GOP. 'I know that Senate Republican caucus well,' Murphy told CNN's 'State of the Union' on Sunday morning. 'The rest of them, I think, had effectively made the decision that Donald Trump is going to be in charge of their party for the next four years,' he continued, referencing the 43 Republicans who voted to acquit the former president. 'As they were deathly afraid of him for the last four years, they are going to continue to be afraid of him for the next four years.' The Senate voted 57-43 on Saturday in Trump's impeachment trial – earning a majority but failing to reach the two-thirds threshold needed to convict the former president for the article of 'incitement of insurrection.' Seven Republicans...
    Democrats touted the Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump as a big win despite his acquittal. "It was a dramatic success in historical terms," lead impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., told NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday. "It was the largest impeachment conviction vote in U.S. History." DEMS 'CAVED' ON WITNESSES IN TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TRIAL, DRAWING CONDEMNATION FROM LEFT AND RIGHT "It was by far the most bipartisan majority that's ever assembled in the Senate to convict a president, which has traditionally been a kind of partisan thing in American history," Raskin continued. "We got seven Republicans, and if you look at the ten Republicans in the House who joined us, it was by far the most bipartisan decision and a complete repudiation of the president's conduct." In this image from video, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., speaks after the Senate acquitted former President Donald Trump in his...
    British Prime Minister Boris Johnson addressed the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic during an interview Sunday on CBS's "Face the Nation," saying everyone needs to be vaccinated. Speaking with host Margaret Brennan, the conservative leader said that he would call on the Biden administration and other wealthy nations to continue supporting COVAX, the World Health Organization-linked effort to deliver vaccines to poorer countries. "There's no point in vaccinating our populations if we don't vaccinate everyone," Johnson said Sunday. Johnson also addressed his own administration's response to the pandemic during his interview, including his government's announcement Sunday that it had reached 15 million vaccinations. Johnson told Brennan the total amounted to "one in four" British adults receiving a dose of the vaccine. Today we have reached a significant milestone in the United Kingdom’s national vaccination programme. This country has achieved an extraordinary feat - administering a total of 15 million jabs into the arms...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE's acquittal in his second impeachment trial dominated the Sunday morning political talk shows, with multiple guests discussing whether witnesses would have changed the outcome.  Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in on Trump impeachment trial; Biden administration eyes timeline for mass vaccinations The five GOP senators who voted to call witnesses Graham says he'll meet with Trump to discuss GOP's future MORE also said Trump during a call indicated he is "ready to move on" and help Republicans in the 2022 midterms.  Read The Hill's complete coverage below.    Graham: Trump angry at some folks but ready to move on By...
    Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinSunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in on Trump impeachment trial; Biden administration eyes timeline for mass vaccinations Senators show signs of fatigue on third day of Trump trial No signs of demand for witnesses in Trump trial MORE (D-Ill.) said on Sunday that former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE’s acquittal in his second Senate impeachment was a foregone conclusion without Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump conviction vote exposes GOP divide Pelosi rules out censure after Trump acquittal Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made the call' MORE (R-Ky.) backing conviction. “We were never going to reach 67 votes in the Senate without Mitch McConnell voting guilty. So he went up on the floor afterwards,...
    NEW YORK -- The Republican Party still belongs to Donald Trump.After he incited a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last month, the GOP considered purging the norm-shattering former president. But in the end, only seven of 50 Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump in his historic second impeachment trial on Saturday.For Trump's loyalists, the acquittal offers a vindication of sorts and a fresh connection to the former president's fiery base. And for Trump's GOP antagonists, it marks another alarming sign that the party is lurching further in a dangerous direction with little desire to reconnect with the moderates, women and college-educated voters Trump alienated.Ultimately, the resolution of the impeachment trial brings into clear relief a divide in the GOP that party leaders, donors and voters will have to navigate as they try to regain control of Congress next year and aim to retake the White House in 2024.That tension...
    Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinPelosi rules out censure after Trump acquittal Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made the call' Liberals howl after Democrats cave on witnesses MORE (D-Md.), who served as the lead impeachment manager in former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE’s second impeachment trial, said Sunday that Democrats had “no regrets at all” despite Trump’s acquittal. NBC’s Chuck ToddCharles (Chuck) David ToddGOP senator compares Trump impeachment proceedings to Soviet 'show trial' Schiff knocks McCarthy: 'He has no values' Kinzinger launching PAC to challenge GOP's embrace of Trump MORE asked if, in hindsight, Raskin believed Democrats could have secured more Republican votes by adding a dereliction-of-duty article. “[W]e have no regrets at all. We left it totally out...
    (CNN)In the wake of the Senate's decision Saturday to acquit Donald Trump of a charge of incitement of the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol, the former President released a celebratory -- and, at times, cryptic -- statement.Trump's statement had two clear goals: 1) To dismiss even the notion that he would be chastened or changed by the fact that seven Republican senators voted to convict and remove him from office and, even among those who voted to acquit him, like Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, there was a widespread admission that he had behaved in ways that were potentially criminal.2) To make clear that he is not done with politics, and that those who crossed him on this vote might well feel the sting of his retribution in two years or four.On the first point, Trump sought to, somehow, connect this impeachment trial with his last...
    In a statement released Saturday evening, President Joe Biden addressed the U.S. Senate’s decision to acquit Donald Trump for the second time, The Hill reported. The upper chamber voted 57-43 to acquit the former commander-in-chief on a charge of incitement of insurrection against the U.S. government, with most Republicans voting not guilty. According to Biden, however, even some of those who voted to acquit Trump acknowledged that his rhetoric contributed to the January 6 riots. “While the final vote did not lead to a conviction, the substance of the charge is not in dispute,” Biden said. “Even those opposed to the conviction, like Senate Minority Leader McConnell, believe Donald Trump was guilty of a ‘disgraceful dereliction of duty’ and ‘practically and morally responsible for provoking’ the violence unleashed on the Capitol.” McConnell, as CNN reported, delivered a scathing speech slamming Trump for his role in the January 6 riots, but...
    Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., said former President Donald Trump's political career is over despite his acquittal in the Senate impeachment trial on Saturday. "He is done," Klobuchar told "Fox News Sunday." REPUBLICANS WHO VOTED TO CONVICT TRUMP FACE BACKLASH AT HOME "One, as Mitch McConnell points out, there's a lot of other investigations going on about this man," Klobuchar said. "Two, the American people have now seen clear out what he did. He violated his oath of office in what Liz Cheney called the greatest betrayal of a president's oath of office in history. And those memories and those police officers' screams will be forever etched in the memory of Americans." Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., gives open remarks before the Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs committee on nomination of Neera Tanden to become the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), during a hearing, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2021 on...
    Sen. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsSunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in on Trump impeachment trial; Biden administration eyes timeline for mass vaccinations Democrats blast Trump team videos: 'False equivalency'  LIVE COVERAGE: Trial ends for day as Senate moves to vote MORE (D-Del.) on Sunday blamed Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump conviction vote exposes GOP divide Pelosi rules out censure after Trump acquittal Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made the call' MORE (R-Ky.) for former President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden on Trump acquittal: 'Substance of the charge is not in dispute' North Carolina GOP condemns Burr for impeachment vote against Trump Toomey on Trump vote: 'His betrayal of the Constitution' required conviction MORE’s acquittal in his second Senate impeachment trial. Appearing on ABC’s “This Week,” Coons echoed the assessment of Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinPelosi rules out censure after Trump acquittal Raskin defends no witnesses deal: 'I made the call' Liberals...
    President Joe Biden confronted the acquittal of former President Donald Trump on Saturday by declaring that although Republican senators in the main did not vote against Trump, the “substance of the charge” that spawned the impeachment trial to his mind was “not in dispute.” As Breitbart news reported,  the Senate failed to clear the 67-vote barrier necessary to convict Trump of the charge he incited an insurrection on January 6, when Congress was certifying the 2020 presidential election. Seven Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump of inciting an insurrection, including Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-LA), Richard Burr (R-NC), Susan Collins (R-ME), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), Pat Toomey (R-PA), Ben Sasse (R-NE). Biden, who was at the Camp David presidential retreat when the decision came down, pointed to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConell (R-Ky.) who did not vote to convict Trump, as part of his statement in response. “While the final vote did...
    Washington (CNN)Del. Stacey Plaskett on Sunday defended the Democratic House managers' decision not to call witnesses in former President Donald Trump's Senate impeachment trial, saying a day after Trump's acquittal that they "needed more senators with spines" in order to convict him."I know that people are feeling a lot of angst and believe that maybe if we had (a witness) the senators would have done what we wanted, but, listen, we didn't need more witnesses, we needed more senators with spines," Plaskett, who represents the US Virgin Islands' at-large congressional district and served as one of nine impeachment managers, told CNN's Jake Tapper on "State of the Union." The Senate on Saturday acquitted Trump of the impeachment charge of inciting a deadly riot at the US Capitol on January 6 in a vote that included seven Republicans siding with the chamber's Democrats to say the former President was guilty. Trump's...
    WASHINGTON -- After the Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump for the second time, America is reminded of a very similar and simultaneously very different showdown in Washington: the impeachment of President Bill Clinton.The Republican-controlled House voted in October 1998 to begin impeachment proceedings against Clinton after months of controversy over his relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.That vote was triggered by two rounds of testimony given by Clinton earlier in the year. In January, he denied having a sexual relationship with Lewinsky; in August, under questioning from independent counsel Kenneth Starr before a federal grand jury, he testified that he engaged in an inappropriate relationship with Lewinsky.Watch the video in the media player for archival news coverage of Clinton's impeachment.EMBED More News Videos Clinton was impeached on Dec. 19, 1998, on the grounds of perjury to a grand jury and obstruction of justice. Clinton was impeached...
    Donald Trump was acquitted after a second trial before the US Senate, which this time tried for his role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. American press review. Por the second time acquitted. Former US President Donald Trump escaped a guilty verdict on Saturday after a historic trial before the US Senate, which tried him for his alleged role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. An acquittal which is, unsurprisingly, the front page of the media across the Atlantic. Senators were a majority – 57 out of 100 – to vote for a conviction of the billionaire. But it would have taken two-thirds of the upper house (67 votes) to reach a guilty verdict which could have been followed by a sentence of ineligibility. Which is “historic” according to the Washington Post. For the daily newspaper in the capital, “of course, Trump was not...
    His successor, Democrat Joe Biden, said that despite the acquittal, the merits of the accusation were “not in dispute”, and asked his fellow citizens to defend democracy, which remains “fragile”. Senators were a majority – 57 out of 100 – to vote for a conviction of the billionaire. But it would have taken two-thirds of the upper house (67 votes) to reach a guilty verdict which could have been followed by a sentence of ineligibility. The base of Republican elected officials has held, which shows the hold that Donald Trump retains on American politics. But the Republican Party is emerging weakened from a streak that began in November with the contesting of Joe Biden’s victory in the presidential election and which culminated with the events of the Capitol. “Our magnificent, historic and patriotic movement, Make America Great Again, has only just begun,” Mr. Trump responded in a statement, once...
    Donald Trump was acquitted after a second trial before the US Senate, which this time tried for his role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. American press review. Por the second time acquitted. Former US President Donald Trump escaped a guilty verdict on Saturday after a historic trial before the US Senate, which tried him for his alleged role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. An acquittal which is, unsurprisingly, the front page of the media across the Atlantic. Senators were a majority – 57 out of 100 – to vote for a conviction of the billionaire. But it would have taken two-thirds of the upper house (67 votes) to reach a guilty verdict which could have been followed by a sentence of ineligibility. Which is “historic” according to the Washington Post. For the daily newspaper in the capital, “of course, Trump was not...
    After Donald Trump’s acquittal, Joe Biden remarked that “democracy is fragile”. At the end of his second impeachment trial, Donald trump was acquitted by the Senate last Saturday. In a press release, Joe biden reacted to this acquittal of its predecessor by indicating that: “This sad chapter in our history reminded us that democracy is fragile.” The tenant of the White House also added: “That it (democracy) must always be defended. That we must always remain vigilant.” Joe biden also commented on theacquittal of the former republican president indicating that: “Even if the final vote did not result in a conviction, the merits of the accusation are not in dispute”, report Le Figaro.For his part, after the outcome of his impeachment trial, Donald trump spoke of the end of a witch hunt, he also pledged to continue to defend America’s greatness. > See our dossier on United States.
    The Senate has decided to acquit Donald Trump accused of having incited his supporters to invade the Capitol on January 6. Second acquittal The Senate acquitted, last Saturday, Donald trump accused ofincitement to insurgency voted against him by the House of Representatives.On January 6, Trumpists invaded Capitol Hill to challenge the election results, violence that left five people dead. Vote of seven Republican senators against Donald Trump Last Saturday, the Senators by 57 votes to 43 decided to declare the former president innocent three weeks after leaving the White House. > Dismissal of D. Trump: the trial is in accordance with the Constitution, according to the Senate During this second impeachment trial Donald trump, seven Republican senators voted against him against just one in the first trial. “End of a witch hunt” Former Republican President reacted to his acquittal by evoking the “end of a witch hunt”, in...
    “Even if the final vote did not result in a conviction, the merits of the accusation are not in dispute,” said the Democrat after the acquittal voted by the US Senate in the second impeachment trial of his predecessor republican. “This sad chapter in our history reminded us that democracy is fragile. That it must always be defended. That we must always remain vigilant,” Joe Biden said in a statement. For the second time acquitted. Former US President Donald Trump escaped a guilty verdict on Saturday after a historic trial before the US Senate, which tried him for his role in the January 6 violence on Capitol Hill. Senators were a majority – 57 out of 100 – to vote for a conviction of the billionaire. But it would have taken two-thirds of the upper house to reach a guilty verdict which could have been followed by a sentence...
    United States President Democrat Joe Biden has spoken about the acquittal of his Republican predecessor Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial. LPresident Joe Biden said on Saturday that despite Donald Trump’s acquittal at his impeachment trial, “the merits of the charge” were “not in dispute,” and that the Jan.6 attack on Capitol Hill showed that democracy was “fragile”. “We must always remain vigilant” “Even if the final vote did not result in a conviction, the merits of the accusation are not disputed,” said the Democrat after the acquittal voted by the US Senate during the second impeachment trial of his predecessor republican. “This sad chapter in our history reminded us that democracy is fragile. That it must always be defended. That we must always remain vigilant, ”Joe Biden said in a statement. For the second time acquitted. Former US President Donald Trump escaped a guilty...
    By STEVE PEOPLES, AP National Political Writer NEW YORK (AP) — The Republican Party still belongs to Donald Trump. After he incited a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last month, the GOP considered purging the norm-shattering former president. But in the end, only seven of 50 Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump in his historic second impeachment trial on Saturday. For Trump’s loyalists, the acquittal offers a vindication of sorts and a fresh connection to the former president's fiery base. And for Trump’s GOP antagonists, it marks another alarming sign that the party is lurching further in a dangerous direction with little desire to reconnect with the moderates, women and college-educated voters Trump alienated. Ultimately, the resolution of the impeachment trial brings into clear relief a divide in the GOP that party leaders, donors and voters will have to navigate as they try to regain control of Congress next...
            
    NEW YORK (AP) — The Republican Party still belongs to Donald Trump. After he incited a deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last month, the GOP considered purging the norm-shattering former president. But in the end, only seven of 50 Senate Republicans voted to convict Trump in his historic second impeachment trial on Saturday. For Trump’s loyalists, the acquittal offers a vindication of sorts and a fresh connection to the former president’s fiery base. And for Trump’s GOP antagonists, it marks another alarming sign that the party is lurching further in a dangerous direction with little desire to reconnect with the moderates, women and college-educated voters Trump alienated. Ultimately, the resolution of the impeachment trial brings into clear relief a divide in the GOP that party leaders, donors and voters will have to navigate as they try to regain control of Congress next year and aim to retake the...
    New York (CNN Business)The Senate acquitted former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial Saturday, and "Saturday Night Live" made sure to lampoon the day's proceedings using their own Tucker Carlson.Carlson, played by Alex Moffat, opened Saturday's episode of the NBC variety sketch show with a quick run down of fear mongering non sequiturs like "is AOC hiding in your house right now? Wouldn't put it past her" and "pronouns for dogs? C'mon. Everybody knows they're boys." He then immediately jumped into the impeachment news by inviting Sen. Lindsey Graham, played by Kate McKinnon, on his Fox News show. Phoebe Bridgers wants you to know women can smash guitars too "Thank you, Tucker. It's a great day for 30% of America," McKinnon as Graham said.McKinnon's Graham then explained that the trial is now over and the country can focus on real issues like locking up Hillary Clinton and freeing...
    House impeachment managers argued Saturday, as throughout former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial, that Congress is exempt from the Constitution. Lead manager Rep. Raskin (D-MD) said that because this was not a criminal trial, the legal requirements for “incitement” did not apply, the right to due process did not apply, and even the cherished First Amendment did not apply. In effect, Raskin argued, Congress was exempt from following constitutional principles. Last year, House Intelligence Committee Chair Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) made the same argument. Due process did not apply to the president in impeachment, he said, and therefore it did not matter that the president could not cross-examine witnesses, or call the so-called “whistleblower.” The House had clearly violated the president’s First, Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendment rights, but Schiff told the Senate that Trump should have been grateful for the few protections he had. That is not how Congress used...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Senate Democrats came up short of the 67 votes needed to convict former President Donald Trump for impeachment on Saturday. Now, Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey says that outcome could have serious repercussions down the line. In a historic vote, the Senate acquitted Trump in inciting the January 6 riots at the Capitol, with only 57 Senators voting “Guilty”. RELATED: Our Family Has Lost Everything: Worcester Court Officer Mourns Loss of 3 Family Members After Deadly House Fire Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell argued it’s unconstitutional to impeach a President who is no longer in office. But Markey now fears the acquittal will empower not only Trump, but his supporters who stormed the Capitol. “It’s a get out of jail free card the Republicans have given him,” Markey said. “And I think we’re now going to reap the whirlwinds from Donald Trump because he will feel there’s no...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Senate Democrats came up short of the 67 votes needed to convict former President Donald Trump for impeachment on Saturday. Now, Massachusetts Sen. Ed Markey says that outcome could have serious repercussions down the line. In a historic vote, the Senate acquitted Trump in inciting the January 6 riots at the Capitol, with only 57 Senators voting “Guilty”. RELATED: Our Family Has Lost Everything: Worcester Court Officer Mourns Loss of 3 Family Members After Deadly House Fire Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell argued it’s unconstitutional to impeach a President who is no longer in office. But Markey now fears the acquittal will empower not only Trump, but his supporters who stormed the Capitol. “It’s a get out of jail free card the Republicans have given him,” Markey said. “And I think we’re now going to reap the whirlwinds from Donald Trump because he will feel there’s no...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Joe Biden said on Saturday that the Senate's acquittal of former President Donald Trump for inciting an insurrection was a reminder that democracy was fragile, and every American had a duty to defend the truth. "This sad chapter in our history has reminded us that democracy is fragile," Biden said in a statement hours after the Senate failed to muster the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump. (Reporting by Andrea Shalal; Editing by William Mallard) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States, crime
    WATCH: Day 5 of Donald Trump’s Senate impeachment hearing WTOP’s coverage of the Capitol riot President Joe Biden weighed in late Saturday night on former President Donald Trump’s acquittal in his second impeachment trial, saying that democracy is “fragile” and “must always be defended.” “This sad chapter in our history has reminded us that democracy is fragile. That it must always be defended. That we must be ever vigilant. That violence and extremism has no place in America. And that each of us has a duty and responsibility as Americans, and especially as leaders, to defend the truth and to defeat the lies,” Biden said in a statement. The Senate acquitted Trump in his second impeachment trial Saturday, voting that the former President was not guilty of inciting the deadly January 6 riot at the US Capitol. The final vote — 57 guilty to 43 not guilty —...
    More from: Michael Goodwin No ‘unity’ in Bidens executive orders: Goodwin With acquittal a foregone conclusion, the real drama is what Trump does next: Goodwin New York Times ties itself in woke knots: Goodwin Take the GOP deal, Mr. Prez: Goodwin Biden brood already cashing in on Joes presidency: Goodwin And so the verdict is . . . Hallelujah. It’s over.  The acquittal of former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial is a fitting outcome to a case that should not have happened. Never before has a former president been impeached and put on trial, and it should never happen again.  This was a show trial, an attempt by Democrats to humiliate Trump after his election defeat and force Republicans to side with him or against him. While the president’s speech before the Capitol riot was at times too angry and bitter, there was nothing in it that could...
    President BidenJoe BidenGraham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Overnight Defense: Pentagon, Congress appoint panel members to rename Confederate bases | Military approves 20 more coronavirus vaccination teams Lawmakers give standing ovation for Officer Eugene Goodman MORE on late Saturday night issued a statement on the acquittal of former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE, in which he said that he was thinking about those who protected the Capitol on Jan. 6, adding that though Republican senators largely did not vote against Trump, the “substance of the charge” was not in dispute. The Senate voted 57-43 on Saturday to acquit Trump of the charge of incitement of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol building. At...
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    Drew Angerer/Getty Images President Joe Biden reacted to the news of former President Donald Trump’s acquittal at his second impeachment trial Saturday, calling it a “sad chapter in our history,” and urging Americans to commit to defending truth and defeating lies in order to “end this uncivil war.” Biden’s statement began with a mention of he and his wife, First Lady Jill Biden, paying their respects to Capitol Police Officer Brian Sicknick while he laid in honor in the Capitol rotunda. Sicknick died after sustaining injuries during the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. Biden praised the 57 Senators, “including a record 7 Republicans,” who voted to convict Trump “for inciting that deadly insurrection on our very democracy,” highlighting that the vote in both the Senate and the House had been bipartisan. “While the final vote did not lead to a conviction,” Biden continued, “the substance of the charge is...
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