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    The Christian Post asserts Saturday that the second impeachment of Donald Trump is a “hyper-partisan” affair driven by Nancy Pelosi’s personal animus toward the former president. “Chief Roberts will have nothing to do with this farce,” writes Dr. Jerry Newcombe in Saturday’s Christian Post essay. “Impeachment is a Constitutional provision to potentially remove a sitting president. But, of course, now Trump is a private citizen.” Citing Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY), Newcombe declares the second impeachment is an act by “hyper-partisan Democrats” who have a “deranged hatred” for the former president. What is happening in our country is the triumph of “factionalism,” Newcombe states, “a nightmare our first president warned about.” In an introduction to George Washington’s 1776 Farewell Address, the U. S. Senate Historical Office noted the first president “believed that the stability of the Republic was threatened by the forces of geographical sectionalism, political factionalism, and interference by foreign...
    The best argument for convicting former President Donald Trump for inciting the capitol violence on January 6th may have come from Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, mere minutes after he voted to acquit. Trump was acquitted for a historic second time in a closer than expected vote of 57 to 43 with seven Republicans joining the entire Democratic caucus, which fell short of the two-thirds majority necessary to convict. McConnell explained his “not guilty” vote on a very narrow constitutional procedural definition, but his explanation came after nearly ten minutes of brutal dragging Trump through the sharded glass of his rhetorically laying the responsibility of the deadly capitol insurgence at the feet of the former president. McConnell’s speech went on for roughly 20 minutes, but the first half was a brutal takedown of the actions of the former president. “January 6th was a disgrace. American citizens attacked their own...
    “Our magnificent, historic and patriotic movement, Make America Great Again, has only just begun,” Mr. Trump responded in a statement, once again posing as a victim of a “witch hunt”. “In the months to come, I will have a lot to share with you and look forward to continuing our incredible journey for America’s greatness,” he added, without elaborating on how he was considering his political future. Thanking all the senators “who proudly defended the Constitution”, he denounced an impeachment trial which was in his eyes only “a new phase of the biggest witch hunt in history”. “No president has ever been treated like this,” he said, repeating a phrase used regularly throughout his term. The former president never mentioned the 7 Republicans who voted for a guilty verdict. Fifty-seven senators voted for and 43 against. The two-thirds majority required for conviction has therefore not been reached.
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. Barely a month since the deadly Jan. 6 riot that stunned the world, the Senate convened for a rare Saturday session to deliver its verdict, voting while armed National Guard troops continued to stand their posts outside the iconic building. The quick trial, the nation’s first of a former president, showed how perilously close the invaders had come to destroying the nation’s deep tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power after Trump had refused to concede the election. Rallying outside the White House, he unleashed a mob of supporters to “fight like hell” for him at the Capitol just as...
    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Senate acquitted Donald Trump on Saturday in his second impeachment trial in a year, with fellow Republicans blocking conviction over the former president's role in the deadly assault by his supporters on the U.S. Capitol. The Senate vote of 57-43 fell short of the two-thirds majority needed to convict Trump on a charge of incitement of insurrection after a five-day trial in the same building ransacked by his followers on January 6, shortly after they heard him deliver a fiery speech. In the vote, seven of the 50 Senate Republicans joined the chamber's unified Democrats in favoring conviction. Trump left office on January 20, so impeachment could not be used to remove him from power. But Democrats had hoped to secure a conviction to hold him responsible for a siege that left a police officer and four other people dead and to set the stage for a...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven Republicans voted Saturday to convict former President Donald Trump in his Senate trial, easily the largest number of lawmakers to ever vote to find a president of their own party guilty at impeachment proceedings. While lawmakers voted 57-43 to find Trump guilty, the evenly divided Senate fell well short of the two-thirds majority required to convict an impeached president. But by joining all 50 Democrats who voted against Trump, the seven GOP senators created a clear majority against him and provided a bipartisan chorus of condemnation of the former president. Trump was acquitted of inciting an insurrection for riling up a crowd of his supporters before they attacked the U.S. Capitol last month. Voting to find Trump guilty were GOP Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben...
    Former President Donald Trump has issued a statement, immediately following his acquittal in the Senate impeachment trial over incitement of the January 6, 2021 assault on the United States capitol. “It is a sad commentary on our times that one political party in America is given a free pass to denigrate the rule of law, defame law enforcement, cheer mobs, excuse rioters, and transform justice into a tool of political vengeance, and persecute, blacklist, cancel, and suppress all people and viewpoints with whom or which they disagree,” the statement says. “I always have, and always will, be a champion for the unwavering rule of law, the heroes of law enforcement, and the right of Americans to peacefully and honorably debate the issue of hte day without malice and without hate.” “This has been yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country,” it continues. “No...
    Former President Donald Trump hinted at a comeback as he cheered on being acquitted, for a second time, in an impeachment trial before the U.S. Senate.   'Our historic, patriotic and beautiful movement to Make America Great Again has only just begun,' Trump said. 'In the months ahead I have much to share with you, and I look forward to continuing our incredible journey together to achieve American greatness for all of our people.' The former president sent out a statement within minutes of being acquitted Saturday by the Senate, in a vote that saw seven Republicans join with the Democrats, but 10 short of the total needed to convict Trump of inciting the January 6 insurrection.   Former President Donald Trump sent out a statement directly after the Senate voted Saturday to acquit, hinting at a political comeback   In his statement, Trump first thanked his 'dedicated lawyers,' as well as...
    Former President Donald Trump on Saturday thanked his lawyers and senators who voted against his impeachment conviction and foreshadowed his political future in a statement following the 57-43 Senate vote to acquit him of inciting an insurrection.  "I want to first thank my team of dedicated lawyers and others for their tireless work upholding justice and defending truth," Trump said. "My deepest thanks as well to all of the United States Senators and Members of Congress who stood proudly for the Constitution we all revere and for the sacred legal principles at the heart of our country." He added: "This has been yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country. No president has ever gone through anything like it, and it continues because our opponents cannot forget the almost 75 million people, the highest number ever for a sitting president, who voted for us just...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate voted 57-43 to acquitted former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial, meaning the Senate has not convicted the former president for inciting an insurrection.Though the majority voted "guilty," it takes a vote of two-thirds of those present (67 out of 100 if everyone is there) to convict.Seven Republicans -- Sen. Mitt Romney, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. Ben Sasse, Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Sen. Pat Toomey -- crossed party lines in voting to convict Trump alongside 50 Democrats.Although Trump is no longer in office, this means he can run for a second presidential term.Trump released a statement after the vote, which read, in part: "This has been yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country. No president has ever gone through anything like it, and it continues because our opponents cannot forget...
    Former Republican President Donald Trump was acquitted on Saturday of charges of “incitement to insurrection” in the disturbances on Capitol Hill in the impeachment trial in the Senate. Although 57 senators voted in favor of convicting the former president, the figure did not reach the two-thirds (67 votes) necessary to do so. Miami World / EFE Senators who voted against the former president include 50 Democrats and seven Republicans. The upper house thus acquitted the former Republican president for the second time in a trial of this type, despite the requests of the political prosecutors in the case, who considered that Trump was responsible for having encouraged the mob of supporters that assaulted Congress on the 6th. January, in an episode that left 5 people dead. The result of the impeachment had already become predictable in recent days, because by the requirement of two-thirds of favorable votes, Democrats needed at...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate voted 57-43 to acquitted former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial, meaning the Senate has not convicted the former president for inciting an insurrection.Though the majority voted "guilty," it takes a vote of two-thirds of those present (67 out of 100 if everyone is there) to convict.Seven Republicans -- Sen. Mitt Romney, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. Ben Sasse, Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Sen. Pat Toomey -- crossed party lines in voting to convict Trump alongside 50 Democrats.Although Trump is no longer in office, this means he can run for a second presidential term.Trump released a statement after the vote, which read, in part: "This has been yet another phase of the greatest witch hunt in the history of our Country. No president has ever gone through anything like it, and it continues because our opponents cannot forget...
    The Senate voted largely along party lines on Saturday to acquit former President Donald Trump of "incitement of insurrection," concluding a fast-paced trial defined by a series of dramatic and contentious moments up until the last remaining hours of the proceeding. In a 57-43 vote, the Senate failed to reach a two-thirds majority, or 67 senators, to convict Trump over his role in the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. Most Republicans, including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, maintained that the Senate didn't have the constitutional authority to try an ex-president who is now a private citizen. While the outcome of the trial was a mostly foregone conclusion – marked by some confusing and surprising moments – Seven Republicans senators broke with their party and joined all Democrats on conviction: Susan Collins of Maine, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Richard Burr of North Carolina, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt...
    (CNN)Seven Republican senators joined with Democrats in voting to convict and declare former President Donald Trump guilty at the conclusion of his second impeachment trial. Ultimately, there were not enough votes for conviction, meaning that Trump has been acquitted of inciting an insurrection at the US Capitol on January 6. The GOP defections nevertheless stand as a sharp rebuke of the former President.The Republicans who voted for conviction were: Richard Burr Bill Cassidy Susan Collins Mitt Romney Lisa Murkowski Pat Toomey Ben Sasse This story is breaking and will be updated.
    (CNN)Here's a look at the life of Donald Trump, the 45th president of the United States.PersonalBirth date: June 14, 1946 Birth place: New York, New YorkBirth name: Donald John TrumpRead MoreFather: Fred Trump, real estate developerMother: Mary (Macleod) TrumpMarriages: Melania (Knauss) Trump (January 22, 2005-present); Marla (Maples) Trump (December 1993-June 1999, divorced); Ivana (Zelnicek) Trump (1977-1990, divorced)Children: with Melania Trump: Barron, March 20, 2006; with Marla Maples: Tiffany, October 13, 1993; with Ivana Trump: Eric, 1984; Ivanka, October 30, 1981; Donald Jr., December 31, 1977Education: Attended Fordham University; University of Pennsylvania, Wharton School of Finance, B.S. in Economics, 1968Other FactsAs Trump evolved from real estate developer to reality television star, he turned his name into a brand. Licensed Trump products have included board games, steaks, cologne, vodka, furniture and menswear.He has portrayed himself in cameo appearances in movies and on television, including "Zoolander," "Sex and the City" and "Home Alone...
    Donald Trump's team completely freaked out when Democrats and five Republicans including Lindsey Graham voted to call other witnesses in his impeachment trial Saturday, according to a report. Insiders close to the former president were said to be 'floored' 'stunned, stupefied [and in a] total panic' as the Senate voted 55-45 to allow witnesses to be called in Trump's trial for 'inciting the insurrection' on the Capitol that left five dead. The trial took a dramatic turn Saturday when House Manager Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland spoke on the need for hearing from at least one witness - Herrera Beutler, a Republican from Washington state.  Rep. Kevin McCarthy told her about his phone call with Trump while the violent MAGA mob was rampaging through the Capitol.  Beutler said in a town hall this week and in an interview with CNN Friday that Trump told McCarthy: 'Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff WASHINGTON (KDKA) — Senator Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania voted to convict former President Donald Trump. The U.S. Senate began to vote around 3:30 Saturday afternoon. Fellow Pennsylvania Senator Bob Casey also voted to convict the former president of inciting the January 6 attack against the U.S. Capitol. The vote against former President Donald Trump was just finalized, and he has been acquitted. Stay with KDKA as we follow this developing story.
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Saturday acquitted Donald Trump of inciting the horrific attack on the U.S. Capitol, concluding a historic impeachment trial that exposed the fragility of America’s democratic traditions and left a divided nation to come to terms with the violence sparked by his defeated presidency. The vote was 57-43, short of the two-thirds needed for conviction. Seven Republicans broke for their party to find Trump guilty. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats wrapped up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a tumultuous morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have prolonged the trial and delayed a verdict on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. An unexpected morning vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw...
    (CBS NEWS) – The Senate voted 57-43 to acquit President Trump of inciting the January 6 riot in his second impeachment trial. While a majority — with seven Republicans joining the Democrats — voted to impeach him, Democrats failed to get the two-thirds majority needed to convict. Earlier Saturday, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced that a deal has been reached to skip witnesses in the impeachment trial of former President Trump, not long after a vote to call witnesses threw the Senate into chaos. A statement from Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler that led to the call for witnesses was read into the record rather than calling her to testify. The 55-45 vote for witnesses included four Republicans who could vote to convict Mr. Trump: Senators Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney and Ben Sasse. And a fifth senator’s position came as a surprise. Senator Lindsey Graham, a close Trump...
    Former President Trump was acquitted in an unprecedented second impeachment trial on the charge of inciting an insurrection for the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, making him the first and only president to impeached and acquitted twice in history. A majority of senators found Trump guilty on Saturday in a 57-43 vote, but the number fell short of the supermajority needed to convict the president. Had Trump been convicted, the Senate would have moved to bar the 45th president from holding federal office ever again. The seven GOP senators who joined with all Democrats in finding Trump guilty were: Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. The acquittal means that as of now Trump can leave the door open to another White House bid in 2024, though senators have hinted they may...
    Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.While campaigning in Iowa in early 2016, Donald Trump proclaimed, “I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody, and I wouldn’t lose any voters, okay. It’s, like, incredible.” Trump essentially did that in the last days of his presidency. He promoted a January 6 rally for what he called a “wild” day in Washington. After an incendiary speech from Trump at that event, the crowd that he had assembled—which was full of white supremacists, neo-Nazis, QAnoners, Christian insurrectionists, and other extremists—turned into a murderous mob that followed Trump’s instruction to march on the Capitol to “fight like hell” and “stop the steal.” There his marauders attacked the citadel of American democracy, killing one police officer and seriously...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate acquits former President Donald Trump of inciting riot at US Capitol, ending impeachment trial. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    US senators agreed on Saturday to omit witness testimony and to pursue the impeachment of former President Donald Trump, as planned. The last-minute agreement avoided a lengthy trial and established that closing arguments from both parties will be heard moments later. Moments earlier, the trial had fallen into confusion after lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could have extended the procedure and delayed the vote on whether the former president incited the deadly assault on the Capitol. Just a month after the five-dead assault, the final arguments of the historic trial against the former president were ready for when the senators met in an unusual session on Saturday, all under the supervision of the National Guard, which continues to guard the landmark building. Confusion about the next steps to take brought proceedings to an abrupt halt. Senators crowded the upper house as leaders spoke to employees...
    The Senate voted to acquit former President Donald Trump of the charge that he incited the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, ending a week-long attempt by Democrats to block the former president from ever seeking higher office again. In a 57-43 vote, seven Republicans voted to convict the president in an historic second impeachment trial. But it was short of the 17 GOP Senators who were needed to join all 50 Democrats in order to convict Trump, with a two-thirds majority as required by the Constitution. Republican Sens. Richard Burr of North Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska, and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania voted to convict Trump. The vote followed a five day impeachment trial featuring riveting video evidence and a last-minute fight over whether to call new witnesses. But Democrats ultimately decided...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate voted 57-43 to acquitted former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial, meaning the Senate has not convicted the former president for inciting an insurrection.Though the majority voted "guilty," it takes a vote of two-thirds of those present (67 out of 100 if everyone is there) to convict.Seven Republicans -- Sen. Mitt Romney, Sen. Bill Cassidy, Sen. Susan Collins, Sen. Ben Sasse, Sen. Richard Burr and Sen. Lisa Murkowski and Sen. Pat Toomey-- crossed party lines in voting to convict Trump alongside 50 Democrats.Although Trump is no longer in office, this means he can run for a second presidential term.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged...
    U.S. President Donald Trump gestures during a rally to contest the certification of the 2020 U.S. presidential election results by the U.S. Congress, in Washington, U.S, January 6, 2021.Jim Bourg | Reuters The Senate on Saturday acquitted former President Donald Trump on the charge of inciting insurrection for his role in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, which left five people dead including a U.S. Capitol police officer.   The decision came after House impeachment managers reversed course and dropped a call for witnesses that would have delayed the verdict. The acquittal marks the end of a five day impeachment trial. Nine House Democrats served as impeachment managers in the trial and argued that Trump had a direct responsibility for the riots, displaying new video and audio evidence during the attack inside the Capitol.  Trump's defense team denied that the former president incited the attack and argued that Trump's rhetoric was protected...
    Senate Republicans handed former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE his second impeachment acquittal on Saturday, clearing him of charges that he incited the mob that attacked the Capitol on Jan. 6. Senators voted 57-43 on whether to convict Trump of high crimes and misdemeanors for “willfully inciting violence against the Government of the United States.” Every Democrat voted to find him “guilty,” the question technically before the Senate, and they were joined by 7 GOP senators — falling short of the necessary 67 votes or two-thirds majority needed for conviction. The vote comes roughly five weeks after the Jan. 6 attack, when a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol in an effort to stop the counting of President BidenJoe BidenGraham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary...
    President Donald Trump was acquitted in his Senate impeachment trial Saturday as the vast majority of Republicans held together against a charge that he incited the Capitol riot of January 6. It was an outcome that was expected but nevertheless disappointed Democrats, who made Trump both the first U.S. president to be impeached twice and the first to be acquitted twice. There were a few surprises from within Republican ranks. Sen. Richard Burr, who is retiring and previously chaired the Senate Intelligence Committee during the Russia probe, voted 'guilty.' So did Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, who had appeared to waver and who voted earlier that the proceeding was constitutional.   Also voting 'guilty' were Republicans Mitt Romney, Lisa Murkowski and Ben Sasse.   Democratic House managers who brought the charge could at least claim that the former president suffered a bipartisan rebuke – with a majority voting to convict him on...
    WASHINGTON -- House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.An unexpected vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump's indifference to the violence.Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind them. Democrats, too, have a motive to move on since the Senate cannot...
    President Biden is spending the weekend at Camp David for the first time in his presidency as the Senate wraps up its second impeachment trial of his predecessor, former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE.  A White House official confirmed to reporters that Biden and his family were spending the weekend at the mountain retreat in western Maryland that has become a traditional getaway destination for U.S. presidents.  The official added that Biden was scheduled to meet with his national security advisers on Saturday.  Reuters reported that Biden arrived at the heavily-guarded compound operated by the U.S. Navy on Friday, and was joined by national security adviser Jake SullivanJake SullivanUS calls for Turkey to release jailed philanthropist Biden takes cautious tack...
    WASHINGTON -- House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.An unexpected vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump's indifference to the violence.Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind them. Democrats, too, have a motive to move on since the Senate cannot...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump was aware his vice president had been evacuated to a secure location as rioters stormed the US Capitol, according to a person who was with Trump on January 6.And while Trump never attempted to contact Vice President Mike Pence directly, infuriating Pence's team, he did express concern for Pence to advisers gathered in the dining room off the Oval Office over the course of the afternoon, said Gen. Keith Kellogg, who was among the aides surrounding Trump.Kellogg's account comes amid conflicting reports of what the former President knew about the danger his vice president and members of Congress were in on January 6 and when he knew it. After returning to the White House from his midday rally on the Ellipse, Trump and his aides had gathered around the flat-screen television in the presidential dining room as his supporters began storming the Capitol, according to Kellogg. Trump...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell told colleagues Saturday that he will vote to acquit Donald Trump in his impeachment trial, ending the suspense over what the chamber’s most influential Republican would decide and likely slamming the door on chances that the former president would be found guilty. The longest-serving GOP Senate leader in history made his views known in a letter to fellow Republican lawmakers, according to two sources familiar with McConnell’s thinking who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss his decision. Word of McConnell’s decision came minutes before the beginning of Saturday’s session of the Senate trial, which had been expected to be the final day of the proceedings. But lawmakers abruptly voted to open the door to calling witnesses to testify, leaving the trial’s duration uncertain. Trump is charged with inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot by his supporters at the Capitol as Congress...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a tumultuous morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. An unexpected morning vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump’s indifference to the violence. Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind...
    There are better things Congress should be focusing on than the impeachment of a president who has already left office, Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel said Saturday. "The constitutionality of this is so flawed. I think the president's attorneys did a great job yesterday, but the impeachment is used to remove somebody from office," McDaniels told "Fox & Friends." McDaniel appeared baffled at the impeachment against Trump. "The president's already out of office. So why are we doing this?" ANOTHER TRUMP IMPEACHMENT TWIST: SENATE SIDESTEPS WITNESSES DESPITE VOTE ALLOWING THEM In another wild plot twist, there won't be witnesses called in former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial after all -- even though the Senate voted Saturday morning to allow it. Lawyers for Trump and the House impeachment managers reached a surprise agreement Saturday afternoon to avoid extending the trial with witness testimony, agreeing instead to move to closing arguments. A vote on whether to acquit or convict...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has told fellow Republicans that he plans to vote to acquit Donald Trump on charges incitement of insurrection – a signal that the House-led effort to convict the former president will fail. McConnell made his position known on what could be the last day of the former president's impeachment trial. 'While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,' McConnell said in the letter.   Although he had denounced Trump's actions in an emotional Senate floor speech immediately after the Jan. 6 MAGA riot in the Capitol, McConnell also did not act to hasten the impeachment trial while Trump was still in office. Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (middle - on the Senate floor today) has told colleagues he will vote to acquit Trump He voted along with 44 other Republicans that the...
    Loading the player... As former President Donald Trump is in the midst of his second impeachment trial, more bad news is coming his way. A new poll has ranked him as the worst president in the nation’s history. Who was voted the best? Barack Obama. READ MORE: Majority of voters ready for Republican party to move on from Trump, CNN poll finds The Economist/YouGov Poll consisted of 1,500 surveyed adult participants and was conducted between Feb. 6 and Feb. 9. Each person was asked 110 questions concerning the country. Among them were the questions of who they thought was the best president in US history and who was the worst. Former President Barack Obama speaks during a drive-in campaign rally with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden at Belle Isle on October 31, 2020 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images) In terms of the best,...
    Marjorie Taylor Greene lashed out at fellow GOP Representative Jamie Herrera Beutler on Saturday for turning on the Republican Party, calling her 'the gift that keeps on giving to the Democrats.' Taylor Greene is specifically referencing Herrera revealing details this week of a January 6 phone conversation between House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and former president Doanld Trump. 'First voting to impeach innocent President Trump, then yapping to the press and throwing @GOPLeader under the bus, and now a tool as a witness for the Democrats running the circus trial,' Taylor Greene tweeted on Saturday. 'The Trump loyal 75 million are watching.' Only 10 Republican congressmen and women voted to impeach Trump last month – exactly one week after the Capitol attack. Taylor Greene, who famously was booted from her committee assignments earlier this month for pushing QAnon conspiracies, said the impeachment is a 'sham.' 'Another sham impeachment trial WITHOUT...
    WASHINGTON - Concluding a morning of surprising changes, the U.S. Senate reached an agreement to avoid witness testimony in the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump. Earlier, five Republican senators voted with all 50 Democrats to hear testimony from witnesses.  The vote was a somewhat surprising development, as the Senate was expected to hear closing arguments from each side, followed by a vote later Saturday to acquit or convict Trump, bringing an end to the trial that began Tuesday. The vote to call witnesses came after Congressman Jamie Raskin, the lead House impeachment manager, announced Saturday that he wanted to subpoena Republican Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state.  Beutler issued a statement late Friday that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told her Trump had expressed sympathy and admiration for the mob during a heated phone call between the two amid the unfolding attack on the Capitol. "When...
    House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., speaks during the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump in the U.S. Senate, Feb. 11, 2021. Senate Television via AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.After winning a call for witnesses on Saturday morning, Democrats agreed not to call any and instead enter a statement from Republican Congresswoman Jamie Herrera Beutler detailing how Trump was asked by Kevin McCarthy to call off the mob and refused to do so. In so doing, Democrats chose not to prolong the trial even though their party controls the Senate, paving the way for a Trump acquittal Saturday evening.   House managers said the evidence they had presented over the course of the week had proved sufficient. Lead House impeachment manager Jamie Raskin quoted GOP Congresswoman Liz...
    Washington Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler released a statement Friday night describing a Jan. 6 phone call between former President Donald Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. After rioters had breached the Capitol, McCarthy got in touch with Trump and pleaded with him to tell his supporters to leave, according to Herrera Beutler. In response, Trump falsely blamed Antifa for the violence, and after being refuted by McCarthy, allegedly said, “Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are.” The Washington congresswoman, one of 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump in January, added that she had previously shared these details among her colleagues, local Republican officials and in her local paper. “To the patriots who were standing next to the former president as these conversations were happening, or even to the former vice president: if you have something to add here, now...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats began wrapping up their impeachment case against Donald Trump on Saturday after a chaotic morning in which they gave up a last-minute plan for witness testimony that could have significantly prolonged the trial and delayed a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. An unexpected vote in favor of hearing witnesses threw the trial into confusion just as it was on the verge of concluding. But both sides ultimately reached a deal to instead enter into the record a statement from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say established Trump’s indifference to the violence. Republicans are anxious to get the trial over with and discussion of Trump and the Capitol invasion behind them....
    (CNN)Marc Short, former Vice President Mike Pence's chief of staff, has been contacted about providing information to House impeachment managers about threats to Pence during last month's Capitol riot, a source familiar with the matter tells CNN.Short has not responded, said the source, who added that managers are also seeking information from Chris Hodgson, Pence's former head of legislative affairs, whom House managers believe was also with Pence that day.House managers unexpectedly asked the Senate Saturday morning to allow them to bring forward witnesses in former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial, in which the threat posed to Pence during the riot has been a central focus. The Senate and trial lawyers instead agreed hours later to insert the statement of a House Republican into the trial record, moving the trial toward a final vote later Saturday. Trumps second impeachment trial: Day 5A former Pence staffer tells CNN that on January...
    Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceTrump lawyers say former president did not know Pence was in danger at the Capitol Key GOP senators question when Trump knew Capitol was breached The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump's lawyers begin oral arguments, hoping for a reset MORE has emerged as a key figure in former President Donald Trump's Senate impeachment trial, but those close to the former vice president say he has no intention of getting involved. Pence's name has been invoked repeatedly during the proceedings this week. The then-vice president was escorted out of the Senate chamber on Jan. 6 as pro-Trump rioters stormed the complex, and the timeline of events has left unanswered questions about when the former president knew Pence was in danger and what, if anything, he did to intervene. As the Senate mulls how to proceed, Pence has become something akin to what former national security adviser John BoltonJohn Bolton...
    The president of the U.S, Joe biden, has made his first trip outside the White House. The Democratic Leader has moved to Camp David to spend Valentine’s weekend. Biden will enjoy his first weekend off ever since he arrived at the White House at Camp David, where will take up the tradition that used to be common in American presidents, except for Trump, who always has preferred spend your days off playing golf in Florida. Donald Trump preferred to play golf The US president has traveled on Air Force One to travel the little more than 10 kilometers from the White House to Camp David, a military complex that is destined to be field residence of the presidents of the United States. It is considered a recreational area located in Frederick County (Maryland), outside of Washington DC. Those who know the place describe it as a residence...
    A longer trial could slow down Democratic President Joe Biden’s efforts to put the controversies surrounding his predecessor behind him and push his own legislative agenda on COVID-19 relief and economic revival. Much of this week’s trial has focused on how much Trump knew about the insurgents’ actions when they swept through Congress on January 6 seeking to prevent lawmakers from certifying the victory of Democrat Joe Biden in the November election. Herrera Beutler, one of 10 people from his party who voted last month in the House of Representatives in favor of Trump’s impeachment, related in a statement late Friday the details of a call between Trump and the top Republican of the House, Kevin McCarthy. “‘Well Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are,’” Beutler quoted Trump as saying. The representative said Trump had initially denied that his...
    Senate Democrats and Republicans cut a last-minute deal to avoid calling witnesses, agreeing to enter into the record a statement about House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy’s phone call with Donald Trump while the Capitol was under attack on Jan. 6. The deal averts what might have been an indefinite extension of the impeachment trial and a protracted fight over witnesses. The trial is now expected to wrap as early as Saturday evening. Instead of calling witnesses, lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin read a statement from Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler, a Washington Republican who disclosed her knowledge of the conversation between Trump and McCarthy, a California Republican. Beutler, in a statement Friday, said she has disclosed many times over the past month her knowledge of the McCarthy-Trump conversation. “When McCarthy finally reached the president on Jan. 6 and asked him to publicly and forcefully call off the riot, the...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate reached a deal on Saturday to skip witness testimony in the impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump. The agreement averts a prolonged trial and sets up closing arguments from both sides on Saturday. THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below. WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection. The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump’s indifference to the violence. Leaders were considering an arrangement...
    WASHINGTON -- No witnesses will be called to the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, ABC News has learned.The written testimony of Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler was admitted into evidence, and neither the Trump legal team nor the House Managers made any further motions for witnesses. The parties mutually came to the agreement to admit Herrera Beutler's statement and not request further witnesses.Closing arguments will begin shortly.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority...
    Watch live as the Senate conducts the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump.
    WASHINGTON -- No witnesses will be called to the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, ABC News has learned.The written testimony of Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler was admitted into evidence, and neither the Trump legal team nor the House Managers made any further motions for witnesses. The parties mutually came to the agreement to admit Herrera Beutler's statement and not request further witnesses.Closing arguemnts will begin shortly.This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority...
    House impeachment managers, former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE's legal team and top senators struck a deal on Saturday that will let the Senate bypass calling additional witnesses. The agreement comes after senators were caught flat-footed by a request from Rep. Jamie RaskinJamin (Jamie) Ben RaskinTrump lawyers center defense around attacks on Democrats Democrats dismiss claims they misrepresented evidence during impeachment trial Democrats warn of 'whataboutism' ahead of Trump defense MORE (D-Md.), the House impeachment managers, to depose Rep. Rep. Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerTrump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report Here are the GOP lawmakers censured by Republicans for impeaching Trump Upton becomes first member of Congress to vote...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump was thrown into confusion Saturday as lawmakers voted to consider hearing witnesses, a step that could significantly extend the proceedings and delay a vote on whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol insurrection.The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump's indifference to the violence.Leaders were considering an arrangement that would move the trial back toward a final vote, without live witnesses. If you want a delay, it will be a long one with many, many witnesses.— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) February 13, 2021The proceedings came to an abrupt halt less than an hour after getting underway, with senators taken aback by the unexpected development huddling on the floor of the chamber...
    More On: Trump impeachment trial Senate Democrats call for 11th-hour witnesses in Trump impeachment trial Mitch McConnell tells fellow GOP senators he will vote to acquit Trump Democrats delay Trump impeachment trial with 11th-hour call for witnesses Trump impeachment trial: Day 5 schedule, time and how to watch The sudden announcement by House impeachment managers that they want to subpoena Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler to testify in former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial potentially could open the floodgates for dozens of other witnesses. Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) said Friday that she was present for a call between House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) and former President Trump during the Capitol riot. It is not yet clear if she plans to fight the subpoena for her testimony and records. McCarthy has not yet commented on Herrera Beutler’s claims, which has led to calls for his own testimony. But there are many...
    New York : WASHINGTON – The Senate approved this Saturday to summon witnesses during the impeachment against the former president Donald trump for the assault on the Capitol on January 6, an unexpected move that could lengthen and change the course of this procedure. Of the 100 senators, 55 voted in favor of subpoenaing witnesses, all of them Democrats and joined by five Republicans: Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney, Ben Sasse, and Lindsey Graham, which initially took a position against it, but changed its vote at the last minute. The vote of Graham, close to Trump, could seek to benefit the defense of the former president, who has refused to subpoena witnesses. Lawyer for former president furious over calling witnesses Before the vote, the attorney for the former president, Michael van der Veen, responded furiously to the Democrats’ request to call witnesses and assured that, if the Senate...
    Five Republican senators voted Saturday to allow witnesses at the Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump after the reported emergence of damning testimony from a Democratic representative. The Senate voted 55-45 to approve witnesses. Republican Sens. Susan Collins, Lindsey Graham, Lisa Murkowski, Mitt Romney and Ben Sasse voted in favor. The trial had been expected to end Saturday but could now continue for weeks. Lead impeachment manager Democratic Maryland Rep. Jamie Raskin unleashed the surprise request by suggesting an eleventh-hour witness had come forward and related a story about Trump telling House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy to calm down about the Capitol riot of Jan. 6. (RELATED: ‘As Painful As Possible’: Trey Gowdy Says Democrats Don’t Expect To Win Impeachment, Just Shame GOP) WATCH: “Last night Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state issued a statement confirming that in the middle of the insurrection, when House Minority...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told President Donald Trump that he had heard gunfire outside the House chamber, when the two leaders talked during the insurrection - a conversation that is now at the center of the Senate impeachment trial.  ABC News' Jonathan Karl reported Saturday that McCarthy had made a specific reference to shots being fired as he encouraged Trump to call off the MAGA mob.    On Saturday morning, the lead impeachment manager, Rep. Jamie Raskin, made a surprise announcement that the Democrats wanted witnesses on the heels of CNN's blockbuster Friday night report that included new details about Trump refusing to rein in his supporters who were attacking the Capitol on January 6.  New details about a call between President Donald Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (pictured) triggered chaos Saturday morning when Democrats announced they wanted witnesses for the impeachment trial. ABC News reported that...
    Actress Gina Carano was fired from the cast of the popular Disney Plus Star Wars spinoff series The Mandalorian on Wednesday after sharing a social media post that likened the direction of society today to Nazi supporters during the Holocaust. Carano’s social media post in question went as follows: Jews were beaten in the streets, not by Nazi soldiers but by their neighbors… even by children. “Because history is edited, most people today don’t realize that to get to the point where Nazi soldiers could easily round up thousands of Jews, the government first made their own neighbors hate them simply for being Jews. How is that any different from hating someone for their political views?” Critics say Carano’s social media post downplays the experience of Jews during the Holocaust. But others have pointed out a stark double standard, given that a slew of prominent leftists — from Democratic lawmakers...
    Rep. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerNRCC finance chair: Republicans who voted for Trump impeachment will not be penalized Gaetz hits back at Kinzinger PAC targeting 'Trumpism' Kinzinger PAC to go on attack against 'Trumpism' MORE (R-Ill.) is calling for officials with knowledge of former President TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE’s involvement in inciting the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol to come forward with whatever information they may have.  "I think there's a lot of people that know things. I don't know who they are. They're sitting on information, now's the time to come forward," Kinzinger, one of Trump’s most vocal critics and one of the 10 House GOP lawmakers to vote in favor of impeachment, told ABC News...
    The Senate voted Saturday to allow witnesses to be called during former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial following a surprise request by Democratic House managers seeking to subpoena a GOP congresswoman for her testimony and notes. By a 55-45 margin, five Republicans joined all Democrats on a vote "to consider and debate under the impeachment rules any motion to subpoena witnesses and or documents." The Republicans supporting the vote included Susan Collins of Maine, Lisa Murkowksi of Alaska, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a loyal ally of the former president who changed his vote at the end. It was a stunning turn of events after Democrats signaled that they wouldn't press for witnesses and instead move straight to closing arguments and a final vote on whether to convict Trump for "incitement of insurrection." The accelerated trial was set to conclude on...
    Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownThe progressive way to slash child poverty LIVE COVERAGE: Trial ends for day as Senate moves to vote Ohio businessman Mike Gibbons steps down from super PAC as he weighs Senate bid MORE (D-Ohio) on Saturday chastised what he called "spineless" lawmakers who are unwilling to seriously weigh the allegations against Donald TrumpDonald TrumpCapitol Police issues no confidence vote in leaders Graham's post-election call with Georgia's Secretary of State will be investigated: report Trump told McCarthy that rioters 'more upset about the election than you are': report MORE due to their "abject fear" of the former president. Brown criticized Republican colleagues who he characterized as having approached Trump’s impeachment trial with a closed mind despite the "damage he's done to his country." “It's so clear this president abused his power. It's so clear he incited violence,” he said. “And my colleagues just refuse to see it because of...
    Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-Wash.) in 2018. Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.House Democratic impeachment manager Jamie Raskin won a motion on Saturday morning to subpoena witness testimony in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial after telling the Senate that Rep. Jamie Herrera Beutler, a Washington state Republican, had information and contemporaneous notes detailing a January 6 call between House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy and the former president. According to press reports and a statement released Friday by Herrera Beutler, the call grew heated after the president claimed his supporters weren’t responsible for the riot and failed to immediately respond to McCarthy’s request for help. .@RepRaskin requests the opportunity to subpoena Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler as a witness. Full #ImpeachmentTrial video here: https://t.co/t7BAmIvz8v pic.twitter.com/JNl9mjMvuG — CSPAN (@cspan) February 13, 2021 The Senate...
    Sources close to ex-President Donald Trump are in a panic over the last-minute addition of witnesses to the Senate impeachment trial, according to ABC News. On Saturday morning, House Impeachment Manager Rep. Jamie Raskin made a surprise request to call witnesses in the wake of bombshell reporting that confirmed the content of a call between McCarthy and Trump in which the then-president not only refused to call off the rioters, but sided with them over the GOP leader. That dramatic motion passed when five Republicans joined Democrats in voting to hear witnesses, which figures to prolong a trial that was expected to end today. According to reporting by ABC News, the twist has Trump’s circle in a panic because his lawyers were only expected to hang in there through Saturday. “Sources close to president Trump are floored by what just happened,” Cecilia Vega wrote on Twitter. “Stunned/Stupefied/Total panic over who...
    After the arguments on Friday of the lawyers of former president Donald Trump during the impeachment trial against him, the Senate is expected to meet again this Saturday, when it could vote to acquit or “convict” Trump. Miami World –Telemundo 51 Donald Trump’s lawyers for his second impeachment trial on Friday accused Democrats of waging a “hate” campaign against the former president, in a hasty defense of the former president’s actions and words prior to the Jan.6 invasion of the Capitol that precipitates the Senate towards a final vote on this historic process. The case is heading swiftly toward a vote, perhaps even Saturday, and possible exoneration in the Senate, where Democrats and Republicans have the same number of seats and where a two-thirds majority is needed for the ex-president to be found guilty. Trump’s attorneys made a condensed presentation that took less than three of the 16 hours they...
    Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Mitch McConnell refused to hold an impeachment trial while Donald Trump was in office. And on Saturday morning, he told his colleagues he would acquit Trump because the trial is unconstitutional since Trump is no longer in office. “While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,” McConnell wrote to Senate Republicans. (He joined 44 Senate Republicans earlier in the week in voting that the trial was unconstitutional.)   McConnell helped created the very timeline he’s now claims is forcing his hand. Of course, McConnell helped created the very timeline he’s now claims is forcing his hand. A week after Trump incited a violent insurrection at the US Capitol, Democratic leader Chuck...
    WASHINGTON - The U.S. Senate voted Saturday morning to subpoena witnesses in the impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump. Five Republican senators voted with all 50 Democrats to hear testimony from witnesses.  The vote was a somewhat surprising development, as the Senate was expected to hear closing arguments from each side, and possibly hold a vote later Saturday to acquit or convict Trump, bringing an end to the trial that began Tuesday.  The move to call witnesses means the trial will continue at least into next week. Congressman Jamie Raskin, the lead House impeachment manager, announced that he wanted to subpoena Republican Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state.   Beutler issued a statement Friday night that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy told her Trump had expressed sympathy and admiration for the mob during a heated phone call between the two amid the unfolding attack on the Capitol....
    (CNN)Lucky because if he gets acquitted again and avoids disqualification from future office in his second impeachment trial -- which is entirely possible, if not likely -- he will manage to avoid any sanction from the Senate despite having received lousy representation from his lawyers throughout the process. Elliot WilliamsTo be clear, 45 US senators -- far more than needed to sink a conviction -- were already on the record opposing the constitutionality of the trial even before it started. His lawyers very intelligently used only a handful of the 16 hours they had been allotted for their arguments in the case, as every word they uttered would have risked their stepping in it and alienating those senators on their side.Still, the very little time Trump's lawyers spent speaking didn't do their client any favor. The trouble started Tuesday with Trump's attorney Bruce Castor's opening arguments, a meandering mess that...
    Loading the player... Senators voted Saturday to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, potentially extending proceedings that just hours earlier had seemed to be speeding to a swift conclusion and up-or-down vote over whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol siege. The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump’s indifference to the violence. Read More: Trump and McCarthy got into profanity-laced screaming match during Capitol riots: report (Credit: Getty Images and McCarthy) The proceedings came to abrupt halt Saturday morning, with even senators seemingly confused about next steps. Senators were huddling on floor of the chamber as leaders spoke to the clerks at the dais. Impeachment trials are rare, especially for a president,...
    WASHINGTON -- Senators have voted to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump.The vote could potentially extend proceedings that had been expected to end with a vote on Saturday. If you want a delay, it will be a long one with many, many witnesses.— Lindsey Graham (@LindseyGrahamSC) February 13, 2021This is a breaking news update. A previous version of this report is below.A last-minute fight over calling witnesses threatened to slow the speedy conclusion of Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial Saturday as the Senate moved closer to a vote whether the former president incited the horrific attack at the Capitol.Heading into Saturday, senators appeared close to resolving the impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. But that process may be at least temporarily slowed by a...
    A majority of Republicans want former President Donald Trump to remain active in politics, a CNBC survey released Friday revealed. While the poll, taken February 2-7, prior to the formal start of Trump’s second Senate impeachment trial, showed that 54 percent of Americans want the former president “to remove himself from politics entirely,” Republicans do not feel the same way. Rather, nearly three-quarters of Republicans, 74 percent, want him to stay politically active. Opinions vary, however, concerning what that looks like. Forty-eight percent of Republicans, for example, want him to remain the head of the party, followed by 12 percent who want him to stay active but in a different capacity than leading the party. Eleven percent want Trump to start a party outside of the Republican Party. Republican National Party (RNC) chairwoman Ronna McDaniel has dismissed the rumors of Trump considering a third party launch. “I’ve talked to the...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER and MARY CLARE JALONICK WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators voted Saturday to consider hearing from witnesses in the impeachment trial of Donald Trump, potentially extending proceedings that just hours earlier had seemed to be speeding to a swift conclusion and up-or-down vote over whether the former president incited the deadly Capitol siege. The last-minute fight over witnesses followed Friday night revelations from a Republican House lawmaker about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump’s indifference to the violence. The proceedings came to abrupt halt Saturday morning, with even senators seemingly confused about next steps. Senators were huddling on floor of the chamber as leaders spoke to the clerks at the dais. Impeachment trials are rare, especially for a president, and the rules are negotiated for each one at the outset....
    The Senate impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump, which seemed destined for a Saturday afternoon conclusion, veered dramatically off script at the last minute — as Democrats are seeking to call a witness, and their request has been granted. By a vote of 55-45, the Senate voted to allow witnesses in the trial. Five Republicans joined the 50 Democrats — Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Mitt Romney (R-UT), and Ben Sasse (R-NE). Graham was a last-minute change, after initially voting nay. House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) sought to call Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (R-WA) via Zoom for her testimony — following her statement that House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) told her that former President Trump had sided with the mob during a phone call while the Capitol was under attack. Trump’s attorney, Michael van deer Veen, threatened that the defense would...
    The Democratic prosecutors in the second impeachment trial of former president Donald Trump opened day five’s proceedings by requesting the opportunity to subpoena Republican Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler over her recent and explosive revelations about a January 6 phone call between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. “Last night, Congresswoman Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington state issued a statement confirming that in the middle of the insurrection, when House minority leader Kevin McCarthy called the president to beg for help, President Trump responded, and I quote, ‘well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are,'” said lead House impeachment manager Rep. Jamie Raskin. “Needless to say this is an additional critical piece of corroborating evidence further confirming the charges before you as well as the president’s willful dereliction of duty and desertion of duty as commander in chief of the United States, his...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Saturday that he will vote to acquit former President Donald Trump in his impeachment trial. McConnell shared the news in a letter with Senate Republicans, telling them he does not believe there is enough evidence to impeach Trump. McConnell had not previously said how he would vote. “While a close call, I am persuaded that impeachments are a tool primarily of removal and we therefore lack jurisdiction,” McConnell wrote, Politico reported. “The Constitution makes it perfectly clear that Presidential criminal misconduct while in office can be prosecuted after the President has left office, which in my view alleviates the otherwise troubling ‘January exception’ argument raised by the House,” McConnell continued. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) walks through the Senate subway on his way to the fourth day of the Senates second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump at the U.S. Capitol on...
    The Senate voted 55-45 to summon witnesses in Donald Trump's impeachment trial, extending it indefinitely. House lead impeachment manager Jamie Raskin on Saturday called on senators to vote to subpoena a GOP witness and evidence in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. Raskin, a Maryland Democrat, said he wants the authority to subpoena Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler, a Washington Republican who disclosed a conversation between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that took place during the January 6 attack on the Capitol. “After the breach and invasion took place he was not working on the side of defending the Capitol,” Raskin said of Trump. “But rather, he was continuing to pursue his political goals, and the information that came out last night. This piece of evidence is relevant to that.” Beutler, in a statement Friday, said she has disclosed many times over the past month her knowledge of the...
    WASHINGTON -- A last-minute fight over calling witnesses threatened to slow the speedy conclusion of Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial Saturday as the Senate moved closer to a vote whether the former president incited the horrific attack at the Capitol.Heading into Saturday, senators appeared close to resolving the impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. But that process may be at least temporarily slowed by a debate over whether to hear from a House Republican who on Friday night offered new details about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump's indifference to the violence.Meanwhile, Republican leader Mitch McConnell made clear that he will vote to acquit Trump, according to a person familiar with his...
    Madison Summers February 13, 2021 0 Comments Former President Donald Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) spoke on Jan. 6, and new details are being revealed about it. Lawmakers who were briefed on the call by McCarthy were told that Trump said on Jan. 6, “Well, Kevin, I guess these people are more upset about the election than you are,” according to CNN. The network also reports that Trump was urged by the House minority leader to call off the protesters. During the call, the two got into a “shouting match,” CNN reports. A Republican familiar with the call recalled McCarthy telling Trump at the time, “Who the f**k do you think you are talking to?” as protesters broke windows to his office. An unnamed Republican lawmaker said, according to CNN, “He is not a blameless observer, he was rooting for them. On January 13, Kevin McCarthy...
    WASHINGTON -- A last-minute fight over calling witnesses threatened to slow the speedy conclusion of Donald Trump's historic impeachment trial Saturday as the Senate moved closer to a vote whether the former president incited the horrific attack at the Capitol.Heading into Saturday, senators appeared close to resolving the impeachment trial that laid bare the violence and danger to their own lives and the fragility of the nation's tradition of a peaceful transfer of presidential power. But that process may be at least temporarily slowed by a debate over whether to hear from a House Republican who on Friday night offered new details about a heated phone call on the day of the riot between Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy that Democrats say establishes Trump's indifference to the violence.Meanwhile, Republican leader Mitch McConnell made clear that he will vote to acquit Trump, according to a person familiar with his...