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    Mother Jones illustration; Timothy D. Easley/AP; Justice for Breonna For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is set to make history twice in less than a year. The first time came in November 2019, when he became the first Black person to be elected to statewide office in Kentucky as a stand-alone candidate. The second time is likely just around the corner, when he decides whether to prosecute the Louisville police officers who killed Breonna Taylor, a 26 year old medical worker who was shot during a no knock police raid. Taylor’s case landed on the attorney general’s desk just as his political career was taking off, one which is expected to reach high places as long as nothing gets in the way. Cameron, the first Republican elected attorney general of Kentucky in more than 70 years, was just 33...
    Sky Palma July 28, 2020 8:12PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on Raw Story   After unveiling their latest coronavirus aid package which slashes the federal benefit from $600 per week in addition to state unemployment to $200, Mitch McConnell and other top Republicans are finding themselves on the receiving end of backlash from members of their own party, Reuters reports. : While Democrats have rejected the package, saying that it falls short, some Republicans also offered their own criticisms, calling the plan too costly. "I'm not for borrowing another trillion dollars," GOP Senator Rand Paul told reporters. "I'm very concerned about the amount of money we're talking about," Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) said according to POLITICO. "What I don't want to do is bail out the states. That's wrong." : Also upsetting Republicans is a provision in the bill that allocates nearly $2 billion in funding for the construction of a...
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks to reporters after the weekly Senate Republican caucus policy luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. June 30, 2020.Jonathan Ernst | Reuters Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that he will not pass a coronavirus relief bill in the Senate which does not include liability protections.  "We're not negotiating over liability protection," he told CNBC as Congress looks to craft a pandemic aid agreement.  Senate Republicans released their coronavirus rescue proposal on Monday. It includes a cut to the enhanced $600 per week federal unemployment benefit, another round of direct payments to Americans, liability protections for businesses and doctors and more funding for Paycheck Protection Program small business loans.  McConnell spoke shortly before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., planned to meet with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows for the second straight day. The...
    Progressives are rejecting out of hand a proposal by Senate Republicans to temporarily slash the weekly federal boost to unemployment benefits from $600 to $200 until states develop the capacity to implement a more complex system that would pay laid-off workers 70% of what they earned prior to losing their jobs. Bloomberg reported Monday that the Senate GOP plan, which was approved by the Trump White House, will call for a two-month transition to the new unemployment system and provide states with an option to apply for a waiver for up to two additional months. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is expected to officially unveil the plan later Monday as part of the GOP’s coronavirus stimulus package. “Millions of Americans are out of work and millions of renters will soon face eviction,” said advocacy group Patriotic Millionaires. “Meanwhile, Trump and Senate Republicans want to cut unemployment benefits from $600 to $200 a week....
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday unveiled the Republican HEALS act to address the coronavirus pandemic — including another round of $1,200 stimulus checks. McConnell said the bill, expected to cost about $1 trillion, gives a liability shield to businesses and funds to schools. It caps at 70 percent of pre-pandemic pay a federal unemployment insurance supplement that lapsed last week. HEALS is an acronym for health, economic assistance, liability and schools, McConnell said. He dismissed a rival Democratic proposal as a “multi-trillion-dollar socialist manifesto.” The stimulus checks will this time include extra cash for people with adult dependents, McConnell said. Bill text released by the Senate Finance Committee indicates every dependent — adult or child — qualifies for a $500 payment. The legislation keeps a formula approved by Congress in March for means-testing stimulus checks. Adults earning up to $75,000 get the full $1,200, but adults earning...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, speaks to the press after a Republican policy lunch on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on July 21, 2020.Olivier Douliery | AFP | Getty Images Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell unveiled the Republican coronavirus relief plan on Monday as Congress scrambles to respond to a pandemic still wreaking havoc across the country.  The GOP outlined its plan after states stopped paying out the $600 per week enhanced federal unemployment benefit and a federal eviction moratorium expired. Senate GOP leaders want their proposal to serve as a starting point in talks with Democrats on a bill that could pass both chambers of Congress.  McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, said the legislation would include relief for jobless Americans, another direct payment to individuals of up $1,200, more Paycheck Protection Program small business loan funds and liability protections for doctors and businesses, among other provisions. While the Senate GOP...
    (CNN)GOP Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has made his priorities clear during the last several months of the Covid-19 crisis: Rush to confirm conservative judges, but take his sweet time when it comes to helping the millions of unemployed Americans about to lose federal unemployment benefits. And given how closely President Donald Trump and McConnell work together, this appears to be Trump's agenda as well. Dean ObeidallahThe federal government's $600 weekly unemployment payment --- a lifeline for more than 20 million Americans that was created as part of the massive aid package passed in March -- is slated to end July 31. In response to these benefits ending, McConnell calmly stated on Friday, "Hopefully in the next two to three weeks we'll be able to come together and pass something that we can send over to the House and down to the President for signature." "Hopefully," McConnell and his...
    CNN political commentator Bakari Sellers said that tributes to the late Georgia Democratic Rep. John Lewis from “individuals like” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp “ring hollow.” “For those individuals like the governor of Georgia, Brian Kemp, for Mitch McConnell, those words you’re saying about John Lewis, they ring hollow and they are empty,” Sellers said on “Reliable Sources” while remarking on the ongoing funeral procession for Lewis. “You cannot praise John Lewis in one hand and then be the leading cause of voter suppression and gutting the Voting Rights Act on the other hand.” WATCH: Tributes to the late Civil Rights icon, who passed away July 17 at the age of 80, rolled in from people on all sides of the political spectrum last week, including from Republicans like McConnell and Kemp. My statement on the passing of Congressman John Lewis: pic.twitter.com/sFuU8cqPc8 — Leader...
    Tributes have poured in commemorating the life and legacy of congressman and civil rights legend John Lewis after his death this past weekend. As the cable networks covered Lewis’ funeral procession live Sunday morning, CNN’s Bakari Sellers took a moment to criticize “hollow” words of tribute to Lewis from some notable Republicans. Sellers spoke with Brian Stelter about the significance of what Lewis and those others marchers gave on Bloody Sunday. He went on to say the following: “I don’t want people to believe that the Voting Rights Act and Civil Rights Act and Fair Housing Act were because of some legislative policy push. I don’t want them to believe it was because of some protest, per se. The reason that we were able to achieve those moments of legislative success is because of black blood that flowed through the streets, just like the black blood that flowed on…...
    Mitch McConnell said this week that the next coronavirus relief package would be revealed several days later than expected, a delay that comes as the Senate majority leader has faced increasing pressure — including protests taking place outside his own home in Washington, D.C.. As The Hill reported, Republican senators had expected to release details of the new proposal late this week after having worked with the White House, but it was pushed back as they “publicly struggling to get on the same page.” In announcing the delay, McConnell said that Republicans needed to give the Trump administration more time to work on the details, though they had more broad agreement on what would be included. “The administration has requested additional time to review the fine details, but we will be laying down this proposal early next week. We have an agreement in principle on the shape of this package,”...
    Savannah Rychcik July 24, 2020 0 Comments Former fighter pilot and Democrat Amy McGrath is preparing to take on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in November and is criticizing his handling of the coronavirus pandemic in the meantime. Co-host of ABC’s “The View” Joy Behar told McGrath Kentucky is in “very bad shape” and suggested McConnell laughed when he was asked if the proposal for the next coronavirus relief package would be ready by next week. She asked McGrath, “What’s so funny about that?” “It’s terrible and, you know, this is a pattern with Senator McConnell. He legislates by emergency,” McGrath said. She added, “If you think about his response to coronavirus from the very, very beginning it’s been pathetic.”Check out her comments below: .@AmyMcGrathKY criticizes Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s handling of the pandemic, saying that he “legislates by emergency”: “If you think about his response to coronavirus from...
    Jake Johnson July 24, 2020 9:43PM (UTC) This article originally appeared at Common Dreams. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Feel free to republish and share widely. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell laughed Tuesday when asked whether he expects Congress to pass coronavirus relief legislation by the end of next week, when enhanced unemployment benefits are set to expire for around 30 million Americans who were thrown out of work by the pandemic-induced economic crisis. "No," McConnell said after letting out what Politico reporter Jake Sherman, who posed the question, described as a "big laugh." : The $600-per-week increase in unemployment benefits provided under the CARES Act have served as both a lifeline for tens of millions of laid-off Americans and a significant cushion for the U.S. economy. For weeks, economists and lawmakers have warnedthat letting the benefits lapse, even for a short period of time, could have devastating effects on those...
    The House Ways and Means Committee shot back at Elon MuskElon Reeve MuskHillicon Valley: Feds warn hackers targeting critical infrastructure | Twitter exploring subscription service | Bill would give DHS cyber agency subpoena power Twitter says hackers likely had access to direct messages of 36 users in last week's attack Tesla turns a 4M profit in Q2, picks site near Austin for new B auto plant MORE on Friday after the billionaire criticized Congress' attempt to pass another coronavirus stimulus package.  "Another government stimulus package is not in the best interests of the people [in my opinion]," the Tesla CEO tweeted earlier in the day on Friday. In response, the Democratic-controlled committee tweeted a popular meme format that reads "Thanks Billionaire, your opinion is noted." https://t.co/vtg3iT4qLn pic.twitter.com/wQL2SwYedo— Ways & Means Committee (@WaysMeansCmte) July 24, 2020  A new stimulus package has been the main focus for Senate Republicans since the chamber returned...
    Tom Conway July 24, 2020 9:01AM (UTC) This article was produced by the Independent Media Institute. Ken Merkel started cutting expenses as soon as Packaging Corp. of America (PCA) furloughed him along with hundreds of other workers at its Jackson, Alabama, location amid the COVID-19 recession. Although the Army veteran and community volunteer slashed his car insurance, quit his satellite TV service and canceled a life insurance policy, he still needs $600 in weekly federal unemployment payments to make ends meet. : But this lifeline for Merkel and more than 30 million other unemployed workers is in jeopardy because Senate Republicans refuse to extend the benefits period and pass other legislation critically needed to battle the pandemic. Instead of safeguarding hard-working Americans who fell on hard times through no fault of their own, callous Majority Leader Mitch McConnell—the person who controls the Senate's agenda—put them squarely in harm's way. The 54-year-old Merkel,...
    Progressives are accusing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Donald Trump of pulling out all the stops to suppress the vote in November after new details of the Republican coronavirus stimulus plan revealed it does not propose a single dollar in election assistance funding. A summary (pdf) of the Republican plan obtained by the New York Times Thursday doesn’t mention election funding directly, but it does note that the GOP relief package will propose “no additional money for state/local governments.” The draft adds in a parenthetical, “Certainly expect to get some [funding] added in negotiations with the Dems.” “It is outrageous that this proposal contains not one penny to help states conduct safe elections during a global pandemic,” Sean Eldridge, founder and president of Stand Up America, said in a statement. “Policymakers should be doing everything they can to ensure voters are not forced to risk their health to cast their ballot.” “Instead,”...
    Igor Derysh July 23, 2020 10:20PM (UTC) Protesters marched to the Washington home of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., on Wednesday to call for an extension of federal pandemic unemployment benefits before they expire next week. The protesters were accompanied by a caravan of supporters, including a band on a trailer with a banner reading, "Mitch better have my money," which is a play on the Rihanna song "B*tch Better Have My Money." : "What has helped millions of people survive — just barely survive — has been this pandemic unemployment insurance of $600 a week," Ana Maria Archila, one of the protest organizers, told WJLA. "It is all of our money. They should be giving it to people to survive instead of giving it to corporations that don't need it." The protest was held as Republicans and the White House push to slash the benefit to less than $200 per...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Wednesday cited “The Satanic Verses” novelist Salman Rushdie in a condemnation of what he called “the grievance-industrial complex,” which he said was stifling free speech. The Kentucky Republican linked a “cycle on nonsense” against unpopular opinions and “eroded” rule of law following unrest in cities as threats to US freedom. “The author Salman Rushdie, who was himself threatened with death for controversial speech, once said this: ‘Two things form the bedrock of any open society — freedom of expression and the rule of law. If you don’t have those things, you don’t have a free country,'” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “Free expression and the rule of law. Exactly the two things we’ve seen eroded in recent months.” Rushdie this month joined an open letter from academics, including political leftists, against censorship of political debate. Rushdie faced Islamist death threats, including a fatwa...
    Yertle the Goddamn Fucking Disgrace (apologies to Dr. Seuss) doesn’t seem to think helping out unemployed workers and others screwed sideways by the coronavirus pandemic—and Donald Trump’s feckless, floundering response to it—is an urgent matter. At least not as urgent as, say, forcing barmy right-wing justices on us, our children, and/or our still-frozen embryo clones. Thursday, Politico’s Jake Sherman asked our reptilian overlord if a new coronavirus bill will pass by the end of the week, as some in the Trump administration have been promising: xI just asked @senatemajldr if he anticipates a coronavirus bill will pass by the end of next week — which is what @stevenmnuchin1 and @MarkMeadows are running around the Hill saying. MCCONNELL let out a big laugh and said: “No.”— Jake Sherman (@JakeSherman) July 21, 2020 Hmm, it’s not like anyone is depending on those extra dollars, is it? Did you enjoy your vacation, Mitch? Hardly anyone...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Wednesday cited “Satanic Verses” novelist Salman Rushdie in a condemnation of what he called “the grievance-industrial complex” he said was stifling free speech. The Kentucky Republican linked a “cycle on nonsense” against unpopular opinions and “eroded” rule of law following unrest in cities as threats to US freedom. “The author Salman Rushdie, who was himself threatened with death for controversial speech, once said this: ‘Two things form the bedrock of any open society — freedom of expression and the rule of law. If you don’t have those things, you don’t have a free country,’” McConnell said on the Senate floor. “Free expression and the rule of law. Exactly the two things we’ve seen eroded in recent months.” Rushdie this month joined an open letter from academics, including political leftists, against censorship of political debate. Rushdie faced Islamist death threats, including a fatwa by...
    REPUBLICANS remain divided on what to put in a new coronavirus stimulus package proposal, with Sen Ted Cruz giving a hard "hell no" to key components that have been raised thus far. Cruz's comments come after a full day of negotiations at Capital Hill, where many Republican lawmakers continued to disagree on how to move forward with the package, as many parts of the US continue to deal with massive spikes in COVID-19 cases. 4Sen Ted Cruz was not pleased with how talks went on Capitol Hill Tuesday Credit: AFP or licensors 4Sen McConnell is urging Republicans to come to an agreement that can serve as a starting point for negotiations with Democrats Credit: AFP or licensors The discussions, which reportedly didn't get very far, come just days before a $600 federal enhancement to unemployment checks is set to expire, and weeks before Congress is set to go...
    Ken Merkel started cutting expenses as soon as Packaging Corp. of America (PCA) furloughed him along with hundreds of other workers at its Jackson, Alabama, location amid the COVID-19 recession. Although the Army veteran and community volunteer slashed his car insurance, quit his satellite TV service and canceled a life insurance policy, he still needs $600 in weekly federal unemployment payments to make ends meet. But this lifeline for Merkel and more than 30 million other unemployed workers is in jeopardy because Senate Republicans refuse to extend the benefits period and pass other legislation critically needed to battle the pandemic. Instead of safeguarding hard-working Americans who fell on hard times through no fault of their own, callous Majority Leader Mitch McConnell—the person who controls the Senate’s agenda—put them squarely in harm’s way. The 54-year-old Merkel, for example, got his first job pumping gas when he was 12 and never stopped pushing himself....
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has his priorities for the next coronavirus relief bill: forcing kids back to school and protecting businesses—and schools—from liability if they end up killing people by reopening prematurely. Those are his priorities. His cadre of vulnerable Republicans seeking reelection this year have more pressing worries, like the tens if not hundreds of thousands of their constituents who are still unemployed and are about to lose the lifeline of expanded unemployment insurance (UI) benefits. “We have to—together—get through this by making sure that people are able to get back to work, that businesses are able to survive, that individuals know that they’re going to be okay,” endangered Republican Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado told The Washington Post. Good luck with that when you’ve got Grim Reaper Mitch McConnell and Trump leading the way. The freak-out impetus for Gardner and others is Trump’s move to keep coronavirus testing and tracing funds out of the next relief bill. The...
    These two are dooming Republican senators. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has his priorities for the next coronavirus relief bill: forcing kids back to school and protecting businesses—and schools—from liability if they end up killing people by reopening prematurely. Those are his priorities. His cadre of vulnerable Republicans seeking reelection this year have more pressing worries, like the tens if not hundreds of thousands of their constituents who are still unemployed and are about to lose the lifeline of expanded unemployment insurance (UI) benefits. "We have to—together—get through this by making sure that people are able to get back to work, that businesses are able to survive, that individuals know that they're going to be okay," endangered Republican Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado told The Washington Post. Good luck with that when you've got Grim Reaper Mitch McConnell and Trump leading the way. The freak-out impetus for Gardner and others is Trump's...
    President Donald Trump’s poll numbers are bad and getting worse, and Republicans are bracing for a possibly devastating loss in November’s election. The coronavirus pandemic has proven to be an anchor on the president’s political fortunes, and his failures may drag down Mitch McConnell’s Senate majority and increase the Democrats’ House majority, according to political scientist Daniel Drezner’s new column for the Washington Post. “Let’s assume this outcome for a second — what does it mean for the GOP?” wrote Drezner, a professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. “Politics is a coldblooded game, and even before Trump has been declared a political dead man walking, speculation is beginning about what comes after.” Some Republicans have already jumped ship and become #NeverTrumpers, but Drezner is doubtful that the GOP will engage in deep self-reflection about the conditions that led to that downfall. “Even if...
    Mitch McConnell was seen wearing a tan suit during a visit to the White House on Monday, leading many supporters of Barack Obama to note that it was a “scandal” for a number of conservative media figures when the former president did the same. The Kentucky senator was seen wearing the suit in a picture shared by Reuters reporter Steve Holland, showing McConnell sitting in the Oval Office as Donald Trump spoke. The tweet relayed an announcement from Trump that he was planning to start coronavirus briefings after a long pause, but many people instead took note of McConnell’s choice of attire and noted the hypocrisy of it. President Trump says he is bringing back the coronavirus briefings, first one Tuesday ay 5pm pic.twitter.com/btQ7qGQY3h — Steve Holland (@steveholland1) July 20, 2020 Obama wore a tan suit to a White House briefing in August 2014, leading to some sharp criticism...
    Republican leaders gathered Monday at the White House to stake out an opening position on new coronavirus stimulus talks, vowing to oppose more generous unemployment insurance payments and to pass liability protections for businesses. President Trump also repeated his desire to see a temporary payroll tax cut — an idea that didn’t gain traction in past pandemic negotiations. Negotiations on a new bill begin this week as lawmakers return to DC after a long Fourth of July vacation. A desired August vacation is pressing politicians to whip up a deal quickly. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), told reporters in the Oval Office that it’s essential for Congress to pass liability protections for companies during the pandemic, which some Democrats oppose. “We don’t need an epidemic of lawsuits,” McConnell said. House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Ky.) said it was important that unemployment benefits don’t give workers an incentive not to...
    The $600 weekly boost in unemployment benefits that more than 30 million laid-off Americans are relying on to endure the coronavirus-induced recession is set to expire in just 10 days without action from Congress—but Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell appears to be in no hurry to negotiate a solution. With the Senate currently on recess and not expected to return until July 20, McConnell told reporters Monday that he doesn’t plan to begin formal stimulus talks with his Democratic counterparts until next week at the earliest. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) reportedly told his caucus Tuesday that he has not heard from McConnell regarding Covid-19 negotiations. McConnell’s timeline for the talks would leave the Senate and House with less than a week to hash out and pass legislation before unemployment benefits begin reverting to their pre-pandemic rate, which in some states maxes out at less than $300 per week. “Mitch McConnell may already have doomed the tens...
    Rep. John Lewis Republicans responded to the death of civil rights hero and long-time member of Congress John Lewis with a variety of offensive moves. But while not one but two congressional Republicans memorialized Lewis with pictures of the late Rep. Elijah Cummings, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell took the cake.  McConnell memorialized Lewis’ “place among the giants of American history,” saying in a statement that “progress is not automatic. Our nation’s great history has only bent towards justice because great men like John Lewis took it upon themselves to help bend it.” All true. But, as Rolling Stone’s Jamil Smith quickly pointed out, McConnell “is sitting on legislation that would help restore the currently maimed Voting Rights Act, which John Lewis nearly died for as a young man. This ‘statement’ is a few niceties wrapped around a biography that anyone could find on the web.” Calls to pass a renewed Voting Rights Act—after...
    Republicans are expected to unveil their plan to steer the United States out of the coronavirus pandemic - a $1 trillion plan with funds for schools, small businesses and the jobless.  Mitch McConnell, the leader of the Senate, is likely to unveil his proposals in the coming days, ahead of the the House's scheduled break on July 31, and the Senate recess beginning August 7. Precise figures for the $1 trillion bill are still being decided, but the plan will have a heavy emphasis on education, Axios reported, giving schools increased funds to help prepare for fall re-openings.  Mitch McConnell, Republican leader, is to set out his $1 trillion proposal this week Unemployment benefits, currently an additional $600 a week, will be reduced to around $200 a week from July 31 - a significant drop, but better than the total cancellation many expected from Republican figures.  More than 3.7 million Americans...
    1 of 2U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) addresses the media at Deaconess Henderson Hospital in Henderson, Ky., Tuesday afternoon, July 14, 2020. McConnell was expressing his gratitude to healthcare workers for their sacrifices during the coronavirus pandemic as well as discussing the Economic Security Act and coronavirus aid. (Denny Simmons/Evansville Courier & Press via AP)1 of 2U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) addresses the media at Deaconess Henderson Hospital in Henderson, Ky., Tuesday afternoon, July 14, 2020. McConnell was expressing his gratitude to healthcare workers for their sacrifices during the coronavirus pandemic as well as discussing the Economic Security Act and coronavirus aid. (Denny Simmons/Evansville Courier & Press via AP) LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Democratic challenger Amy McGrath continued her blistering fundraising pace in the spring, outdistancing Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell for another quarter in their bruising, free-spending campaign in Kentucky. Despite her prodigious pace, McGrath ended the quarter...
    The $600 weekly boost in unemployment benefits that more than 30 million laid-off Americans are relying on to endure the coronavirus-induced recession is set to expire in just 10 days without action from Congress—but Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell appears to be in no hurry to negotiate a solution. With the Senate currently on recess and not expected to return until July 20, McConnell told reporters Monday that he doesn’t plan to begin formal stimulus talks with his Democratic counterparts until next week at the earliest. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) reportedly told his caucus Tuesday that he has not heard from McConnell regarding Covid-19 negotiations. McConnell’s timeline for the talks would leave the Senate and House with less than a week to hash out and pass legislation before unemployment benefits begin reverting to their pre-pandemic rate, which in some states maxes out at less than $300 per week. “Mitch McConnell may already have doomed the tens...
    Alex Thomas July 15, 2020 0 Comments Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is sharing that he has “total” confidence in Dr. Anthony Fauci, who has been under attack in recent weeks. During an appearance in Kentucky, McConnell was asked, “What is your level of confidence in Dr. Fauci at this point?” The Kentucky lawmaker responded simply, “Total.” Video via CBS affiliate @WLKY Q: "What's your level of confidence in Dr. Fauci at this point?" McConnell: "Total." pic.twitter.com/b5PdtYQoRO— Alan He (@alanhe) July 15, 2020Throughout the early stages of the coronavirus pandemic, Fauci was a regular face on television during the daily coronavirus task force briefings. But Trump and Fauci’s relationship has since grown if not colder, then certainly more distant. Fauci has said that he sometimes goes weeks without speaking to the president. This week, Trump amplified a tweet accusing Fauci and others of lying and the...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSara Gideon wins Democratic race to challenge Susan Collins Schumer pushes for elimination of SALT deduction cap in next coronavirus relief bill Dunford withdraws from consideration to chair coronavirus oversight panel MORE (R-Ky.) on Wednesday threw his support behind Anthony FauciAnthony FauciTrump adviser knocks Fauci: Wrong about 'everything' Overnight Health Care: Experimental COVID-19 vaccine shows immune response in early results Fauci: Young people have 'societal responsibility' to avoid COVID infection MORE, as the nation's top infectious disease expert has come under fire.   Asked during a stop in Kentucky what his level of confidence is in Fauci, McConnell replied: "Total."  Video via CBS affiliate @WLKY Q: "What's your level of confidence in Dr. Fauci at this point?" McConnell: "Total." pic.twitter.com/b5PdtYQoRO— Alan He (@alanhe) July 15, 2020McConnell's backing of Fauci comes as President TrumpDonald John TrumpIvanka Trump pitches Goya Foods products on Twitter Sessions defends...
    (CNN)Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has been crisscrossing Kentucky and delivering a sober analysis of the country's struggle with the coronavirus pandemic, imploring Americans to wear masks and warning in blunt terms that it's unclear how long the virus will continue to wreak havoc on the country."Well regretfully, my friends, it's not over," McConnell said Monday at a hospital in Mt. Vernon, Kentucky. "We're seeing a surge in Florida and Texas and Arizona and yes, here in Kentucky."It's a far different message than what's being espoused by President Donald Trump, who boasts about the country's response, demands the economy reopen, rarely urges Americans to wear a mask and dismisses the virus' surge across the Sun Belt and the rise in cases in 37 states."It's going to take a while to get a vaccine," McConnell said back home this week, less than a week after Trump promised a vaccine "very, very...
    WASHINGTON — A second round of stimulus checks will likely be included in the next coronavirus relief package, with the idea getting the green light from both Republicans and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, one Senate source told The Post. It’s unclear if the payments will match the $1,200 sum paid to most Americans as part of a $2 trillion economic bailout in March but the measure is one that has received rare bipartisan approval from Democrats and Republicans, as well as the Trump administration. However, expanded unemployment benefits could be scrapped as soon as the end of the month as the Trump administration and members of the Republican caucus push Americans to return to work and argue the $600-a-week bonus is a disincentive from doing so. Senators will return from the break next Monday to begin hammering out the details of a fourth congressional relief package as the pandemic...
    The AFL-CIO on Tuesday announced a new television and social media ad buy that calls on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell in talks with Mnuchin on next phase of coronavirus relief Pelosi: 'We shouldn't even be thinking' about reopening schools without federal aid The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K MORE (R-Ky.) to pass the House Democrats’ coronavirus relief package. The six-figure ad buy will run in Kentucky over the next two weeks. The labor group stresses that the House-passed Health and Economic Recovery Omnibus Emergency Solutions (HEROES) Act will provide long-overdue relief for working people.  “If Mitch McConnell doesn’t act...budget cuts will destroy the public services we need to recover from the coronavirus,” the ad said. “Tell Mitch McConnell Kentucky won’t be left behind — fund our essential public services now. Pass the HEROES...
    Getty The second round of stimulus checks would help immigrants. Will a second COVID-19 stimulus check plan happen? Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is “predicting” that a second COVID-19 stimulus “rescue package” will happen, and he said it “could well” include second direct stimulus check payments to some Americans. What form it will take, however, and whether people will get second stimulus checks, and in what amount, is all uncertain. According to Bloomberg, McConnell, a Republican, made the comments at a news conference in his home state of Kentucky. On July 13, the news site reported that McConnell said: “We shouldn’t lightly add more to the national debt, but I’m predicting that we will have one more rescue package, which we’ll begin to debate and discuss next week.” It’s likely that the GOP will put forward its own stimulus relief plan to counter the Democratic version, Bloomberg...
    Conservative firebrand Ann Coulter is so mad she’s backing a Democrat. Coulter was a “super-Trumper,” even penning a book titled “In Trump We Trust.” But she says she’s lost all faith in the president, calling him a “moron” and a “blithering idiot.” And now, she’s going after Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY), the GOP leader of the Senate. She wants McConnell to lose in November to Democratic opponent Amy McGrath, who recently won the party’s nomination after a tight race. “The lovely Amy McGrath is a Marine Corps veteran. The average donation to her campaign is $36. Mitch McConnell is a broken-down old man owed [sic] by cheap labor lobbyists,” she wrote on Twitter, referencing McConnell’s support for some pro-immigration measures. She added “#DefeatMcConnell.” The lovely Amy McGrath is a Marine Corps veteran. The average donation to her campaign is $36. Mitch McConnell is a broken-down old man owed by...
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Ann Coulter, who wrote the book In Trump We Trust, has been far more critical of the president recently, calling him a “moron” and a “blithering idiot” just two months ago. Now Coulter is calling for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to lose in November to Democratic opponent Amy McGrath, who recently won the nomination in a close race against Charles Booker. Coulter went off over a GOP group affiliated with McConnell taking out ads to stop Kris Kobach in the Kansas Senate primary: Sen. Mitch McConnell is spending millions of dollars on ads in Kansas to defeat the greatest living Republican — because the Chamber of Commerce is afraid Kris Kobach will cut off their supply of cheap foreign labor. — Ann Coulter (@AnnCoulter) July 10, 2020 She tweeted directly “PLEASE REPUBLICANS, VOTE AGAINST MCCONNELL AND NEVER GIVE HIM ANOTHER DIME” and attacked Kobach’s...
    I'll say this for McConnell, he's a helluva liberal motivator. If fundraising translates into votes, Mitch McConnell's Senate majority is toast. Okay, we all know that it doesn't work that way, but fundraising translates to enthusiasm and enthusiasm can definitely translate to votes. So, yes, Majority Leader McConnell's freak-out over the filibuster is well-founded, and will be intensified now that fundraising information for the second quarter has been released. As CBS News puts it, Democratic Senate candidates have "smashed" fundraising records, and boy does it seem like a lot of it is precisely because of Mitch McConnell. Prime example: the astonishing $17.4 million raked in from April through June by Amy McGrath, now the Democratic nominee to take on McConnell. Her average donation is $39, so that's a lot of donors. McGrath has spent $15 million so far on advertising on both the primary against Charles Booker, which tightened up considerably...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City With four months gone by since the first – and maybe the last – federal stimulus package during the COVID-19 crisis, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez warns that politics-as-usual in Mitch McConnell’s Senate threatens further relief from Washington. During a Thursday press conference, Ocasio-Cortez suggested that there should have been multiple stimulus bills at this point in the crisis bring local economies to their knees, but she believes Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is holding additional help up to coerce the Democrats into doing something they may not otherwise favor. “Right now we’re at the precipice, if we think things are getting hot right now in New York City in terms of crime, the $600 pandemic unemployment assistance is set to expire in about two weeks. That is a ticking time bomb,” Ocasio-Cortez...
    Savannah Rychcik July 9, 2020 0 Comments Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) revealed he is not so sure he will be heading off to Florida for the Republican National Convention taking place next month amid the coronavirus pandemic. McConnell was asked by a reporter on Thursday if he will be attending the convention despite the uptick in the number of coronavirus cases in states including Florida. “Well I think the convention, it’s a challenging situation and a number of my colleagues announced that they’re not going to attend, and we’ll have to wait and see how things look in late August to determine whether or not you can safely convene that many people,” McConnell said. (00:00:19)Watch his comments below: Senator Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader, talked today in Kentucky about his stance on whether he will attend the Republican convention in Jacksonville, Florida. ⁦@Enquirer⁩ pic.twitter.com/m9Onp0pvzQ— Chris Mayhew (@reportermayhew) July...
    Getty Steve Mnuchin On Thursday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said the Trump administration is working alongside the Senate to pass another stimulus relief package by the end of July, according to The Wall Street Journal. In an interview with CNBC, Mnuchin said, “I had a very productive call with [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell yesterday. As soon as the Senate gets back, we’re going to sit down on a bipartisan basis with the Republicans and the Democrats, and it will be our priority to make sure between the 20th and the end of the month that we pass the next legislation.” But will that legislation include another round of coronavirus relief checks? According to The Wall Street Journal, Mnuchin said the administration “supports a second round of economic impact payments to households.”Senate Majority Leader Mitch Mcconnell Expressed His Support for Another Round of ChecksOn Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell broke with the White House on Thursday and said the coronavirus pandemic may scuttle plans for the Republican National Convention. “We will have to wait and see how things look in late August to determine whether or not we can safely convene that many people,” McConnell said in Kentucky. The Republican leader did not directly answer where he’s willing to skip the Jacksonville, Fla., gathering along with a handful of other GOP senators. “I think the convention is a challenging situation and a number of my colleagues have announced that they are not going to attend,” he noted. McConnell, 78, is a polio survivor and early in the pandemic stoically carried on his duties on Capitol Hill, wading through tightly packed groups of colleagues and reporters. But as new infections surge, he’s been a leading Republican proponent of mask-wearing. President Trump and White House officials...
    Matthew Rozsa July 7, 2020 9:26PM (UTC) A recent remark by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell suggests that, if another round of individual stimulus checks are approved by Congress, they may only be issued to Americans who earn less than $40,000 per year. Speaking at a series of events in Louisville, McConnell struck an initial positive note for struggling Americans hard-hit by the economic shutdown. : "I can't comfortably predict we're going to come together and pass [a second bill] unanimously like we did a few months ago — the atmosphere is becoming a bit more political than it was in March," McConnell said at one point. "But I think we will do something again. I think the country needs one last boost." Yet McConnell also argued that "I think the people who've been hit the hardest are people who make about $40,000 a year or less," including those...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Eighty-eight years of debt pieties Ernst says Trump should sign defense policy bill with military base renaming provision MORE (R-Ky.) said on Monday that he believes there will be a fifth coronavirus relief bill, as the country sees an uptick in the number of cases. "We will be taking a look at — in the Senate in a couple of weeks — another package based on the conditions that we confront today," McConnell said in Louisville, Ky. McConnell added on the potential for a fifth coronavirus bill that "I believe there will be one." McConnell previously predicted in early April that there would be another coronavirus bill, but, since then, Republicans hit pause on talk of another relief package, saying that they wanted to see how the nearly $3 trillion already appropriated by Congress was...
    On a Sunday morning in 1971, Americans woke up to discover that all prices and wages in the nation had been frozen. If eggs were selling at 50 cents at the local grocery, they would stay at 50 cents right up until December. It didn’t matter if there were raises due the following week—no one was getting a raise until the end of the year. The same thing applied to service fees, or to costs like rent. For an extraordinary period of 90 days, both costs and incomes in the United States were nailed down. The economic lockdown came from an executive order signed by President Richard Nixon. Going into that August weekend, no one knew that presidents had the power to do what Nixon had just done. In a day, he didn’t just respond to concerns over inflation and unemployment by placing the nation in an economic lockdown, he also smashed...
    While Senate Republican are happy to double-down on their coronavirus relief small business loan program—the Paycheck Protection Program, which was ostensibly created to help keep people employed—they are scoffing at the idea that the people who haven’t been able to keep their jobs or find new ones deserve expanded unemployment benefits. (Disclosure: Kos Media received a Paycheck Protection Program loan.) The extra $600/week payments, which are expiring at the end of this month, are encouraging lazy people to stay home, Republicans—with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell out front—say. It apparently hasn’t occurred to them that people don’t relish the idea of reentering workplaces that might be teeming with the coronavirus. Or that a lot of business have closed and there aren’t jobs available for potentially millions of people. Or that the extra $600 a week is helping people make sure they meeting their rent and mortgages and have some money to spend and are...
    By BRUCE SCHREINER, Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Looking to flex his newfound influence among Kentucky Democrats after his Senate campaign fell just short, Charles Booker reached out Thursday to unite behind Amy McGrath's uphill fight to unseat Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Booker, a progressive who lost to McGrath by about 15,100 votes in primary election results released Tuesday, portrayed McConnell as “our common enemy" in the struggle for racial and economic justice issues that formed the foundation of his campaign. “We must beat him, so we can do the real work," Booker tweeted. Booker said he was reaching out to McGrath to “discuss how we can truly work together." There is “power in unity," he said, and called for a campaign of “not mere gestures, but truly locking arms to work for real change." McGrath welcomed the overture, praising his movement as a “fight for justice."...
    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Looking to flex his newfound influence among Kentucky Democrats after his Senate campaign fell just short, Charles Booker reached out Thursday to unite behind Amy McGrath’s uphill fight to unseat Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Booker, a progressive who lost to McGrath by about 15,100 votes in primary election results released Tuesday, portrayed McConnell as “our common enemy” in the struggle for racial and economic justice issues that formed the foundation of his campaign. “We must beat him, so we can do the real work,” Booker tweeted. Booker said he was reaching out to McGrath to “discuss how we can truly work together.” There is “power in unity,” he said, and called for a campaign of “not mere gestures, but truly locking arms to work for real change.” McGrath welcomed the overture, praising his movement as a “fight for justice.” She tweeted: “Your voice...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights Manchin draws line against repealing legislative filibuster Hillicon Valley: Facebook takes down 'boogaloo' network after pressure | Election security measure pulled from Senate bill | FCC officially designating Huawei, ZTE as threats MORE (R-Ky.) on Wednesday said that he hopes President TrumpDonald John TrumpUtah Lieutenant Gov. Cox leads Huntsman in close governor's race Trump tweets 'we all miss' Ailes after swiping at Fox Former NFL player Burgess Owens wins Utah GOP primary MORE does not veto a mammoth defense bill over a plan that requires the Pentagon to change the names of bases named after Confederate figures. “Well, I would hope the president really wouldn't veto the bill over this issue. ... I hope the president will reconsider vetoing the entire defense bill,” McConnell said during an interview with Fox News. McConnell's remarks are a...
    Mitch McConnell shuffling his way to the minority, ever a hypocritical asshole. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell might be the worst Republican of all, a cynical con-man who has made a mockery of the norms and customs that have guided our politics. As the Washington Post’s Dana Milbank once wrote, “No man has done more in recent years to undermine the functioning of U.S. government. His has been the epitome of unprincipled leadership, the triumph of tactics in service of short-term power.” Put that on his tombstone, please. Now, he’s at it again, but …. there’s something different going on. There’s a tone and rhetoric that says, “I won’t be majority leader next January.”   xMcConnell warns Democrats “ought to take a pause and think about whether they really think it’s a good idea for the country to put the one institution that guarantees that America stayed in the middle of...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocratic lawmakers call for expanding, enshrining LGBTQ rights Manchin draws line against repealing legislative filibuster Hillicon Valley: Facebook takes down 'boogaloo' network after pressure | Election security measure pulled from Senate bill | FCC officially designating Huawei, ZTE as threats MORE (R-Ky.) said on Wednesday that an infrastructure bill set to get a vote in the House will not be taken up in the Senate. "So naturally this nonsense is not going anywhere in the Senate. It will just join the list of absurd House proposals that were only drawn up to show fealty to the radical left," McConnell said from the Senate floor. The House is set to vote Wednesday on a $1.5 trillion green infrastructure plan, which would provide billions to repair the nation’s crumbling roads and bridges while setting aside funds for broadband, schools and hospitals. It would also require states...
    Mitch McConnell split with President Trump Tuesday on whether Russia should be allowed back into the G-7 — roundly rejecting the move, which has been repeatedly pitched by the commander in chief. “Absolutely not,” the Senate majority leader told reporters at the Capitol. Trump said last month that he wanted to expand the number of countries that take part in the next meeting, including Russia, which had been bounced by the Group of Eight after invading and annexing Crimea in 2014 and backing rebels in eastern Ukraine. The president spoke with Russian President Vladimir Putin this month, and according to a White House readout, they “discussed progress toward convening the G-7. McConnell (R-Ky.) had already said in 2018 that Russia should not be allowed back in after Trump floated allowing it back in, and many Democrats agreed. Trump called it “common sense” to invite Russia given that the country is...
    Former Marine combat pilot Amy McGrath has edged out a victory in the surprisingly-close Democratic Senate primary fight in Kentucky. McGrath narrowly beat state Rep. Charles Booker to the finish line thanks to a flood of absentee ballots caused by the coronavirus pandemic, which led to thousands of votes being mailed in prior Booker surging in the polls. Booker, a progressive who openly supports “Medicare-for-all,” rose to national prominence in the wake of the killing of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor, a black woman, in Louisville, Kentucky. Taylor was killed on March 13 during a botched police raid at her home, when officers used a no-knock warrant to enter the premises. Protesters have taken to the streets in Louisville demanding justice for her killing. Booker, a black man, became actively involved in the protests, which mirrored those taking place nationwide against police injustice. His involvement gained him the attention of some prominent...
    On Tuesday, the Associated Press called the June 23 Democratic primary for Kentucky’s U.S. Senate seat for Marine veteran Amy McGrath. With about 520,000 votes counted as of Tuesday afternoon, McGrath leads state Rep. Charles Booker 45-43 in the contest to take on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Though the primary took place a week ago, state election authorities advised that final tallies would be delayed due to a surge in mail-in votes, which made up most of the total and take longer to count. Booker, a vocal progressive who has been a highly visible presence at protests against police violence, picked up attention and support as the election drew closer. He performed well with the voters who cast their votes on primary day. But McGrath, whose massive financial advantage allowed her to blanket the airwaves, made up for it by performing well with mail-in ballots. However, serious obstacles loom. Kentucky has marched...
    Projections indicate that former Marine fighter pilot Amy McGrath has won the Kentucky Democratic Senate Primary. The primary has been a source of intrigue among Democrats since McGrath (a moderate and a favorite of the national party) was locked in a close race against the more-progressive state representative, Charles Booker. CNN’s election coverage shows that McGrath edged out Booker by approximately 7,000 votes, and defeated him with 45 percent of the primary vote against his 43 percent. The news means that McGrath will advance in her effort to unseat Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in the fall. Watch above, via CNN. Have a tip we should know? [email protected]
    The Democratic Party establishment’s choice to take on Sen. Mitch McConnell in Kentucky has won a narrow primary victory, though the bruising contest may have further lessened her chances of ousting the GOP Senate Majority Leader in November.  Amy McGrath, the 2018 U.S. House candidate backed by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, defeated the upstart campaign of Charles Booker in Kentucky on Tuesday after additional mail-in ballots were counted. McGrath now enters the general election matchup with McConnell not on the strength of a primary romp but flagging after an unexpectedly competitive fight with a rival who galvanized progressives in Kentucky and nationally.  McGrath, who entered the race in 2019, had a big head start over Booker, a state legislator who began his campaign in January. She has raised a staggering $41 million from a liberal base that viewed her as their best shot to get rid of McConnell.  But...
    Lexington Herald-Leader/ZUMA For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.After a long primary season redefined by a pandemic and police brutality, Amy McGrath defeated her progressive challenger, Charles Booker, in the US Senate Democratic primary in Kentucky. McGrath will take on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in November. McGrath entered the race in July as the clear frontrunner, running at the behest of Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.), who’d been recruiting the former Marine fighter pilot since her failed attempt to unseat a Republican House member in 2018. With an early endorsement from the campaign arm of the Senate Democrats and frequent advertisements on MSNBC—an easy play for the pocketbooks of liberals nationwide eager to dethrone McConnell—McGrath had amassed $41 million by June 1, even as she slow-walked her support for impeaching President Trump. She even outraised the ever deep-pocketed McConnell in several...
    (CNN)Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell argued there should be no stigma about wearing a face mask amid the coronavirus pandemic, as President Donald Trump continues to be resistant to wearing one in public."We must have no stigma, none, about wearing masks when we leave our homes and come near other people. Wearing simple face coverings is not about protecting ourselves, it is about protecting everyone we encounter," McConnell said on the Senate floor Monday. McConnell's comments come as the US has reported more than 2.6 million cases of the virus and at least 129,544 deaths, and as of Tuesday, 36 states have showed an upward trend in average new daily cases over the last seven days, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. "The more we hate the pain and suffering that accompanied the strict stay-home guidelines a few months ago, the happier we should be to take responsible small...
    Reuters June 30, 2020 0 Comments Kentucky voters will learn on Tuesday which Democrat will challenge Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in November: Black progressive Charles Booker, or establishment favorite Amy McGrath. Preliminary results from the June 23 primary showed a too-close-to-call contest, and election officials had to wait until Saturday to receive all ballots cast by mail due to the coronavirus. State officials said they would not release the complete results until Tuesday evening. McGrath, a former combat pilot who was endorsed by Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and raised $41 million in campaign funds, was long thought of as the frontrunner. A moderate, she stressed in ads that she was the “only candidate who can win” against McConnell. But in recent weeks Booker, who vowed to unite Kentuckians of all races “from the hood to the holler,” saw his prospects rise as protests against police brutality...
    By Susan Cornwell (Reuters) - Kentucky voters will learn on Tuesday which Democrat will challenge Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in November: Black progressive Charles Booker, or establishment favorite Amy McGrath. Preliminary results from the June 23 primary showed a too-close-to-call contest, and election officials had to wait until Saturday to receive all ballots cast by mail due to the coronavirus. State officials said they would not release the complete results until Tuesday evening. McGrath, a former combat pilot who was endorsed by Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer and raised $41 million in campaign funds, was long thought of as the frontrunner. A moderate, she stressed in ads that she was the "only candidate who can win" against McConnell. But in recent weeks Booker, who vowed to unite Kentuckians of all races "from the hood to the holler," saw his prospects rise as protests against police brutality spread nationwide,...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday denounced the “stigma” perpetrated by some about wearing masks as US coronavirus cases surge. The Republican leader weighed in as partisan divisions persist in Washington over whether or not to wear masks  — and as new US infections hit a record high on Friday, driven by spikes in California, Arizona, Texas and Florida. “We must have no stigma, none, about wearing masks when we leave our homes and come near other people,” McConnell (R-Ky.) tweeted on Monday. “Wearing simple face coverings is not about protecting ourselves, it is about protecting everyone we encounter.” On Friday, the third-ranking House Republican, Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, tweeted a photo of her father, former Vice President Dick Cheney, wearing a mask with the hashtag  #realmenwearmasks. On Sunday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said a nationwide mandate was “long overdue.” In Nashville, authorities mandated that masks...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday denounced the “stigma” perpetrated by some about wearing masks as US coronavirus cases surge. The Republican leader weighed in as partisan divisions persist in Washington over whether or not to wear masks  — and as new US infections hit a record high on Friday, driven by spikes in California, Arizona, Texas and Florida. “We must have no stigma, none, about wearing masks when we leave our homes and come near other people,” McConnell (R-Ky.) tweeted on Monday. “Wearing simple face coverings is not about protecting ourselves, it is about protecting everyone we encounter.” On Friday, the third-ranking House Republican, Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, tweeted a photo of her father, former Vice President Dick Cheney, wearing a mask with the hashtag  #realmenwearmasks. On Sunday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) said a nationwide mandate was “long overdue.” In Nashville, authorities mandated that masks be...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Friday slammed Minority Leader Chuck Schumer as a “total hypocrite” for preventing a vote on a Republican police reform bill. Schumer (D-NY) led Democrats on Wednesday to block the bill responding to the killing of George Floyd by Minnesota police. Schumer said it didn’t go far enough and House Democrats passed a broader bill on Thursday. McConnell alleged in a Fox News Radio interview that Schumer had an eye on the election and tried to “airbrush” bill author Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC) out of the debate. Scott is one of three black senators, the other two being Democrats. “It was an inconvenient truth for Chuck Schumer that Tim Scott was the author of the bill,” McConnell (R-Ky.) said. “And so he tried to just sort of airbrush him out of it. He referred to it several times as the McConnell bill. It was the...
    Charles Booker moved into the lead in Kentucky’s Democratic Senate primary, where the winner will take on Mitch McConnell and a major part of the party’s hopes on flipping the Senate. As WDRB reported, Booker had been trailing Amy McGrath for much of the early vote counting but moved into the lead with close to 80 percent of precincts reporting. Booker held an edge of close to 2,500 votes, thanks in large part to favorable margins among Louisville voters. Booker had earned a court victory on voting day, earning an injunction to keep polling places open as long lines of voters waited to cast their ballots. He took to social media throughout the day, encouraging voters to stay in line until they could vote. As the report noted, Democrats in Jefferson County picked Booker by a roughly five-to-one margin, though that total does not yet include the absentee ballots mailed...
    House Democrats continue to demand Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell stop blocking a vote on legislation that could put more than 2 million immigrants onto a path to legalization and citizenship. While legislators made a similar demand earlier this year following the one year anniversary of the House of Representative’s passage of the American Dream and Promise Act, the renewed call comes following a historic victory for immigrants at the Supreme Court last week. “Following the Supreme Court’s landmark decision rejecting President Trump’s repeal of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), the Senate has a responsibility to consider legislation to protect the young immigrants who are eligible for DACA,” more than 100 House Democrats told McConnell in a new letter this week. “As Majority Leader, you can immediately schedule a vote in the Senate for the American Dream and Promise Act.” “With Republicans in the majority, the United States Senate has failed to...
    Actor Jim Carrey warned Senator Mitch McConnell that his “senatorial infestation” will end in November this year, hours before he sailed through the Republican primary in his home state of Kentucky. “It’s comin’ Mitch! Soon all greedy garden pests and political invertebrates will be mowed down,” Jim Carrey wrote in a tweet, accompanied by a gruesome painting of a slug-like McConnell in front of an oncoming lawnmower. “Your Senatorial infestation ends in 2020.” It’s comin’ Mitch! Soon all greedy garden pests and political invertebrates will be mowed down. Your Senatorial infestation ends in 2020. pic.twitter.com/WfrZluFFag — Jim Carrey (@JimCarrey) June 23, 2020 The Senate Majority Leader easily won the Republican primary on Tuesday, although he will of course face a challenge from a Democratic opponent who has not yet been confirmed. Over the course of the campaign, McConnell has focused his efforts on attacking Amy McGrath, a retired Marine combat pilot considered the...
    The Senate will vote Wednesday morning on whether it will move forward with negotiating the Republicans' police reform bill, but Democrats have already denounced the legislation as 'threadbare' and are prepared to block it. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi claimed Tuesday that if Democrats allowed the current version of the bill to pass in the Senate, it would be like allowing Republicans to 'get away with murder.' 'For something to happen, they're going to have to face the realities of police brutalities, the realities of the need for justice in policing, and the recognition that there's many good people in law enforcement, but not all. And that we have to address those concerns,' Pelosi told CBS News Radio correspondent Steve Futterman. 'So, when they admit that, and have some suggestions that are worthy of consideration – but so far they were trying to get away with murder, actually – the murder...
    Amy McGrath address supporters after her loss during her Election Night Event at the EKU Center for the Arts on November 6, 2018 in Richmond, Kentucky.Jason Davis | Getty Images The Kentucky primary race between Democratic candidates to decide who takes on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in November is too close to call, NBC News projected. Amy McGrath, a retired Marine lieutenant colonel, had a slight edge in a tougher-than-expected challenge from state Rep. Charles Booker. With less than 10 percent of the vote at 11:30 p.m. ET, McGrath led Booker by slightly over 2,000 votes. Those votes include only ones cast at the polls Tuesday; none of the mail-in ballots have been counted yet. Democratic enthusiasm for McGrath was high when she entered the race last year, and she raised $2.5 million in her first 24 hours. The enthusiasm quickly cooled when she said in an interview with The...
    On Tuesday, a leftist agitator announced the time and date of a planned destruction of the Emancipation Memorial in Washington, DC, while being cheered on by political allies. “We are going to show up and wake these rich white people up,” shouted the aspiring vandal through a bullhorn while wearing a mask lowered to his chin. The Emancipation Memorial is a bronze statue depicting Abraham Lincoln freeing a shackled black slave. The left-winger promised, “Thursday at 7 p.m., we tearing this motherfucker down!” WATCH: “Thursday at 7 PM, we tearing this motherfucker down!” (loud cheering) pic.twitter.com/hLTqlhocZR — Richie
    Kentucky Democratic Senate candidate Charles Booker, a liberal, has the momentum against centrist Amy McGrath in their primary for the right to take on Republican incumbent Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in the ruby red state this November. McGrath, 45, is a former Marine fighter pilot who became a Democratic establishment darling after her relatively close but failed attempt to oust central Kentucky Republican Rep. Andy Barr from office in their 2018 House race. And she was the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee's candidate of choice, despite several high-profile, more liberal party figures rallying behind her rival. McGrath trounced Booker, 35, in polling and fundraising for much of their primary before his bid received an injection of momentum thanks to endorsements from Sens. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, as well as New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. They all touted his support of sweeping reforms, such as the...
    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has positioned himself as President Donald Trump’s most crucial congressional ally, easily won his party’s nomination Tuesday night in Kentucky in his bid for a seventh term. McConnell, who has worked closely with Trump on cutting taxes and putting conservatives on the federal bench, faced only token opposition from a group of Republican challengers in the Bluegrass State’s primary. In an unprecedented move, the state allowed widespread absentee mail-in voting because of the coronavirus pandemic. It might be days before McConnell knows who his Democratic opponent will be in the fall. McConnell has spent months, and considerable campaign cash, in attacking Amy McGrath, a retired Marine combat pilot seen as the front-runner for most of the Democratic primary. But freshman state lawmaker Charles Booker appeared to seize the momentum in the final weeks of the primary, boosted by a...
    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who has positioned himself as President Donald Trump’s most crucial congressional ally, easily won his party’s nomination Tuesday night in Kentucky in his bid for a seventh term. McConnell, who has worked closely with Trump on cutting taxes and putting conservatives on the federal bench, faced only token opposition from a group of Republican challengers in the Bluegrass State’s primary. In an unprecedented move, the state allowed widespread absentee mail-in voting because of the coronavirus pandemic. It might be days before McConnell knows who his Democratic opponent will be in the fall. McConnell has spent months, and considerable campaign cash, in attacking Amy McGrath, a retired Marine combat pilot seen as the front-runner for most of the Democratic primary. But freshman state lawmaker Charles Booker appeared to seize the momentum in the final weeks of the primary, boosted by a...
    (CNN)Democratic Senate candidate Amy McGrath is a former Marine fighter pilot and a fundraising phenomenon. But she enters primary day with an unexpected challenge for the party's nomination.Long viewed as a shoo-in to progress to a showdown with Republican Senate Majority Mitch McConnell in November, McGrath has increasingly turned her attention to progressive primary rival Charles Booker, a Kentucky state representative gaining momentum -- and national attention -- in the aftermath of the police killings of George Floyd in Minnesota and Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky. (Mike Broihier, a retired Marine advocating for universal basic income, is also running for the nomination.)The state hasn't sent a Democrat to the Senate since the reelection of Wendell Ford in 1992. It gave President Donald Trump a 30-point victory in 2016. Neither Democratic candidate would be favored to beat McConnell, the longest-serving Kentucky senator.But McGrath's supporters believe that she would have a better...
    Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell has long been regarded as an enemy of Black people, beginning, conservatively, in the late 1980s, when he voted against the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987, and continuing to this day with his unwavering support of the Trump White House. But a young, Black, educated and homegrown Kentuckian who succeeded in securing a seat in the Kentucky House of Representatives in 2018, Charles Booker, aims to defeat the veteran Republican senator. theGrio spoke exclusively with Booker ahead of the June 23 primary, which is today, about what inspired him to enter politics, how the police killing of Breonna Taylor impacted him, and why Kentuckians should vote for him. READ MORE: Jamaal Bowman, a former educator, hopes to bring new face to Congress Like far too many Black families, Charles Booker grew up surrounded by poverty. “My childhood really shaped my view of the...
    U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) arrives as Senate Republicans hold their weekly policy lunch on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 16, 2020.Jonathan Ernst | Reuters A slate of primary elections Tuesday will decide who faces the top Senate Republican in November and whether two notable House Democrats can win another term in office.  In Kentucky, state Rep. Charles Booker and Marine veteran Amy McGrath lead the field of Democrats hoping to challenge Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Booker, a Black man running on a sweeping liberal platform, has earned endorsements from the likes of Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren during a national reckoning over systemic racism. McGrath, a White woman backed by Senate Democrats' campaign arm, was once seen as an overwhelming favorite to win the primary as she ran on more centrist policies and anti-McConnell sentiment among Democrats fueled a fundraising bonanza. In New York,...
    Democrats are positioning themselves to block the Senate Republicans' police reform bill before it even hits the floor for debate as they claim the legislation does not go far enough, especially in banning cops' use of chokeholds. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell needs 60 votes for the Senate to begin negotiations on the bill, which was authored by the sole Black GOP Senator Tim Scott – but Democrats are signaling they will not let the debate commence. There was no Democratic input in the bill, and many claim that McConnell is not prepared to negotiate on additional measures or those already included. Notably, the Republican version of the legislation includes a stipulation where police officers can only use a chokehold when their life is threatened, while Democrats want a more sweeping ban on the move. Democrats claim they want more assurances from McConnell that there will be concessions made on...
    Caroline Brehman/ZUMA For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.It’s been a primary season full of polling-place disasters, and as Kentuckians vote on Tuesday, there’s reason to believe another one could be on the way. Amid coronavirus concerns, Kentucky has cut the number of polling places from its usual 3700 to just 200, with just one polling place each for the state’s two biggest cities, Louisville and Lexington. The likes of LeBron James have tweeted their dismay about the possibility of long lines and voter suppression. The most-watched race in the state is the Democratic US Senate primary between Charles Booker and Amy McGrath to decide who will face off against Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) in November. Primary elections throughout the country this year have been marred by long lines and confusion over mail-in ballots, and Kentucky’s may be no exception. But McConnell has...
    In New Jersey cities, many thousands of families will soon be homeless, once the governor lifts his moratorium on evictions during the pandemic.Some are already being evicted, illegally. Yet even a decent landlord is in an impossible situation without federal help. And Mitch McConnell is standing in the way.The Senate Majority leader and President Trump have been blocking any more help to states, including as much as $100 billion for tenants and landlords, in rent and utility assistance.Miserly Mitch also pledged not to renew the unemployment benefits that have been helping tens of millions of… Read More
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) has again become the target of protesters’ ire as a group chanted “No justice, no sleep” outside his home. As The Hill reported, protesters with the progressive Sunrise Movement, a left-wing environmental group, yelled outside McConnell’s home while holding signs. “No justice, no sleep Mitch. You let our economy tumble into free-fall, our people be gunned down in the streets by killer cops, & our planet be ravaged by your oil CEO friends. This #Juneteenth, we’re wide awake. In November when we vote you out, maybe you’ll wake up, too,” the group, which is verified on Twitter, tweeted. It’s anyone’s guess how it is McConnell’s fault that the economy “tumble[d] into free-fall” when it was state governors who ordered businesses to close amid concerns over the novel coronavirus. Also, unarmed black men were “gunned down in the streets by killer cops” during the Obama...
    Black Lives Matter and other protest groups marched outside the home of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in Kentucky early Friday. The GOP leader lives in Louisville, which has been rocked by racial discord particularly over the March 13 fatal shooting of black local EMT Breonna Taylor at the hands of three white cops during a botched home raid. “BREONNA COULDN’T SLEEP. NEITHER SHOULD MITCH,” read one of the banners held by some of the roughly 30 protesters, who staged the hourlong march from 6 to 7 a.m., according to the Louisville Courier-Journal and Newsweek. It wasn’t clear whether McConnell or any of his family was home at the time. The group that organized the effort was the Sunrise Movement, which describes itself as “an army of young people to stop the climate crisis and create millions of good jobs in the process” on its Facebook page. The group was...
    Protesters descended on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnell The LGBTQ community scores a win this week, but the fight isn't over Senior State Dept. official resigns in response to Trump's handling of protests Overnight Energy: EPA declines to regulate chemical tied to developmental damage | Democrats unveil .5T infrastructure plan | Land management bureau eases requirements for oil, gas royalty cut requests MORE’s (R-Ky.) Kentucky home to demonstrate an array of issues to commemorate Juneteenth. Activists with the progressive Sunrise Movement, an environmental group that advocates for a slate of  left-leaning issues, were seen making noise and holding signs reading, “No justice, no sleep.” “No justice, no sleep Mitch. You let our economy tumble into free-fall, our people be gunned down in the streets by killer cops, & our planet be ravaged by your oil CEO friends. This #Juneteenth, we’re wide awake. In November when we vote...
    A group of protesters gathered in front of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s Kentucky home Friday morning, protesting the shooting of Breonna Taylor, an unarmed Black woman, in Louisville. In a video of the protest, a big banner says “Breonna couldn’t sleep. Neither should Mitch,” as the protesters banged on pots, honked horns, and screamed outside the Kentucky Senators home. The group who posted the video said: “BREAKING: It’s 6am and we are live at Mitch McConnell’s house on #Juneteenth #BreonnaTaylor and for all of us. Every single problem in our country, Mitch McConnell stands in the way of solving. Wake up, or get ready to get voted out. #WakeUpMitch” WATCH: Protesters outside of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s house in Louisville, KY at 6 a.m. this morning demanding justice for Breonna Taylorpic.twitter.com/hhSwoue9Dd — Daily Caller (@DailyCaller) June 19, 2020 Meanwhile, Senate Republicans released their police reform legislation Wednesday...
    (CNN)As primary day approaches in Kentucky, Democratic Senate candidate Amy McGrath is suddenly fighting a political battle on two fronts.Long viewed as a lock to win the party's nomination and take on Republican Senate Majority Mitch McConnell in November, McGrath, one of the most prodigious fundraisers in any down-ballot 2020 race, has increasingly turned her attention to progressive primary rival Charles Booker, a Kentucky state representative gaining momentum -- and national attention -- as early voting begins.Powerful forces in the party, including Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer, are behind McGrath. But Booker is rising as the political landscape has rapidly changed, shaped by the nationwide uprising against racism and police brutality, and a pandemic that has disproportionally hurt minorities and the poor. Booker, the youngest black Kentucky lawmaker at 35 years old, comes from one of the state's poorest zip codes and has argued that his perspective is uniquely suited...
    (CNN)On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell went public with what has long been suspected: He has no plans to leave the Senate even if his party loses its majority in November. "I do," McConnell tersely responded to Politico when asked if he would seek to stay as the highest-ranking Republican in the Senate no matter what happens in the 2020 election. (All of that assumes that McConnell is reelected to a seventh term in November, and his colleagues are willing to support him as leader going forward. Both seem likely at least at the moment.)Obviously, McConnell would prefer to spend his next few years in the Senate as the majority leader. But if Republicans lose the majority this fall -- a prospect that looks decidedly plausible at the moment -- then McConnell seems likely to spend much of his eighth decade as the head of the minority rather than...
    Mitch McConnell has signaled a new sense of urgency as he prepares to unveil a Republican police reform bill Wednesday as Democrats plan to vote on their own version of the bill in the House in a matter of days. The Senate Majority Leader and the sole black Republican Senator Tim Scott will hold a press conference at 9:30 a.m. Wednesday morning announcing the plan and intention to bring the bill to the Senate floor as early as next week. The move comes just one day after President Donald Trump revealed he would be working with Congress to get policing legislation passed in conjunction to the executive order he signed after remarks in the Rose Garden Tuesday afternoon. The GOP originally said their version of the bill wouldn't reach the floor until after July Fourth, but the change of plans comes as urgency surmounts to get Scott's plan passed before...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told reporters Tuesday that he was open to renaming military bases named after Confederate leaders - but he didn't want Confederate statues in the Capitol removed.  'If it’s appropriate to take another look at these names, I’m personally OK with that - and I am a descendant of a Confederate veteran myself,' McConnell said, according to Politico. 'What I do think is clearly a bridge too far is this nonsense that we need to airbrush the Capitol and scrub out everybody from years ago who had any connection to slavery.'    Last week, President Trump said he 'will not even consider' renaming military bases and he's historically been against the removal of Confederate statues, hinting at his thinking on the matter when he said at the White House Tuesday, 'We must build upon our heritage - not tear it down.'  Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell...
    Fox News recently highlighted that Moscow Mitch is totally against the “defund the police” movement: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Monday slammed the growing liberal momentum behind the “defund the police” movement as “outlandish.”   His comments referenced the growing left-wing movement in cities such as Minneapolis — where George Floyd died last month in police custody — New York City and beyond.   “We’re already seeing outlandish calls, ‘defund the police,’ ‘abolish the police,’ take root within the left-wing leadership class,” McConnell, R-Ky., said on the Senate floor Monday.   Minneapolis’ left-leaning City Council members on Sunday announced a veto-proof push to disband the Minneapolis police, even as the mayor made clear he did not support abolishing the department. “The president of the city council in Minneapolis proclaimed she can imagine a future without the police,” McConnell continued Monday. “I’m all for social work and mental health. Call me old fashioned, but...
    New York’s top Republican officials agree: Congress should send the Metropolitan Transportation Authority another $3.9 billion — for the good of the city, the region and the nation. They didn’t say so, but we can: It matters for the GOP, too. A functioning MTA is vital to the city’s future, and the city remains a key to the nation’s economy. But the pandemic devastated the agency’s revenues even as it imposed new costs; it can’t possibly get back in the black this year. see also NY Republicans petition Mitch McConnell for MTA bailout money New York’s most prominent elected Republicans are urging Senate Majority... For these reasons and more, Reps. Peter King, Elise Stefanik and Lee Zeldin and other elected Republicans from across the state, including the GOP leaders of the state Senate and Assembly, wrote US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell last week, urging him to back new federal funding....
    New York’s most prominent elected Republicans are urging Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to deliver the MTA billions of dollars in federal coronavirus rescue money. In a letter to McConnell Thursday, 18 Empire State Republicans — including Rep. Elise Stefanik and City Councilman Joe Borelli, President Trump’s New York campaign co-chairs — echoed the MTA’s call for a second $3.9 billion bailout, calling the previous bailout “not enough to meet the need.” “The MTA’s financial future is at risk without federal relief. COVID-19 has blown a massive hole in its budget,” the officials wrote. “The agency has run out of avenues for support. Without assistance from Washington, the only option left for repayment of the MTA’s debt is fare and toll hikes.” Reps. Peter King and Lee Zeldin also signed on to the letter, along with both of the GOP’s leaders in Albany and the three Republicans servings as county...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell seems poised to violate another unwritten rule for his own partisan gain. The Kentucky Republican as minority leader cited the so-called Thurmond Rule in June 2012 to halt judicial nominees at the end of President Barack Obama’s first term, but McConnell is moving forward with the nomination of his protégé Justin Walker on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, reported Roll Call. “The Leader has made it clear no vacancy will be left behind,” said McConnell spokesman David Popp. “The party who nuked the judicial filibuster doesn’t get to talk about the Thurmond Rule. They should have thought about that before they set off the bomb.” Senate Democrats ended the 60-vote filibuster for executive branch nominees in 2013, but McConnell has a record of citing the rule — named after the late South Carolina Republican Sen. Strom Thurmond — when a...
    You can put the Georgia voting debacle right on the shoulders of two people: Supreme Court Justice John Roberts and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. In communities of color, people waited for hours to vote. In a pandemic. With new machines, and fewer voting locations. Back in the day, when Georgia’s election system was subject to preclearance under the Voting Rights Act, this wouldn’t have happened. But the Supreme Court under Roberts decided seven years ago that the country had had enough of voting rights. Roberts, who had spent his entire legal career fighting against the Voting Rights Act, wrote the opinion striking down Section 4 of the law, requiring jurisdictions with a long history of voting discrimination to submit any changes in voting procedures to the Justice Department. Roberts argued that “Things have changed dramatically” since the VRA was enacted in 1965. “Yet the Act has not eased Section 5’s restrictions or narrowed the scope of...
    Meghan McCain has called out a Kentucky Democrat who is attempting to unseat Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), after the candidate used the image of her father, the late Sen. John McCain (Ariz.), in an attack ad against McConnell without the family's permission. What are the details? Democrat Amy McGrath released a campaign ad this week highlighting the "historic moment" when John McCain cast the deciding "no" vote against Senate Republicans' bill to dismantle Obamacare. Tuesday evening, John McCain's widow, Cindy, tweeted, "I'm disappointed in @AmyMcGrathKY's use of my late husband #johnmccain image in a partisan attack ad against his good friend @senatemajldr. John's memory should be used promote common ground and civility and not to stoke division." The next morning, McGrath shared the ad again on Twitter with the message, "Prior to running this ad, I reached out to a member of...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R- Ky.) tore into the New York Times from the Senate floor Wednesday, accusing the paper of "lying" and bowing to the "angry mob" in walking back a controversial op-ed written by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) last week. "One of our nation's most storied newspapers just had its intellectual independence challenged by an angry mob and they folded like a house of cards," McConnell blasted. "A jury of people on Twitter indicted them as accessories to a thought crime and instead of telling them to go take a hike, the paper pleaded guilty and begged for mercy." McConnell noted that the Times has, in the past, published pieces by Russian President Vladimir Putin and Iranian propagandists, yet it was "800 words from the junior senator from Arkansas" that really caused a stir. "The New York Times had erred grievously by making people confront...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that Republicans are crafting a bill to address “obvious racial discrimination” in policing — after Democrats unilaterally unveiled a House of Representatives reform package Monday. Republican senators spent most of a caucus luncheon listening to ideas from Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC) in the aftermath of national unrest over the Minnesota police killing of George Floyd. “I’ve asked Sen. Tim Scott to lead a group that is working on a proposal to allow us to respond to the obvious racial discrimination that we’ve seen on full display on our television screens over the last two weeks — and what is the appropriate response by the federal government,” McConnell (R-Ky.) said. “Tim spent most of our lunch explaining his proposal that’s in the works,” he said. Senators leaving the lunch were tight-lipped on details presented by Scott, the chamber’s sole black Republican. Sen. Mitt Romney...