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    White House lifts 14-day quarantine period for players entering U.S. to play on Tour 23 Edge Control Products That Keep Your Baby Hairs Super Sleek Were hurting — these Americans are losing $600 of weekly unemployment but still cant find work The $600 weekly unemployment boost lapsed this weekend after lawmakers failed to extend the aid.  Cindy Pineda and Kacey Levesque, two accountants from Florida, will get just $275 a week in state jobless benefits without the federal subsidy.  They've had a tough time finding new jobs, putting them in a difficult financial position.  © Provided by CNBC Cynthia Pineda lost her accounting job in early April. Without the $600 weekly unemployment boost, she'll get just $275 each week in aid from Florida. Meanwhile, finding a new job has proven extremely challenging. Cindy Pineda was the breadwinner of her family before the coronavirus pandemic hit. Load Error ...
    Cynthia Pineda lost her accounting job in early April. Without the $600 weekly unemployment boost, she'll get just $275 each week in aid from Florida. Meanwhile, finding a new job has proven extremely challenging. Cindy Pineda was the breadwinner of her family before the coronavirus pandemic hit. But Pineda, 60, lost her accounting job in early April. And her husband, an hourly worker who does fiber-optic cabling, has been getting just two or three days of work per week.  Unemployment benefits have been keeping the family, who live in Davenport, Florida, afloat.  That's largely due to a $600 weekly supplement to state unemployment checks. But that federal subsidy ended Saturday, leaving the family with $275 a week ($1,100 a month), too little to cover the mortgage and other bills. Even with the enhancement, her pay is much less than it had been at work.VIDEO0:5700:57Senate GOP will unveil new relief package...
    A lawsuit by the Chamber of Commerce against President Trump’s administration claims it is “critical” that wealthy households are able to import foreign au pairs during the Chinese coronavirus crisis. This week, Chamber of Commerce CEO Thomas Donohue announced the group’s lawsuit against Trump’s expanded executive order, signed last month, which halts the H-1B, H-4, H-2B, L-1, and J-1 visa programs to reduce foreign competition against 35 million unemployed and underemployed Americans. Specifically, the lawsuit claims the J-1 visa program — where mostly upper-middle-class to wealthy households are allowed to import foreign au pairs at below-market wages — is “critical” during the nation’s time of crisis. The lawsuit states: And the au pair program is principally used by families that would otherwise lack live-in childcare. That resource is especially critical now, with children forced to stay home by the pandemic rather than attend school in person: Without childcare, many parents will...
    WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW TODAY > US surpasses 4 million coronavirus cases  > Trump cancels GOP convention plans in Jacksonville, Fla., citing virus concerns  > CDC releases new guidelines in favor of schools reopening in fall  > Fauci: With vaccine, 'we could start talking about real normality again' in 2021 > Wave of evictions could be coming for nation’s renters  > In mid-year report, World Trade Organization says pandemic impact on global trade expected to be ‘substantial’  > Rep. Lauren UnderwoodLauren UnderwoodThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump wins by losing in the Supreme Court The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump takes on CDC over schools The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Teachers' union President Randi Weingarten calls Trump administration plan to reopen schools 'a train wreck'; US surpasses 3 million COVID-19 cases MORE cites systemic COVID-19 problem facing communities of color, says we...
    But Republicans say unemployed workers are getting too much assistance from the federal government — it makes them lazy. Senate Republicans should tell that to the more than 16 million unemployed Americans who live in the states they represent. The simple fact is that there aren't jobs to be had right now, and there won't be until we get the virus under control. The best way to address the extreme financial pressure facing American families is for Congress and the president to pledge to the American people that we will help as long as help is needed. We are all in it together. We are one nation, faced with the greatest challenge since World War II and the greatest health crisis in 100 years.  It didn't have to be this way. Donald Trump has badly bungled the coronavirus crisis, and we are paying an extraordinarily high price in lives lost...
    Sen. Kamala Harris joined the movement to address the housing crisis in America. The California Democrat introduced the Relief Act, which would ban evictions and foreclosures for a year for tenants and homeowners. Those affected would have 18 months to make up missed rent payments. This comes on the heels of a May survey by the American Apartment Owners Association that found nearly 60% of landlords said their tenants are unable to pay rent because of the coronavirus and 80% said they're willing to work with these renters. "We made it pretty clear to our landlords that people aren't just suddenly going to be able to afford to pay back everything they owe on one day," said Alexandra Alvarado, the association's director of marketing and education. "So it doesn't make sense to create a plan that isn't realistic."  She said landlords could use a lease guaranty to help shield against nonpayment...
    THE coronavirus pandemic has brought with it a surge in the number of Americans using swingers' apps, it has been revealed. Data shows that there are currently at least 721,927 active swingers across the United States. Swinging is a practice in which people already in a committed relationship engage in sexual activity with other people. It is a form of non-monogamy or open relationship. The figures are based on the number of people using threesome dating app 3Fun to swing since lockdowns were imposed in March. They show users in some of the country's major metropolitan centres, with the largest cities seeing the highest uptake. Of the 8.4million people living in New York, 22,874 have used the app to arrange extramarital encounters. The figure for Los Angeles is 12,228 while in Houston it is 9,068. Chicago had 7,347 users, Las Vegas had...
            by Andrew Trunsky  The Department of Labor reported Thursday that over 1.4 million Americans filed additional claims for unemployment last week, marking the first weekly increase in claims since March. The number of Americans filing for unemployment had been declining each week before mid-July, but the Thursday report marks the 18th week in a row that unemployment claims have been above one million, CNBC reported. Total new jobless claims for the week ending July 18 rose by 109,000 from the previous, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics release. California, Florida and Georgia were the states with the largest increases in number of claims, while Maryland, Texas and New Jersey had the largest decrease in claims, according to the Department of Labor report. The increase comes as the $600-per-week unemployment benefits are set to expire on July 31, risking the financial security of millions of Americans. Despite the...
    "My stomach is growling and I have a headache," said Sheila Ritter, 51.Sheila Reiter Sheila Ritter was laid off from her job as a security guard on March 14, the same day as her oldest daughter's birthday. Affording enough food to feed her family has been a struggle for Ritter, who lives in Denver, ever since.  "It's devastated us," she said of the pandemic. In the last 48 hours, Ritter, 51, has eaten just a bowl of oatmeal and a hot dog.  "My stomach is growling and I have a headache," she said. "Most of our conversations are, 'When are we getting something else to eat?' And, 'Mom I'm hungry.'"  More From Invest in You:It's a tough outlook for graduates in the Class of 2020Many college graduates are relying on unemployment to pay the billsInternships canceled? College students must get creative and adapt Amid one of the worst downturns in U.S....
    The Department of Labor reported Thursday that over 1.4 million Americans filed additional claims for unemployment last week, marking the first weekly increase in new claims since March. The number of Americans filing for unemployment had been declining each week before mid-July, but the Thursday report marks the 18th week in a row that unemployment claims have been above one million, CNBC reported. Total new jobless claims for the week ending July 18 rose by 109,000 from the previous, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics release. BREAKING: U.S. weekly jobless claims total 1.416 million, vs. 1.3 million expected. https://t.co/sRY44KcqbL pic.twitter.com/bHZQi6TYS3 — CNBC (@CNBC) July 23, 2020 California, Florida and Georgia were the states with the largest increases in number of claims, while Maryland, Texas and New Jersey had the largest decrease in claims, according to the Department of Labor report. The increase comes as the $600-per-week unemployment...
    About 1.4 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits once again last week, new data show — a troubling sign that the nation’s recovery from the coronavirus crisis is unraveling. Workers now have filed more than 52 million initial jobless claims since layoffs spiked in mid-March, suggesting about a third of the American labor force has been sidelined at some point during the pandemic. Seasonally adjusted new filings increased last week for the first time since late March as the worst labor crisis since the Great Depression enters a precarious new phase, according to Thursday’s figures from the US Department of Labor. A surge in coronavirus infections has forced several states to roll back reopening plans that fueled record job gains in May and June. And a $600 boost to weekly unemployment benefits under the CARES Act is set to run out after this week, delivering a big financial hit...
    The number of Americans applying for jobless aid is increasing, marking the first rise in months, as the coronavirus spreads across the nation. Some 1.4 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits in the week ended July 18, adjusting for seasonal variations, the Labor Department said Thursday. It's an increase from the prior week, when 1.3 million applied. Another 975,000 requested Pandemic Unemployment Assistance, a new federal program for self-employed and gig workers. That figure increased by 20,000 from the week before. The biggest increases were in Florida, Georgia, California, Washington and Indiana, states that have seen sharp increases in the number of COVID-19 cases. This marks the 17th week in a row that total jobless claims have been above 2 million. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox The latest string of layoffs is occurring just before a $600 weekly federal aid payment for the jobless is...
    New York (CNN Business)Another 1.4 million Americans have filed for first-time unemployment benefits last week, according to the Department of Labor.Four months after the Covid-19 pandemic ravaged the health of Americans, their economy and their labor market, the upswing in economic data is tapering of. A resurgence in infections and a rollback of reopening plans in several states is making it difficult for people to re-enter the labor force following the pandemic lockdown.Continued claims, which count people who have applied for benefits for at least two consecutive weeks, slipped to 16.2 million, down by more than 1 million from the week prior.This is a developing story. It will be updated.
    Legality of federal agents in Portland scrutinized as protests become more violent Retail workers slammed by job cuts, pushed into new roles as coronavirus shakes their industry Dow Rises but Wall Street Wobbles on Escalating U.S.-China Tensions Stocks fluctuated Wednesday on escalating tensions between the U.S. and China. © TheStreet Dow Rises but Wall Street Wobbles on Escalating U.S.-China Tensions Equities had been given a boost earlier in the session after Pfizer reached a coronavirus vaccine agreement with the U.S. government. Load Error The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 62 points, or 0.23%, to 26,903, the S&P 500 rose 0.18% and the Nasdaq was down 0.19%. The S&P 500 has closed higher for three straight sessions. Pfizer was the biggest gainer on the Dow, rising 4.67%, after the drugmaker and its German partner BioNTech reached an agreement to receive $1.95 billion from the U.S. government for...
    Youll love watching Francis Ngannou in this adorable car dealership commercial All the Looks to Shop When Planning Your Engagement Photos Stocks Wobble on Escalating U.S.-China Tensions, Pfizer Holds Higher Stocks fluctuated Wednesday on escalating tensions between the U.S. and China. © TheStreet Stocks Wobble on Escalating U.S.-China Tensions, Pfizer Holds Higher Equities had been given a boost earlier in the session after Pfizer reached a coronavirus vaccine agreement with the U.S. government. Load Error The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 13 points, or 0.05%, to 26,854, the S&P 500 rose 0.03% and the Nasdaq was down 0.31%. The S&P 500 has closed higher for three straight sessions. Pfizer was the biggest gainer on the Dow, rising 4.4%, after the drugmaker and its German partner BioNTech reached an agreement to receive $1.95 billion from the U.S. government for 600 million doses of their developing coronavirus vaccine...
    A FREE coronavirus vaccine will be offered to Americans after drug company Pfizer makes a pact with the United States for 600million doses. The United States has agreed to give $1.95 billion to Pfizer for an initial 100million doses of a vaccine, which is being developed by Pfizer Inc. and Germany's BioNTech. 4The United States has agreed to give $1.95 billion to Pfizer for an initial 100million doses of a vaccine, which is being developed by Pfizer Inc. and Germany's BioNTechCredit: Getty Images - Getty 4According to a Pfizer press release on Wednesday, the vaccine will be free to AmericansCredit: Getty Images - Getty The US can also obtain up to 500 million additional doses of the potential mRNA-based Vaccine Candidate Against SARS-CoV-2. According to a Pfizer press release on Wednesday, the vaccine will be free to Americans - which is "consistent with the US government’s commitment for free access for COVID-19...
    Pfizer and BioNTech, a German biotech company, announced Wednesday that the U.S. has reached a $1.95 billion deal with them for an initial order of 100 million doses of their coronavirus vaccine. According to the announcement Americans will receive the vaccine for free. The United States, which has a population of over 300 million people, could get up to 500 million more doses of the vaccine.  "Expanding Operation Warp Speed's diverse portfolio by adding a vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech increases the odds that we will have a safe, effective vaccine as soon as the end of this year," said Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar in a statement. “Depending on success in clinical trials, today’s agreement will enable the delivery of approximately 100 million doses of this vaccine to the American people.” Shares of Pfizer rose more than 4 percent in premarket trading on the news and BioNTech stock popped...
    The Chamber of Commerce has filed a lawsuit against President Trump, demanding the 300,000 businesses it represents be allowed to import foreign workers while more than 26 million Americans remain jobless. On Tuesday, Chamber of Commerce CEO Thomas Donohue announced the group’s lawsuit against Trump’s expanded executive order, signed last month, which halts the H-1B, H-4, H-2B, L-1, and J-1 visa programs to reduce foreign competition against millions of unemployed Americans. Donohue said in a statement: Our lawsuit seeks to overturn these sweeping and unlawful immigration restrictions that are an unequivocal ‘not welcome’ sign to the engineers, executives, IT experts, doctors, nurses, and other critical workers who help drive the American economy. Left in place, these restrictions will push investment abroad, inhibit economic growth, and reduce job creation. The lawsuit claims Trump does not have the authority as president to “alter the hiring practices of American employers as it relates...
    President Donald Trump raised an eye-popping $20 million on Tuesday night in his first-ever virtual fundraiser, from a total of more than 300,000 individual donors who participated. “This is a great day for the president and for the country showing the robust enthusiasm for President Donald Trump,” Kimberly Guilfoyle, the national chair of the Trump Victory Finance Committee, told Breitbart News on Tuesday evening. “They want four more years. We had over 300,000 people log on for our event tonight to donate to the president. We raised over $20 million in the first-ever of its kind virtual Zoom event.” Pulling in $20 million in a single fundraiser is stunning for any candidate, especially in the age of virtual events during the coronavirus pandemic. Guilfoyle and Trump’s eldest son, Donald Trump, Jr., co-hosted the event, along with Trump’s younger daughter Tiffany Trump. It featured special appearances by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin...
    Many states' pandemic-era moratoriums on renter evictions have expired. In some 30 states, eviction proceedings now can continue. Pictured, rent-forgiveness graffiti in Los Angeles.VALERIE MACON Most of the relief measures included in the historic stimulus package Congress passed in March are coming to an end, even as the financial suffering of millions of Americans, and the virus to blame, shows no sign of abating.  Some 25 million Americans are receiving the additional $600 federal unemployment benefit established in the federal CARES Act, and the unemployment rate continues to rival Great Depression-era highs. Half of American households say they have lost income during the pandemic. And the pain is far from over. There were more than 62,000 new reported cases of the virus in the U.S. just yesterday. As a result, many states are walking back their plans to reopen.  Congress returns to Washington this week to work on a second stimulus package.  The...
    Jake Johnson July 19, 2020 7:29PM (UTC) This article originally appeared at Common Dreams. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Feel free to republish and share widely. The $600 weekly boost in unemployment benefits that more than 30 million laid-off Americans are relying on to endure the coronavirus-induced recession is set to expire in just 10 days without action from Congress—but Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell appears to be in no hurry to negotiate a solution. With the Senate currently on recess and not expected to return until July 20, McConnell told reporters Monday that he doesn't plan to begin formal stimulus talks with his Democratic counterparts until next week at the earliest. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) reportedly told his caucus Tuesday that he has not heard from McConnell regarding Covid-19 negotiations. : McConnell's timeline for the talks would leave the Senate and House with less than a...
    Come autumn 2020, the convergence of disease, death and economic misery across our wounded nation will likely be without living precedent. And the damage that’s being done and will be done by the time the November general election rolls around will be most keenly felt in the nation’s poorest and least secure neighborhoods. These are the very places that we have ignored for decades. But in the wake of Black Lives Matter and COVID-19, the corporate news media has finally shown some interest. While much has been made of the depression-esque spike in unemployment, it needs to be put in economic context. Note that just last year, when the economy was supposedly doing well, 40 percent of Americans said they would not be able to come up with $400 in the event of an emergency, according to the Federal Reserve. The post-depression economic disaster took a few years to play out after the 1929 crash. This time, it...
    Triathlon: World Championships to move forward in 2020 Best Roller Skate Toe Caps for Preventing Scuff Marks More than 25 million Americans are set to lose the $600 unemployment boost next week Unless Congress acts, the $600 per week boost to unemployment benefits will be cut off at a time when a record number of Americans depend on that assistance.  © Provided by CNBC The $600 weekly payments from the Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation program were put in place as part of the $2.2 trillion CARES Act that Congress passed in late March amid the coronavirus pandemic. Americans who are eligible for unemployment insurance receive an extra $600 on top of what they normally claim under their state's benefits. Yet this boost is scheduled to end for all states except New York, on Saturday July 25, 2020. New York's end date is Sunday, July 26, according to the Department of...
    An A.I. bot answers 10 burning questions about the 2020 NFL season Princess Beatrice Has a New Royal Title After Her Surprise Wedding to Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi Rising coronavirus cases threaten U.S. economic rebound Rising coronavirus infections across dozens of states are threatening the U.S. economic recovery, forcing businesses and consumers to freeze spending and keeping the unemployment rate stubbornly high. © / Getty Images Store Closed The government reported Thursday that retail sales rose a sharp 7.5% in June, but the positive trend was undercut by more recent data showing that credit card spending has stalled. A separate report showed that more than a million Americans sought unemployment benefits last week – a sign that companies continue to cut jobs as the virus spreads across the heavily populated Sunbelt. Click to expand Replay Video UP NEXT How you can save $1 million for retirement How you...
    By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter (HealthDay) FRIDAY, July 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Each COVID-19 death in the United States leaves an average of nine close family members to grieve, researchers say. With more than 137,000 deaths so far in the pandemic, that means about 1.2 million Americans have lost a grandparent, parent, sibling, spouse, child or other close relative. "In just a few short months, over 1 million Americans have experienced an irreplaceable loss that not only leaves them grieving and possibly traumatized but may come with long-lasting health and economic consequences for themselves and others in their family," study co-author Emily Smith-Greenaway said in a news release from the University of Southern California. She is an associate professor of sociology and spatial sciences at USC's Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. Lead author Ashton Verdery predicted the impact on families will be long-lasting. "Our results show that...
    Millions of Americans who have missed rent payments due to the coronavirus pandemic could be at risk of being evicted in the coming months unless government measures to protect them are extended, economists and housing experts say. FBI WARNS OF CORONAVIRUS SCAMS Nearly 12 million adults live in households that missed their last rent payment, and 23 million have little or no confidence in their ability to make the next one, according to weekly Census Bureau data. About a third of the country’s renters are protected by an eviction moratorium that covers properties with federally insured mortgages. That expires July 25. Many renters are jobless and depend on supplemental weekly unemployment benefits of $600 that are due to end on July 31. VideoA number of cities and states have broader protections that will remain in place longer. Boston has banned evictions from public housing through the end of the year....
    A torrent of evictions loom in the coming months for millions of Americans who have been unable to pay rent during the COVID-19 pandemic. Housing researchers and activists are warning that millions of people risk becoming homeless if the government doesn't extend measures, both federally and locally, that were put in place during the pandemic to protect renters.  According to the latest weekly Census Bureau data, 11.6 million people live in households that missed their last rental payments.   More than 22 million Americans also have no, or only slight confidence, that they will be able to make next month's rental payments, the figures show.    People who rent have largely been able to survive the initial months of the pandemic due to eviction moratoriums put in place in most states, as well unemployment and federal relief checks.  Those measures, however, have had a cascading effect within the housing market as landlords who cannot...
            by Dan McCaleb  Four months into the COVID-19 pandemic, an additional 1.3 million Americans filed for unemployment benefits last week, according to U.S. Department of Labor data released Thursday. That’s down 10,000 from the previous week but still significantly higher than pre-pandemic figures. Continued claims of workers who filed claims at least two weeks in a row were at 17.3 million for the week ending July 4. Continued claims lag a week behind the new weekly claims report. June’s unemployment rate was 11.1 percent. Government restrictions that closed or scaled back businesses deemed non-essential are largely driving the unemployment numbers. The number of new claims has been dropping each week since the last week of March, when nearly 6.9 million American workers filed for unemployment benefits. “The frustrating reality is that new claims have remained above one million since exploding in late March and having...
    An additional 1.3 million Americans filed first-time jobless claims for the week ending July 11, according to Department of Labor data released Thursday. Thursday’s numbers are down only 10,000 from the week before, CNN business reports. On an unadjusted basis, over 1.5 million Americans filed jobless claims for the first time — almost 109,000 from the week before, the publication notes. (RELATED: Jobs Increased And Unemployment Decreased In June) Jobless claims have remained at historically high levels for the past several months due to the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent stay-at-home and quarantine orders, ABC News reports. As these orders have begun to be lifted, first time unemployment applications began to decline. But last week’s numbers were less than economists had expected. This is the second week in row that the U.S. Department of Labor has said that about 1.3 million Americans have filed for unemployment benefits for the first time. https://t.co/EJ9MxSAR3T...
    New York (CNN Business)It's still not easy to remain employed in the US, nearly four months after the coronavirus pandemic began upending the economy.Another 1.3 million people filed first-time jobless claims on a seasonally adjusted basis last week, according to the Department of Labor. That's down 10,000 from the prior week's revised level.On an unadjusted basis,1.5 million people filed first-time claims, up almost 109,000 from the week before. The seasonal adjustments are traditionally used to smooth out the data, but that has tended to have the opposite effect during the pandemic.Weekly first-time unemployment applications have been on the decline for more than three months since their peak in the last week of March. Continued claims, which count workers who have filed claims for at least two weeks in a row, stood at 17.3 million for the week ending July 4, down 422,000 from the prior week. These claims peaked in...
    If someone had suggested five months ago that we would be seeing more than 3 million cases and 135,000 COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. by mid-July, I wouldn’t have believed it.  But now it’s distinctly possible that, five months from now, half of all Americans could have been infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and more than 800,000 Americans may die in this extraordinary outbreak. That is what many of our most prominent public health experts now expect.  Could their projection models be off base? Maybe. But don’t count on it. As bad as the health consequences, disruptions, restrictions and fear of the last five months have been, things could get a whole lot worse.  Sharp spikes in Covid-19 cases, hospitalizations and fatalities are now being reported in many states, including Texas, Arizona, California and Florida. And we’re still far behind where we should be at this point in the...
    The $600 weekly boost in unemployment benefits that more than 30 million laid-off Americans are relying on to endure the coronavirus-induced recession is set to expire in just 10 days without action from Congress—but Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell appears to be in no hurry to negotiate a solution. With the Senate currently on recess and not expected to return until July 20, McConnell told reporters Monday that he doesn’t plan to begin formal stimulus talks with his Democratic counterparts until next week at the earliest. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) reportedly told his caucus Tuesday that he has not heard from McConnell regarding Covid-19 negotiations. McConnell’s timeline for the talks would leave the Senate and House with less than a week to hash out and pass legislation before unemployment benefits begin reverting to their pre-pandemic rate, which in some states maxes out at less than $300 per week. “Mitch McConnell may already have doomed the tens...
    CALIFORNIA'S Death Valley has recorded a scorching temperature of 128F - the hottest on the planet for three years as 50 million Americans are placed under a heat warning. The sizzling high in the Mojave Desert on Sunday is part of a heatwave hovering over the nation's southwest which is expected to expand east and northwards later in the week. The sizzling high was recorded in the Mojave Desert on SundayCredit: Facebook/Death Valley National Park Two rangers stand beside a thermometer at Furnace Creek showing temperatures a degree hotter than what was officially recorded California's Death Valley has recorded a scorching temperature of 128F - the hottest on the planet for three years One woman poses beside the thermometer readingCredit: Facebook/Marichelle Chung Park rangers were photographed beside a thermometer reading 129F alongside the caption "Near record heat!" "This weekend Death Valley National Park experienced another extreme heat wave, with official temperatures...
    Death Valley, California in the Mojave Desert reached a sizzling 128 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday in what is the highest recorded temperature anywhere on Earth since 2017. Although the official weather station in the area recorded 128F, a photo taken at the aptly named Furnace Creek Visitor Center read 129F.  Sunday's scorching high is part of a heatwave that is currently hovering over the Southwest of the country, but the 'heat dome' is expected to expand east and northwards later in the week. The place still holds the record for hottest air temperature ever recorded which was 134F set in July 1913.  A photo posted by the Park Service in Death Valley showed their thermometer to be at 129F The scorching temperature was recorded at the aptly named Furnace Creek in Death Valley The extreme heat has been cause in part because of a 'heat dome' which keeps...
    Record numbers of Americans are filing for unemployment. The unemployment systems across the country, already hamstrung by conservative bogus bootstrap sabotaging, have left tens of millions of Americans in need of assistance. Meanwhile, our country’s leadership continues its do-nothing for Americans without money approach to dealing with our current economic and public health crisis. And so with at least 50 million people filing for unemployment during the COVID-19 pandemic, what does Donald Trump and his bestest advisers come up with? On Tuesday, the Associated Press reports that the White House is backing a new “ad campaign” that will “encourage people who are unemployed or unhappy in their jobs or careers to ‘find something new.’” Find something new. This is reportedly the brainchild of Trump’s American Workforce Policy Advisory Board. Ivanka Trump, probably best known for being just as untalented and narcissistic as her father promoted the new program, along with the companion website on her Twitter account, saying “Jobs...
    (CNN)Four months before the presidential election, Ivanka Trump, adviser to her father President Donald Trump, is promoting a new ad campaign dubbed, "Find Something New." Aimed at helping unemployed Americans find new careers, the initiative launched Tuesday with a virtual roundtable hosted at the White House featuring Ivanka Trump and business leaders, including Apple CEO Tim Cook, and a reveal of one of the ads, a 30-second spot with a handful of people telling their employment stories."Now, as a result of Covid, people need to, unfortunately, in some cases learn a completely new skill," said Trump on Tuesday during the launch. "But that is also an opportunity to be put on for a new trajectory for themselves and their lives and we want to facilitate that connection back to the workforce and make it as smooth as possible.""Find Something New" was swiftly criticized on social media, most vociferously for its...
    Medical staff work outside the Covid-19 intensive care unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on June 30.Go Nakamura | Getty Images Amid one of the worst public-health crises in history, a record number of Americans are without health insurance. More than 5.4 million people who were laid off from their jobs are uninsured, according to a new study by Families USA, an advocacy group. For comparison, 3.9 million people became uninsured in the Great Recession between 2008 and 2009.  Some states have been hit particularly hard: A quarter of working-age adults were uninsured in Florida as of May, and 30% were uninsured in Texas.  In mid-March, New York resident Jad Kamal lost his health insurance when he was laid off from his job as a sommelier at Lupa, an Italian restaurant in Manhattan. More from Personal Finance:Unemployed and eligible for Social Security? What you need to knowMore than half of Americans...
    According to Families USA, about 5.4 million non-elderly Americans (i.e., those without Medicare) have lost their health insurance during the COVID-19 pandemic: It goes without saying that this is insane. More than 5 million working-age people have lost their health insurance during a pandemic. The bulk of the newly uninsured are in the South, in states that refused to expand Medicaid after Obamacare was passed. The rest lost their employer health care when they were furloughed and couldn’t afford to replace it. And of course, the states where lack of insurance is the worst are the same states where COVID-19 is rising the fastest: If there’s anything that could convince the American public that our current hodgepodge of health insurance is broken, this ought to be it. I’ll just repeat the bottom line in case anyone missed it: More than 5 million working-age people have lost...
    HOW ARE WE MANAGING TO SCREW UP EVERY LAST LITTLE DETAIL OF PANDEMIC RESPONSE FFS?! I really don't know how we can properly convey how bad things are about to get in the United States. Americans are losing their jobs. They are running out of money. We are on the brink of a homelessness crisis, and all of that is happening even before the pandemic began to get much much worse. In an interview with CNBC, American Bar Association Task Force Committee on Eviction Chair Emily Benfer estimates that between 20 and 28 million Americans will face eviction between now and September; for context, 10 million were evicted during the Great Recession. She is urging a nationwide moratorium on eviction. But it has to happen soon. Very soon. In Michigan, the statewide eviction moratorium will be lifting this Thursday. The result is expected to be 75,000 new eviction filings, with...
    A record number of Americans lost their health insurance during the coronavirus pandemic, with 5.4 million more Americans finding themselves uninsured between February and May, a study has found.  Unprecedented job losses have caused the mass loss of coverage, with more people losing their health insurance during the time period than they ever had in a previous single year, according to the study from consumer advocacy group Families U.S.A. The data resulting from the study is likely to inform the on-going debate in Congress over the next round of virus relief funds, and comes during campaign season when the Affordable Care Act is a key campaign issue for both President Trump and Democratic candidate Joe Biden. The group said that this increase in the number of uninsured adults is 39 percent higher than any annual increase ever previously recorded, with the last record standing at 3.9 million losses taking place between...
    Amid the worst public health crisis in a century and a devastating economic downturn that has thrown tens of millions out of work, more than five million people in the U.S. lost their health insurance in just three months this year, shattering the previous record set during the entire annual period from 2008 to 2009. The finding by advocacy group Families USA that at least 5.4 million Americans became uninsured between February and May was viewed by progressive activists and lawmakers as the latest evidence of the fundamental brokenness of a privatized system that ties healthcare to employment—and yet another reason Medicare for All is an urgent necessity. “If we had Medicare for All, nobody would be losing their healthcare,” Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), lead House sponsor of the Medicare for All Act of 2019, tweeted late Monday in response to the new figures. Dr. Abdul El-Sayed, a public health expert and former Michigan gubernatorial candidate,...
            by Robert Romano  Another 630,000 Americans came off continuing unemployment claims the week ending June 27, according to the latest unadjusted data from the U.S. Department of Labor, proving President Donald Trump is right about the economy rapidly recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic state-based shutdowns. Since the week ending May 9, unadjusted continuing unemployment claims have dropped from 22.8 million to 16.8 million the week ending June 27, a massive turnaround of 6 million Americans who temporarily found themselves on unemployment benefits but then rapidly came off of it on a net basis. Really, the number of Americans coming off of assistance is greater than that because the overall drop of 630,000 came the same week initial claims came in at about 1.4 million, indicating more than 2 million people found jobs that week, with the 1.4 million as an offset. That type of churn has been going on...
    An estimated 5.4 million Americans have lost their health insurance between February and May after being laid off due to the coronavirus pandemic, a recent study found. The number of newly uninsured in that three-month span dwarfs all prior annual records for workers losing their health coverage. The study conducted by Families USA, a non-partisan healthcare advocacy group, found that 5.4 million American workers became uninsured from February to May of this year as a result of the wave of job losses from the Covid-19 pandemic. The number of people who lost their health insurance in that three-month span is greater than the loss of coverage in any single year. “These recent increases in the number of uninsured adults are 39 percent higher than any annual increase ever recorded. The highest previous increase took place over the one-year period from 2008 to 2009, when 3.9 million nonelderly adults became uninsured,”...
    One in five U.S. households who rent their homes could face eviction by October as enhanced federal unemployment benefits and eviction moratoriums come to an end this summer, an analysis shows. Already, thousands of eviction cases are pending in a number of states.  Between 19 million and 23 million families that rent across the country are at risk of losing their homes by September 30, estimates the COVID-19 Eviction Defense Project, an advocacy group focused on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on housing.  A spike in evictions could add to the nation's problems as it battles the widening COVID-19 outbreak and the accompanying economic recession. A surge in homelessness also could raise the risk of infection because evicted families often double up with relatives and friends, stay in shelters or end up on the street. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Among those fearing eviction is 18-year-old Chris...
    Jack Dorsey recently donated $3 million to a coalition that supports and promotes Universal Basic Income. The organization is called Mayors for Guaranteed Income, a network that believes there should be an income floor for all Americans, an idea known as Universal Basic Income (UBI). Dorsey, the billionaire co-founder of Twitter, announced his decision in a tweet, “This is one tool to close the wealth and income gap, level systemic race and gender inequalities, and create economic security for families.” Stockton California Mayor Michael Tubbs is the leader of the coalition that Dorsey donated to. He leads the Stockton Economic Empowerment Demonstration, the first government-led guaranteed income initiative. Tubbs said in an interview of UBI, “This is how we build prosperity and build wealth and create opportunity for certain groups of people. We know, given the history of this country, that people of color and in particular Black people...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Sunday she believes U.S. lawmakers can find a compromise on extending jobless benefits and unemployment insurance for Americans struggling amid coronavirus pandemic shutdowns. “We have to find a compromise because we must extend it,” Pelosi said on CNN’s “State of the Union.” The top Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives has said it would not be productive to extend the extra unemployment benefits that were included in coronavirus relief legislation earlier this year. The benefits expire on July 31. Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and other Republicans point to statistics showing many Americans receive more money from the extended unemployment benefits than they earned when they were at work. Republicans and Democrats have been debating how to help the country recover from the economic...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democratic House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Sunday she believes U.S. lawmakers can find a compromise on extending jobless benefits and unemployment insurance for Americans struggling amid coronavirus pandemic shutdowns. "We have to find a compromise because we must extend it," Pelosi said on CNN's "State of the Union." The top Republican in the U.S. House of Representatives has said it would not be productive to extend the extra unemployment benefits that were included in coronavirus relief legislation earlier this year. The benefits expire on July 31. Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and other Republicans point to statistics showing many Americans receive more money from the extended unemployment benefits than they earned when they were at work. Republicans and Democrats have been debating how to help the country recover from the economic effects of the novel coronavirus, which led to business closures that have thrown tens of millions...
    Jack Dorsey, the billionaire co-founder of Twitter, is donating $3 million to help fund a group of guaranteed income pilot programs that will put cash directly in the hands of Americans who need it the most in more than a dozen cities across the United States.  The recipient, an organization called Mayors for a Guaranteed Income, founded last month, is a network of mayors who say they believe all Americans should have an income floor, also known as a universal basic income, to help reduce economic insecurity in the U.S.. "This is one tool to close the wealth and income gap, level systemic race and gender inequalities, and create economic security for families," Dorsey said in a tweet announcing his donation Thursday. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox Dorsey in April pledged $1 billion for coronavirus relief efforts; this donation is part of that promise. The tech entrepreneur also donated...
    Roger Sollenberger July 10, 2020 5:00PM (UTC) Organizations listed as hate groups by the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) received millions of dollars in government-backed Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans, according to data from the Small Business Administration. The Center for Media and Democracy was the first to report on the loans, which went to six nonprofits for a total of somewhere between $2,350,000 and $5,700,000. (The SBA has only disclosed loan amounts in ranges — not exact sums.) The groups will not need to repay the government if they put the money towards payroll and other operational expenses. (Disclosure: Salon received a PPP loan to keep our staff and independent journalism at 100%.) : The loans, which came through in early to mid April, predate the recent nationwide social justice upwelling by several weeks. Since receiving the funds, a number of the organizations have advanced their policy and ideological interests, lobbying the federal government and writing and publishing articles. The organizations include the anti-Muslim hate group Center for Security Policy; two anti-immigrant...
    Country Club of Detroit to host U.S. Senior Amateur in 2021 Theres a Reason You Get More Acne Scars in the Summer Continued unemployment boosts will help recovery more than new stimulus checks, economists say Economists estimate a new $1.5 trillion coronavirus relief package will be needed to stabilize the U.S. economy, with the most critical funding needed to continue enhanced unemployment and food assistance benefits, which have kept some 10 million Americans out of poverty this year but are set to expire at the end of July. © Provided by CNBC Hundreds of unemployed Kentucky residents wait in long lines outside the Kentucky Career Center for help with their unemployment claims on June 19, 2020 in Frankfort, Kentucky. Moody's Analytics chief economist Mark Zandi and Harvard economics professor Raj Chetty said on a briefing with the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities this week that spending on enhanced Supplemental Nutrition...
    A punishing and relentless heatwave is set to bake the US for weeks on end beginning this weekend until the end of July, with the historic ‘heat dome’ set to encapsulate more than 265 million Americans by next week. The heatwave is already getting underway in the South, with some areas – including Las Vegas and Phoenix - forecast to peak above a scintillating 110 degrees by Saturday. However, the surging summer heat will not just be limited to the south. Next week, the heat is set to move north and east, spreading 100-degree temperatures across the Ohio Valley and into the Mid-Atlantic, forecasts show. The National Weather Service is predicting that 75 or more record-high temperatures will either be matched or broken from Friday to Tuesday alone – with that number expected to grow significantly by the end of next week. Meteorologists are also predicting that Texas and the...
    © UNICEF/UN0309959/Arcos The coronavirus pandemic will create 45 million more poor people in Latin America in 2020, according to the United Nations. The report, released on Thursdays by UN chief Antonio Guterres, paints a dark picture for Latin America and the Caribbean, predicting an economic contraction of 9.1 per cent — the worst the region has seen in 100 years. Devastating economic consequences from the coronavirus pandemic such as a steep decline in tourism and sharp drop in remittances will see Latin America’s poverty levels increase by 7 per cent from 2019. This would mean there will be a total of 230 million people living in poverty in the region with a population of 630 million. Moreover, as many as 28 million Latin Americans could enter a situation of extreme poverty in 2020, meaning they won’t be able to afford to feed themselves. More than three million people have...
    Employee Linda Tarkenton holds a blank U.S. Treasury check before it's run through a printer at the U.S. Treasury printing facility in Philadelphia.Getty Images Another batch of one-time stimulus checks could be coming. But this time, far fewer Americans could get paid. President Donald Trump has made it clear that he wants to include another batch of checks in the next coronavirus legislation. But Senate Republicans have been slow to warm to the idea. One reason: the high cost of cutting millions of checks to Americans. Now, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., is considering a compromise: disbursing funds to people making $40,000 or less a year. More from Personal Finance:12 million are at risk of not getting their stimulus payments How much money the next coronavirus relief bill could give Americans  What unemployment benefits will look like without that extra $600 a week The new threshold would dramatically reduce...
    ROUGHLY 50 million Americans are out of work as the coronavirus pandemic continues to grip the US economy. Another 1.31 million filed for state unemployment benefits for the week ended July 4, the US Department of Labor announced on Thursday morning. 1 Roughly 50 million Americans are out of work, while another 1.31 million filed for jobless claims last week, the Labor Department said on ThursdayCredit: Getty Images Thursday's figure is a slight drop from the previous week, when 1.43 million jobless claims were filed. Although new claims sent to the Labor Department have consistently declined since early April, weekly applications have hovered between one million and two million since late May. The level of new claims is a significant improvement from the 6.9 million peak in late March when the US outbreak kicked off, forcing businesses nationwide to shut their doors. But unemployment levels are still much higher than...
    ROUGHLY 50 million Americans are out of work as the coronavirus pandemic continues to grip the US economy. Another 1.31 million filed for state unemployment benefits for the week ended July 4, the US Department of Labor announced on Thursday morning. 1 Roughly 50 million Americans are out of work, while another 1.31 million filed for jobless claims last week, the Labor Department said on ThursdayCredit: Getty Images Thursday's figure is a slight drop from the previous week, when 1.43 million jobless claims were filed. Although new claims sent to the Labor Department have consistently declined since early April, weekly applications have hovered between one million and two million since late May. The level of new claims is a significant improvement from the 6.9 million peak in late March when the US outbreak kicked off, forcing businesses nationwide to shut their doors. But unemployment levels are still much higher than...
    A proposed policy platform for the Democrat Party, drafted by supporters of presumed Democrat presidential nominee Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), would give asylum to the world’s migrants — inviting them all to the United States to live and work. The document, known as the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force Recommendations, would provide amnesty and a pathway to U.S. citizenship to the 11 to 22 million illegal aliens living in the nation and welcome hundreds of millions of the world’s migrants. The proposed Democrat platform would expand asylum for migrants arriving at the U.S.-Mexico border, freeing them into the interior of the nation while they await their hearings. Gallup research from 2018 finds that nearly 160 million migrants around the world would move to the U.S. if given the opportunity — five million of which are located in Central America. Likewise, the plan ends construction of the border wall,...
    The number of confirmed coronavirus cases being reported over the past six weeks has increased globally. And the executive director of the World Health Organization emergencies program warned a spike in deaths could soon follow.ABC chief medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton explains why the numbers for the U.S. death rate are alarming."Our fatality rate for confirmed COVID-related deaths is hovering just under 5%. That is incredibly high. Worldwide, we're hearing numbers of 0.6% fatality rate. To compare that to seasonal flu - that's 0.1% fatality rate - six times as deadly. If you're talking about numbers like that, you're potentially talking about millions, potentially 2 million Americans who could lose their lives to this," said Dr. Ashton.The ABC medical correspondent reminds everyone that the virus is still unpredictable and everyone should continue to follow health guidelines.Study: Half of COVID-19 cases coming from silent spreadersEMBED More News Videos New research indicates...
    Hope you’re having a good Wednesday, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories: Personal FinanceThe Supreme Court gave abortion-rights supporters a win, but those on both sides of the debate say the battle is far from over Those opposed to abortion see other victories ahead in their work to reduce access to the service. ‘If I tell people about what happened, I honor my ancestors.’ How the pandemic is helping a slavery historian develop a K-12 lesson plan on African-American history Non-academic historians step in to preserve stories that would otherwise be lost. Letter from New York: For these Italians in the U.S., the threat of COVID-19 struck twice ‘It was easy to recognize people from Italy on New York City’s streets in early March — they were the ones who already wore masks, used gloves and practiced social distancing because they acknowledged the crisis that was coming.’ Loaning money to...
    Host Brian Kilmeade questioned this assertion, noting, "With the pandemic, now you know that the growth is not there. You know the unemployment is still 11%. So you can't really say 'you're better off than you were three years ago,' because — at the very least — the pandemic. So you can't really say that, right?" "No, absolutely. Of course you can say that!" Gidley answered. Gidley, Trump's longtime deputy White House press secretary before he was named campaign press secretary last month, then changed the subject, saying  the coronavirus pandemic "hit all of us, not just in this country, but across the world." He repeated a false claim that Joe Biden had called Trump's January partial China travel ban "racist" and "xenophobic." That frequent Trump campaign attack has been debunked by independent fact-checkers and even by Donald Trump himself. Next, Gidley repeated another false Trump claim: that his...
    Americans significantly decreased contributions to Democrats running for state legislature seats in the second quarter as the Democrat Party has turned hard left, fundraising information announced this week shows. The lackluster performance by Democrats at the state level could have broader national implications. First off, state-level political trends sometimes forecast later looming national trends—”from the State House to the White House,” the saying goes. But more importantly, the state legislatures elected this year will handle redistricting next year heading into the 2022 cycle—influencing the direction of and perhaps control of the U.S. House of Representatives for the next decade. The drop-off in Democrat Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) fundraising—which has Democrats $20 million shy of their stated cycle-long goal of $50 million total—comes as their Republican counterparts nearly doubled the total raised by Democrats in the second quarter. The DLCC and its affiliated organizations in the second quarter of 2020 pulled...
    Eagles star wide receiver DeSean Jackson said he “never wanted to put any people down” and “was just trying to uplift African Americans and slavery and just enlighten my people” when he posted anti-Semitic quotes falsely attributed to Adolf Hitler over the weekend. “I post things on my story all the time, and I just probably should’ve never posted anything that Hitler did because Hitler was a bad person, and I know that,” the 33-year-old three-time Pro Bowler said in an Instagram video Tuesday after facing backlash. “I was just trying to uplift African-Americans and slavery and just enlighten my people.” The Eagles and NFL condemned Jackson’s anti-Semitic posts in separate statements Tuesday. Jackson has spoken with general manager Howie Roseman “a lot today,” according to NBC Sports Philadelphia, and was also expected to speak with owner Jeffrey Lurie. It was unclear whether Jackson would be disciplined for his...
    krisanapong detraphiphat Americans have lost more than $77 million in fraud related to Covid-19, according to the Federal Trade Commission. But that tally is likely a severe undercount amid an "unprecedented" scope of scams connected to the coronavirus, according to John Breyault, vice president of public policy, telecommunications and fraud at the National Consumers League, a consumer advocacy group. "I think the FTC's numbers are almost certainly just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to fraud losses," Breyault said. "We know fraud is historically an under-reported crime." More from Personal Finance:Gig workers are eligible for this $1,000 grantCovid-19 could upend retirement plansWealth management firms took PPP loans Con artists have scammed consumers out of $77.4 million in coronavirus-related fraud since the beginning of the year, according to FTC data through Sunday.   Consumers reported around 62,400 instances of fraud. Nearly half were linked to some financial loss. The...
    During Friday’s Democratic Weekly Address, Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE) criticized the Trump administration’s efforts to have the Affordable Care Act struck down in court by stating that “there is never a good time to rip away health care from millions of our fellow Americans, but to do so in the middle of a deadly pandemic is just plain cruel.” Transcript as Follows: “Hello, I’m Tom Carper, the last Vietnam Veteran serving in the United States Senate, and I serve there today as the senior senator from the great state of Delaware. This week, Delawareans and Americans across our country woke up to the stark reports from our health and economic experts that are cause for alarm. The number of Americans our nation has lost to the coronavirus has now reached 130,000 people. The U.S. hit the highest single-day total of new infections with nearly 40,000 confirmed cases this week. Tragically,...
    Black Lives Matter protests that have erupted across the United States may be the largest demonstrations in the country's history, with upwards of 26million people participating.  The figures come from four recent polls - including one released by Civis Analytics - that found that 15 million people to 26 million people have been a part of demonstrations that spawned following the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd.   'I've never seen self-reports of protest participation that high for a specific issue over such a short period,' Neal Caren, associate professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, explained to the New York Times. The figures come from four recent polls that found that 15 million people to 26 million people have been a part of demonstrations that spawned following the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd (protest in New York)  The surveys...
    Florida Ron DeSantis (R-FL) signed into law this week a statewide mandatory E-Verify law that will ban public employers from hiring illegal aliens over American citizens and legal immigrants. DeSantis had lobbied since November 2019 for the state House and Senate to pass mandatory E-Verify for all employers — public and private — with no exemptions for industries. Florida Republican lawmakers, though, quickly gutted the plan, giving exemptions to the tourism and agriculture industries. Eventually, the legislation was watered down to only apply to public employers, being state agencies and private businesses that are contracted to do work for those agents. The law, which went into effect this week, prevents illegal aliens from being hired by those employers over Americans. DeSantis’s original mandatory E-Verify plan, applying to all employers, had huge support across racial, class, and party lines. A St. Pete Polls survey in February revealed that about 60 percent...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — At first glance, the June employment report was a blockbuster. The U.S. economy produced a record 4.8 million added jobs last month, walloping expectations. And the unemployment rate sank from 13.3% all the way to 11.1%. “Today’s announcement,” President Donald Trump declared Thursday after the report was released, “proves that our economy is roaring back.” Maybe. But most economists warn that the risks ahead outweigh the reasons to cheer as the economy and the job market struggle to emerge from a devastating meltdown triggered by the coronavirus. Further hiring gains are imperiled by a resurgence of COVID-19 cases throughout the South and West. And despite a solid rebound in employment, the job market remains badly damaged — by the pandemic itself, by the lockdowns imposed to contain it and by a loss of confidence among Americans fearful of returning to shops and restaurants until a vaccine...
    By PAUL WISEMAN, AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — At first glance, the June employment report was a blockbuster. The U.S. economy produced a record 4.8 million added jobs last month, walloping expectations. And the unemployment rate sank from 13.3% all the way to 11.1%. “Today’s announcement," President Donald Trump declared Thursday after the report was released, "proves that our economy is roaring back.” Maybe. But most economists warn that the risks ahead outweigh the reasons to cheer as the economy and the job market struggle to emerge from a devastating meltdown triggered by the coronavirus. Further hiring gains are imperiled by a resurgence of COVID-19 cases throughout the South and West. And despite a solid rebound in employment, the job market remains badly damaged — by the pandemic itself, by the lockdowns imposed to contain it and by a loss of confidence among Americans fearful of returning to shops...
    The comments were first flagged by American Bridge, a progressive opposition research organization. Cornyn has made similar comments in the past. Since late March, he has taken several different positions on the unemployment benefits, which were a part of a coronavirus relief package known as the CARES Act. On March 25, Cornyn was one of 48 senators who voted for an amendment to the CARES Act to make those unemployment benefits less generous. A day after that vote, Cornyn bragged about the very benefits he opposed, calling the overall legislation a "lifeline" for families that would help "cover their rent, groceries, electric bills, and other expenses until they can make other arrangements, like apply for unemployment insurance under our beefed up provisions." In May, Cornyn shifted back to opposing the benefits, telling NBC News reporter Julie Tsirkin that "we just made a mistake" in approving additional unemployment benefits. Cornyn’s insistence...
    Fox Business anchor Charles Payne said he understands why President Trump did not take questions from reporters during a pre-holiday press briefing at the White House, where he touted the June jobs report that indicated the economy is beginning to rebound from the depths of its crash during the coronavirus pandemic. Payne told “America’s Newsroom” on Thursday, “I think the reason why the president didn’t take any questions is because when we got the May report, which was the best job report then on record in history, the very first question was why did [the] black unemployment rate go higher?” “The inference there was that somehow black Americans did not participate in that great jobs report, when in fact ...  black Americans did get jobs, just more of them came into the labor force, which skewed that one unemployment number.” “So the media is trying to find the most negative, disingenuous thing to talk about instead of something...
    Throughout the 2020 election campaign, members of the Far Left have branded Joe Biden “the ultimate centrist Democrat” and even “an imperial corporatist wrapped in the bloody flag of Charlottesville.” Jill Filipovic, writing in the Guardian, labeled him a “mediocre white guy” with “no vision other than a backward-looking one.” Anybody who takes even a passing glance at Biden’s proposals can see that these portrayals are wrong. On every major issue, Biden, the party’s presumptive nominee for president, has proposed deep, radical reforms to aid the most vulnerable Americans. Consider his tax proposals. In line with general Democratic demands, he would raise the corporate profits tax, eliminate deductions for high-income earners, repeal most of the Trump tax cuts and increase taxes on fossil-fuel emissions. But he doesn’t stop there. His campaign has gone up and beyond, calling for three unique reforms that would dramatically increase taxes on the rich. If...
    A man reads a sign on the door of a New York State Department of Labor office, closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. EFE Photo / File The US government received 1.42 million applications for unemployment benefits in the week ending May 27, according to the DOL. The index of unemployment in the United States it fell to 11.1 percent in June compared to 13.3 percent the previous month, reflecting the gradual reopening of the economy hit by the pandemic of coronavirus COVID-19, reported Thursday the Department of Labor. In the week ending May 27, the U.S. Government received 1.42 million requests for unemployment benefits, compared to 1.48 million in the previous seven days. Unemployment Insurance Weekly Claims Initial claims were 1,427,000 for the week ending 6/27 (-55,000). Insured unemployment was 19,290,000 for the week ending 6/20 (+59,000) .https: //t.co/ys7Eg5LKAW – US Labor Department (@USDOL) July 2, 2020 With...
    The FBIs system to perform background checks on those seeking to own or possess a firearm processed a record 3.9 million requests, the most in the 22-year history of the program and 200,000 more than the previous record, The Associated Press reported. The system created in 1998 to ensure felons and other prohibited people could not buy or possess a firearm eclipsed the previous high of 3.7 million requests set in March, according to AP. With only six months of 2020 completed, more than 19 million checks have been completed, more than all of 2012 and every year before that. The FBI system not only checks for gun sales but states that require a permit to carry a firearm. "Civil unrest, rioting, looting, and calls to defund police are unquestionably motivating factors of why this trend is increasing," said National Shooting Sports Foundation spokesman Mark Oliva. "Americans are right to be...
    MERRIMACK, N.H. (CBS) – RVs and campers are flying off the lot at Campers Inn of Merrimack in New Hampshire, a sign of the times. “We have folks that don’t want to travel on planes, cruise ships. They want to sleep in a bed that they own. They want to handle their own food. They can do that all in a camper or a motor home,” sales manager Peter Maggraf said. “They probably should hurry up because our inventory is getting really tight.” AAA reports that millions of Americans are hitting the roads this summer, despite the coronavirus pandemic. “People are still going to travel. In fact, people are going to be taking 700 million trips over the course of the summer and that’s down about 15% from last year but it’s a still a very significant number,” said John Paul, a Senior Public Affairs Manager for AAA. RVs at...
    Millions of Americans are yet to receive their refunds from the IRS due to 'extreme delays' in processing federal income tax returns, according to the National Taxpayer Advocate service. A new report released to Congress this week revealed the IRS had a backlog of 4.7 million paper tax returns as of May 16, after suspending core operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The health crisis forced the agency to push back the April 15 filing deadline by three months, however, millions of taxpayers who filed before then are still waiting for their returns to be processed.  A new report released to Congress this week revealed the IRS had a backlog of 4.7 million paper tax returns as of May 16  'While the overwhelming majority of taxpayers file electronically, taxpayers who file paper returns are experiencing extreme delays in processing their returns,' the report, first reported on by CBS News,...
    MERRIMACK, N.H. (CBS) – RVs and campers are flying off the lot at Campers Inn of Merrimack in New Hampshire, a sign of the times. “We have folks that don’t want to travel on planes, cruise ships,” sales manager Peter Maggraf said. “They probably should hurry up because our inventory is getting really tight.” AAA reports that millions of Americans are hitting the roads this summer, despite the coronavirus pandemic. “People are still going to travel. In fact, people are going to be taking 700 million trips over the course of the summer and that’s down about 15% from last year but it’s a still a very significant number,” said John Paul, a Senior Public Affairs Manager for AAA. RVs at Campers Inn of Merrimack, N.H. (WBZ-TV) Traditionally, Paul said, summer travelers would go to theme parks and on cruises. This year, they are headed for the woods and the...
    New York Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo, in an effort to prevent the further spread of COVID-19 in his state, expanded New York's mandatory quarantine order Tuesday to include eight additional states experiencing a spike in confirmed cases. Now, travelers from 16 different states will be required to self-quarantine upon traveling to New York. The sixteen states now under the quarantine order are Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Nevada, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah. The states listed have a combined total population of more than 157 million, or nearly half of the population of the entire country.If you're traveling to New York from the following states you must self-quarantine for 14 days. The states are: AL… https://t.co/jRmPb0uHFm — Andrew Cuomo (@Andrew Cuomo)1593530929.0Last week, Gov. Cuomo, along with New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy (D) and Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont (D), announced a joint...
    Donald Trump suspended the entry of most Europeans in March. American make up a big share of Europe's tourism industry, and summer is a key period. More than 15 million Americans travel to Europe each year, while some 10 million Europeans head across the Atlantic. The news was a blow to revenue-starved shopkeepers hoping for a summertime boom. "Americans were 50% of my clientele," said Paola Pellizzari, who owns a mask and jewelry shop on the Saint-Louis island in the heart of Paris and heads its business association. "We can't substitute that clientele with another." The Louvre museum is scheduled to reopen July 6. Americans used to be the largest single group of foreign visitors to the home of the "Mona Lisa." "When I returned after lockdown, five businesses had closed," Pellizzari said. "As days go by, and I listen to the business owners, it gets worse." Sharmaigne Shives, an...
    Nearly half of the U.S. adult population is still without a job as the number of Americans filing for unemployment remains high and reopening in several states is slowed because of high levels of new coronavirus cases. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the employment-population ratio for May 2020 shows that just 52.8 percent of the adult population was employed last month. This means that 47.2 percent of Americans are jobless despite a surprising surge in jobs in May. The employment-population ratio highlights the number of employed people as a percentage of the U.S. adult population, creating a broader picture of the rate of employment across the country. Almost half of all adult Americans have been jobless in the past two month. It was a sharp fall from the 61.2% employed in January 2020 and the record 64.7% set in 2020 The employment-population ratio in the U.S...
    June 30 in sports history: A brief glimpse at Magic kingdom 6 popular US traditions that are actually Canadian Amid pandemic, Americans making a $320 million retirement mistake The coronavirus pandemic has been incredibly costly for millions of people across the country. More than 45 million Americans have filed for unemployment benefits since the start of the pandemic, and although some states have started slowly reopening businesses, many people are still struggling to make ends meet. © Getty   The CARES Act aimed to help those who are facing financial hardship due to COVID-19, and it includes a provision that allows Americans to withdraw up to $100,000 from their retirement accounts without facing an early withdrawal penalty. Load Error While some people may have no choice but to tap their retirement savings to get through tough financial times, there's one mistake that could be incredibly costly.Withdrawing too much...
    A least 26 million Americans are expected to be affected by a new wave of severe storms hitting the US this weekend, with flash flooding in areas throughout the Heartland. As storms moved through eastern Missouri, to Southern Illinois and Indiana on Sunday, an additional 2-3 inches of rainfall was expected to hit Kentucky, which alongside the other states was at risk of flash flooding after already taking a hefty hit on Friday. Video from Chicago morning radio host Joe Cicero showed heavy rain, strong winds and lightning hitting Illinois on Friday.  Ventusky Privacy Policy Severe thunderstorms are set for the North East on Tuesday and Wednesday and outdoor plans will be disrupted But a fresh warning came as a line of storms moved southeast through Kentucky and Tennessee, making its way into Virginia and the Carolinas.  The southeast has endured some gusty winds this weekend, with a...
    The number of Americans who have contracted COVID-19 is likely 10 times higher than the 2.5 million currently confirmed cases, the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. Center For Disease Control (CDC) Director Dr. Robert Redfield’s estimate indicates that at least 25 million Americans have been infected by SARS-CoV-2 to date. That means the fatality rate could be 10 times lower than previously thought. By the numbers as of June 28, via the Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering: 2,510,337 confirmed cases 125,539 fatalities = 5.0% death rate But using Redfield’s numbers, the equation looks like this: 25,103,370 cases 125,539 fatalities = 0.5% death rate Confirmed cases of COVID-19 have soared recently amid a massive testing increase in states across the country. But because the virus can be asymptomatic in up to 50% of people, the number of infected is...
    BET founder Robert Johnson has called for the US to pay $14 trillion in slavery reparations to bring 40 million African-Americans in line with the wealth of white Americans, as he says the nation 'has never come to grips with its original sin of slavery'. Johnson, who was the first black American billionaire, told Fox News that his proposal for reparations to be paid to US descendants of slaves would be 'a huge emotional assuaging of guilt for black and white Americans'. The move would tackle the vast wealth gap between black and white Americans that can be traced right back to the slave trade, make African-Americans financially equal in society and help repair some of the damage caused by generations of inequality, he said.   'You want a big idea: white America, what would happen if you said, "please forgive us and accept our apology. And by the way, we think...
    Vice President Mike Pence celebrated 'remarkable progress' against the coronavirus, even as he acknowledged a surge in cases and the startling number of deaths due to the pandemic at the coronavirus first task force briefing in months Friday. 'We slowed the spread. We flattened the curve. We saved lives,' Pence told reporters at a task force briefing Friday – this time held for the first time at the Department of Health and Human Services. He offered 'sympathies and our deepest condolences' to families and victims – and kicked off the briefing by citing the grim statistics, with 125,000 dead and more than 2.5 million Americans infected. As he did at White House briefings in the past, Pence praised President Trump's actions, including blocking many travelers from China, even as public opinion polls show significant public dissatisfaction with the administration's handling of the pandemic.  'We slowed the spread. We flattened...
    Nancy Kaszerman/Zuma For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.The Trump administration filed a brief Thursday encouraging the Supreme Court to strike down the entirety of the Affordable Care Act, threatening to leave 23 million Americans uninsured amid a pandemic that has killed nearly 120,000 people in the United States. The briefing, filed by Solicitor General Noel Francisco, reaffirms the government’s position that the lack of an individual mandate renders the legislation known as Obamacare unconstitutional. Last year, a federal appeals court found the individual mandate—which requires uninsured Americans to pay a yearly penalty—unconstitutional, because it could no longer be considered a tax after it was set to zero by the GOP’s 2017 tax bill. In March, the Supreme Court announced that it would hear the case, brought by Republican attorneys general, to determine whether the invalidation of the individual mandate would nullify the...
    (CNN)Over 80 million Americans will be under the threat of severe storms the next two days.A cold front pushing through the Northern Plains into the Midwest will trigger potentially severe thunderstorms. Damaging winds and hail will pose the biggest risks, but a tornado cannot be ruled out.Check your local weekend forecast hereMidwest threat Friday"Scattered storms posing a risk for damaging winds and hail are expected from the central Plains east-northeastward across the Midwest to the Great Lakes Friday afternoon and evening," the Storm Prediction Center said.Read MoreThe center issued an Enhanced Risk, level 3 of 5, for areas of eastern Iowa eastward to portions of southern Michigan, including Chicago and Milwaukee.Severe storms from Central Plains to Great Lakes FridayThere is also a Slight Risk, level 2 of 5, for severe storms from the Upper Great Lakes southward to the Central Plains including Detroit, Cleveland and Kansas City.Showers in the morning...
    New York (CNN Business)Consumer spending bounced back sharply in America last month. That's the good news. But paychecks got smaller at the same time, complicating hopes for a quick economic rebound.Personal consumption expenditures -- i.e. spending -- jumped an unprecedented 8.2%, the Bureau of Economic Analysis reported Friday. It reversed from a revised 12.6% collapse in spending in April, when the economy ground to a halt and people stayed at home to limit the spread of Covid-19.America's savings rate stood at 23.2% in May, down from 32.2% in April. So far so good. Many economic indicators registered stark declines in April -- the height of the lockdown -- and rebounded in May, making the data very choppy. It looks like consumer spending fits that pattern, too. That's important because some two-thirds of America's economic growth are driven by consumer spending.But the recovery story is not quite that simple.Read MoreWhile spending...
    Meaghan Ellis June 26, 2020 0 Comments House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) is criticizing President Donald Trump’s administration for its late-night call for the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the Affordable Care Act (ACA) widely referred to as Obamacare. The top Democratic lawmaker released a statement on Thursday evening deeply scrutinizing the president’s call to end Obamacare, an act that also serves as one of former President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden’s signature achievements. “President Trump and the Republicans’ campaign to rip away the protections and benefits of the Affordable Care Act in the middle of the coronavirus crisis is an act of unfathomable cruelty,” she wrote. Pelosi went on to highlight the number of Americans that would be negatively impacted by Trump’s decision. In the dead of night, the Trump Administration has once again asked the Supreme Court to rip away the protections and...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — Planning a trip for the Fourth of July? You’re not alone. A travel data company predicts more than 36 million Americans will hit the road for the Independence Day weekend. Download The New And Improved CBS Philly App! That number isn’t as high as last year’s predictions– then again, no one predicted a pandemic at that time. AAA says Americans will take 700 million trips this summer, which is 120 million fewer than last year. The decline is mostly because of reduced air, bus, rail and cruise travel.
    FEARS have emerged that up to 20 million Americans may now have caught coronavirus - well above the official tally of 2.5million. The news comes as Texas halts the lifting of its lockdown following infection spikes in states across the country. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 5 Estimates now show that up to 20million Americans may have been infected by coronavirusCredit: Getty Images - Getty 5 Dozens of states, including California, have seen significant spikes in cases this weekCredit: EPA The figures were part of the latest estimates released by the Centers for Disease Control. Speaking to reporters, Director Dr Robert Redfield said: "Our best estimate right now is that for every case that was reported, there actually were 10 other infections." He said that only a small portion of cases in March, April, and May would have been picked because only people...
    With almost 125,000 Americans dead and tens of million more still out of work, the U.S. government Thursday night filed its brief in opposition to the Affordable Care Act with the Supreme Court. If they succeed, 20 million people would lose their medical coverage amid a raging pandemic and a deep recession. For good measure, the Foundation for Moral Law, the non-profit helmed by Kayla Moore, wife of the Trump-approved ex-Alabama judge with an eye for under-age girls, is siding with the government. The reality is that Americans place greater faith in Joe Biden than the president when it comes to healthcare, and right now, they are not buying what the administration is selling. Simply put, gutting Obamacare is a political loser. 
    Between 5 and 8% of the American population has been infected by the coronavirus causing the Covid-19, estimated Thursday the director of the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC), Robert Redfield, who insists that the pandemic is far away to be stopped in the country. “Between 5, 6, 7 or 8% of Americans have had an infection, whether they know it or not”, that is to say more than 20 million people and on the order of ten times more than the reported number of cases (2 , 4 million), said Robert Redfield during a conference call with reporters. These figures are based on serological tests carried out on samples representative of the population, and which make it possible to see if the immune system of a person has come into contact with the virus before. They have not been officially published by the CDC, but correspond to...
    More than 20 million Americans may have contracted COVID-19, according to new data compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The data was collected from blood samples of citizens nationwide and indicate that nearly 10 times more people have caught the virus than the 2.3 million confirmed cases of the new coronavirus, representing 6% of the total population according to the Associated Press. “Our best estimate right now is that for every case that’s reported, there actually are 10 other infections,” CDC Director Robert Redfield said on a call with reporters Thursday, Axios reported. While many spikes in new cases caused several states to reverse plans for reopening, U.S. health officials believe this new estimate likely reflects that many Americans contracted the virus earlier in the year without knowing, the AP reports. (RELATED: New York To Mandate 14-Day Quarantine For Travelers From States With ‘Significant Community Spread...