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    NYU professor Cristina Beltran wrote the op-ed for The Washington Post last week  An NYU professor has been slammed for claiming in a Washington Post op-ed that black and Hispanic voters supported Trump because of something called 'multiracial whiteness' which separates them from their own race.  Cristina Beltran - who describes herself using the gender neutral term 'Latinx' -  wrote last week that it was a surprise to see Latino and black faces among the MAGA mob that stormed the Capitol, and that it was also 'unsettling' that  'a quarter to a third of Latino voters voted to re-elect Trump'.  She rationalized their preference for him with the idea of 'multiracial whiteness' which is the idea that white is more than a race or racial identity.  'What are we to make Latino voters inspired by Trump? And what are we to make of unmistakably White mob violence that also includes...
    Just one day until it’s Turkey Day! Here are today’s top stories: Personal Finance Remember, COVID-19 spread when 5 million people left Wuhan for Chinese New Year, yet 50 million Americans will travel for Thanksgiving ‘Staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others from getting sick,’ AAA said. Over 261,000 people have died in the U.S. from the coronavirus.A house by the lake or the sea? Why families buying second homes are choosing the former during COVID-19 Perceptions are shifting and the nation’s lakes and ponds are becoming more popular for families buying a vacation home. ‘It would be incredible if Jeff Bezos could maybe just hold off for a day’: Small business owners can’t compete with Amazon’s Black Friday deals 'I don’t have the luxury of offering 30% off everything,' said one small-business owner.Thanksgiving is increasingly bleak for many food pantries this year — here’s why...
    Terry H. Schwadron November 11, 2020 2:35PM (UTC) Read more articles from the DCReport here. One unresolved mystery of the relative closeness of the presidential election has been the vote among women, particularly white women. Listening to the elation in the streets about having our first woman vice president in Kamala Harris and the supportive calls of healing from Joe Biden, you might have thought this was evident in the voting patterns. : But despite Donald Trump's long record of misogynistic statements, policies and personal acts: While women voters backed Biden, it was by the same proportion as in 2016, a 13% majority. More than half of white women voted for Trump, according to exit poll data. So did white men. Black women voted much more for Biden, even more strongly than Black men. From all the polling information and actual campaigning before the election, it seemed...
    (CNN)Dave Richards arrived at his polling place before dawn, carrying a blue lawn chair and a giant bottle of water.It was about 6 a.m. on October 12 -- the first day of early voting in Georgia -- and the business consultant was ready for a long wait in the Atlanta suburb of Smyrna. After three hours in line, Richards, 51, voted in what he called the most crucial election of his lifetime. "This election is more important than the 2008 one for Barack Obama. That 2008 one was for change and making history. This election is for saving the US," Richards said, citing concerns about racial justice and suppression of Black voters. "The racial divide that is going on, we need someone who is going to be a leader for everyone, not just their base."Across the country, Black voters are turning out in huge numbers. The stakes this year are...
    Washington (CNN)It's one of those seemingly hard-to-explain things: President Donald Trump holds an allure for some Black men, despite his history of denigrating Black Americans and his refusal to explicitly acknowledge systemic racism.This relationship was on display on Monday, when the rapper 50 Cent said to "vote for Trump" in response to Democratic nominee Joe Biden's tax plan.At the Republican National Convention in August, speakers including the former NFL star Herschel Walker and South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott lacquered Trump with praise.With the 2020 presidential election coming down to the wire, it's clear that Team Trump is hoping to maximize its appeal with Black voters. During the final debate on Thursday, NBC's Kristen Welker asked Trump and Biden if they understand why Black parents have to give their children "the talk" about how to handle encounters with the police. The President said yes -- before he quickly moved on and...
    Although many venues have been shuttered for the past six months over COVID-19, B-Side Live is opening this Friday, October 9, in the former Black Buzzard space in the basement of Oskar Blues at 1624 Market Street. Hayley Steiner, who paired bands with visual artists as founder of the RiNo Showcase, will act as the venue's operator and booking manager. She says her vision for the spot is simple: "Human beings need live music, and even in a time like this, there has to be a safe place for it." In keeping with Colorado state guidelines and local public-health orders, capacity will be limited to fifty people inside the venue at a time. The concerts will be socially distanced, and guests will be required to sit. Related Stories Mad Dog Blues Experience Finds Positivity During the Pandemic Celebrate Halloween at Itchy-O's Drive-In Hallowmass Staying Present: Augustus on Color TV...
            by Gillian Flaccus  PORTLAND, Oregon (AP) — People arrested in Portland since late May on non-violent misdemeanor charges during the protests that have racked Oregon’s largest city for more than two months won’t be prosecuted. The new policy announced Tuesday recognizes the outrage and frustration over a history of racial injustice that has led to the city’s often violent protests and the practical realities of the court system, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said. It is running more than two months behind in processing cases because of COVID-19. In this July 29, 2020, file photo, members of the “Wall of Moms” protest group march during a Black Lives Matter protest in Portland, Ore. Protests in Portland have topped the headlines for days, but lost in the shouting are the voices of Black Portlanders themselves and their feelings about the unrest are nuanced and...
    People arrested in Portland since late May on non-violent misdemeanor charges during the protests that have racked Oregon’s largest city for more than two months wont be prosecuted. The new policy announced Tuesday recognizes the outrage and frustration over a history of racial injustice that has led to the citys often violent protests and the practical realities of the court system, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said. It is running more than two months behind in processing cases because of COVID-19, As a result, at least several hundred people arrested over the past few months will not face criminal prosecution, according to statistics provided by Schmidt’s office. The same no prosecution policy applies to those arrested on similar charges in future demonstrations, he said. “The protesters are angry ... and deeply frustrated with what they perceive to be structural inequities in our basic social fabric. And this frustration can...
    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — People who have been arrested since late May on non-violent misdemeanor charges during protests that have racked Oregon’s largest city for more than 70 days won’t be prosecuted. The new policy announced Tuesday recognizes the outrage and frustration over a history of racial injustice that has led to sustained, often violent protest in Portland as well as the more practical realities of the court system, which is running more than two months behind in processing cases because of COVID-19, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said. At least several hundred people who have been arrested in the past few months will not face criminal prosecution, according to statistics provided by Schmidt’s office. People arrested on similar charges in future demonstrations will also not be prosecuted, he said. “The protesters are angry ... and deeply frustrated with what they perceive to be structural inequities...
    By GILLIAN FLACCUS, Associated Press PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — People who have been arrested since late May on non-violent misdemeanor charges during protests that have racked Oregon’s largest city for more than 70 days won't be prosecuted. The new policy announced Tuesday recognizes the outrage and frustration over a history of racial injustice that has led to sustained, often violent protest in Portland as well as the more practical realities of the court system, which is running more than two months behind in processing cases because of COVID-19, Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt said. At least several hundred people who have been arrested in the past few months will not face criminal prosecution, according to statistics provided by Schmidt’s office. People arrested on similar charges in future demonstrations will also not be prosecuted, he said. “The protesters are angry ... and deeply frustrated with what they perceive to be...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Fourth of July celebrations are underway in Chicago, but things are noticeably different considering the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic and recent national unrest.In Washington Park, many exchanged cookouts for community activism amid calls for people of color to boycott Independence Day."We need more than topped Confederate statues," said Jitu Brown, national director of the Journey for Justice Alliance. "We need more than people taking their Confederate flags down or putting Black Lives Matter on their websites."The Quality of Life march stepped off Saturday from in front of Chicago Police Department headquarters at 35th and Michigan.Marchers say the Black experience in America hasn't improved much over the centuries, and neither has access to quality housing, education and jobs."It's a mockery of our values to say that this is the Fourth of July, Independence Day, because it's not because there are still people who aren't free," said marcher Loreen Targos.Similar...
    LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Friday that many Black and ethnic minority people felt they were discriminated against so the country had to break down barriers. When asked if he believed there was insitutionalised racism in the British police, Johnson said: "I think the issue - and it has been really highlighed by the whole Black Lives Matter campaign - is that people unquestionably feel in their lives, Black and minority ethnic groups feel that there are barriers to them and to their success. "And we need to break those down. It's still true and it's unacceptable. And we need to do all sorts of things to tackle it," he said. Johnson added that Britain had changed over the past decade and that the successes should also be spoken about. "What we should also be doing is talking about some of the incredible success stories...
    Actress Jennifer Lawrence has created a public Twitter account to advocate for social justice. She created her Twitter account Tuesday and shared a RepresentUs PSA. “Nearly 1 in 4 Black men in America will be locked up at some point in their life,” Lawrence tweeted in her first tweet. “In this short video, @omarepps & @desmondmeade explain how corruption has broken our criminal justice system—& what we can do to fix it.” Nearly 1 in 4 Black men in America will be locked up at some point in their life. In this short video, @omarepps & @desmondmeade explain how corruption has broken our criminal justice system—& what we can do to fix it. #UnbreakingAmerica #JusticeForSale https://t.co/nBgujzH2BH pic.twitter.com/Jhw4Jtav5L — Jennifer Lawrence – Represent.Us (@JLawrence_RepUs) June 16, 2020 Lawrence also shared a statement regarding the death of Breonna Taylor, who was allegedly shot eight times by police officers who used a...
    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Black community leaders in Tulsa said they fear a large rally by President Donald Trump in the city this weekend could spark violence, and the state’s governor asked Trump not to visit the site of a race massacre where up to 300 black residents were killed by white mobs in 1921. Tens of thousands of Trump supporters are expected in Tulsa Saturday for the first of a series of rallies across the country to rev up his reelection campaign. The gathering at the 19,000-seat BOK Center, and at a 40,000-capacity convention center nearby, would overlap a two-day local celebration of Juneteenth, which marks the end of slavery in the country. Both events are in the city’s downtown area. The Rev. Al Sharpton is among the speakers at the Juneteenth observance in the Greenwood district, where several dozen blocks of black-owned businesses were burned in the...
    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Black community leaders in Tulsa said they fear a large rally by President Donald Trump in the city this weekend could spark violence, and the state’s governor asked Trump not to visit the site of a race massacre where up to 300 black residents were killed by white mobs in 1921. Tens of thousands of Trump supporters are expected in Tulsa Saturday for the first of a series of rallies across the country to rev up his reelection campaign. The gathering at the 19,000-seat BOK Center, and at a 40,000-capacity convention center nearby, would overlap a two-day local celebration of Juneteenth, which marks the end of slavery in the country. Both events are in the city’s downtown area. The Rev. Al Sharpton is among the speakers at the Juneteenth observance in the Greenwood district, where several dozen blocks of black-owned businesses...
    Hi there, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories: Personal FinanceWhy do so many Americans refuse to wear face masks? Politics is part of it — but only part ‘Americans are rarely up in arms when they see signs that require them to wear shoes or shirts because it is part of our culture.’ 3 ways the tax code ‘amplifies’ the racial wealth gap Many black taxpayers aren’t in a financial position to access the tax code’s ‘special aspects.’ 5 ways to support black-owned businesses: ‘It’s not rocket science — people just choose not to do it’ Spending money at black-owned businesses is a way to address racial inequities long after protests are over. Americans have increasingly embraced Black Lives Matter. Will employers let them do so at work? Starbucks now allows employees to show support for Black Lives Matter — but some companies say it violates their dress codes. ‘You...
    Many of the banks tasked with distributing loans under the program instead prioritized big companies with which they had existing business relationships. Better-connected businesses were able to get much of the cash before it ran out, leaving many less-connected ones — including many Black-owned businesses — out in the cold. While Congress added another $310 billion to the program in April, this was of little help to many Black-owned businesses. According to the Center for Responsible Lending, the program's structural design advantaged businesses owned by white people over those owned by people of color. These structural disadvantages, they noted, included a fee structure that "heavily discourages small loans to smaller businesses and, in particular, non-employer firms." Firms owned by people of color are significantly more likely than white-owned businesses to have few or no employees. The report also said, "Pre-existing disparities in access to capital have posed further disadvantages for...
    By now it should be obvious to anyone paying attention that Donald Trump is one of the most notorious revisionists of any modern president, routinely authoring his own myths, lies and tall tales to counter the brutal reality of his incompetence, malevolence and despotism. It started from Day One, with his easily debunked insistence that his inauguration generated the largest audience in the history of audiences. His myth-making continues today with his whiny laments about his popularity backed with alleged “Democrat hoaxes” surrounding every one of his obvious crimes. It’s no wonder, then, that Trump is a marketeer for the apocryphal “Lost Cause,” the toxic revisionist history that emerged in the decades following the Civil War and continues to flourish today. “History,” by the way, is used loosely here, given that the Lost Cause is nothing more than a series of dubiously manufactured myths — counterfactual propaganda designed to absolve southern whites of...
    More than ten years ago, when I was working for the federal government in Chicago, I noticed a police car following closely behind me on the road. I made sure I was at, or below, the speed limit while the cops trailed me for another two miles before pulling me over. At my window, they asked whose car I was driving, and when I told them it was mine, they questioned how I could afford such a car. I was cuffed and placed in the backseat of the squad car while they ran my license and searched my car without permission. Eventually, they allowed me to leave. It was a horrible incident, but one I was prepared for — black parents often tell their children to be ready for these kinds of interactions — and I feel blessed I made it out alive. In the weeks since George Floyd’s murder,...
    LOS ANGELES (AP) — When violent protests over the death of George Floyd, a black man pinned down by a white Minneapolis officer, reached Los Angeles, people of color expressed heartbreak but not necessarily surprise — they had seen it nearly 30 years ago during the Rodney King riots. On April 29, 1992, thousands in the city’s largely minority south side took to the streets after an all-white jury acquitted four white police officers of attacking King, a black driver, after a traffic stop. The outcome outraged a community that watched video of King being beaten with police batons, shot with stun guns and stomped on. By the time order was restored, rioting had spread across much of LA for five days, leaving more than 60 people dead, over 2,300 injured and $1 billion in property damage. Smoke enveloped the city after hundreds of buildings burned to the ground....
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