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    Joe Biden's spokesperson said Monday the U.S. 'reserves the right' to sanction Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman for the 2018 murder of journalist Jamala Khashoggi. 'Our objective is to recalibrate the relationship, prevent this from ever happening again and to find ways to work together with Saudi leadership,' White House Press secretary Jen Psaki told reporters during a press briefing on Monday afternoon. In a Sunday morning interview, Psaki told CNN that there are 'more effective ways' for President Biden to retaliate against MBS than directly issuing sanctions after a recent intelligence report indicated the de facto Saudi ruler was behind Khashoggi's killing. She walked back slightly on those comments on Monday. 'Of course we reserve the right to take any action at a time and manner of our choosing,' Psaki said during her daily briefing. 'Historically, the United States through Democratic and Republican presidents has not typically...
    The first in a series of congressional hearings on the January 6 U.S. Capitol attack has sparked a debate over whether intelligence breakdowns left the building vulnerable to what some officials and lawmakers have termed a “planned and coordinated” insurrection by supporters of former President Donald Trump. Former officials responsible for Capitol security appeared before two Senate panels on Tuesday to defend their actions in the lead-up to and during the bloody riot that left five dead and hundreds injured, saying they did everything they could to prepare for the attack and that the intelligence community failed to see it coming. But some experts say blaming the riot solely on faulty intelligence is misplaced. "It was very much of a collective failure, much like one could argue that September 11, 2001, was a collective failure in response or anticipation,” said Bruce Hoffman, a veteran terrorism expert at the Council on...
    toggle audio on and off change volume download audio The Hunt: Feb. 24, 2021 (J.J. Green) Congress is probing the intelligence failure that led to the Capitol riot. On this week’s edition of “The Hunt, with WTOP National Security Correspondent J.J. Green,” former FBI agent and counter-terrorism expert Tom O’Connor explains why the intelligence may not have been taken as seriously as it should have.
    Savannah Rychcik February 24, 2021 0 Comments Sen. Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.) is weighing in on the blame intelligence officials are placing on each other and other agencies for failed communication leading up to the riots at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. CNN’s Alisyn Camerota asked Merkley during his appearance on “New Day” on Wednesday why Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund did not know about a memo from the FBI warning about potential violence one day before the insurrection until now. “It really is an enormous failure and when I pressed him on that question, he said, ‘Well it came in at a lower level and it wasn’t a polished report. It was just raw intelligence data,'” Merkley said. He continued, “I don’t think we should just say, ‘Well somebody didn’t pass it up.’ I mean the head of the chief of police has a responsibility to establish...
    Washington — Top security officials who were responsible for protecting the Capitol during the January 6 attack on the complex faced lawmakers for the first time on Tuesday, revealing new details about the intelligence leading up to the assault and the frenzy to respond as the chaos unfolded. Four officials, three of whom resigned in the days following the assault, appeared before the Senate Rules Committee and the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, both of which are investigating security failures surrounding the attack.  Questions surrounding the nature of the intelligence leading up to the attack and the delay in calling up National Guard reinforcements to aid Capitol Police were central points of contention in the hearing. The officials who testified included former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger, former House Sergeant-at-Arms Paul Irving, former U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund and Robert Contee, acting chief of the Metropolitan Police Department. ...
    Former officials responsible for securing the U.S. Capitol testified Tuesday before Congress for the first time since the January 6 attack on the complex, blaming inadequate intelligence for the failure to prevent what they characterized as an unexpected, military-style “insurrection” by supporters of former President Donald Trump.   The officials – former U.S. Capitol Police Chief Steven Sund; former House Sergeant at Arms Paul Irving; and former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Michael Stenger – testified before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration. The hearing is the first in a series on security and intelligence failures that led to the January 6 attack.   All three former officials resigned immediately after the attack, which left five people dead, including a Capitol Police officer, and at least 140 police officers injured.   Former Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper Michael Stenger testifies via teleconference before a...
    REUTERS By Jeff Stein I don’t know about you, but I’ve had it up to my keister with “wake-up calls” and “lessons learned.” We keep talking about our intelligence failures like they’re feckless college students. One day their screw-ups are gonna get us killed. (Oh wait, that’s happened already.) The latest kick in the butt came Wednesday courtesy of The Wall Street Journal, which revealed that on Jan. 5, the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis sent a situation report to law enforcement across the country saying, “Nothing significant to report.” Let that sink in. The Journal pointed out without snark that “the office is responsible for monitoring threats online.” Nobody here needs to be reminded that far-right fringe groups and untold tens of thousands of delusional pro-Trump fans had been lighting up their social-media redoubts and chat-room hideouts for weeks with excited talk of marching...
    By Jeff Stein I don’t know about you, but I’ve had it up to my keister with “wake-up calls” and “lessons learned.” We keep talking about our intelligence failures like they’re feckless college students. One day their screw-ups are gonna get us killed. (Oh wait, that’s happened already.) The latest kick in the butt came Wednesday courtesy of The Wall Street Journal, which revealed that on Jan. 5, the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis sent a situation report to law enforcement across the country saying, “Nothing significant to report.” Let that sink in. The Journal pointed out without snark that “the office is responsible for monitoring threats online.” Nobody here needs to be reminded that far-right fringe groups and untold tens of thousands of delusional pro-Trump fans had been lighting up their social-media redoubts and chat-room hideouts for weeks with excited talk of marching on Washington...
    ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images By Jeff Stein What we had here was a failure to communicate. Again, on January 6—years after numerous investigations and study commissions picked apart the intelligence failures leading up to the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Last week, America’s security agencies were again caught flat footed when another kind of militant wave, this time pro-Trump fanatics, stormed and trashed the citadel of American democracy, nearly executing what al-Qaeda had failed to do, destroy the U.S. Capitol. Democrats in Congress are teeing up another round of investigations and commissions to get to the bottom of the January 6 insurrection, which will almost certainly revisit the thorny question of whether the U.S. needs an independent counter-subversion agency to infiltrate and neutralize armed domestic extremists, who are now threatening more attacks on or around the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. Already, a bill has been...
    By Jeff Stein What we had here was a failure to communicate. Again, on January 6—years after numerous investigations and study commissions picked apart the intelligence failures leading up to the September 11, 2001 terror attacks. Last week, America’s security agencies were again caught flat footed when another kind of militant wave, this time pro-Trump fanatics, stormed and trashed the citadel of American democracy, nearly executing what al-Qaeda had failed to do, destroy the U.S. Capitol. Democrats in Congress are teeing up another round of investigations and commissions to get to the bottom of the January 6 insurrection, which will almost certainly revisit the thorny question of whether the U.S. needs an independent counter-subversion agency to infiltrate and neutralize armed domestic extremists, who are now threatening more attacks on or around the inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. Already, a bill has been introduced to empower federal law enforcement...
    House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffSunday shows preview: Washington prepares for an inauguration and impeachment; coronavirus surges across the US What our kids should know after the Capitol Hill riot  Pelosi names 9 impeachment managers MORE (D-Calif.) on Sunday blamed a "massive intelligence and security failure" for the seizure of the U.S. Capitol for hours earlier this month by a violent riot, and vowed that it would be investigated. Speaking on CBS's "Face the Nation," Schiff said that many aspects of the Jan. 6 incident would be investigated, including reports that some lawmakers took people through the Capitol on "reconnaissance" tours ahead of the attack. "Along with my fellow chairs, we are beginning an investigation into what went wrong," Schiff said. "I think there's a massive intelligence and security failure here that needs to be fully investigated,"  #QAnon in Congress? Amid probes that some lawmakers gave unsanctioned...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Federal authorities have formed a strike force of attorneys and investigators from across the country to build "Sedition and Conspiracy" cases against some of those involved in the U.S. Capitol attack, who they believe were organized to incite a rebellion. More than 70 people have already been charged with lesser crimes.But Illinois Congressman Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL 8th District) told the ABC7 I-Team that what happened was the result of an FBI intelligence failure.RELATED: FBI warned of violent 'war' at Capitol in internal report issued day before deadly riot: Report"There's failures at multiple levels, and right now we've launched an investigation with regard to the security situation," Krishnamoorthi said. "Unfortunately there are militia groups, armed militia groups across the country that are coordinating to make a show of force especially around Inauguration Day. And I have to tell you Chuck that we are not going to stand by...
    VIENNA (Reuters) - The scale of Austria's intelligence failure before last week's deadly jihadist attack in Vienna became clearer on Monday as the Interior Ministry confirmed the attacker had taken part in a large meeting in the summer that included Islamists from abroad. Austria has acknowledged that "intolerable mistakes were made" in the handling of intelligence on the attacker, a convicted jihadist, who killed four people in a shooting rampage in the city centre last Monday. It has previously confirmed that the gunman had tried to buy ammunition in Slovakia and had met people from Germany who were under observation. Swiss Sunday newspaper NZZ am Sonntag said two men arrested in Switzerland in connection with the attack had travelled to Vienna between July 16 and July 20 to meet the attacker, citing two sources. "A meeting took place in Vienna among the people (you) addressed from Germany and Switzerland but...
    By Francois Murphy VIENNA (Reuters) - Austria's opposition parties lambasted the government on Thursday over its admitted mishandling of intelligence that might have prevented a deadly rampage in Vienna this week, accusing it of trying to shift the blame onto others. A 20-year-old native of the city, who had previously been jailed for trying to join Islamic State in Syria, was shot dead by police within nine minutes of opening fire on bystanders and bars on Monday. He killed four people. Fifteen arrests have been made since the attack, but Interior Minister Karl Nehammer conceded on Wednesday that "some things went wrong" in processing intelligence from neighbouring Slovakia in July that the attacker had tried to buy ammunition. Nehammer and Chancellor Sebastian Kurz have also said, however, that the attacker was released from prison too soon because he fooled a deradicalisation programme as to his rehabilitation. The organisation running the...
    Joe Biden and Kamala Harris say they spoke to Jacob Blakes family Facebook warns that Apples privacy changes will decimate a small part of its advertising business Praise the Process Not the Talent: How to Build a Growth Mindset In Kids Your child brings home a good grade on a reading or math assignment. You are understandably proud and want to acknowledge this achievement and encourage them to keep trying. What do you say? The words are probably out of your mouth before you’ve thought about it: “You’re so smart!” you declare, sticking the assignment to the fridge. © Provided by Fatherly But that might actually be the wrong thing to say.  Parents influence whether or not their children develop what psychologists call a “growth mindset” — a belief that intelligence can be developed over time. Children with this mindset are more likely to take on challenges, bounce back...
    On August 15, Democratic Representative Eric Swalwell of California proposed, through the medium of (what else?) Twitter, that after the election a “Presidential Crimes Commission” should be created to investigate the manifold derelictions of Donald J. Trump, including “[s]abotaging the mail to win an election.” He evidently regards this idea as a bold and meaningful innovation: “I don’t say this lightly.” Why is this a bad idea? Swalwell appears to be an able and articulate House member and has managed to snare at least his share of TV time on the cable news shows. A congressman since 2012, he is not a neophyte, and his membership on the intelligence and judiciary committees ought to make him knowledgeable about possible law-breaking by Trump. But a commission? That is a half-step stronger than demanding that someone conduct a study. I don’t question Swalwell’s motives, but I think that somewhere along the line this...
    On August 15, Democratic Representative Eric Swalwell of California proposed, through the medium of (what else?) Twitter, that after the election a “Presidential Crimes Commission” should be created to investigate the manifold derelictions of Donald J. Trump, including “[s]abotaging the mail to win an election.” He evidently regards this idea as a bold and meaningful innovation: “I don’t say this lightly.” Why is this a bad idea? Swalwell appears to be an able and articulate House member and has managed to snare at least his share of TV time on the cable news shows. A congressman since 2012, he is not a neophyte, and his membership on the intelligence and judiciary committees ought to make him knowledgeable about possible law-breaking by Trump. But a commission? That is a half-step stronger than demanding that someone conduct a study. I don’t question Swalwell’s motives, but I think that somewhere along the line this...
    by Erik J. Dahl, Naval Postgraduate School As the coronavirus pandemic continues to unfold, it’s clear that having better information sooner, and acting more quickly on what was known, could have slowed the spread of the outbreak and saved more people’s lives. There may be finger-pointing about who should have done better – and President Donald Trump has already begun laying blame. But as a former naval intelligence officer who teaches and studies the U.S. intelligence community, I believe it’s useful to look at the whole process of how information about diseases gets collected and processed, by the U.S. government but also by many other organizations around the world. The role of traditional US intelligence agencies The U.S. intelligence community has for many years considered the possible threat of disease among the potential risks to national stability and security. For instance, then-Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told Congress in...
    (CNN)Looters in New York City were able to tear through some of the most expensive, high-end stores in the city because of an intelligence failure, according to a high-ranking police official. The coordinated effort of looters to target the Manhattan neighborhood of SoHo without the police department's knowledge points to something the NYPD missed, said John Miller, the NYPD's chief of counterterrorism and intelligence."On the looting, that's an intelligence failure," Miller said at a briefing on Saturday. "If a couple of hundred people knew to be in a certain place at a certain time for criminal activity and we didn't detect that, that's on me. We've gone back looking for 'where was the Facebook page, where was the chatter in the places where we monitor gang's social media' and we still haven't seen it."In midtown Manhattan, there was widespread looting along the neighborhood's eastern portion, including the high-end shopping district...
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