Monday, Mar 01, 2021 - 07:43:41
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Chief Contee:

    The chief of the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan Police said he was left “stunned” and “surprised” by the initial reluctance to send the National Guard to quell the Jan. 6 riot at the Capitol. Acting Chief Robert Contee made his remarks on Tuesday in testimony before the Senate Rules and Homeland Security committees. His comments were detailed by The Hill. Contee said he was part of an emergency phone call at 2:22 p.m. on Jan. 6 which included leaders of the National Guard, the Capitol Police and the Department of the Army. The call came more than an hour after members of his department were sent to the Capitol. "I was surprised at the reluctance to immediately send the National Guard to the Capitol grounds," Contee told senators. According to The Hill, nearly an hour passed before the Pentagon approved deployment of more Guard troops. Contee also noted that at 2:30 p.m.,...
    More On: capitol riot Second day of Senate hearings begins for Merrick Garland Senate panels to hold hearings on deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot Senate hearing on Capitol riot security breach gets underway Former Florida cop charged with breaching US Capitol The acting chief of Washington, DC’s Metropolitan Police Department was “stunned” by a lack of urgency in deploying the National Guard to quash the deadly Jan. 6 riot at the US Capitol. Testifying Tuesday before a Senate panel on the insurrection, Chief Robert Contee recalled a group phone call he had with now-former Capitol Police Chief Steve Sund, US Army leaders and Washington, DC officials as the unrest spiraled out of control. “Chief Sund was pleading for the deployment of the National Guard,” said Contee. “And in response to that, there was not an immediate ‘Yes, the National Guard is responding. Yes, the National Guard is on the...
    The head of Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) told Senate lawmakers on Tuesday that there was an initial "reluctance" to send the National Guard during the Jan. 6 rioting at the U.S. Capitol — a resistance that left him "surprised" and "stunned," given the gravity of the violent attack. Testifying before a pair of Senate committees, Robert Contee said that at 2:22 p.m. on Jan. 6 — more than an hour after his forces were summoned to the Capitol — he was part of an emergency phone call that included leaders of the Capitol Police, the National Guard and the Department of the Army. "I was surprised at the reluctance to immediately send the National Guard to the Capitol grounds," Contee told senators on the Rules and Homeland Security committees. Almost an hour would pass before the Pentagon would approve the deployment of more Guard troops to defuse the violent mob, and those...
    The acting chief of the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, D.C., said he was "honestly shocked" by how slowly the National Guard responded to his emergency request for help during the Capitol riot last month as he scrambled to mobilize 850 officers from neighboring states. "I was stunned at the response from Department of the Army, which was reluctant to send the D.C. National Guard to the Capitol," acting MPD Chief Robert Contee wrote in a statement submitted ahead of a joint hearing Tuesday between the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee and Senate Rules Committee. "On the call, in an effort to seek clarification, I asked the Capitol Police Chief if he were, in fact, requesting the assistance of the National Guard and then asked the U.S. Army representatives on the call if they were refusing to deploy the Guard to assist. The Army staff responded that they...
    D.C. police Chief Robert Contee has confirmed that Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., was issued a concealed carry permit in the district after the congresswoman raised controversy by vowing to bring a firearm into the Capitol after the riot last month. “A concealed carry permit was issued in that case,” Contee said at a press conference on Thursday, when asked about Boebert. The congresswoman released an ad last month that featured her walking across the Capitol grounds saying, “I will carry my firearm in D.C. and in Congress.” Contee noted in the press conference that although the video implies Boebert is armed, she is not actually seen carrying a firearm, and said that he learned after the ad’s release that a permit application was “in the works,” at that time. “As we do with all our permits, if citizens are allowed to carry, then we grant them a permit,” Contee said....
    A second police officer has died by suicide following the Jan. 6 incident where supporters of former President Donald Trump rioted and stormed the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C., according to testimony from Metropolitan Police’s (MPD) Acting Chief of Police Robert Contee. Contee noted that “two officers” at the Capitol that day “took their own lives in the aftermath of that battle” during his testimony on Tuesday regarding security failures at the U.S. Capitol. Officers Jeffrey Smith and Howard Liebengood both died by suicide. Smith’s death had previously gone unreported, according to Politico. “And tragically, two officers who were at the Capitol on January 6th, one each from the Capitol Police and MPD, took their own lives in the aftermath of that battle,” Contee said during the testimony, according to a copy reviewed by the Daily Caller. “We honor the service and sacrifices of Officers Brian Sicknick, Howard Liebengood, and Jeffery Smith,...
    Supporters of President Donald Trump attempted to steal a gun from a D.C. police officer and use it against him during last week’s storming of the U.S. Capitol, according to the police chief. The officer was said to be “very shaken, very appalled, very angry” after being released from the hospital, the chief said. D.C. Metropolitan Police Department Chief Robert Contee said the Trump supporters attacked his officer and tried to steal his gun, MSN News reported. He said the officer managed to retain his firearm but did lose some of his other department-issued equipment. In addition to being angry, Contee said the officer is “doing better and he is healing.” The chief added that the officer has not yet returned to work. Contee said the officer is not one of those shown in videos that went viral following the riot at the U.S. Capitol on January 6. The chief...
    Acting Metropolitan Police Chief Robert Contee said U.S. Capitol Police Officers told him that last week’s riot in the Capitol “was scarier” than their time in combat during the Iraq War. A mob of supporters for President Donald Trump breached the Capitol last week in an attempt to stop the congressional certification for President-elect Joe Biden’s electoral victory. Five individuals died as a result of the riot, including Ashli Babbit, a 35-year-old Air Force veteran, who was shot by law enforcement. Capitol Police Officer Brian D. Sicknick also reportedly died after being injured “while physically engaging with protesters.” “I have 56 officers and counting that were injured in some way, shape, form or fashion …not just for their lives, but for the democracy of this country,” Contee said at a news conference Monday. “I have talked to officers, who have done two tours in Iraq and said that this was scarier...
    The Washington, D.C. police chief believes the Capitol Police miscalculated what President Donald Trump supporters, who are generally pro-law enforcement, would do before a group stormed the Capitol Wednesday, the DCist reported Friday. Acting Metropolitan Police Chief Robert Contee III said that unlike the Capitol Police, the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) prepared for the pro-Trump rallies by discussing mutual aid efforts with other agencies prior to Wednesday’s events and making sure they had resources on hand to respond to any unrest, the DCist reported. “I believe that there was a miscalculation on what [Capitol Police] were actually going to be dealing with on their part,” Contee said on The Politics Hour. “A lot of these supporters of our president that were out are normally law enforcement supporters, that kind of thing, perhaps there was a miscalculation. I mean, that would be my guess, that there was a miscalculation in terms of...
    The four people killed during the chaos at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday were all from outside the Washington D.C., according to Metropolitan Police Robert Contee. During a press conference on Thursday, Contee identified the woman who was shot and killed by law enforcement as 35-year-old Ashli Babbit from Huntington, Maryland. The other three who died from medical emergencies were identified as 50-year-old Benjamin Phillips of Ringtown, Pennsylvania, 55-year-old Kevin Greeson of Athens, Alabama, and 34-year-old Roseanne Boylan of Kennesaw, Georgia. Police are actively investigating Babbit's death. Babbit, identified in media reports as an Air Force veteran who resided in San Diego, was taken to a nearby hospital after being shot in the Capitol building and was later pronounced dead. Hundreds of President Trump's supporters stormed the Capitol building after a protest against Congress certifying President-elect Joe Biden's victory. In total, Contee said 68 people were arrested on Wednesday. Of...
    Robert Contee III, the chief of D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department, said on Monday that he will reach out to Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-Colo.) after she said she intended to carry a handgun in the district. Contee said during a press conference that he wanted to ensure Boebert “is aware of the what the laws of the District of Columbia are," according to Politico. "That congresswoman will be subjected to the same penalties as anyone else that’s caught on the D.C. streets carrying a firearm,” Contee said. The Colorado representative made it clear in November after winning her race that she planned on carrying her gun while in D.C. Regulations dated back to 1967 prohibit federal or D.C. laws from stopping a member of Congress from having a handgun in their office but the gun must be unloaded and securely wrapped. In D.C., a license is required to carry a firearm and open...
    D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser is expected Tuesday to name Robert Contee as the District’s new interim police chief. The announcement is expected at a news conference, according to The Washington Post. The paper interviewed Contee ahead of the announcement. Bowser is also expected to say at that news conference that the director of D.C.’s 911 call center is stepping down. NBC Washington reports Office of Unified Communications Director Karima Holmes is the third person on Bowser’s public safety team to leave in recent months. The call center has been under fire over D.C. Fire and EMS crews being dispatched to wrong or nonexistent addresses. In the police department, Contee, 48, has been serving as the assistant chief of the Investigative Services Bureau since 2018. He joined the department as a cadet in 1989. Contee takes the reins now that outgoing D.C. Police Chief Peter Newsham has been named police chief in Prince...
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