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    Start with putting the right policies in place. February 25, 2021 4 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. The workplace can be a relatively high-stress environment even in the best of times. Between fast-approaching deadlines, miscommunication, and other on-the-job quagmires, stress management has long been a key part of every workplace. Covid has made the need even greater than ever before. Related: Become A Better Leader By Helping Your Team Manage Stress According to Pathways, a mental and behavioral health provider, more than three-quarters of workers have reported anxiety as a cause for concern in their work recently. Employee anxiety is bad news for both productivity and morale, meaning that business leaders cannot afford to ignore the stress epidemic any longer. And change needs to start from up top. De-stressing the office is no small task, and...
    VIDEO5:0405:04BET founder: Leaders need to increase Black representation in workforceClosing Bell BET founder Robert Johnson told CNBC on Monday he believes companies will more seriously address racial inequality within their workforces once a failure to do so starts impacting their stock price. "Companies understand return on investment capital. They understand return on equity. They understand total shareholder return," Johnson said on "Closing Bell." "Tie all of those factors to achieving opportunities in employment at all levels for Black Americans, I think then you'll see results because that's what companies understand. They respond to financial factors and market conditions." Johnson's comments follow the release of a new report on Black employment in the U.S. private sector from consulting giant McKinsey & Company. Drawing on data from 24 companies that together account for 3.7 million workers, the McKinsey report found notable disparities in Black representation in management roles. Black...
    By Norma Galeana and Alan Devall MECCA, Calif. (Reuters) - Deemed an essential workforce during the pandemic, California's mostly Latino farmworkers are also underrepresented in the state's vaccination program, health officials and activists say, prompting the delivery of shots in the fields. In one such campaign, public health officials vaccinated about 250 workers on Monday, including about 150 from Hadley's Date Gardens, in the first of what they hope will be a weekly visit to agricultural lands. "We're essential for the country, to be able to feed the other families," Maria Razo, 45, a date sorter, said from the vaccination site in Mecca, California, about 140 miles (225 km) east of Los Angeles. "Now that we have it, we’re going to work a little safer," Razo said after getting her first of two shots of the vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc and German partner BioNTech SE. Though falling behind health...
    Dear Ms. MoneyPeace: I am a working mom with two children studying from home. I’ve read about making use of time at home to declutter, rearrange financial priorities and consider ways to save. Please write something for those of us overworked who need to improve our financial situation but do not have much time. As an essential worker, I am working harder and often longer hours, so I am still commuting — no savings there. My husband is working from home. We are both trying to make the most of remote learning school for our children — which means me checking their homework every night. He works at home yet seems to have more time on his hands and is always looking to buy things online. Property that we do not need is his latest venture. We have no time to get our wills done, clean out our home...
    Though Denver Public Schools will be shut down until October 16, the Denver Public Library is just starting a soft reopening, and many workers for the City and County of Denver are doing their gigs from home, Halloween is still happening. The holiday comes as coronavirus cases rise nationally and President Donald Trump, who is dealing with COVID-19, mugs as though he's doing fine and encourages residents of the United States not to be scared. But plenty of people are, especially as they contemplate kids and trick-or-treat activities. And so the Denver Department of Public Health and Environment has released a set of guidelines regarding what people can do to reduce their risk of transmitting or catching the virus as they celebrate Halloween. The guidelines are based on the county's current status on the state's COVID-19 Dial Dashboard, where Denver falls somewhere in the middle, under Safer at Home, Level 2 Concern, with enough cases...
    A promotional video for a Mazda dealership in Queensland has been ridiculed after copying TikTok's viral 'Savage' dance.   Grand Prix Mazda Aspley, in Brisbane, posted the ad to social media on September 17 and declared 'September's Savage' would be a month packed with savings.   The video showed three staff members performing the choreographed dance routine while one of them promoted the sale.  But the ad was immediately slammed by perplexed social media viewers, who declared the marketing idea missed the mark.   'Omg I don't know what's worse, that the company think this marketing works or the fact these people actually did this,' one Facebook user wrote.   A cringeworthy advertisement from Grand Prix Mazda Aspley (pictured) has been ridiculed online after copying TikTok's viral 'Savage' dance Another said: 'Why do I feel like a middle aged man named Greg thought this would be a good idea?  'Probably saw his niece watching...
    Fuming Paire shows little effort in 1st-round loss in Rome 15 Health Claims on Food Labels That Are Total BS — Sorry! Tech companies are starting to let their employees work from anywhere — as long as they take a lower salary © Provided by Business Insider Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images Software firm VMware will start cutting pay for employees who leave Silicon Valley, according to a recent Bloomberg report.  While employees can work remotely on a permanent basis, they could face an 18% pay cut for moving to a city like Denver, Bloomberg reports. VMware isn't the only company reconsidering employee pay. Facebook will start adjusting salaries in January based on where employees live, according to The New York Times. Twitter has had a pay localization policy in place for years as part of a broader push to decentralize its workforce.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories....
    Next stop: new ‘do. Following months of DIY haircuts and at-home beauty hacks, The Post teamed up with the newly reopened Pierre Michel Salon on the Upper East Side to give five essential workers — from a bus driver to a hospital employee — well-deserved makeovers. “I was honored to have the opportunity to give something back to the front-line workers who have been working tirelessly and so hard for months,” Pierre Michel head stylist Jerome Lordet told The Post, adding that the luxe beauty treatments were “the least I could do.” Here, the five newly refreshed ladies reveal about how they love their new color and freshly lacquered digits. Maria Santos, 39, Lower Manhattan Maria Santos Job: Physician’s assistant working in internal medicine with COVID-19 patients at Montefiore Hospital Life on the front lines: “I’ve been working with COVID patients since the start [of the pandemic in New York...
    Next stop: new ‘do. Following months of DIY haircuts and at-home beauty hacks, The Post teamed up with the newly reopened Pierre Michel Salon on the Upper East Side to give five essential workers — from a bus driver to a hospital employee — well-deserved makeovers. “I was honored to have the opportunity to give something back to the front-line workers who have been working tirelessly and so hard for months,” Pierre Michel head stylist Jerome Lordet told The Post, adding that the luxe beauty treatments were “the least I could do.” Here, the five newly refreshed ladies reveal about how they love their new color and freshly lacquered digits. Maria Santos, 39, Lower Manhattan Maria Santos Job: Physician’s assistant working in internal medicine with COVID-19 patients at Montefiore Hospital Life on the front lines: “I’ve been working with COVID patients since the start [of the pandemic in New York...
    Coronavirus — Eight Tabasco doctors and nurses took refuge in the refusal of the IMSS authorities to allow them to leave or change their area to a non-COVID Health workers from various states of the country have presented shelters to be absent for fear of catching COVID-19Therefore, in some cases, they indicate that they do not have the necessary protection supplies and still others say they suffer from chronic degenerative diseases, which increases the risk of coronavirus. At the cut of June 16 of the Ministry of Health, 32 thousand 388 health workers have infected with COVID-19, and 463 have died in Mexico. The Ministry of Health reported in May that 53 percent of COVID-19 infected doctors are from the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS). Given this, eight Tabasco doctors and nurses they were protected by the refusal of the IMSS authorities to allow them to leave or...
    Someone picked, packaged and sent those berries off to your local grocery store. That someone likely works in Washington State’s Yakima County, home to a $1 billion agricultural industry and now also a hot spot for COVID-19 infections. There were more than 6,283 cases as of Monday as the deadly virus works its way out of urban cities and into rural America. Washington state not only is the nation’s biggest supplier of apples, it also produces 90.5% of red raspberries in the U.S. Fruits make up the biggest share of the state’s roughly $3.4 billion pile of annual agriculture exports. “ Coronavirus has raised fears of meat shortages, and Yakima County has become a hot spot for outbreaks among farm workers. ” Places like Yakima only rarely make the nightly news. Recently, coronavirus has raised fears of meat shortages and concerns that the food supply will be...
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