Thursday, Mar 04, 2021 - 05:10:38
15 results - (0.000 seconds)

Astra’s rocket:

    Rocket 3.2 launches from Kodiak, Alaska.Astra / John Kraus Rocket builder Astra is preparing to go public in the second quarter, taking on a crowded field of competitors while aiming for daily deliveries to space by 2025. CEO Chris Kemp spoke to CNBC this month about the company's plans for its upcoming cash infusion. Once Astra closes its merger with Holicity, a special purpose acquisition company, the venture expects it will have as much as $500 million in capital on hand. That includes a previously unreported $30 million funding round that the rocket builder closed prior to announcing its SPAC deal. Astra, based in Alameda, California, raised the smaller round to help it "go faster" while the merger awaits regulatory approval, with Holicity and existing investors such as Marc Benioff contributing. "We're actually building a space platform – in much the same way that when Amazon started, they weren't marketing...
    Oklahoma shooting leaves five children, one adult dead Senate Confirms Mayorkas as Homeland Security Secretary Astra, rocket startup that has yet to conduct a successful launch, is going public Astra, a US-based rocket startup aiming to build cheap rockets to haul satellites to space, announced Tuesday that it's going public via a reverse merger known as SPAC. © Astra Rocket 3.1 left the Alaskan coast at Astra's Kodiak launch site on September 12, 2020. The company has yet to begin commercial operations, and though a December test launch of its Rocket 3.2 came very close to entering Earth's orbit, Astra has not yet conducted a fully successful test launch. Load Error But Holicity — a special-purpose acquisition company (SPAC), or a "blank check" investing tool, created by Craig McCaw who made a fortune in the telecom business — is planning to acquire the company. ...
    (Reuters) - Astra, a startup that makes small rockets to send satellites into orbit, is going public at a valuation of $2.1 billion through a deal with blank-check company Holicity Inc, the companies said on Tuesday. The deal with Holicity is expected to provide up to $500 million in cash proceeds, they said. This includes a $200 million private investment led by funds and accounts managed by BlackRock Inc, the statement added. Holicity's shares were up about 56% in pre-market trading. Mergers with blank-check companies, also known as special purpose acquisition companies (SPACs), have become an increasingly popular route to public markets for companies seeking to avoid a traditional initial public offering. Astra's existing shareholders will own about 78% of common stock of the combined company, the statement said. Ad firm Taboola and electric vehicle maker Faraday Future are just a few of the companies that have joined the SPAC...
    A close up view of Rocket 3.2's engines shortly after liftoff.Astra / John Kraus San Francisco-area startup Astra is going to be the next publicly-traded space stock, as well as the first that's dedicated to orbital rocket launches. Astra announced on CNBC's Squawk Box on Monday that it is merging with special purpose acquisition company Holicity to go public in a deal that values the rocket company at a $2.1 billion enterprise value. Astra will list on the Nasdaq under the ticker symbol ASTR when the deal closes, which is expected in the second quarter of this year. Holicity's SPAC currently trades under the ticker HOL. The deal is expected to provide Astra with up to $500 million in cash proceeds, including $200 million in a PIPE round led by BlackRock.Rocket 3.2 launches from Kodiak, Alaska.Astra / John KrausThe rocket startup became the latest private company to reach space in December...
    Astra, a California-based startup aimed at launching small satellites, successfully launched its rocket to space for the first time yesterday from Alaska, but the vehicle barely missed reaching the right speed to achieve orbit. Still, the company says the test flight was a major success and is preparing to fly its next rocket, this time with a payload on board. “This far exceeded our team’s expectations,” Chris Kemp, Astra’s CEO, said on a press call. “This far exceeded our team’s expectations.” Astra’s rocket, dubbed 3.2, took off from Alaska’s Pacific Spaceport Complex just before 4PM ET on Tuesday. The vehicle successfully climbed to space, performing all of its expected engine burns and separations. The rocket reached its target altitude of 390 kilometers, or about 242 miles, and a final speed of 7.2 kilometers per second, or more than 16,000 miles per hour. Unfortunately, that was just short of 7.68 kilometers...
    Towns finds increased support from T-wolves on and off court 25 gifts that let you give back Rocket startup Astra reaches space for the first time with second launch attempt from Alaska San Francisco-area startup Astra became the latest U.S. rocket builder to reach space on Tuesday, with the successful launch of its Rocket 3.2 vehicle from Kodiak, Alaska. Astra shared images captured by the rocket at the edge of space. The rocket came just shy of reaching orbit, with Astra CEO Chris Kemp telling reporters after the launch that the vehicle reached the target altitude of 390 kilometers but was "just a half a kilometer per second short" of the target orbital velocity. "This far exceeded our team's expectations," Kemp said. © Provided by CNBC Astra launches Rocket 3.1 from Kodiak, Alaska on Sept. 12, 2020. San Francisco-area startup Astra became the latest U.S. rocket builder to reach...
    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — There were no injuries when a test rocket fired by an aerospace company crashed and exploded on a hillside on an Alaska island, officials said. The rocket operated by Astra from the nearby Pacific Spaceport Complex-Alaska crashed on Kodiak Island Friday, The Anchorage Daily News reported. The newspaper reported that Mark Lester, president of the Alaska Aerospace Corporation, which operates the spaceport, said in a radio interview that the fire caused by the crash was put out quickly and no one was hurt. “The launch was terminated early, which is part of our safety process,” Lester said. “We are prepared for these things. The key is public safety, and everything we did to keep the air, waterways and land free from the public is exactly why we do that in conditions like this.” Astra's Rocket 3.1 appeared to experience “slight oscillation,” causing the rocket to drift...
    SPACE start-up Astra sees its first test rocket come crashing back to earth after flying for just 30 seconds in Alaska. The rocket - which veered off course and catapulted to the ground - was a bold new launch by California start-up Astra Space Inc. 5The 38-foot-tall rocket took off from the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Kodiak, Alaska, at 7.19pm FridayCredit: Twitter 5The rocket flew for about 30 seconds before it hit the ground in a fiery explosionCredit: Facebook 5 The 38-foot-tall rocket took off from the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Kodiak, Alaska, at 7.19pm Friday and flew for about 30 seconds before it hit the ground in a fiery explosion. "Successful lift off and fly out, but the flight ended during the first-stage burn. It does look like we got a good amount of nominal flight time. More updates to come!" Astra tweeted. Astra is among a number of...
    Astra Space Inc's first attempt to launch a rocket into orbit came to a disappointing end as it veered off course and catapulted to the ground.  The California start-up conducted launch from the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Kodiak, Alaska, on Friday evening.  Video showed the 38-foot-tall rocket taking off at 7.19pm local time and flying for about 30 seconds before it fizzled out and came tumbling to the ground, creating a fiery explosion upon landing.  'Successful lift off and fly out, but the flight ended during the first-stage burn. It does look like we got a good amount of nominal flight time. More updates to come!' Astra tweeted.  Scroll down for video  Astra Space Inc made its first attempt to launch a rocket into orbit on Friday in Kodiak, Alaska Video showed the 38-foot-tall rocket taking off from the Pacific Spaceport Complex at 7.19pm local time...
    Amplify the sound! Orbit launch attempt of Rocket 3.1 pic.twitter.com/nm1bDewdl5September 12, 2020 After the launch of the failed launch site, the space launch Astra 2020 could attempt its second orbital test shot before completion. California based company Introduced its first orbital test aircraft On Friday night (September 11), a 38-foot (12-meter) rocket launches its 3.1-foot vehicle from the Pacific Spaceport campus on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Everything went exactly right when we first started. But then Rocket 3.1 certainly began to recede, prompting launch controls to command engine shutdown for safety reasons. The booster came to earth with a bang, an explosion Some spectators know the fireball floor. Related: History of rocketsFigure 1 of 2(Image credit: Astra / John Cross)Figure 2 of 2 (Image credit: Astra / John Cross) Preliminary data analyzes suggest a problem with Rocket 3.1’s guidance system, which “introduced some minor roll oscillations in the aircraft,” Astra co-founder...
    Astra stressed that it didn’t expect to reach orbit with its first rocket. It anticipated three flights before reaching that milestone. The mission still ended sooner than expected, though, and the company positioned the premature end as a chance to collect “valuable experience” and flight data. It remained confident that could can reach orbit as planned. The follow-up Rocket 3.2 vehicle is already complete, and you should see a launch sometime after Astra spends “several weeks” poring over flight data. The Alameda-based firm is effectively a competitor to Rocket Lab, with a similar goal of launching payloads into orbit at less cost than usual. To some extent, it’s already successful — Rocket 3.1 took off with a launch system deployed by just six people in under a week. While that won’t necessarily be true of future launches, it shows that you don’t always need extensive ground crews. ...
    The first orbital mission for rocket launch startup Astra ended without its Rocket 3.1 reaching orbit. The rocket successfully lifted off from the Pacific Spaceport Complex in Alaska at about 11:19PM ET Friday, but the company said its guidance system “introduced some slight oscillation into the flight,” which caused the rocket to drift from its planned trajectory. The flight safety system shut down the engines, and the rocket fell back to the ground. It wasn’t carrying any payloads. A spectator caught the launch on video, showing the rocket’s ascent. In the footage, the rocket’s engine shuts off mid-flight and a few moments later, you can see flames as the rocket hits the ground. The company’s stated objective with this flight was to have a nominal first stage burn, which apparently didn’t quite happen since that’s when the engine shutdown occurred. But Astra wasn’t planning to reach orbit with...
    Astra’s first orbital mission landed, but it soon came down again. California-based space travel made its debut The first orbital test aircraft Tonight (September 11), its two-stage rocket launches 3.1 into the sky at 11:20 pm from the Pacific Spaceport campus in Alaska (local Alaska time at 7:20 pm and September 12 at 0320 GMT). The 38-foot-tall (12 meters) booster, without carrying any loads, did not reach the finish line. “Successful throw, but the first phase of the flight was over when it burned out. Looks like we got a good amount of nominal flight time. More updates are to come!” Astra tweeted tonight. Related: History of rockets Best shot of Rocket 3.1 off the pad! pic.twitter.com/g8uo6N2HQwSeptember 12, 2020 Failure is no shock; Introductory planes rarely go with swimming, and Astra has openly stated that it does not expect a completeness. A prelaunch task description, Company representatives wrote that the...
1