Friday, Mar 05, 2021 - 18:20:43
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a global climate crisis:

    Smoke hovers over the forest amid the August Complex fire in September. (Mike McMillan / USFS) As the nation deals with the tragic drama of President Trump’s final days in office, and the world reels under a now-year-long assault by a virus, the Earth continues to evolve into a dangerously inhospitable environment. And it is our collective fault. This past year was, in essence, in a statistical tie with 2016 for the hottest on record, with temperatures driven upward by the warming effects of human activities that spew carbon and other greenhouse compounds into the atmosphere. Temperatures breached 100 degrees in, of all places, Siberia, setting a record for north of the Arctic Circle. Climate change-driven wildfires scorched the Earth’s surface from Australia to the American West — the August Complex fire in Northern California became the first in the state to burn more than 1 million acres —...
    More from: Rich Lowry No, Edward Snowden doesnt remotely deserve a pardon from President Trump US intel veterans lied about ‘Russian plot’ — and the media bought it hook, line and sinker COVID-19 hit the working class hardest — just when it was finally doing better Pro-Trump lawyers are doing Democrats work by declaring war on Georgia GOP Joe Biden looks bent on restoring chaos at the border Former Obama chief of staff Rahm Emanuel’s famous axiom is that a crisis is a terrible thing to waste. It’s an even a worse thing to manufacture. Although Joe Biden obviously disagrees. Creating an unwarranted sense of drama and urgency around climate change is central to his approach — to catalyze action unsupported by the facts or common sense. In announcing his climate and energy team the other day, the president-elect declared climate change a crisis requiring a “unified national response.”...
    D.C. has joined a competition that challenges students from cities around the world to think of a way for their cities to meet the challenges and demands of the climate crisis, Mayor Muriel Bowser announced Friday. The competition, called Students Reinventing Cities, is led by C40 Cities, a “global network of cities committed to bold climate action,” according to a news release. “It’s particularly important for our youngest residents — those who will be most impacted by the climate crisis — to be engaged and help us rethink the future of cities and neighborhoods,” Bowser said. “It’s going to take all of us working together at the local, national, and global level to keep building a greener and more sustainable world.” The mayor has identified the area of New York Avenue Northeast as a location in need of future planning and analysis. Students and universities are being invited to submit...
    This year is set to be one of the hottest on record, the World Meteorological Organisation said — with temperatures more than 2°F above preindustrial levels. The Geneva-based UN organisation called it 'another extraordinary year' for the climate — with floods, heatwaves, hurricanes and wildfires threatening lives. World Meteorological Organisation experts published their analysis on January–October conditions in a provisional report on the state of the global climate. While the assessment could still change once the full year's figures are in, 2020 seems likely to be the second hottest on record, behind only 2016.  That year saw  a strong El Niño event, a Pacific ocean climate pattern which pushes up global temperatures — on top of humankind's impact on the climate. This year is on course to be one of the hottest on record, the World Meteorological Organisation has said — with global temperatures more than 2°F above baseline (stock image)...
    By David Lawder and Andrea Shalal WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The election of Joe Biden as U.S. president gives the International Monetary Fund a chance to reset its relationship with its largest shareholder and make green initiatives a bigger part of its global economic recovery plan. IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva sent "personal" letters to President-elect Biden and running mate Kamala Harris this week, an IMF spokesman told Reuters, without providing any details about their contents. Trump has mounted legal challenges to the election results, thus far without evidence, but the Fund typically shies away from publicly commenting on elections until they are concluded. Sources familiar with Georgieva's thinking say Biden's commitment to multilateral institutions and his pledge to re-enter the Paris climate agreement should help the IMF advance its own goals. Biden’s transition team did not respond to a question about communications with Georgieva and the IMF. One IMF source...
    (CNN)Noah is an 8-year-old in Flamborough, Ontario. He loves nature shows and his two cats, Shadow and Whispers (he probably meant to name the second cat "Whiskers," according to his mom, but he mixes those words up sometimes). When he grows up, he wants to be a veterinarian or a nature photographer -- something that puts him in touch with animals and the Earth. John D. SutterLately, according to his mom, Jodi Green, Noah has become preoccupied with the climate crisis. He learned about it last year in school during a Greta Thunberg-style rally where students came together to demand swifter action on the global climate emergency, she said. Ever since, he's been brimming with questions. He sent one of those questions -- a doozy -- to me recently as part of my new series for CNN Opinion, called "Let's talk about the climate apocalypse." "I want to know...
    By Kate Abnett BRUSSELS (Reuters) - United under Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, young people rallied across the world on Friday to demand urgent action to halt catastrophic climate change, in their first global action during the coronavirus pandemic. With wild weather wreaking havoc across the world – from fires ravaging the U.S. West, to abnormal heatwaves in the Siberian Arctic and record floods in China – organisers said the protests would remind politicians that while the world was focused on COVID-19, the climate crisis has not gone away. Demonstrations were planned in more than 3,100 locations, with Australia, Japan and Fiji among the first to kick off - though with pandemic-related curbs limiting the size of gatherings, much of the action shifted online. In Stockholm, Thunberg and a handful of members of her group, Fridays for Future, assembled outside parliament. She said in a tweet on Thursday that the strikers...
    The global climate crisis – rising temperatures and sea levels, worsening natural disasters, and more frequent extreme weather patterns – is making some environments completely inhabitable by humans.  Over the next 50 years, over a billion people could be displaced due to climate migration. One report, the Ecological Threat Register (ETR), conducted by the Sydney-based Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP), projected that as many as 1.2 billion people around the world could be displaced by 2050. Drawing on data from the United Nations, the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, the Food and Agriculture Organization, and the IEP’s prior research, the IEP calculated relative threats of population growth, water stress, food insecurity, droughts, floods, cyclones, and rising temperature and sea levels. The ETR showed that 141 countries are exposed to at least one ecological threat between now and 2050. 19 countries with the highest number of ecological threats are among...
    GLOBAL warming is still hotting up as Covid makes it harder to monitor, a report warns. Ice continues to melt and heatwaves plague Siberia, the United Nations study reveals. Getty 2 Global warming is continuing ‘unabated’ during the coronavirus crisis The pandemic is crippling monitoring efforts. It has cut data being gathered from weather stations, commercial ships and tracking aircraft. The world is not on target to limit warming to 1.5C, or well below 2C, above pre-industrial levels, as countries aimed. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres writes: “The Covid-19 pandemic has disrupted lives worldwide. “At the same time the heating of our planet and climate disruption has continued apace. “Never before has it been so clear that we need long-term, inclusive, clean transitions to tackle the climate crisis and achieve sustainable development. “We must turn the recovery from the pandemic into a real opportunity to build a better future.” Most...
    Smoke lingers in the skies as the sun sets over the Las Vegas Strip as a wildfire, dubbed the Mahogany Fire, burns in the Spring Mountains on June 28, 2020.David Becker/Zuma For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.This piece was originally published in the Guardian and appears here as part of our Climate Desk Partnership. The past decade was the hottest ever recorded globally, with 2019 either the second or third warmest year on record, as the climate crisis accelerated temperatures upwards worldwide, scientists have confirmed. Every decade since 1980 has been warmer than the preceding decade, with the period between 2010 and 2019 the hottest yet since worldwide temperature records began in the 19th century. The increase in average global temperature is rapidly gathering pace, with the last decade up to 0.39 degrees Celsius warmer than the long-term average, compared with a 0.07...
    Teenage climate worrier Greta Thunberg issued a string of fresh demands Thursday for world leaders to take emergency action on climate change, lamenting some had “given up” on the possibility of preparing a decent future for coming generations. Key to her list of executive actions was an immediate end to all investments in fossil fuel in parallel with a shutting down of fossil fuel subsidies as well as making “ecocide an international crime at the International Criminal Court.” In an interview with Reuters, the 17-year-old said governments must accept the need to transform the global economic system as a basic step in avoiding “a climate catastrophe.” “We need to see it as, above all, an existential crisis. And as long as it’s not being treated as a crisis, we can have as many of these climate change negotiations and talks, conferences as possible. It won’t change a thing,” Thunberg said, speaking via video...
    By Matthew Green LONDON (Reuters) - Swedish activist Greta Thunberg urged European leaders on Thursday to take emergency action on climate change, saying people in power had practically "given up" on the possibility of handing over a decent future to coming generations. In an open letter climateemergencyeu.org also signed by several thousand people, including climate scientists, economists, actors and activists, the 17-year-old called for countries to start treating climate change and ecological breakdown "like an emergency". The letter was made public ahead of a European Council summit on Friday, where countries in the 27-member EU will try to reach a deal on the bloc's next budget and a recovery package to respond to the economic shock of the coronavirus pandemic. Demands in the letter included an immediate halt to all investments in fossil fuel exploration and extraction, in parallel with a rapid ending of fossil fuel subsidies. It also called...
    A study released Tuesday by the Oakland Institute details an “unprecedented wave of privatization of natural resources that is underway around the world”—one that is largely being driven by the United States and its allies. According to the progressive think tank’s report (pdf), “Driving Dispossession: The Global Push to Unlock the Economic Potential of Land,” governments around the world—particularly in developing countries—are often put under pressure by financial institutions and Western agencies to open up land for so-called “productive use” by miners, agribusiness interests, and other corporate entities intent on exploiting natural resources for profit. The U.S. in particular, the report says, is a “key player in an unfettered offensive to privatize land around the world.” With deforestation and fossil fuel extraction helping to fuel the climate crisis, governments are being pushed in a direction that’s “just the opposite of the drastic shift we need to win the struggle against climate change,” Frederic Mousseau, policy director of...
    Jessica Corbett June 23, 2020 6:45PM (UTC) This article originally appeared at Common Dreams. It is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License. Feel free to republish and share widely. "A crisis is a crisis, and in a crisis, we all have to take a few steps back and act for the greater good of each other and our society. In a crisis, you adapt and change your behavior." That is one of the takeaway messages from a 75-minute radio program, "Humanity Has Not Yet Failed," that 17-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg released Saturday. In the program, available in Swedish and English, the two-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee discusses climate science and activism; how polluting activities of industrialized, rich nations are driving global conditions that disproportionately impact poor and historically marginalized groups; and the failures of the existing economic and political systems. : Thunberg, whose solitary protests outside the Swedish Parliament...
    London (CNN Business)Can the global economy and environment be rescued at the same time? The answer is yes, according to the International Energy Agency, which is calling on governments to invest $3 trillion in a green recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.The agency on Thursday released a blueprint produced with the International Monetary Fund that recommends governments spend big over the next three years on technology and infrastructure projects to create millions of jobs and make 2019 "the definitive peak in global emissions.The collapse in travel and other activity triggered by pandemic lockdowns could slash carbon emissions this year by a record amount. But they're already rising fast again as economies begin to open up. Failure to act now risks a repeat of the aftermath the 2008 global financial crisis, when governments did not prioritize stimulus spending on climate, allowing CO2 emissions to bounce back with what the IEA describes as...
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