Wednesday, Feb 24, 2021 - 12:38:01
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    House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy has a fresh spring in his step after the Republicans defied the odds and professional political prognosticators by picking up 15 seats in the 2020 congressional elections. McCarthy, who has his eyes on the majority in November 2022, approached the 2020 congressional elections differently than Republicans in recent history have traditionally targeted congressional electoral efforts, and his moves paid off—and not only infuriated but befuddled the beltway pundit class. For the first time since 1994, in 2020 no GOP incumbent running for reelection lost. Meanwhile, McCarthy blew away fundraising records previously set by former House Speaker Paul Ryan—astonishing since he did it from the minority. Usually, House political leaders do better raising money from the majority. That’s not to mention the most significant development which is a freshman class entering Congress in 2021 that represents perhaps the most diverse in party history with the most...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — She’s guided the Senate through two impeachment trials, vexed Democrats and Republicans alike with parliamentary opinions and helped rescue Electoral College certificates from a pro-Trump mob ransacking the Capitol. She also does spot-on impersonations of senators including Bernie Sanders. Elizabeth MacDonough, an English literature major and the Senate’s first woman parliamentarian, is about to demonstrate anew why she’s one of Washington’s most potent, respected yet obscure figures. Any day, she’s expected to reveal if she thinks a federal minimum wage boost, progressives’ most prized plank in Democrats’ $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief plan, should fall from the bill. Her decision, a political minefield likely to elicit groans from whichever side she disappoints, will play an outsized role in deciding the wage increase’s fate. It may not be definitive — majority Democrats might try overriding an opinion they don’t like. “Elizabeth has a soul-crushing job, to which she brings...
    By ALAN FRAM, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — She's guided the Senate through two impeachment trials, vexed Democrats and Republicans alike with parliamentary opinions and helped rescue Electoral College certificates from a pro-Trump mob ransacking the Capitol. She also does spot-on impersonations of senators including Bernie Sanders. Elizabeth MacDonough, an English literature major and the Senate's first woman parliamentarian, is about to demonstrate anew why she's one of Washington's most potent, respected yet obscure figures. Any day, she's expected to reveal if she thinks a federal minimum wage boost, progressives' most prized plank in Democrats' $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief plan, should fall from the bill. Her decision, a political minefield likely to elicit groans from whichever side she disappoints, will play an outsized role in deciding the wage increase's fate. It may not be definitive — majority Democrats might try overriding an opinion they don't like. “Elizabeth has a soul-crushing...
    Mitch McConnell and Kevin McCarthy are making a bad bet. The House Budget Committee advanced the American Rescue Plan, the $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package, on Monday. It combined bills from nine other committees into the budget reconciliation package that will get a final vote in the House at the end of this week, then go to the Senate where it can be passed with a simple majority vote. That part is key, and why lawmakers chose to use the budget reconciliation took for enacting the relief: because you can't count on any Republican to do the right thing. The right thing in this case is spending $2 trillion on helping everyone as opposed to giving it in tax cuts to the very rich. Republicans are proving yet again how necessary choosing a path for relief that does not require them really is. Thus far, their only contribution has been to insist...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R), whose entire previous tenure as majority leader coincided with a period of GOP minority rule in the Senate. Even though Democrats narrowly won a majority in the Senate this year, the institution as a whole still gives Republicans a massive undue advantage—and has done so for decades. To illustrate this, Daily Kos Elections has compiled a spreadsheet that calculates the popular vote for the Senate going back nearly three decades and also shows the proportion of the country’s population that senators from each party represent. The implications of this data are astonishing: As shown on the chart below, Senate Republicans have neither won more votes nor represented more Americans than Democrats since the late 1990s. Despite that fact, the GOP has controlled the Senate just over half the time since then, a development that has not gone unobserved. Senators are of course elected to staggered six-year...
    CNN reporter Lauren Fox described the Democratic majority in the U.S. Senate as “incredibly fragile” Monday and highlighted the “tension” between moderate and progressive Democrats in addressing legislation and executive nominations. In an appearance on “New Day,” Fox listened as host John Berman began the discussion by noting some of the moderate senators from both parties announcing their opposition to the nomination of Neera Tanden to lead the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). Berman pointed out that the fact Tanden may not be confirmed “shows us that there’s no margin for error for President Biden in the U.S. Senate.” He then asked Fox what that meant for the $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill. (RELATED: ‘The Democratic Party Has Some Real Problems’: Former Congressman Lays Out GOP’s Opportunity To ‘Take Back The House’) “Well, this is an incredibly fragile majority that Chuck Schumer, the majority leader, has on...
    Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN), the chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), told Breitbart News exclusively that he believes the Republicans will retake the House majority in November 2022 and retire Democrat Speaker Nancy Pelosi once and for all. The NRCC last week released a list of 47 Democrat-held target districts that Republicans are focused on. Currently, the House Democrats have 222 seats, while the GOP minority is comprised of 213 seats. That means to retake the House, Republicans need to only flip a net five seats back into GOP hands. Emmer, in an appearance on Breitbart News Saturday on SiriusXM 125 the Patriot Channel, further explained those 47 targets that make the Republicans’ path back to a majority clear and easy to accomplish. “Out of the 47, the top 29 we list as ‘Battleground Democrats,’” Emmer said. “These folks make up the majority of our offensive targets because...
    Three-quarters of Republicans said they want former President TrumpDonald TrumpSix people who guarded Roger Stone entered Capitol during attack: NYT Cassidy pens column explaining vote to convict Trump Puerto Rico governor: Congress 'morally obligated' to act on statehood vote MORE to play a prominent role in the Republican Party despite his second impeachment trial, according to a poll released on Monday – two days after his acquittal.  A Quinnipiac University poll determined that 75 percent of Republican respondents expressed interest in Trump continuing to play a prominent role in the GOP, while 21 percent said they wouldn’t want that.  Sixty percent of all Americans said they did not want Trump to have an important role in the Republican Party, including 96 percent of Democrats and 61 percent of independents.  A majority of respondents, 55 percent, also said the former president should not be permitted to hold elected office in the future. Republicans...
    Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) senior adviser Dyjuan Tatro has frequently supported defunding America’s law enforcement, called police racist, espoused anti-capitalist views, called to end cash bail, and urged officials to let criminals out of prison, which could have significant implications for the Democrats’ 2022 midterm election strategy. DCCC chairman Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY) hired Tatro, a former New York gang member, to serve as a senior adviser for “diversity and inclusion.” Tatro served time for “shooting two rival gang members in 2006” and was convicted in 2011 for racketeering. Tatro was also the former “triggerman” for Albany’s Original Gansta Killer (OGK). Tatro referred to police officers as “white supremacists” after the January 6 riots and even appeared to condone looting after George Floyd’s death. In addition, Tatro approves of defunding law enforcement, which could have significant implications for his new position as senior adviser for strategy and outreach at the DCCC’s...
    The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) tapped Dyjuan Tatro, the former “triggerman” for Albany’s Original Gangsta Killers, or OGK, street gang to help lead efforts in protecting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-CA) slim majority in the House. The DCCC, led by chairman Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY), hired Tatro, a former New York gang member, to serve as a senior adviser for “diversity and inclusion.” He served time for “shooting two rival gang members in 2006” and was also convicted in 2011, serving six years for racketeering conspiracy, according to the New York Post. According to the outlet, Tatro “confessed to the shootings, and to a ‘razor slashing’ of another victim in 2002 as well as to dealing drugs,” making around $12,000 per month doing so. The DCCC has vehemently defended its decision to hire him, praising him for turning his life around. He, notably, appeared in the 2019 documentary series College Behind Bars, where inmates...
    Vice President Kamala Harris is also the presiding officer of the Senate and could issue important rulings in favor of Democrats that would allow them to enact Joe Biden's agenda. Astute politics observers well know that the Senate filibuster—the Jim Crow relic that requires supermajority support to pass most legislation—is a major obstacle for any hopes that Democrats have of enacting Joe Biden’s agenda and righting the country after four years of wicked misrule. But because a handful of Democratic senators (as well as all Republicans) oppose curtailing the rule—for now, at least—party leaders are pursuing an alternative route that will allow them to bypass the filibuster and pass major bills with just a simple majority. It’s called reconciliation, and it’s a complicated beast. If you’ve heard about it, you may have read that it can only be used in a limited fashion. But that’s simply not so. Democrats can...
    House Republicans launched a plan to retake the House majority in 2022 by targeting 47 districts with vulnerable Democrats. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) noted in a memo that the Republican Party is only five seats away from having a majority in the House of Representatives, and said the Republican Party can be competitive in four dozen districts. « We are just a few weeks away from the Biden administration and Americans are already seeing the job-destroying initiatives supported by House Democrats, » NRCC Chairman Tom Emmer said in a statement. “We will hold the House Democrats ruthlessly accountable for their socialist agenda and make sure voters understand policies with damaging impact like cutting off police funds, government-run healthcare, and ending the Keystone XL pipeline. they will have in the daily lives of Americans. «  Emmer noted that in the House, the Republican Party is « only five seats away from the...
    The campaign arm for House Republicans is spotlighting 47 seats currently held by what they consider to be "vulnerable Democrats" that they see as "prime pick-up opportunities" for the GOP in the 2022 midterm elections. National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) chair Rep. Tom Emmer, in unveiling the list on Wednesday, vowed, "We’re going to retire Speaker Pelosi once and for all." HOUSE GOP RE-ELECTION CHAIR SAYS BIDEN'S EXECUTIVE ORDERS HELPING REPUBLICANS TO WIN BACK HOUSE IN 2022 The GOP controlled the House majority for eight years before losing control of the chamber in the 2018 midterms. But Republicans defied expectations and took a big bite out of the Democrats’ majority in last November’s elections and only need to flip five seats in 2022 to regain the control of the House. In modern times, the party that controls the White House traditionally loses roughly 25 House seats in midterm elections. "Midterm...
    U.S. House Republicans released a detailed breakdown of 47 Democrat-held districts they intend to target in November 2022 in their quest to retake the majority from Speaker Nancy Pelosi. The National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) laid out in a memo how the GOP is only five seats away from a majority in the House, and explained it believes Republicans can be competitive in 47 districts Democrats currently hold. Technically, given redistricting will see several changes to congressional district lines and the move of some districts either into or out of certain states around the country, this map may and probably will change some when those new districts are set in stone later this year. But for now, the fact that Republicans are already laser focused on retaking the lower chamber of Congress has to warm some hearts on the right of depressed GOP base voters who saw Democrats sweep into...
    The National Republican Congressional Committee released a list of 47 Democratic-held House districts that it is targeting for 2022, ready to finish the job it started in 2020 chipping away at the Democratic majority and "retire Speaker Pelosi once and for all," as Chairman Tom Emmer put it. "We're going to focus on to build a lasting majority, not just a win, but to build a lasting majority," Emmer, a Minnesota congressman, told reporters on Wednesday. The 47 offensive targets include 29 "battleground Democrats" in districts that President Biden lost or where the 2020 presidential or congressional margin was less than 5%, eight "underperforming Democrats" who won by less than 10% and underperformed compared to Biden in the district, and 10 "redistricting watch Democrats" who are at risk of the 2020 census causing their districts to be redrawn since their states will likely either gain or lose congressional...
    A very large and bipartisan majority of Americans would support congressional passage of a new stimulus bill to help those impacted by the pandemic, and many would prefer that it receive bipartisan support in Congress, too. Meanwhile, a majority give President Joe Biden good marks for his handling of the coronavirus outbreak, and for his job as president overall in the opening weeks of his administration.  And though most think the coronavirus vaccine rollout in their states is still too slow, most think it has been at least fair. A majority of Americans are planning to either get vaccinated as soon as possible, or are at least considering it, though some remain resistant. Large majorities of Democrats, Republicans, and independents, as well as Americans of all income levels would approve of a COVID relief package. The vaccineThough six in 10 Americans think the vaccine rollout has been too slow in...
    Former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE’s attorney Bruce Castor opened his defense on Tuesday by arguing the impeachment trial is explicitly political and an effort by Democrats to ensure they never have to face Trump in an election again. “Let’s understand why we’re really here,” Castor said. “We’re really here because the majority of the House of Representatives does not want to face Donald Trump as a political candidate in the future.” If Trump is convicted in the Senate by a two-thirds majority, it would then only require a bare majority vote to bar him from ever running for office again. Castor accused Democrats of taking the easy way out and of infantilizing ordinary Americans, who he said...
    A slim majority of Americans back the Senate convicting former President Donald Trump at his impeachment trial for inciting an insurrection, new polling found.   A CBS News/YouGov survey that was released Tuesday found that 56 per cent of Americans believe Trump should be convicted, with the same percentage saying the ex-president encouraged violence at the Capitol.  Polling on the matter falls in line with party preference, with just 8 per cent of Trump's 2020 voters believing he should be convicted, as well as 17 per cent of survey respondents who said they were Republicans.  A majority of Americans believe President Donald Trump should be convicted by the Senate and believe he was responsible for the violence at the Capitol Building, but the number of Democrats is much bigger than the number of Republicans and Trump supporters  New polling found a slim majority of Americans believe Trump should be convicted...
    A slim majority of Americans back the Senate convicting former President Donald Trump at his impeachment trial for inciting an insurrection, new polling found.   A CBS News/YouGov survey that was released Tuesday found that 56 per cent of Americans believe Trump should be convicted, with the same percentage saying the ex-president encouraged violence at the Capitol.  Polling on the matter falls in line with party preference, with just 8 per cent of Trump's 2020 voters believing he should be convicted, as well as 17 per cent of survey respondents who said they were Republicans.  A majority of Americans believe President Donald Trump should be convicted by the Senate and believe he was responsible for the violence at the Capitol Building, but the number of Democrats is much bigger than the number of Republicans and Trump supporters  New polling found a slim majority of Americans believe Trump should be convicted...
    A majority of Americans favor convicting former President TrumpDonald TrumpDOJ to seek resignations of most Trump-appointed US attorneys: report Trump attorney withdraws request to not hold impeachment trial on Saturday Kinzinger in op-ed calls on GOP senators to convict Trump in impeachment trial MORE in his second impeachment trial this week, according to a CBS/YouGov poll released Tuesday. The survey found 56 percent favor the former president’s conviction, the same percentage who said they supported it in an ABC News/Ipsos poll released Sunday. The same percentage of respondents in the CBS poll also believed the president encouraged the violence by pro-Trump rioters at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. This included 88 percent of Democrats, 21 percent of Republicans and 54 percent of independents. In January, Trump’s second impeachment, a historic first, charged him with inciting an insurrection against the United States. Conviction would permanently bar Trump, rumored to be mulling a...
    It is never preferable to be in the minority party in a legislative body. But as far as minorities go, House Republicans are in a pretty good spot. Between the trend of midterm elections usually favoring the party that is not in the White House, a closely divided House, and a party apparatus ready to continue their expectations-exceeding 2020 strategy while Democrats rework theirs, Republicans are on track to winning back the House in 2022. "It has the makings of what could be a good year for the Republicans when it comes to the House," said J. Miles Coleman, associate editor of Sabato's Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia Center for Politics. President Biden’s approval rating is around 53%, and while he is not underwater, history indicates he would need to bump that rating up by at least 10 points in order to have a shot...
    Democrat Anthony Brindisi, who had stolen this seat in a region near Syracuse from Claudia Tenney during the 2018 legislative elections, publicly conceded defeat, in a tweet, after fighting in court against the confirmation of the victory of its rival, by only 109 votes. “It is time to turn the page on these elections (…) and to build a more united country for our children,” he said on Monday. Mrs. Tenney thanked him. “He graciously offered to help with a smooth transition and I look forward to working with him in the next few days,” she said. Mr. Brindisi had pointed out numerous dysfunctions in the way local authorities conducted the elections, notably preventing more than 2,400 people from taking part in the polls. But after three months of examining them, a New York State Supreme Court judge ruled that the valid ballots counted did grant Ms. Tenney the...
    (CNN)The early lines of division between the parties during Joe Biden's presidency point toward rising confrontation, sooner rather than later, over rules and traditions in the Senate that empower the minority party to block the majority. The quick turn by Biden and congressional Democrats toward reliance on the special "reconciliation" procedure for passing their Covid-19 "rescue" package with only 51 Senate votes underscores their conviction that in today's highly polarized environment, they are unlikely to secure support for anything close to their plan from 10 Senate Republicans, the number they would need to break a GOP filibuster. Yet by relying on the reconciliation process to pass that priority, Democrats may only raise more questions about whether they should sustain other venerable Senate procedures -- including the filibuster and deference to home state senators on judicial nominations -- that impede majority rule and provide the minority a virtual veto on many...
    Dave Wasserman, a political analyst and the editor of the non-partisan Cook Political Report, reported Monday that Republicans came within less than 32,000 votes from regaining the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives. “Republicans came within 31,751 votes of winning the majority,” Wasserman wrote in a tweet, shortly after Democrat Anthony Brindisi conceded to former GOP Rep. Claudia Tenney (R-NY) in the race for New York’s 22nd Congressional District. Just in: Anthony Brindisi (D) has conceded to Claudia Tenney (R) in #NY22. Final 2020 election House result: 222D, 213R. Republicans came within 31,751 votes of winning the majority. — Dave Wasserman (@Redistrict) February 8, 2021 Tenney’s Empire State victory over Brindisi, the final undecided House race in the nation, gives Democrats in the House a slim majority of nine seats. With Tenney’s victory cemented, and all totals finalized for the 2020 election, Republicans flipped 15 house seats held by Democrats. Tenney...
    Representative Mike Rogers (R-AL), the ranking Republican member on the House Armed Services Committee, says Democrats were setting a precedent by expelling controversial freshman Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) from her assigned congressional committees. During an interview that aired Friday on Mobile, AL radio FM Talk 106.5, Rogers explained there were plusses to Democrats spending time on Greene and impeachment. According to the Alabama GOP lawmaker, if Democrats continued to pursue Greene and former President Donald Trump, they were not passing legislation. “You just described why I’m not that unhappy about what they’re doing,” he said. “I hope this impeachment trial in the Senate lasts three months. If they’re spending two or three months on an impeachment trial, they’re not passing bills into law. I’ve been doing this a long time. The further you go into an election cycle, the dimmer the chances of you passing meaningful legislation are happening....
    On Friday dozens of progressive nonprofits wrote a letter to Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer demanding he take steps to eliminate the Senate filibuster.  The nonprofit activist groups are considered "dark money" groups as the sources of their funding are unknown.  "Voters across the country have made their voices loud and clear, culminating in the strong message that was recently delivered in Georgia," the coalition of liberal groups wrote. "They are sick and tired of the gridlock and dysfunction that is keeping the system rigged against them."  "To be clear, the filibuster was never intended to be used and abused the way it has been over the past decade. Despite what some will claim, the filibuster isn’t in the Constitution," the letter continued.  The Senate filibuster requires 60 votes to end debate on most legislation, and supporters argue it’s necessary to maintain the upper chamber as the most deliberative body in...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate just wrapped its budget reconciliation process with the tie-breaking vote cast by Vice President Kamala Harris, providing Democrats with a simple majority to proceed with its coronavirus stimulus package without Republican support.The measure, which the House is expected to adopt later today, sets aside room for up to $1.89 trillion in deficit spending to combat the pandemic and provide financial aid to millions while the economy recovers.The implementing legislation for the budget reconciliation package, which Democrats used to sidestep the Senate's usual 60-vote filibuster threshold and pass with a simple majority, will start to take shape in a dozen House committees next week.It was Harris' first tie-breaking vote in the Senate."The yays are 50. The nays are 50. The Senate being equally divided, the vice president votes in the affirmative. And the concurrent resolution as amended is adopted," she declared just after 5:30 a.m. Friday.This breaking...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate just wrapped its budget reconciliation process with the tie-breaking vote cast by Vice President Kamala Harris, providing Democrats with a simple majority to proceed with its coronavirus stimulus package without Republican support.The measure, which the House is expected to adopt later today, sets aside room for up to $1.89 trillion in deficit spending to combat the pandemic and provide financial aid to millions while the economy recovers.The implementing legislation for the budget reconciliation package, which Democrats used to sidestep the Senate's usual 60-vote filibuster threshold and pass with a simple majority, will start to take shape in a dozen House committees next week.It was Harris' first tie-breaking vote in the Senate."The yays are 50. The nays are 50. The Senate being equally divided, the vice president votes in the affirmative. And the concurrent resolution as amended is adopted," she declared just after 5:30 a.m. Friday.This breaking...
    WASHINGTON -- The Senate just wrapped its budget reconciliation process with the tie-breaking vote cast by Vice President Kamala Harris, providing Democrats with a simple majority to proceed with its coronavirus stimulus package without Republican support.The measure, which the House is expected to adopt later today, sets aside room for up to $1.89 trillion in deficit spending to combat the pandemic and provide financial aid to millions while the economy recovers.The implementing legislation for the budget reconciliation package, which Democrats used to sidestep the Senate's usual 60-vote filibuster threshold and pass with a simple majority, will start to take shape in a dozen House committees next week.It was Harris' first tie-breaking vote in the Senate."The yays are 50. The nays are 50. The Senate being equally divided, the vice president votes in the affirmative. And the concurrent resolution as amended is adopted," she declared just after 5:30 a.m. Friday.This breaking...
    Multiple Republicans came to the defense of Georgia Republican Marjorie Taylor Greene on Thursday after the Democrat-led House of Representatives voted to strip of her two committee seats for past statements she has made. Greene took to the House floor before the vote to say she does not currently hold the kinds of conspiratorial views that got her in trouble in the first place and never made any statements about the conspiracy theory QAnon during he 2020 campaign. Still, the House voted 230-199, with only 11 Republicans joining Democrats in an what was otherwise a party-line vote to remove Greene from the committees responsible for education and the budget. Democratic leaders said Greenes suggestions of violence and approval of social media threats against elected Democrats crossed a line. She has also been criticized for denying the reality of mass shootings at Connecticut and Florida schools and asserting that 9/11s terror attacks were an...
    After losing the 2020 presidential election to Democrat Joe Biden, former President Donald Trump reportedly told adviser that he would like to form his own political party. According to a new Hill-HarrisX poll, that would not be a bad idea. Released on Thursday, the poll — which was conducted online among 340 registered voters — found that 64 percent of registered Republicans would likely join Trump’s party. Notably, nearly 3 in 10 independents and 15 percent of Democrats said that they would also join the Trump-led effort. Overall, 37 percent of respondents said that they would likely join the party. According to Dritan Nesho, CEO and chief pollster at HarrisX, this suggests that Trump is still a powerful figure, despite the fact that his alleged incitement of the January 6 riots at the U.S. Capitol was widely condemned by politicians across the ideological spectrum. Both major parties, Nesho continued, have...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) plans to make combatting climate change a “whole of Senate approach” for however long Democrats retain the majority. Schumer, who leads a chamber split 50-50 between Democrats and Republicans, announced on Tuesday that he had instructed his party’s committee chairs to make the issue a top priority. The majority leader, in particular, argued that by mobilizing every “relevant” committee to tackle climate change, the Senate would take “a leading role in combatting the existential threat of our time.” “Senate Democrats are not going to waste any time taking on the biggest challenges facing our country and our planet,” Schumer said from the floor of the Senate. “I’ve already instructed the incoming Democratic chairs of all relevant committees to begin holding hearings on the climate crisis in preparation for enacting President [Joe] Biden’s Build Back Better agenda, which includes major climate legislation,” the senate leader...
    This will come back to haunt you. That's the message from House Republicans on Wednesday to their Democratic colleagues as the majority party moves to oust Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene from her committee assignments due to incendiary social media posts by the Georgia Republican from before her 2020 election. Democrats are set on Thursday to strip Greene of her posts on the House Education and Labor Committee and the House Budget Committee. Democrats say it's necessary because House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and members of the Republican Steering Committee, which makes committee assignments, are unwilling to punish Greene over Facebook posts and tweets sympathetic to QAnon and promoting violence against members of Congress. Still, it's the first time in recent memory that the majority party has gone after committee spots of the minority. And it is a move that Republicans say sets an awful precedent. After all, they note, should...
    By LISA MASCARO, AP Congressional Correspondent WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced an agreement Wednesday with Republicans to organize the evenly split chamber, ending a weekslong standoff that prevented the new Democratic majority from setting up some operations and soured relations at the start of the congressional session. Schumer, D-N.Y., said that he and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky had agreed on committee ratios and other details in the 50-50 chamber, where Democrats have the slim edge because Vice President Kamala Harris is a tie-breaking vote. Senators can now promptly “get to work, with Democrats holding the gavels,” Schumer said. Organizing the Senate is typically a routine procedure at the start of a new Congress. But the prolonged negotiations involved a power play by McConnell as Republicans refused to relinquish control without first trying to extract concessions from Democrats that Schumer refused to give. In...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced an agreement Wednesday with Republicans to organize the evenly split chamber, ending a weekslong standoff that prevented the new Democratic majority from setting up some operations and soured relations at the start of the congressional session. Schumer, D-N.Y., said that he and Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky had agreed on committee ratios and other details in the 50-50 chamber, where Democrats have the slim edge because Vice President Kamala Harris is a tie-breaking vote. Senators can now promptly “get to work, with Democrats holding the gavels,” Schumer said. Organizing the Senate is typically a routine procedure at the start of a new Congress. But the prolonged negotiations involved a power play by McConnell as Republicans refused to relinquish control without first trying to extract concessions from Democrats that Schumer refused to give. In particular, McConnell wanted...
    Almost a month after the Democrats gained majority power in the U.S. Senate following their two victories in Georgia, they will finally be able to exert functional control after Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Republican Minority Leader Mitch McConnell reached a deal on Wednesday, as reported by The Hill. After weeks of negotiation, Schumer announced that the two sides had come to an agreement from the Senate floor. “We will pass the resolution through the Senate today, which means that committees can promptly set up and get to work with Democrats holding the gavels,” the Democrat said. The results in Georgia that saw victories by the Democratic candidates Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff basically split the Senate evenly. It currently consists of 50 Republicans, 48 Democrats and two Independents. The two Independents, Bernie Sanders of Vermont and Angus King of Maine, caucus with the Democrats. The incoming Biden administration gives...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said he’s reached a two-year power sharing deal with GOP leader Mitch McConnell formally giving Democrats committee chairmanships and setting other ground rules, allowing the chamber to begin fully functioning after weeks of procedural limbo. The agreement is based on a 2001 deal reached the last time the 100-member chamber was divided 50-50. That setup allowed for the same number of Republicans and Democrats on committees, though Democrats controlled committee gavels and the majority leader set the agenda on the floor. Schumer said the agreement will spur committee work on President Joe Biden’s priorities and his cabinet-level nominations as Democrat chairmen will be in place and ground rules will be set for committee structure. “I’ve already instructed the incoming Democrat chairs of all relevant committees to begin holding hearings on the climate crisis in preparation for enacting President Biden’s build back better agenda, which includes...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) speaks during a news conference in the U.S. Capitol in Washington, on January 26, 2021.Al Drago | Reuters Senate leaders reached a deal to transfer control of committees to Democrats, two weeks after the party took control of the chamber, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said Wednesday. This story is developing. Please check back for updates. Subscribe to CNBC on YouTube.Related Tags Breaking News: Politics White House Politics
    The health scare for the Senate’s longest serving member, Democrat Patrick Leahy, just before he’s due to preside over next week’s impeachment trial was a reminder of just how fragile his party’s Senate majority is. Leahy is just one of a half-dozen Democratic senators from states with Republican governors. One interim appointment could shift power in an instant in the 50-50 Senate, a circumstance something like the one that Democrats dealt with after Ted Kennedy died in August 2009 and Republican Scott Brown’s surprise win in the special election to fill his seat put an abrupt end to the Democrats’ supermajority and nearly took down Obamacare with it. Things are a little less precarious in the House, where Democrats are clinging to a 221-to-211 majority and David Wasserman with the nonpartisan Cook Political Report says the GOP could use its advantage in statehouses to retake control in 2022 by flipping...
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC) has rebuffed a request from Sen. Dick Durbin (D-IL) to hold a confirmation hearing for President Joe Biden’s nominee for attorney general, Merrick Garland. “At this point, there is simply no justification to object to a February 8 hearing for Judge Garland,” Durbin wrote in a Monday letter to Graham, noting the date “accommodates your desire not to hold a hearing on Judge Garland’s nomination during a day when the Senate will be conducting” former President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. Despite losing the Senate to Democrats in January, Republicans have not reached a power-sharing agreement with Democrats, which has allowed them to retain committee majorities. Without such an agreement, Vice President Kamala Harris would need to be consistently available in the Senate to cast tie-breaking votes, owing to the fact that Democrats hold just 48 of the chamber’s 100 seats, along with two independents — Sens. Bernie...
    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Some leadership positions in the Maine Legislature have been shaken up due to the decision by a state senator to relinquish a top post. The Maine Senate Democratic Caucus on Monday elected Sen. Eloise Vitelli of Arrowsic as Senate majority leader and Sen. Mattie Daughtry of Brunswick as assistant Senate majority leader. The changes were made necessary by the decision of Sen. Nate Libby to relinquish his position as Senate majority leader because of professional and family commitments, Democrats said. The senate president remains Sen. Troy Jackson of Allagash. The Democrats have an edge in the Maine Senate by a count of 21 to 13, and there is one vacancy. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Maine, Associated Press
    The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee emerged from a bruising 2020 election cycle with $8.4 million in the bank and $14 million in leftover debt, leaving the House majority’s political arm with less available net cash at the outset of the 2022 campaign than the National Republican Congressional Committee. The DCCC raised $345.8 million in 2019 and 2020, finishing last year with $21 million in cash on hand, versus the NRCC’s $280.9 million raised and $12.6 million banked as of Dec. 31. But the House GOP campaign arm entered the Jan. 1 kickoff of the 2022 election cycle in a better financial position than its Democratic counterpart, reporting zero debt in Federal Election Commission filings made public on Sunday. These figures have Republicans feeling optimistic about next year’s midterm elections — especially after they flipped a dozen House seats and came within a handful of winning the majority despite the DCCC’s...
    A near majority of Missourians approve of Sen. Josh Hawley’s (R-MO) job as their senator, according to a poll released recently. Forty-six percent of Missourians approve of Hawley’s job as their junior senator, according to a Missouri Scout poll. Forty percent of his constituents disapprove of his job, and 14 percent remain unsure about his job performance. Seventy-three percent of Republicans approve of his performance, while 15 percent of GOP voters disapprove of him. In contrast, 13 percent of Democrats approve of his job performance, and 73 do not like his performance as a senator for Missouri. Hawley’s net-approval in the Show Me State runs in contrast to the two other statewide officials Missouri Scout polled, Sen. Roy Blunt (R-MO) and State Auditor Nicole Galloway. Thirty-nine percent of Missourians disapprove of Blunt, while 38 percent approve of the senior Missouri senator. Forty percent of Missourians disapprove of Galloway, and 32...
    More than a week into his administration, President Joe Biden’s legislative agenda seems to have hit a wall in Congress. Biden, who served in the United States Senate for 36 years before his ascension to the vice presidency, was pitched as “master legislator” by allies and supporters during the 2020 campaign. The president, himself, bolstered that image with constant references to his history of working across the aisle to craft bipartisan compromise. “Compromise is not a dirty word, it’s how our government is designed to work,” Biden told the National Education Association last July. “I’ve done it my whole life.” “I’ve been able to bring Democrats and Republicans together in the United States Congress to pass big things, to deal with big issues,” he added at the time. Such efforts, made in an attempt to convince voters that Biden alone could break the decades-old gridlock of Washington, DC, did not stop...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Sen. Gary Peters, who won a tough reelection race in the fall, will lead Democrats’ efforts in 2022 to expand their current razor-thin Senate majority. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced Thursday that Peters will head the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, calling him “hard-working, disciplined and effective.” The 62-year-old Peters, who is in his second term, is the first Midwesterner to hold the position in decades. Next year, Democrats will have chances to pick up seats in states such as Pennsylvania, Ohio, North Carolina and Wisconsin. Democrats also will need to protect incumbents in Georgia, Arizona, Nevada and New Hampshire in the midterms, when Republicans have an opportunity to break Democrats’ new monopoly on Congress. “Someone who can win tough races in Michigan has an appreciation for what it takes to win in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Ohio,” Peters told The Associated Press, saying he feels...
    Sen. Gary Peters (D-MI) will chair the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) as Democrats seek to hold their one-seat majority in 2022. Peters, who defeated Republican John James in November, was chosen to lead the Democrat Senate campaign team. Democrats just gained the Senate majority for the first time since 2014 and have to maintain their one-seat majority after both Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock won their respective Senate runoffs in January. Democrats will have to contend with a competitive cycle in 2022; they will have to defend newly elected senators in Georgia and Arizona and flip seats in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and North Carolina. Sens. Pat Toomey (R-PA) and Rob Portman (R-OH) both announced recently they will not seek reelection in 2022. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) called the Michigan Democrat a “hardworking, disciplined, and effective member” of the Senate when announcing his decision to tap Peters as the...
    (CNN)Former President Donald Trump and House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy met Thursday at Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida, where the two Republicans discussed strategy for winning the House majority in next year's mid-terms, according to a readout of the meeting provided by Trump's Political Action Committee Save America."They discussed many topics, number one of which was taking back the House in 2022," the statement read. "President Trump's popularity has never been stronger than it is today, and his endorsement means more than perhaps any endorsement at any time."The statement described the meeting as "cordial" and highlighted a stronger than expected performance among key House GOP candidates, though Democrats maintained their House majority with a slimmer margin.McCarthy's visit comes at a tumultuous time for the Republican Party, following Trump's role ahead of the January 6 deadly riot storming the Capitol that led to Trump's second impeachment just days before...
    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Sen. Gary Peters, who won a tough reelection race in the fall, will lead Democrats’ efforts in 2022 to expand their current razor-thin Senate majority. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., announced on Thursday that Peters will head the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee. The 62-year-old Peters, who is in his third term, is the first Midwesterner to hold the position in decades. Next year, Democrats will have chances to pick up seats in states such as Pennsylvania, North Carolina — where incumbents will not seek reelection — and Wisconsin. Democrats also will need to protect incumbents in Georgia, Arizona, Nevada and New Hampshire. “We have a great opportunity in 2022 to defend and expand our Democratic majority so we can keep working to protect our health, rebuild our economy stronger than before and deliver real progress for the American people,” Peters said in a...
    Rep. Tom Emmer (R-MN) said Thursday that President Joe Biden’s harmful executive orders will make Democrats run into “real trouble” ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. Emmer, the chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC), said Biden’s executive orders have helped make the committee’s case ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. “The last cycle we ran and won in districts all over the country by highlighting exactly the policies that these guys, now with the stroke of a pen, have followed through on,” Emmer told Fox News. Despite losing the White House and Senate, Republicans managed to flip a dozen Democrat House seats, which shrunk the Democrats’ majority significantly. Now, Democrats have a bare ten-member majority in the House with 221 members, whereas Republicans have 211 members. Emmer suggested Biden’s anti-American energy policies could impact members across the south and Midwest. “The polling we did last cycle showed us in...
    Sen. Gary Peters of Michigan will steer the Senate Democrats reelection efforts in next year’s midterm elections, when the party will be defending its fragile majority in the chamber. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer on Thursday announced that Peters, who narrowly won reelection in November, will serve during the 2022 election cycle as chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, which is the reelection arm of the Senate Democrats. OHIO'S PORTMAN NOT RUNNING FOR RE-ELECTION TO THE SENATE "Gary Peters is a hardworking, disciplined and effective member of the Senate, and I know he will be an outstanding DSCC Chair to ensure Democrats protect our strong incumbents and go on offense to expand our majority," Schumer touted in a statement. Sen. Gary Peters, D-Mich., speaks at a rally for Democratic presidential candidate former Vice President Joe Biden and former President Barack Obama at Northwestern High School in Flint, Mich.,...
    Sen. Gary Peters will lead the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in 2022 as the party seeks to secure its majority beyond Vice President Kamala Harris breaking ties. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced on Thursday the Michigan Democrat will lead the campaign committee, working with grassroots organizations across the country to mobilize voters to turnout for the midterm elections. Peters is the first Midwesterner to run DSCC in decades and will succeed Nevada Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto. "Gary Peters is a hardworking, disciplined, and effective member of the Senate, and I know he will be an outstanding DSCC Chair to ensure Democrats protect our strong incumbents and go on offense to expand our majority," Schumer, a New York Democrat, said in a statement. Peters, 62, is a former House member who won his Senate seat in 2014, overcoming that year's Republican wave, which gave the GOP the majority, as well...
            by Cole Lauterbach  After receiving commitments from two Democratic colleagues that they wouldn’t abolish the filibuster, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell says he’ll hand over the chamber’s legislative gavels to Majority Leader Chuck Schumer. The U.S. Senate is actually split 50-50 between Republicans and Democrats, but Democratic Vice President Kamala Harris holds the tie-breaking vote. McConnell, R-Kentucky, had previously sought to reach an agreement from Democrats that they would allow a power sharing structure similar to what the two parties agreed to in 2001 but also to promise not to abolish the filibuster. The parliamentary move, targeted by both Republicans and Democrats when they’ve attained majorities, is meant to block legislation by debating at length or offering a host of other procedural roadblocks. It can be avoided with a 60-vote consensus. McConnell dropped that caveat after receiving commitments from Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Arizona, and Joe...
    Approximately 39 members of the Democratic conference within the United States Senate—more than half of the party’s overall majority within the chamber—are backing an effort to grant statehood to Washington, D.C. Sen. Tom Carper (D-DE), a longtime ally of President Joe Biden, introduced legislation on Wednesday to make the District of Columbia the country’s 51st state. Carper, who has introduced similar legislation in the past, asserts that Biden’s election, accompanied by full Democratic control of Congress, presents the perfect opportunity “to call out this historic injustice.” “This isn’t a Republican or Democratic issue,” Carper said in a press release accompanying the legislation. “It’s an American issue because the lack of fair representation for D.C. residents is clearly inconsistent with the values on which this country was founded.” Currently, the district has no formal power in the national legislature. Every two years, the district elects one delegate to the U.S. House...
    A humiliated Mitch McConnell was all threats and bluster on the Senate floor Tuesday after his capitulation to Democrats over the filibuster. McConnell has been blocking the new Senate majority—and much of President Biden's Cabinet from forming—so that he could preserve his ability to block absolute everything. Boy, is he a sore loser (and massive liar) or what? He lobbed a lot of threats while waxing poetic about "minority rights," including a "guarantee" to make life sheer hell for Democrats (and the nation) "if Democrats ever attack the key Senate rules." Meaning, letting the minority rule through the filibuster. One of the things he threatened was tying the floor up in quorum calls, noting that "a quorum is 51 Senators and the Vice President does not count." He made a point of that: "The majority cannot even produce a quorum on their own and one could be demanded by any Senator at...
    If President Joe Biden’s plan for COVID relief ever passes the Senate, it won’t be with the 10 Republican votes it needs to clear a filibuster. “I’m going to suggest that we get together and talk about what we think would be a reasonable package, and one that could garner bipartisan support,” said Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, to reporters after a conference call with a bipartisan group of 16 senators led by her and Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va. Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, another necessary vote, isn’t just skeptical of the cost, he’s skeptical that the country needs another relief bill so soon after the last one. Without Republican support, Democrats have two options for passing Biden’s plan into law. They could use “reconciliation” — a limited-use parliamentary maneuver that lets any deficit-neutral budget-related bill pass with a simple majority — or they could end the legislative filibuster and rid themselves...
    Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinDick DurbinJustice watchdog to probe whether officials sought to interfere with election Moderates vow to 'be a force' under Biden Skepticism reigns as Biden, McConnell begin new era MORE (D-Ill.) said Tuesday that Democrats can use a special process known as budget reconciliation to increase the minimum wage to President Biden’s proposed target of $15 an hour without any Republican votes. Durbin, who has served in the Senate since 1997 and is a veteran of many budget and procedural battles, said a minimum wage increase falls within the parameters of budget reconciliation. That means Democrats would be able to pass it in the Senate with a simple-majority vote, instead of the 60 normally needed to advance legislation. “It’s being discussed. I don’t know that a final decision has been reached,” Durbin said of the possibility of increasing the minimum wage through the budget reconciliation process. He affirmed that...
    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell promised a "nightmare" for Senate Democrats and Vice President Kamala Harris if they move to end the legislative filibuster during the next two years.  The foreboding speech from McConnell, in which he alternatively lauded the merits of the 60-vote hurdle for the Senate to pass bills and warned of a dystopian Senate if Democrats remove it, came after two Senate Democrats on Monday said on-the-record that they don't support removing the protection for the Senate minority.  After getting those pledges from Sens. Joe Manchin. D-W.Va., and Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., McConnell relented on his demand that Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., include a provision preserving the filibuster in their power-sharing agreement in the 50-50 Senate.  McConnell said that "simple arithmetic" now assures the Senate "won't tear up a central rule."  MCCONNELL ENDS STALEMATE OVER FILIBUSTER, PAVING WAY FOR POWER-SHARING AGREEMENT WITH SCHUMER "The Senate exists to...
    Former Attorney General Eric Holder urged Democrats on Monday to pack the Supreme Court in response to what he called a crisis of “legitimacy” brought about by the appointment of a conservative majority. Packing the Court would involve passing legislation to add seats to the nation’s highest judicial body, then using a simple Senate majority to fill the vacancies with liberals. Holder was addressing a virtual seminar hosted by the Brookings Institution, “Is There a Path Forward for Court Reform?”  The left has shown interest in “reform” since President Donald Trump was able to appoint conservatives to the bench. Holder began his presentation with what he called “three realities.” First, he said, “Democrats and progressives, are, and have been, uncomfortable with the acquisition and the use of power.” Republicans and conservatives, he said, were not. Second, he said, the Supreme Court and other courts had been “political bodies.” And...
    (CNN)It hasn't even been a week since Chuck Schumer assumed his long-sought goal of becoming Senate majority leader. But he's already been in a staring contest with Mitch McConnell, the Senate Republican leader, over the future of the institution. He faces outright opposition from Republicans over President Joe Biden's domestic agenda, including a $1.9 trillion plan to take on the coronavirus pandemic.And he must keep his party unified despite a divisive debate over whether it's worthwhile to try to even work with Republicans.Schumer has to overcome bad blood from years of fierce battles with the very Republicans he's sought to defeat but whose support he now needs. Read More"What this campaign taught me about Chuck Schumer is that he will say or do anything in order to win," Maine GOP Sen. Susan Collins told CNN after winning a hard-fought campaign against Schumer-backed groups in 2020. "It was a deceitful, despicable...
    "Democrats used it constantly, as they had every right to," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said on the floor last week, of the filibuster. Photo By Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images/ McConnell wanted a promise that Democrats would not eliminate the filibuster. Two Democratic Senators signaled their support for keeping the filibuster in place Monday. With those assurances, McConnell said he was ready to move forward with an organizing resolution. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday night that he would move forward with organizing the new Senate after days of a forced stalemate over the filibuster. Before allowing the new Democrat-controlled Senate to begin work, McConnell wanted a promise that Democrats would not eliminate the filibuster. It appears McConnell got his wish.  Two Democratic Senators, Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Sen. Kyrsten Sinema of...
    Bradley Cortright January 25, 2021 0 Comments While Senate Democrats mull whether or not they should make changes to the legislative filibuster if Republicans try to block President Joe Biden‘s agenda in the upper chamber, some moderate senators are voicing skepticism with the idea.  In the House, Democrats have a slim majority but only need a simple majority to pass legislation. And while they have a nominal majority in the Senate — the chamber is split 50-50 with Vice President Kamala Harris able to cast the tie-breaking vote — they would need Republicans to vote for legislation to clear the 60-vote threshold.  In order to eliminate that threshold, Democrats would need all 50 of their members and Harris to vote in favor of scrapping it. However, some moderate senators do not appear to be on board with that idea.  Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.) told Politico, “They will not get my vote on [nuking...
    Centrist House Democrats make up only a fraction of the party's majority, but they're positioned to punch above their weight politically with the chamber narrowly divided. The Blue Dog Democrats, 18 in number, are positioned to have outsize sway not only in the House, where Democrats have 221 seats, Republicans have 211, and three are vacant. Across the Capitol, the Senate is split 50-50, with Vice President Kamala Harris set to break ties. And with President Biden in the White House, Democrats hold all the power in the federal elected branches for the first time in more than a decade. But the close margins mean all factions of the party have to be considered. Legislation too far to the left is unlikely to become law. "The House majority runs through the Blue Dogs," said Rep. Stephanie Murphy of Florida, co-chairwoman of the coalition, in audio obtained by the...
    Rep. Dan Crenshaw (R-TX) told Breitbart News Saturday that the road to the House majority goes through winning over moderate voters in swing districts. Crenshaw told Breitbart News Saturday host Matthew Boyle that the road to a House majority for Republicans goes through persuading moderate voters in swing districts currently held by Democrats. He said, “The way we can win at least in the next two years before we take back the House is to make it more difficult for those moderate Democrats in the House.” He continued, “By persuading people in their district, persuading those moderate voters that put them there in their district and explain why we think what we think. It’s not just about the red meat rhetoric we always like to spew out. It’s about persuasive arguments.” Boyle noted that many establishment figures expected Democrats to expand their majority during the 2020 elections; however, Republicans shrunk Democrats’...
    They did not believe the 60-vote threshold was essential when it applied to Trump's Supreme Court nominees. Senate Republicans are mounting an aggressive campaign to keep their power to block nearly all of the new Democratic majority's legislative proposals. But while they now defend the Senate's filibuster rule as vital for "bipartisanship," they unanimously voted to eliminate it for Supreme Court nominations less than four years ago. While it only takes a simple majority in the 100-member U.S. Senate to pass legislation, with few exceptions it takes a three-fifths supermajority — 60 votes — to end debate and actually hold a vote. Segregationists long used those cloture rules to block civil rights legislation and Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell used them a record-breaking number of times to obstruct President Barack Obama's agenda.
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (center) and Sen. Joe Manchin (at left) Mitch McConnell’s making a mistake. He hasn’t made many during his long and tawdry career, but he is right now. At issue is how the Senate, divided between 50 Democrats and 50 Republicans, should operate for the next two years. With Kamala Harris as the tie-breaker, no one questions that Democrats are in charge and that Chuck Schumer is now majority leader. But some procedural questions remain, like how committee assignments should be divvied up between the parties, or how tied votes on those committees should be handled. Fortunately, there’s a blueprint for exactly this sort of situation, one that both McConnell and Schumer themselves worked under 20 years ago: a power-sharing plan hammered out by Republican Trent Lott and Democrat Tom Daschle that addressed all of these outstanding issues. Committees, for instance, had equal numbers from both...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Thursday she hasn’t determined when to send to the Senate the article of impeachment against former President Donald Trump, leaving the matter hanging more than a week after the House passed it. “You’ll be the first to know,” Pelosi told reporters who asked her about the fate of the article that charges Trump with inciting an insurrection. The House impeached Trump on Jan. 13 by a vote of 232-197. While Pelosi has appointed a team of impeachment managers, she has not sent the article to the Senate, where lawmakers would be compelled to hold a trial to determine whether to convict Trump and ban him from future office. Legal scholars have questioned whether the move would be legal because the constitution does not address charging and convicting former presidents. Pelosi said Senate leaders must work out an agreement on the timeline and...
    After blocking hundreds of pieces of legislation, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is demanding Democrats let him continue his 'Grim Reaper' act. Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) lost his position as Senate majority leader on Wednesday, but he and his Republican minority caucus still want to be able to obstruct every bit of progressive legislation as they have for the past few years. Vice President Kamala Harris, as president of the Senate and its tie-breaker, gives Democrats at 51 to 50 majority in the chamber. Democrats reportedly offered a bipartisan power-sharing agreement this week that would give Republicans an equal number of seats on committees, but McConnell rejected it over a demand that the new majority agree to preserve a rule requiring a 60-vote supermajority to end debate on nearly all legislation. If a simple majority of senators vote to change those...
    Sen. Tester, calling it like he sees it. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has rebuffed Republican leader Mitch McConnell's obstructionist demand that the Democrats commit to keeping the filibuster on legislation. Schumer has precedent on his side; the organizing resolution from the last time the Senate was divided 50-50 didn't delve into floor procedure on the filibuster. Schumer also has his Democratic conference behind him. That support ranges from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who said, "McConnell was fine with getting rid of the filibuster to a United States Supreme Court nominee for a lifetime appointment but he’s not ok getting rid of the filibuster for unemployment relief for families that are out of work because of COVID-19," to Sen. Jon Tester from Montana, who said, "Chuck Schumer is the majority leader and he should be treated like majority leader. We can get shit done around here and we ought to be...
    Democrats are shooting down an effort by GOP Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBudowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated Biden's inauguration marked by conflict of hope and fear McConnell faces conservative backlash over Trump criticism MORE (R-Ky.) to include protections for the legislative filibuster as part of a Senate power-sharing deal. "We’re not going to give him what he wishes. If you did that then there would be just unbridled use of it. I mean nothing holding him back," said Sen. Dick DurbinDick DurbinSchumer becomes new Senate majority leader McConnell keeps GOP guessing on Trump impeachment Officials brace for second Trump impeachment trial MORE (Ill.), the No. 2 Senate Democrat, on Thursday. McConnell has urged Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerSchumer becomes new Senate majority leader US Chamber of Commerce to Biden, Congress: Business community 'ready to help' Why pretend senators can 'do impartial justice'? MORE (D-N.Y.) to...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — Wednesday marked a change in control of the Senate with Democrats taking the majority. Sen. Chuck Schumer is now the majority leader. He’s both the first Jewish person to hold this rank, as well as the first from New York. Schumer will oversee a rare 50-50 split in the Senate. It’s only the fourth time in history this has happened. MORE FROM CBS NEW YORK As U.S. Mourns 400,000 Lives Lost, Mayor De Blasio Wants Approval To Use Vaccine Earmarked For Second Doses For First Shots NYC Buildings Lit Up To Honor 400,000 Americans Who Have Died From COVID-19 Capitol Chaos: Upper East Side Man Samuel Fisher Taken Into Custody By FBI In his first speech as the new Senate Majority Leader, Schumer urged colleagues to turn the spirit of the new president’s call for unity into action. “President Biden, we heard you loud...
    Members of the progressive "Squad" have signaled their interest in pushing the Biden administration to the left as the president takes office on his first day. "Good afternoon. We need Medicare for All," Rep. Mondaire Jones, D-N.Y., tweeted just hours after President Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., who has backed "Medicare-for-all," was less explicit on policy preferences but called on the Biden administration to "implement bold and aggressive policies advancing economic, racial, and environmental justice, as well as strong civil rights protections to ensure that every person has the ability to thrive." Their comments came after Biden, a perceived moderate who has opposed "Medicare-for-all," struck a deal with progressive icon, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., to pursue a host of left-leaning priorities upon entering office. 'SQUAD' MEMBERS CONTINUE RESISTING CALLS FOR MODERATION, BLAST BIDEN'S CONSIDERATION OF EX-OBAMA OFFICIAL As Biden was inaugurated, the focus among Democrats appeared to be...
    With the inauguration of President Biden and the swearing-in of three Democratic senators, Democrats have trifecta control of the federal government. In the Senate, Chuck Schumer is in the driver's seat as the majority leader. Georgia Sens. Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock and California Sen. Alex Padilla were sworn into the Senate on Wednesday, making the breakdown of power in the Senate 50 votes for the Democratic caucus and 50 votes for Republicans, with Vice President Kamala Harris, as the president of the Senate, casting the tie-breaking vote. "With the swearing-in of these three senators, the Senate will turn to Democratic control, for which I deeply thank my colleagues. The Senate will turn to Democratic control under the first New York-born majority leader in American history," Schumer said in a speech on the Senate floor on Wednesday, describing himself. "A kid from Brooklyn, the son of an exterminator...
    Bradley Cortright January 20, 2021 0 Comments In one of her first official acts in office, Vice President Kamala Harris is swearing in three new Democratic senators, ending six years of Republican control of the upper chamber. Hours after she made history as the first woman of color to be sworn in as vice president, Harris returned to the Capitol to swear in Sens. Jon Ossoff (D-Ga.), Raphael Warnock (D-Ga.), and Alex Padilla (D-Calif.) Ossoff and Warnock won two run-off elections in Georgia on January 5. Padilla was appointed to fill Harris’ seat in the Senate. Watch the video below: Newly inaugurated VP Harris swears in new Senators Ossoff (D-GA), Warnock (D-GA), and Padilla (D-CA) pic.twitter.com/d2emxYEBGu— Daily Caller (@DailyCaller) January 20, 2021 There will now be a 50-50 split in the Senate, with Harris able to cast the tie breaking vote, giving Democrats control of the chamber. With the new...
    Three Democrats were officially sworn in as U.S. Senators on Wednesday, hours after President Joe Biden’s inauguration, giving Democrats a majority in the Senate. California Democrat Alex Padilla will take Vice President Kamala Harris’s Senate seat, Georgia Democrat Jon Ossoff will take David Perdue’s seat, and Georgia Democrat Raphael Warnock will take Kelly Loeffler’s seat. The two Georgia Senate runoff victories secured Democrats’ majority in the Senate. Harris swore the three Senate Democrats in. The Senate will now be split 50-50, with Harris, giving Democrats the tie-breaking vote. “As I’m sworn in today, know that I will be a senator for all Georgians. Whether or not you voted for me, I’ll carry your hopes and concerns to Washington,” Warnock tweeted before he was sworn in. As I’m sworn in today, know that I will be a senator for all Georgians. Whether or not you voted for me, I’ll carry your...
    The Democrats on Wednesday regained control of the Senate for the first time in six years. Newly inaugurated Vice President Kamala Harris, in her first official act in her constitutional role as president of the Senate, swore in Sens.-elect Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock — who defeated GOP Sens. David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler in Georgia’s twin Jan. 5 Senate runoff elections. HARRIS MAKES HISTORY AS SHE'S INAUGURATED AS THE NATION'S VICE PRESIDENT And the vice president — who in advance of her inauguration stepped down from her Senate seat representing California on Monday — also swore in Alex Padilla, who was appointed by California Gov. Gavin Newsom to succeed Harris in the Senate. Harris was given a standing ovation by her former colleagues in the Senate as she entered the chamber. All three new senators are making history. Warnock, 51, and Ossoff, 33, become Georgia’s first Black and first Jewish senators. Padilla, 47, becomes California’s...
    Democrats swore in three new senators on Wednesday, officially handing the party the Senate majority for the first time since they lost the chamber in the 2014 elections. Newly minted Vice President Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisScalise bringing Donna Brazile as guest to Biden inauguration McConnell, Schumer fail to cut power-sharing deal amid filibuster snag Howard University's marching band to escort Harris at inauguration MORE swore in Georgia Sens. Jon OssoffJon OssoffThe Hill's Morning Report - President Biden, Vice President Harris begin work today Democrats torn on impeachment trial timing Here's what you need to know about Inauguration Day MORE (D) and Raphael WarnockRaphael WarnockThe Hill's Morning Report - President Biden, Vice President Harris begin work today Democrats torn on impeachment trial timing Here's what you need to know about Inauguration Day MORE (D), who defeated GOP Sens. David PerdueDavid PerdueWarnock, Ossoff to be sworn into Senate Wednesday afternoon Georgia secretary of...
    WASHINGTON — Vice President Kamala Harris on Wednesday swore in three Democratic senators, including her replacement and two new Georgia Democrats, wresting away control of the upper chamber from Republicans in the 117th Congress. A few hours after her historic inauguration on Wednesday, Harris was in the Senate chamber to administer the oath of office to Peach State Democrats Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock, and Alex Padilla who replaces her as a senator from California. Vice President Kamala Harris administers the oath of office to newly elected senators Jan. 20, 2021, in the Senate Chamber.US Senate The Senate balance of power is now 50-50, with Harris the tie-breaking vote as vice president, giving Democrats a razor-thin majority. Chuck Schumer replaces Mitch McConnell as Senate majority leader. Democrats flipped two Georgia Senate seats in fiercely-contested runoff races on Jan. 5 which became the most expensive races in US history. Filed under...
    Three new senators, sworn in by a new Senate president. The Democrats formally gained a majority in the U.S. Senate on Wednesday afternoon, thanks to four historic firsts. With the November elections and the Georgia Senate runoffs in January, Democrats gained a net of three new Senate seats, bringing the chamber to a 50 Democrat, 50 Republican tie. With a Democratic vice president now presiding over the body and three Democrats sworn in on Wednesday, Democrats now hold a majority for the first time since January 2015. The new majority is courtesy of: Raphael Warnock
    Democrats are taking control of the Senate on Wednesday afternoon, giving the party control of the White House and both chambers of Congress. Vice President Kamala Harris, who was sworn in during the inauguration ceremony Wednesday, will administer the oath of office for Senators-elect Jon Ossoff, Alex Padilla and Raphael Warnock on Wednesday. Ossoff and Warnock won their runoff elections in Georgia earlier this month, and Padilla was appointed by California Governor Gavin Newsom to replace Harris in the Senate.How to watch Harris administer the oath of office for Warnock, Ossoff and Padilla What: Vice President Kamala Harris swears in Rev. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff of Georgia, and Harris' replacement former California Secretary of State Alex Padilla Date: Wednesday, January 20, 2021 Time: 4:30 p.m. ET Online stream: Live on CBSN in the player above and on your mobile of streaming device  Follow: Live Inauguration Day...
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy called on President Biden to pick up on challenges “confronted” by his predecessor, now former President Donald Trump. McCarthy, who has long supported Trump but blamed him in part for the Jan. 6 Capitol attack, said Biden must begin dealing with the pandemic and the consequences of enduring lockdowns, as well as China’s threats to America’s economy and security. “President Donald Trump led our country in acknowledging and confronting these generational challenges,” the California Republican said in a statement Wednesday. “It would be wise to pick up that mantle and work towards common ground to make our country and her people stronger.” McCarthy’s statement noted the extremely close margins in the House and Senate. House Democrats maintain a very slim majority, while the Senate is split evenly between Democrats and Republicans, with Vice President Kamala Harris providing the one-vote majority for the Democrats. “I believe...
    Democrats will be taking control of the Senate on Wednesday afternoon, giving the party control of the White House and both chambers of Congress. Vice President Kamala Harris, who was sworn in during the inauguration ceremony Wednesday, will administer the oath of office for Senators-elect Jon Ossoff, Alex Padilla and Raphael Warnock Wednesday afternoon.  Ossoff and Warnock won their runoff elections in Georgia earlier this month, and Padilla was appointed by California Governor Gavin Newsom to replace Harris in the Senate. With Ossoff, Padilla and Warnock seated, Democrats will hold the narrowest possible majority in the Senate. The balance will be 50 Democrats to 50 Republicans, with Harris breaking any tie. Incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Minority Leader Mitch McConnell have discussed a arrangement based on the power-sharing deal implemented in 2001, the last time there was a 50-50 split in the Senate. Vice President Dick Cheney was in office...
    GOP Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWhat would MLK say about Trump and the Republican Party? Biden's minimum wage push faces uphill battle with GOP GOP senators wrestle with purging Trump from party MORE (Ky.) and Democratic Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerCowboys for Trump founder arrested following Capitol riot Graham pushes Schumer for vote to dismiss impeachment article Biden and the new Congress must protect Americans from utility shutoffs MORE (N.Y.) failed to reach a deal on Tuesday on organizing a 50-50 Senate as a fight over the filibuster threatens to drag out the talks for days.  The two Senate leaders met to discuss how to share power in an evenly split Senate where they discussed, according to Schumer, "a whole lot of issues" but didn't get an agreement.  The talks have snagged over a fight on the 60-vote legislative filibuster, which could drag out the negotiations for several days.  McConnell is pressing...
    House Majority Whip Jim ClyburnJames (Jim) Enos ClyburnPelosi mum on when House will send impeachment article to Senate Biden to name Jaime Harrison to lead the Democratic National Committee: report Republicans gauge support for Trump impeachment MORE (D-S.C.) predicted that the lower chamber will be able to pass President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenWoman accused of trying to sell Pelosi laptop to Russians arrested Trump gets lowest job approval rating in final days as president Trump moves to lift coronavirus travel restrictions on Europe, Brazil MORE’s legislative agenda despite Democrats’ razor-thin majority. “I’ve been managing something all my life, so I can manage this,” Clyburn, a top Biden ally, said Tuesday in a Politico Playbook Live interview. “I’ll have the management in place to get it done.” Clyburn’s confidence comes despite expectations that passing substantial bills could be a slog in the House, which is only narrowly controlled by Democrats after the party unexpectedly lost...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — In one of his final acts as majority leader, Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell is pressuring Democrats to keep the filibuster — the procedural tool that liberals and progressives are eager to to do away with so President-elect Joe Biden’s legislative priorities can be approved more easily over GOP opposition. McConnell has told Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer that retaining the legislative filibuster is important and should be part of their negotiations for a power-sharing agreement in the narrowly divided Senate. Schumer and McConnell met Tuesday to begin hammering out the details of organizing the chamber, which will be split 50-50, with Democrats holding the majority once three new senators are sworn in Wednesday and Kamala Harris is inaugurated as the vice president. “Leader McConnell expressed his long-held view that the crucial, longstanding and bipartisan Senate rules concerning the legislative filibuster remain intact, specifically during the power...
    Reuters January 19, 2021 0 Comments Three new Democratic U.S. senators, including the winners of a pair of Georgia races and the successor to Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, are set to be sworn in on Wednesday, a source familiar with the planning said, giving the party a working majority in the chamber. Georgia’s Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff, as well as California’s Alex Padilla, should be sworn in once the Senate reconvenes after the midday inauguration of Democratic President-elect Joe Biden and Harris, the source said, asking not to be identified. The additions will split the chamber, currently Republican controlled, 50-50 with Harris holding the tie-breaking vote. Georgia officials certified the results of the state’s Jan. 5 runoff election on Tuesday, Georgia’s secretary of state said earlier, confirming Warnock and Ossoff had defeated Republicans Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue. The statewide results “are a true and correct tabulation of...
    President-elect Joe Biden will soon seek to enact his legislative agenda despite facing a split Senate majority. Although Georgia Senate Democrats Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock won the January runoffs, Democrats still do not technically control the Senate majority. As of January 3, when the 117th Congress was sworn in, 51 Republicans, 46 Democrats, and two independents that caucus with the Democrats comprise the Senate. This is why Mitch McConnell (R-KY) remains the Senate Majority Leader. Georgia will likely certify the runoff election results on Wednesday and then swear in Warnock and Ossoff, making the Senate comprise 50 Republicans and 50 Democrats. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris resigned Monday as California’s junior senator. California Gov. Gavin Newsom selected California Secretary of State Alex Padilla to serve as the next senator from California. On Wednesday, Harris will take the oath of office to become the vice president and then formally give control...
    Sens. Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer have a long road to go in working out agreements on power-sharing and other immediate issues for the 50-50 divided Senate. Time is running out for McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, and Schumer, a New York Democrat, with just one day before President-elect Joe Biden is inaugurated and Schumer is set to become the majority leader of the Senate with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris's tiebreaking vote. Top congressional aides told the Washington Examiner that the Republican and Democratic Senate leaders have not reached any agreements on immediate issues for the Senate, including the division of power in committees and whether legislation can advance in case of a tie vote, the schedule for a Senate impeachment trial for President Trump, confirmations of key Biden Cabinet nominations, and the timing for considering Biden's proposed coronavirus aid package. The two men are scheduled to meet...
    Senate Democrats announced on Tuesday that the first major legislation they will aim to pass once they take the majority will be a voting and elections reform bill that languished in the Senate after being passed in the House two years ago. Democrats will have the slimmest possible majority once three new senators are sworn in this week, with Vice President-elect Kamala Harris to cast any tiebreaking vote in the evenly split Senate. "This legislation will bring about long-needed democracy reforms that will ensure that government is finally able to respond to the pressing needs of the American people. Anyone who believes in a government by the people and for the people should support this important legislation," said incoming Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer in a statement. The act includes voting reforms intended to block recent state laws which have made voting more difficult with provisions allowing online voter registration...