Monday, Mar 01, 2021 - 02:37:55
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American survival:

    Martin Avila, the CEO of IT infrastructure company Right Forge, which provides digital services for center-right businesses and groups, recently published an op-ed arguing that a second internet must be created to maintain digital freedom. In a recent op-ed published in Newsweek titled “A Second Internet is Needed for American Survival,” Marvin Avila, the CEO of Right Forge, argues that American survival is dependent on reigning in Big Tech firms and the possibility of the creation of a new type of internet. Right Force is “a full-service technology infrastructure company,” according to Avila, and provides IT services to brands including Beteran, RE Factor Tactical, and Tier 1 Concealed. In his op-ed, Avila notes that in the last six months major tech firms have censored newspapers, de-platformed Parler, and banned former President Trump from almost every major social media platform. Avila discusses how these tech firms differ from American companies in years...
    Tony Blinken, Joe Biden's nomination to be secretary of state, praised his prominent diplomatic family and paid tribute to his stepfather's surviving the Holocaust in his speech thanking the president-elect for the nomination. Biden introduced his national security team in Wilmington on Tuesday as he prepares to transition to the White House in January. He noted Blinken, one of his longtime advisers, comes from a family of 'immigrants and refugees' that include 'a Holocaust survivor who taught him to never take for granted the very idea of America as a place of possibilities.' Tony Blinken is Biden's nominee to be secretary of state and comes from a prominent diplomatic family Blinken acknowledged the prominent diplomatic family that raised him. His paternal grandfather migrated from Kiev when it was under the control of Russia and his stepfather, prominent international attorney Sam Pisar, was a Holocaust survivor. His father and uncle...
    Halfpoint Images | Moment | Getty Images Families across America are facing repercussions from the coronavirus pandemic. From unemployment to career shifts to a loss or reduction in income, they are dealing with a new dynamic that may affect their relationships and their financial well-being. Millions of Americans have also moved in with family members because of the Covid-19 crisis. In July, 52% of young adults lived with one or both of their parents, up from 47% in February, according to a recent Pew Research Center analysis of Census data. That surpasses the peak hit during the Great Depression, Pew said. "Families have been happily coming together and looking at it as a way of survival that we haven't seen for generations," said Winnie Sun, co-founder and managing director of Irvine, California-based Sun Group Wealth Partners. More from Invest in You:How to negotiate your medical bills and lower your costsDeepak...
    NEW YORK -- WABC-TV, New York's No. 1 station and the most-watched television station in the nation, aired "Breast Cancer: Survival During a Pandemic" on SUNDAY, OCT. 18 (5.30 p.m. EDT), and will rebroadcast MONDAY, OCT. 19 (2:00 a.m. EDT). Hosted by Eyewitness News anchor Liz Cho, the special features inspiring breast cancer survivors who share their journey of resilience as they face challenges navigating their health during the pandemic. This year marks WABC's 26th year working with the American Cancer Society.The special shares inspiring stories of breast cancer survivors who face challenges and bravely conquer them. Featured stories include the following: A 38-year-old woman shares her journey of being diagnosed with breast cancer and finding out she was pregnant a week later, while dealing with the death of two family members who passed away from cancer. A mother of two, who correctly suspected she had breast cancer, was...
    NEW YORK -- WABC-TV, New York's No. 1 station and the most-watched television station in the nation, aired "Breast Cancer: Survival During a Pandemic" on SUNDAY, OCT. 18 (5.30 p.m. EDT), and will rebroadcast MONDAY, OCT. 19 (2:00 a.m. EDT). Hosted by Eyewitness News anchor Liz Cho, the special features inspiring breast cancer survivors who share their journey of resilience as they face challenges navigating their health during the pandemic. This year marks WABC's 26th year working with the American Cancer Society.The special shares inspiring stories of breast cancer survivors who face challenges and bravely conquer them. Featured stories include the following: A 38-year-old woman shares her journey of being diagnosed with breast cancer and finding out she was pregnant a week later, while dealing with the death of two family members who passed away from cancer. A mother of two, who correctly suspected she had breast cancer, was...
    NEW YORK -- WABC-TV, New York's No. 1 station and the most-watched television station in the nation, will air "Breast Cancer: Survival During a Pandemic" on SUNDAY, OCT. 18 (5.30 p.m. EDT), and will rebroadcast MONDAY, OCT. 19 (2:00 a.m. EDT). Hosted by Eyewitness News anchor Liz Cho, the special features inspiring breast cancer survivors who share their journey of resilience as they face challenges navigating their health during the pandemic. This year marks WABC's 26th year working with the American Cancer Society.The special shares inspiring stories of breast cancer survivors who face challenges and bravely conquer them. Featured stories include the following: A 38-year-old woman shares her journey of being diagnosed with breast cancer and finding out she was pregnant a week later, while dealing with the death of two family members who passed away from cancer. A mother of two, who correctly suspected she had breast cancer,...
    In 1970, the American Indian Movement (AIM) declared its intention to open a school for Native youth living in Minneapolis. AIM had identified the urgent need for Indigenous children to be educated within their own communities. Two years later, Heart of the Earth Survival School opened its doors, providing hope to Native families whose children had endured the racial abuse prevalent in the Minneapolis public schools. In the 1960s and early 70s, due in part to discrimination experienced within the public schools, the dropout rate among Native students in the Twin Cities hovered between 60 and 80 percent. This led to an even greater crisis: the widespread removal of “truant” children from their homes by the social welfare agencies of Ramsey and Hennepin Counties. Most of these young people, in violation of international law, were placed outside of Native communities, with white foster parents. According to the United Nations, taking...
    The coronavirus pandemic is a global disaster that is not independent of other crises and disasters. The pandemic has killed more than 500,000 people around the world, more than 130,000 of those in the United States. It has caused a severe global economic recession. Global climate disaster continues. There is a heat wave in Siberia. The United Nations reports that hundreds of millions of people face starvation because of a global food shortage. When America’s global leadership is most needed to fight the coronavirus pandemic — and the imminent danger of other and perhaps greater disasters — the Trump regime has announced that the U.S. will withdraw from the World Health Organization. (If Trump is no longer president next year, this presumably will not happen.) Global wealth and income inequality continue to grow. Foreign Policy reports that “the coronavirus pandemic is set to push half a billion people into poverty and is expected to double the number of people facing acute hunger to 265 million.” Right-wing fascist-flavored regimes are expanding their control...
    (CNN)As the nation confronts a pandemic, high unemployment and social unrest in the aftermath of George Floyd's killing, Americans are desperately seeking adult presidential leadership to right the ship of state and reassure them about their future. Instead, Americans receive never-ending rants from a detached president during this moment of crisis. President Trump obsesses over perceived personal affronts, petty grievances, slights, betrayals and matters not relevant to issues crying out for serious, measured responses. Worse, Trump has undermined his own administration's attempts to guide us through the pandemic with absurd, science-denying comments over the possible benefits of injecting disinfectant and the perils of excessive Covid-19 testing. He has further plunged the country into a completely counterproductive debate by politicizing the wearing of masks. This president has the attention span of a gnat. Trump couples that with an alarming ignorance of American history and a complete disinterest in matters of public...
    How long can this nation survive when its main cultural and educational institutions preach a relentless, unchallenged stream of anti-Americanism to young people (and others) who lack the background to resist this toxicity? Along with others, I have long argued that the American left has a major problem with America as founded. Yet Democrats are outraged by the suggestion, and too many Republicans seem insufficiently concerned about it. They better wake up. If current events aren’t enough to turn your head, please consider the following data presented by Eric Kaufmann, professor of politics at the University of London Birkbeck College. Kaufmann writes that the “cultural revolutionaries” who are toppling statues and renaming buildings “are changing minds, and could be in a position to enact a root-and-branch reconstruction of America into something completely unrecognizable to its present-day inhabitants.” He adds: “Imagine a country whose collective memory has been upended, with a...
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