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    I’m always looking for little tips and tricks to pick up in the kitchen. I’m a pretty decent cook, but there is so much to learn. One of the places I consistently turn to for this is Food52’s Genius Recipes Column. Run by Founding Editor and Creative Director Kristen Miglore, each week there is a different recipe that is delicious, as well as a conversation about a kitchen tip with input from the community. So far, I’ve learned a hack to prep bell peppers and a way to plop big chunks of potatoes into boiling water without burning myself. But I wanted to know what her favorite tip she’d picked up was—and her answer surprised me. “I love this pepper mill,” she said. The grinder in question is the PepperMate Mill. It’s not shaped like a cylinder as you might expect, but it’s more of a box. It has a...
    It is the one royal group that no one wants to join. Referred to only half-jokingly as the 'Sussex Survivors' Club', its membership is sadly rising. But its select band of members have one thing in common: all have worked for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex and lived to tell the tale. Joking aside, some even believe they may have a form of post-traumatic stress, defined by doctors as an anxiety disorder caused by distressing or frightening events. Such experiences, of course, are now widely acknowledged not to be limited to soldiers who have undergone traumatic experiences on the battlefield, but also to people at work. Even if that work is in a palace. And today, many former palace staff look back on the moment that Prince Harry introduced to the world his beautiful, intelligent and passionate bride-to-be as the beginning of one of the most traumatic periods in...
    More On: andrew cuomo How Cuomo plans to buck calls to resign: Goodwin The GOP is still Trump’s and other commentary LI Rep. Zeldin exploring run for governor amid Cuomo scandals Cuomo to be stripped of pandemic powers amid sex harass, nursing home scandals The Issue: The three women who have come forward accusing Gov. Cuomo of sexual harassment. The dominoes are falling, and Gov. Cuomo’s “I was joking” excuse is a lame, last-ditch response (“Hey, I’m a funny guy,” March 1). No matter your profession, these days nearly everyone sits through an annual sexual-harassment training. His response doesn’t cut it. It seems our governor has never had this training. He may have been too busy focusing on bail reform (a failure), overseeing an incompetent parole board that rewards violent offenders with freedom and requiring COVID-positive patients to be admitted to nursing homes (allegedly) covering up the death toll....
    More On: parole ‘Has more rights than we do’: Slain NYPD cop’s family angered over killer’s release NYPD cop-killer convicted in 1980 murder to be paroled ‘Fake heiress’ Anna Sorokin headed to parole check-in Fake heiress Anna Sorokin released early from prison The Issue: The parole of a man convicted of killing NYPD Officer Harry Ryman in 1980. The parole of cop-killer Paul Ford is yet another sign that Gov. Cuomo has absolutely no regard for victims’ families (“Slain-cop kin aghast at murderer’s parole,” Feb. 21). Cuomo has no interest in protecting the residents of New York, as his criminal-justice reforms and handpicked Parole Board members are causing violent criminals to be released onto our streets. It is time for all New Yorkers to wake up and protect themselves by pushing this ruthless tyrant out of his easy chair. Nicholas MaffeiYonkers Some 20 cop-killers have been released by Cuomo’s...
    An editor at Washingtonian magazine has a history of making disparaging remarks about black people on social media. Daniella Byck, an assistant editor at the Washingtonian, once mocked Africa and the size of a black man’s lips, quipping that “no human has lips that big” in a December 2011 Twitter post. "'Earl Sweatshirt is a myth, he was a robot created by Tyler, The Creator; no human has lips that big' #internetfindings,” Byck said in one post. "Earl Sweatshirt is a myth, he was a robot created by Tyler, The Creator; no human has lips that big" #internetfindings— Daniella Byck (@daniellabyck) December 2, 2011 “In #Africa tweeting is when you sit on a tree and make bird calls,” Byck joked in another. in #Africa tweeting is when you sit on a tree and make bird calls— Daniella Byck (@daniellabyck) January 19, 2012 THE RACISM OF THE ANTI-RACISTS “Afros and scooter...
    New York (CNN Business)For nearly a year, newsrooms have mostly sat empty because of the pandemic. Staffers have been working from home and not seeing many of their coworkers in person. But over the past week in Texas, as millions lacked power and water, local journalists sought refuge in each others' homes or even in their abandoned newsrooms.Manny García, editor of the Austin American-Statesman, said that their newsroom has been nicknamed "Camp Statesman" and he has been using his own four-wheel drive vehicle — driving on the city's icy streets — to pick up and drop off his journalists there. Hi this is my home now pic.twitter.com/KYagACDT9h— Sarah Asch ???? (@sarahradinasch) February 16, 2021 Local news has been crucial for disseminating information over the past week as a rare winter storm swept through Texas with freezing temperatures that triggered power outages for millions. At least 38 people have died nationwide...
    Ocasio-Cortez raises $1 million for Texas relief, plans trip to Houston Op-Ed: Collapseologists are warning humanity that business-as-usual will make the Earth uninhabitable © Photo: Stocksy/OHLAMOUR STUDIO benefit they're real magnet mascara Superhero. Eyes to Kill. Lash Blast. And now: They’re Real Magnet Mascara from Benefit. If you'd been wondering what the next great mascara would be, look no further than Benefit's most recent launch, which taps innovative technology to lengthen lashes and stack pigments on top of one another in a way we haven't yet seen. Utilizing a magnet core technology inside of the short zig-zag bristled wand, magnetized pigments in the mascara formula are guided, almost like Lego pieces snapping one on top of the other to lengthen lashes as you move the applicator across your fringe. The technology allows the pigments to stack out beyond where your natural lashes end, meaning They're Real Magnet Mascara...
    Mario Tama/Getty Images About half of New York Times employees are uncomfortable expressing themselves around their colleagues, according to a company survey. Responding to the statement, “There is a free exchange of views in this company; people are not afraid to say what they really think,” 51 percent of employees responded affirmatively. The other 49 percent said they were not comfortable expressing their opinions. The poll was conducted by the Times and obtained by The New York Post. “Although the majority of us feel well-informed, many indicated that differing viewpoints aren’t sought or valued in our work,” the Times noted in an internal assessment of the study. “Relatedly, we saw some negative responses on whether there’s a free exchange of views in the company, and scored below the benchmark on this question.” The results come after a year in which more liberal Times staffers sought to jettison moderate colleagues from the...
    White House spokesman TJ Ducklo resigned Saturday after news that he threatened a Politico reporter came out. By now you’ve probably heard about how Ducklo threatened Tara Palmeri for working on a report about his relationship with Axios reporter Alexi McCammond. The Biden administration only announced his one-week suspension after the initial Vanity Fair report broke, but on Saturday — following questions about whether that suspension is really sufficient given his behavior — Ducklo resigned. Politico editor Carrie Budoff Brown spoke with CNN’s Brian Stelter on Sunday and said, “I expect my reporters to behave professionally. And in return, we expect the same of the people we cover, but particularly public officials who are paid by taxpayers.” Brown noted President Joe Biden’s day-one pledge to staffers that they would be fired “on the spot” if they treated colleagues with disrespect. “The president set a high bar. And I think what this...
    More from: Keith J. Kelly War erupts at NY Times after Donald McNeil ousted over N-word controversy Reddit Rally yields 2 book deals, 3 movie deals in wild week New York Times Cliff Levy still not appearing on papers masthead The American Spectator magazine goes to war with London-based The Spectator Washington Post publisher to handle search for Marty Baron replacement Scratch the top editor of the Minneapolis Star Tribune off the wish list of candidates for the executive editor job at the LA Times. “I respect the heck out of the LA Times, but I politely declined to be a candidate,” Rene Sanchez told Media Ink. He had served as the LA Bureau chief for the Washington Post from 1998 to 2004 before joining the Star Tribune. The New Orleans native advanced through its reporting and editorial ranks and supervised a team that won a Pulitzer Prize...
    Bloomberg News announced dozens of layoffs in its newsroom on Thursday. A source familiar with the matter told The Hill that about 90 Bloomberg editorial and research employees are expected to leave the company, roughly 3 percent of its 3,100 editorial and research staff. The cuts are global, but the majority will take place in its Europe, Middle East and Africa divisions, as well as the Americas, the source said. The majority of the cuts will affect editors. Bloomberg LP has roughly 20,000 employees globally. The layoffs come as part of an effort to restructure the newsroom’s editing process. In a memo to staff obtained by The Hill, Bloomberg’s editor-in-chief John Micklethwait said he was restructuring the newsroom in an effort to “elevate editing.” “For the most part, we will stick to the principle of one story, one editor. No more unnecessary back-reading or re-editing. Yes, of course there will be...
    Google Photos implemented new editing options for subscribers Google One. After weeks of rumors, the technology announced the changes that will apply from today. Options for paid users are three characteristics that until today were exclusive to the Pixel. The first one is the mode Portrait Blur, which blurs the background simulating the use of a large aperture lens. Google uses its machine learning algorithms for this, so the effect can be applied to photos you’ve taken before. Another similar filter is Portrait Light, which improves the illumination of faces by means of artificial intelligence. The filter Color Pop, which is regularly used for photos in Portrait mode, can be applied to your entire library if you are a Google One user. The company confirmed that this option will continue to be available to the general public, although only for photographs with depth information. Finally others...
    Now that Google has revamped Photos’ still image editing, it’s turning its attention to moving pictures. Google has overhauled the video editor in Photos for Android and iOS to give you much more control than the usual trimming, stabilization and rotation. You can crop and straighten the frame, tweak exposure and make subtle adjustments to elements like contrast and saturation. There won’t be quite as much of a need for a third-party app to fine-tune your dog walking video. The upgraded video editing is already available for iOS users, and should reach Android over the “coming weeks.” Google is also expanding some of its previously Pixel-exclusive photo editing features, but only to One subscribers. Pay up and you’ll get after-shot Portrait Blur and Portrait Light effects as well as AI-based Dynamic and sky suggestions. They’ll be available to One members on Android in the “next few days.” Earlier...
    Daily Beast editor-at-large Molly Jong-Fast allegedly knew about the sexually explicit messages that John Weaver — a co-founder of the anti-Trump super PAC Lincoln Project — had been sending to nearly a dozen young men, in which he offered them career advice and jobs in exchange for sexual favors. “According to several mutual friends, [Molly Jong-Fast] heard I had this story back in the early summer. And that it was circulating several outlets,” tweeted political consultant Ryan Girdusky — the conservative activist who first broke the story — of the scandal involving Weaver. According to several mutual friends, @MollyJongFast heard I had this story back in the early summer. And that it was circulating several outlets. — Ryan James Girdusky (@RyanGirdusky) January 31, 2021 “Molly Jong-Fast kept her mouth shut after she learned that one of her Lincoln Project sexual predator pals was targeting young boys,” commented GOP strategist Arthur...
    More On: andrew cuomo NY has used 100 percent of its first-dose COVID-19 allocation AG report finds NY nursing homes with low staffing had most deaths ‘Who cares?!’ Cuomo callously addresses COVID nursing home death report Cuomo’s not off the hook for refusing to release COVID nursing home death data: watchdog The Issue: AG Letitia James’ finding that the Cuomo administration undercounted nursing-home deaths. Gov. Cuomo called to account? “Finally,” says Janice Dean (“Finally, this gov is called to task,” Jan. 29), and she’s dead right. Pity it took so long. Did no one see that he was wrecking the state with Buffalo Billion and other spendthrift failures? Or note that he shut down the ethics commission he himself created as soon as it looked at his own dealings? Now, finally, some eyebrows are raised, but only after his eldercide killed thousands of seniors and his cynical attempt to...
    The New York Times star reporter on the coronavirus pandemic, Donald McNeil Jr., 66, has been accused of making offensive comments, including using the N-word on a 2019 student trip to Peru The New York Times has stopped short of firing one of its most prominent reporters despite claims he used the N-word during a Times-branded student trip to Peru. Donald McNeil Jr., 66, whose writing on the coronavirus pandemic over the last year has been submitted for a Pulitzer prize, is alleged to have used the racial slur in front of a group of 26 students and some of their parents.  But the Times has decided not to fire him after its editor believed McNeil did not use the words with 'hateful or malicious' intent. The incident comes just a week after the paper ended the contract of an editor after she tweeted that she had 'chills' watching President-elect...
    More On: letters to the editor Letters to the editor — Jan. 20, 2021 Letters to the editor — Jan. 17, 2021 Letters to the editor — Jan. 16, 2021 Letters to the editor — Jan. 15, 2021 The Issue: Joe Biden’s inauguration on Wednesday as the 46th president of the United States. After a tortuous four years under President Donald Trump, it’s a new day in America. Our long national nightmare is over. Say what you will about President Biden, we can all agree that he is a fundamentally kind and decent man. We can also all agree Trump was not. Biden, unlike Trump, would be the first to tell you that he’s not a perfect man, but arguably, he’s the perfect person for this fragile moment in our republic’s history. If anyone is capable of uniting us and healing the searing wounds that have unraveled the fabric...
    The Breitbart logo. Photo by Jaap Arriens/NurPhoto via Getty Images In internal messages leaked to The Daily Beast, Breitbart News employees debated the role President Donald Trump played in inciting last week's deadly Capitol riot. The far-right Breitbart has actively avoided direct criticism of the president, but the internal messages highlight the growing divide among conservatives regarding Trump's behavior.   "We have worked so hard to promote our values, values that made him president when he hawked them, and now he does this, leaving everything in shambles? Nah, destroy him. Let it be a lesson to every other 'populist,'" wrote one editor in the leaked messages. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Employees at the conservative, pro-Trump outlet Breitbart News argued over the extent of Trump's role in last week's insurrection at the US Capitol, according to The Daily Beast. In internal Slack messages leaked to The Daily...
    Loading the player... Howard University has tapped journalist and digital media specialist Rin-rin Yu to lead its storytelling efforts by serving as editor-in-chief of Howard Magazine.  Born and raised outside New York City, Yu is co-founder of Silver Media Group, a strategic communications consultancy that she has managed for the past five years. In her new role at the HBCU (Historically Black Colleges and Universities), she will report to Vice President of Communications and Chief Communications Officer Frank Tramble.  Read More: Howard University women react to alum Kamala Harris’ historic win “I’m excited to welcome Rin-rin to the Howard team,” said Tramble in a statement. “She is a skilled journalist with a proven track record that will serve the University well. This chapter of Howard’s history is one of the most critical to date. The stories lived today will be told for generations to come and it is important...
    Best Accessibility Tech Wearable Devices Ltd. Mudra Band Wearable Devices Ltd. The technology underpinning the Mudra Band might seem fanciful: sensors capture neural electrical impulses in the wrist and map them onto specific movements like a swipe or a tap, essentially letting you control an Apple Watch with subtle finger movements on one hand. There’s no doubt the benefit of convenience — you can operate your watch when your hands are wet or dirty, for instance. But some of the most interesting implications of this technology might relate to accessibility, like helping amputees use their devices. The band connects to the Apple Watch via Bluetooth, making it a simple integration with compelling possibilities. — Chris Ip, Features Editor GoodMaps Explore (presented by American Printing House for the Blind) Goodmaps GoodMaps Explore is a navigation tool that’s all about the next step. Designed for people who are visually impaired or...
    More On: assaults Disturbing video shows latest attack by alleged Brooklyn subway puncher Catholic deacon punched in random NYC subway attack ‘Soho Karen’ ‘lost her mind for a minute’ before tackling black teen: lawyer Man busted for series of attacks on women in Brooklyn subway station The Issue: A man armed with a bat who allegedly attacked 10 people Saturday night. Mayor de Blasio and Gov. Cuomo have a duty to protect this state’s residents (“Bat out of hell,” Jan. 4). We pay some of the highest sales and real-estate taxes in the nation. We should not have to put our lives on the line walking around this city in broad daylight or riding the subway. The bat-wielding maniac is just one of many animals protected by the radical leftists in office. The fact that a Cuomo staffer was randomly assaulted in the city should send a stinging...
    More On: nancy pelosi Sorry, Pelosi: Eliminating official use of ‘mother’ isn’t inclusive — it’s waging war on women ‘A-woman’: Oy vey! House Democrat closes Congress’ opening prayer with ‘amen and awoman’ Democrats are now paying the price for empowering Antifa The Issue: Rep. Nancy Pelosi’s proposal to use only gender-neutral language in House rules. At first glance, I thought, for sure, it was a satirical piece that I was reading in The Post (“Nancy Cancels Mom,” Jan. 5). But no! Lo and behold —’twas not a satire at all. The (out-of-their-minds) members of the House of Representatives have actually proposed changes to its rules regarding the terminology to be used to promote “gender-neutrality.” If they have their way, get ready to say good-bye to the following “offensive” familial nouns: mother, father, son and daughter, aunt and uncle. I, for one, am very proud to be not only a...
    ONE DAY TO GO IN GEORGIA… Tim Scott: Georgia Runoffs Are ‘More Consequential’ Politically ‘Than Anything We’ve Ever Seen In Our Lifetime’ (VIDEO)
    Issue: Reports that Hilaria Baldwin has been pretending to be Spanish, despite being from America. Thank you for exposing Hillary Baldwin for the fraud she is (“It’s all bull!” Dec. 29). If she is Hilaria, than I am Alicia — and at least I have all my degrees in Spanish. Hillary is a double fraud since the main language in Mallorca, where she’s claimed she’s from, is a dialect of Catalan called Mallorquin. Baldwin is a pretentious phony who cannot even do her research. No wonder Alec Baldwin is unstable. Alice Lemos Woodside I want my money back. Hilaria — ahem, Hillary — Baldwin lied to me, and I feel deceived. I wasn’t born in Spain, like I thought Hilaria was, but I do have a Spanish passport and my parents are from Spain, and I spent all my summers there — so I related to her living in the...
    Ex-presidential contender Andrew Yang files papers to run for New York mayor Trumps former national security advisor calls his defense bill veto a shameful last act of a failed presidency The 3 Best Christmas Movies of 2020, According to an Entertainment Editor It may not be the most wonderful year, but that doesn't mean we don't get to enjoy the most wonderful time of the year. And even if we can't celebrate the holidays like "normal" (I could probably use a year off from the family political arguments anyway), we still have festive decorations, Starbucks drinks that taste like peppermint and, of course, Christmas movies. Now please don't think I'm being snarky when I say the bar is low when it comes to Christmas movies. They're cheesy. They're predictable. They're EXACTLY WHAT I WANT RIGHT NOW. What more could I desire from a holiday flick than a...
    Breitbart Editor-in-Chief Alex Marlow on Friday claimed that President-elect Joe Biden should be impeached immediately after entering the White House next month. “Biden enriched his family as VP doing everything that the Democrats falsely accused Trump of the last 4 years,” he tweeted. “If they had any sense of principle he’d be impeached day one.” Alongside the comment was a Breitbart article that highlighted an interview he conducted with Peter Schweizer, president of the Government Accountability Institute, who investigated the Biden family. The author of Profiles in Corruption: Abuse of Power by America’s Progressive Elite, accused the Biden family of financially benefitting from their political connections and influence. According to Marlow, Schweizer’s probe revealed “indisputable evidence” that the President-elect is “running a crime-like syndicate” that allows his family to profit and get rich off of the family name; the author appears to support the editor’s claims. “There’s a direct link...
    Tatcha When you buy through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more. Tatcha is a skincare brand that takes inspiration from centuries-old skincare routines of Japanese geisha.  The founder, Victoria Tsai, still works with geisha and Japanese scientists to formulate the products, which prioritize calming ingredients like camellia oil, green tea, and silk extracts. As a beauty editor, it's one of my absolute favorite brands. You can find it at Sephora, or Tatcha. Many of the product formulas are offered in variations for specific skin types, which allows you to customize your routine based on very specific concerns (for me, it's dryness).  There's something particularly gentle about practicing a morning or evening skincare routine with multiple steps. The careful massaging of cleansers and serums, the soft swipe of toners and essences on cotton pads, the precise application of hydrating creams — it's...
    The New York Times on Friday issued a retraction for its 2018 podcast series "Caliphate," after finding that one of its main subjects exaggerated or provided false accounts of his involvement with the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria. After a two-month internal review, the newspaper "found that Caliphate gave too much credence to the false or exaggerated accounts of one of its main subjects, Shehroze Chaudhry, a resident of Canada who claimed to have taken part in Islamic State executions under the name Abu Huzayafah." An Editors Note says that the investigation turned up "significant falsehoods and other discrepancies" in Chaudhrys story. "From the outset, Caliphate should have had the regular participation of an editor experienced in the subject matter," the note continues. "In addition, The Times should have pressed harder to verify Mr. Chaudhrys claims before deciding to place so much emphasis on one individuals account." The review came...
    This thing is great, especially since I only use a laptop without an external keyboard and mouse. It comes flat-packed and fully assembled. The aluminum frame supports up to 22 pounds, enough to hold your computer and various knicknacks (just don’t go leaning on it), and it’s quiet when raising and lowering as well. Simply press the handles on either side of the desk and its height will adjust nearly silently. Plus it’s lightweight, which allows me to easily move it when I want to use my kitchen table as, you know, a kitchen table. Now I even have somewhere to store my cat! — Senior Editor, Andrew Tarantola Nest Thermostat (2020) Google For years, I’ve coveted Nest’s smart thermostats. In an industry overstuffed with smart home failures, they offered plenty of useful upgrades over their old-school counterparts. Plus, they just looked incredibly cool. So when I moved out of...
    Calif. stay-at-home order to affect 33M U.S. Reports 1 Million New Coronavirus Cases in Just 5 Days, Tops 14 Million-Infection Threshold The best holiday gifts our editors ever gave or received The holidays are inching ever-closer, and if you need a little gift-idea inspiration in what's decidedly been a generally uninspiring year, we rounded up a list of some of the best gifts our editors have ever gifted or received. Check out our list of personal favorites, from clothing to beauty products to tech and home items — across a range of price points — that could make for excellent gifts for everyone on your list, whether you're celebrating with a small group this year or from afar. (Plus, check out our tips for making sure your holiday purchases arrive on time as well as plenty more gift guides here.) © DSW Dr. Martens 1460 Combat Boot ©...
    Alexandra Shulman and Kate Moss are pictured together in September 2016 My favourite memory of Kate Moss is from British Vogue’s 100th birthday after-party.  True to form, she had been the last to arrive at the gala dinner, giggling arm-in-arm with her great friends make-up artist Charlotte Tilbury and hair-stylist Sam McKnight, who had been at her home doing her up. Giorgio Armani, Damien Lewis, Joan Collins, Kim Kardashian and 200 other guests were all seated, but not Kate. She made up for it at the later bash at Tramp nightclub, where in a sliver of black she climbed up on the decks, as discs were spun by DJ Fat Tony, and powered the dancefloor – transforming what was a fun evening into something unforgettably special. The party was naturally pretty glamorous but it was Kate, with her supernova power, who confirmed that you were at the only place...
    Vox co-founder Ezra Klein is leaving the digital-news organization to join The New York Times, The Daily Beast has learned. The paper will announce that Klein, who left The Washington Post in 2014 to launch Vox will join the Times in the coming weeks, the Beast has confirmed. Klein was one of a handful of prolific writers who kicked off a wave of political blogging in the early aughts, eventually finding a home for his blog at The American Prospect and then moving it to the Post, where it was called WonkBlog. After founding Vox, he served as editor-in-chief of the website until 2017, when he transitioned into an editor-at-large role while continuing to expand his work into other forms of media, including regular MSNBC appearances, several successful political podcasts, and executive producing Vox’s Netflix series Explained. Klein is the second Vox co-founder to leave in recent weeks. Earlier this...
    We started this week with some reviews of the alternatively-sized iPhone 12s — the mini and the Pro Max. We ended this week with an all-new episode of The News Brigcast. All that stuff in between? That’s what our News Brigcast crew talked about on the show today. News Brigcast co-hosts Nilay Patel and Dieter Bohn start the show discussing their reviews of the new iPhones — Nilay on the Pro Max and Dieter on the mini — and how the really big iPhone and the tiniest iPhone rank in battery life, screen size, and ergonomics. Believe it or not, there was another Apple event on Tuesday. During its “One More Thing” hardware event, we saw Apple debut its own M1 processor chips, which power a new Macbook Air, Macbook Pro, and Mac mini. Deputy editor Dan Seifert and news editor Chaim Gartenberg join the show to discuss...
    Hu Xijin, editor of China’s state-run Global Times, complained about Americans “arrogantly” challenging him on the Internet and railed against the “overconfidence of some U.S. elites” in an editorial on Thursday. Hu’s goat was gotten by those arrogant Americans – and a few unnamed “Chinese public intellectuals” who follow them  – because they argued that, messy as the 2020 election might be, it is preferable to living in a brutal one-party communist tyranny that sends dissidents to prison and troublesome minorities to concentration camps.  Since he lives in a system where state newspaper editors are essentially government officials, Hu is not accustomed to strenuous disagreement. He responded by falling back to one of the Communist Party’s favorite talking points, arguing authoritarianism is a charming quirk of Chinese culture, and Westerners are insensitive chauvinists for thinking their notions of human rights are universal: What is really laughable are some shallow folks...
    1 SENATE RACE RESOLVED, 3 TO GO… Democrat Cunningham Concedes North Carolina Race To Republican Tillis
    We are in a whipsaw-fast news cycle, events breaking and churning faster than ever — but over at the New York Times, self-regarding reporters, columnists and editors have spent this most incredible year fighting amongst themselves over The New York Times. A jaw-dropping piece in New York Magazine reveals just how far and fast the paper has fallen, executive editor Dean Baquet somehow allowing his millennial social justice warriors to dictate not just how stories are covered but who writes them, edits them, or whether they should run at all. Make no mistake: The Times is engaging in self-censorship, which extends to outright censorship. The paper has been steadily morphing from a news organization into a far-left propaganda sheet that can please no one but the truest believers. Think about “All the President’s Men” or “Spotlight,” cinematic depictions of buzzy newsrooms, journalists hot to expose corruption at the highest levels,...
    Massive fire burning after building explosion in Virginia This Grocery Store Has the Best Customer Service How One Vogue Editor Is Becoming a Dress Person This Fall © Vogue As we continue to navigate these ever-changing times, in season two of What I Wore This Week, one Vogue editor shares their outfits—both on Zoom and IRL—from the previous week. It’s been 7 months since I’ve been in New York. I thought I’d be in my home city, Chicago, for only two weeks, and left Brooklyn with only my coziest clothes, because who was going anywhere at that time? Weeks and months passed, and I found myself digging into my old clothes from when I was young to switch things up. But it all just felt so mundane–a melange of yoga pants and knits–and I quite honestly stopped enjoying getting dressed completely. My frustration was partly due to the fact...
    CLEARED FOR FACEOFF… CDC Director Robert Redfield Gives Go-Ahead To Mike Pence To Participate In Vice Presidential Debate   The memo stated that the CDC, in consultation with White House physician Dr. Jesse Shonau, “concludes from a public health standpoint, it is safe for the Vice President to participate in the upcoming Vice-Presidential debate.” VP DEBATE… 9 PM ET… The debate will be moderated by USA Today Washington bureau chief Susan Page and be broken into nine segments of about 10 minutes each. In the format, Page will ask an opening question, after which the candidates will have two minutes to respond. A deeper discussion of the topic will follow.   WILL PENCE BRING UP HARRIS’S MINNESOTA PRISON SCANDAL? The Media Is Studiously Ignoring This Gigantic Kamala Harris Scandal (PATRIOTS ONLY)   The Daily Caller and the Daily Caller News Foundation (DCNF) obtained documents uncovering the use of Minnesota Freedom Fund (MFF) donations to...
    David Warner (L) and Larry Biddle.Nick Cardello All hail the happy warriors! If David Warner and Larry Biddle didn’t exist, it would be wise for us to invent them. I returned to the Bay Area after a multi-decade hiatus in 2010. As a devotee of alt-weeklies, I sought out Creative Loafing and discovered its multi-talented editor. David Warner is a lesson in total immersion in one’s community. And then I learned of Larry Biddle, David’s multi-decade partner and husband as of 2012. These guys are everywhere, fully politically and socially engaged change agents. Despite pedigrees that link to Merrick Garland (remember him?) at Harvard (David) or ancestral ties to one of Philadelphia’s great families predating our founding fathers (Larry), both gents are firmly rooted in the present. And that present is not about self-aggrandizement, but about lifting up the lives of others. I realized that David and Larry...
    Sir Harold Evans, who died Wednesday at age 92, was among the most consequential journalists of his or any generation, an impassioned and wily newspaper editor who used his prominence and penchant for battle to challenge, and sometimes torment, the British political and legal establishments when he believed they were wrong. During a career that spanned eight decades on both sides of the Atlantic, he ran Britain’s two most influential broadsheets, the Sunday Times for 14 years and (briefly) the daily Times before his resignation was forced in 1982 by the new owner, journalistic buccaneer Rupert Murdoch. Evans then emigrated to the United States to become editorial director of U.S. News & World Report and editor in chief of the Atlantic Monthly Press—both owned by his friend Mort Zuckerman—and went on to launch a successful glossy magazine, Condé Nast Traveler, write best-selling books, head the American publishing behemoth Random House,...
              Dear Virginia Star, On 15 September 1787, the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia was just two days from adjourning after nearly four months of painstaking negotiations. Yet Col. George Mason of Virginia remained fearful the proposed federal government could one day go rogue. In the waning hours of deliberation, he set out to persuade fellow delegates they were on the verge of codifying a fatal flaw. On that day, with extraordinary foresight, Mason championed a ‘Break In Case of Emergency’ tool which 233 years later is being used to stop out-of-control federal bureaucrats and career politicians. Col. Mason called for a change to Article V, which defines the two-step process for constitutional amendments: first they are proposed, then separately ratified. The ratification step is more widely known: three-fourths of state legislatures (38 in all) must affirm proposed amendments before they are incorporated to our...
    A Wisconsin-based journalist said he quit his job at The Kenosha News after objecting to a headline about a Jacob Blake rally that focused on a violent threat made by one of the speakers. Daniel J. Thompson, a now-former digital editor for The Kenosha News, said he was the only Black journalist at the paper. Thompson said he attended a "Justice for Jacob” rally for Blake but the paper’s headline gave a misleading impression of the event. BLAKE’S FAMILY TO ORGANIZE PROTEST AGAINST POLICE VIOLENCE According to The New York Times, the original headline on the paper’s website said, “Kenosha speaker: ‘If you kill one of us, it’s time for us to kill one of yours.’” Thompson feels that the headline is misleading and only focused on a particular speaker who didn’t represent all the attendees. “The story is about the entire reaction of all the speakers and people in attendance, and that quote is one outlier falling within a flood...
    Fact check: Police gave Kyle Rittenhouse water and thanked him before shooting How to Stuff a Turkey the Right Way (for the Juiciest, Most Flavorful Result) I’m a Fashion Editor, and Here’s the One Trend I’m Begging You Not to Wear This Summer © Reformation If you were a kid in the late '90s or early aughts, I’m sure you experienced the wrath that was the platform flip-flop. If your ankle doesn’t twinge in phantom pain at the mere thought of those shoes, let me explain the phenomenon.   Generally featuring a generous four-inch stiletto heel (or, sometimes, a three-inch wedge), these plagues upon humanity rely on very little to affix your foot to the actual footbed: two leather (or rubber) straps that converge at the rather sensitive midpoint between your big toe and your second toe. In the late 90s, the look was favored by...
    Character assassination. Negative campaigning. Call it what you will. But hard-edged tactics have been central to American politics since even before the Constitution's adoption in 1789. Washington Examiner and the Character Assassination and Reputation Politics (CARP) Research Lab have teamed up for a new webinar series on how the 2020 presidential campaign, pitting President Trump against Democratic nominee Joe Biden, fits into historical perspective. The webinar series will include three episodes. David Mark, Washington Examiner Senior Politics Editor and Author of Going Dirty : The Art of Negative Campaigning, will host one-on-one conversations with: Hugo Gurdon, Washington Examiner, Editor-in-Chief, Former Editor-in-Chief of The Hill. Eric Shiraev, political psychologist, and author at George Mason University, CARP cofounder. Jennifer Keohane, Assistant Professor of Communication, University of Baltimore, CARP co-founder. News Video
    Washington Post managing editor Emilio Garcia-Ruiz has been named the new editor in chief at the San Francisco Chronicle, the paper's owner Hearst Newspapers, announced Thursday. “Emilio has an impressive track record of innovation and producing great journalism on all platforms,” said Jeff Johnson, Hearst Newspapers President, in a statement announcing Garcia-Ruiz's addition to the publication. “As we continue to develop our digital and video strategies, his experience and leadership will greatly benefit the Chronicle and the communities we serve.” Garcia-Ruiz, who served as one of four managing editors at the Post under Executive Editor Marty Baron, had been with the publication for more than two decades. During his time at the paper, Garcia-Ruiz helped make the Post one of the most-read digital news sites worldwide. Monthly traffic currently surpasses 100 million U.S. visitors, while digital subscriptions top 2.5 million.  “The opportunity to lead the Chronicle’s newsroom at a time when local...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Newsweek has apologized for an op-ed that questioned Sen. Kamala Harris’ U.S. citizenship and her eligibility to be Joe Biden’s working mate, a false and racist conspiracy idea which President Donald Trump has not dismissed. “This op-ed is being utilized by some as a instrument to perpetuate racism and xenophobia. We apologize,” learn Newsweek’s editor’s word on Friday, which changed the journal’s earlier detailed protection of the op-ed. “We fully didn’t anticipate the methods during which the essay can be interpreted, distorted and weaponized,” learn the apology, signed by Josh Hammer, opinion editor, and Nancy Cooper, international editor in chief. However they ended the word by saying that the op-ed would stay on the location, with their word connected. The op-ed was written by John Eastman, a conservative legal professional who argues that the U.S. Structure doesn’t grant birthright citizenship. Eastman sowed doubt about Harris’...
    The National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ) held its annual convention last week, one month late and online instead of in Washington, D.C., because of coronavirus concerns.  Roughly 3,400 registrants logged in for this annual gathering of Black journalists in the U.S., one of the largest turnouts in the event’s 46 years. But going virtual meant recruiters couldn’t interview job seekers in person at the convention’s popular Career Fair, which was unfortunate.  George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police on Memorial Day, and the subsequent protests in Minneapolis and around the world, reminded many of us in journalism of an ongoing problem in our midst: the small number of Black journalists in newsrooms nationwide. Even fewer occupy leadership or “gatekeeping” positions, deciding which stories get covered, and who gets hired to tell them.  A 2018 survey by the American Society of News Editors, the most recent available, found...
    Rush Limbaugh drew on Breitbart News Entertainment Editor Jerome Hudson’s forthcoming book, 50 Things They Don’t Want You to Know About Trump, in describing President Donald Trump’s successes, offering his comments on Monday’s edition of his eponymous radio program. Limbaugh’s remarks came in response to a caller named Lisa from State College, Pennsylvania, a self-described Trump supporter, who worried the president’s communications lacked clarity. Lisa expressed concern over what she described as a lack of precision in Trump’s “flow of consciousness” extemporaneous speaking. Lisa said, “[Trump] is not a politician, which is what I like about him, but also what sometimes can get him in trouble. I think maybe he needs to speak more in bullet points, and talk more about what he’s done, [like] school choice, criminal justice reform. His ads aren’t targeting that, either.” Limbaugh cited a Breitbart News report on Hudson’s book as an example of how Trump...
    By Thalia Beaty | Associated Press NEW YORK — Pete Hamill, the self-taught, street-wise newspaper columnist whose love affair with New York inspired a colorful and uniquely influential journalistic career and produced several books of fiction and nonfiction, died Wednesday morning. He was 85. Hamill died at a Brooklyn hospital from heart and kidney failure, his brother Denis confirmed in an email. “Pete was truly one of the good guys,” Denis Hamill said. Pete Hamill was one of the city’s last great crusading columnists and links to journalism’s days of chattering typewriters and smoked-filled banter, an Irish-American both tough and sentimental who related to the underdog and mingled with the elite. Well-read, well-rounded and very well connected, Hamill was at ease quoting poetry and Ernest Hemingway, dating Jacqueline Onassis or enjoying a drink and a cigarette at the old Lion’s Head tavern in Greenwich Village. His topics ranged from...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- Legendary New York City journalist Pete Hamill has died after emergency surgery for a fractured hip.Hamill, 85, was remembered as a "newspaperman, novelist, mentor to so many, citizen of the world," following word of his death.He worked for 3 New York City tabloids over 40 years, including as editor for the Daily News and the New York Post.Hamill fell on Saturday, fracturing his right hip. He had emergency surgery at Brooklyn Methodist Hospital but passed away Wednesday morning.He died from heart and kidney failure, his brother Denis confirmed in an email. "Pete was truly one of the good guys," Denis Hamill said. So saddened to hear that Pete Hamill passed away. Pete was not just an unsurpassed journalist, editor and writer — he was the voice of New York.We say goodbye today to an irreplaceable New Yorker.​ I know that his legacy and work will live...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork/AP) — Legendary newspaper columnist Pete Hamill died Wednesday at the age of 85. Hamill was a self-taught, street-wise newspaper columnist whose love affair with New York inspired a colorful and uniquely influential journalistic career and produced several books of fiction and nonfiction. He died at a Brooklyn hospital from heart and kidney failure, his brother Denis confirmed in an email. “Pete was truly one of the good guys,” Denis Hamill said. Pete Hamill was one of the city’s last great crusading columnists and links to journalism’s days of chattering typewriters and smoked-filled banter, an Irish-American both tough and sentimental who related to the underdog and mingled with the elite. Well-read, well-rounded and very well connected, Hamill was at ease quoting poetry and Ernest Hemingway, dating Jacqueline Onassis or enjoying a drink and a cigarette at the old Lion’s Head tavern in Greenwich Village. His topics ranged from baseball,...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Pete Hamill, the self-taught, street-wise newspaper columnist whose love affair with New York inspired a colorful and uniquely influential journalistic career and produced several books of fiction and nonfiction, died Wednesday morning. He was 85. Hamill died at a Brooklyn hospital from heart and kidney failure, his brother Denis confirmed in an email. “Pete was truly one of the good guys,” Denis Hamill said. Pete Hamill was one of the city’s last great crusading columnists and links to journalism’s days of chattering typewriters and smoked-filled banter, an Irish-American both tough and sentimental who related to the underdog and mingled with the elite. Well-read, well-rounded and very well connected, Hamill was at ease quoting poetry and Ernest Hemingway, dating Jacqueline Onassis or enjoying a drink and a cigarette at the old Lion’s Head tavern in Greenwich Village. His topics ranged from baseball, politics, murders, boxing and riots...
    By THALIA BEATY NEW YORK (AP) — Pete Hamill, the self-taught, street-wise newspaper columnist whose love affair with New York inspired a colorful and uniquely influential journalistic career and produced several books of fiction and nonfiction, died Wednesday morning. He was 85. Hamill died in Brooklyn, New York, his brother Denis confirmed in an email. “Pete was truly one of the good guys,” Denis Hamill said. Pete Hamill was one of the city’s last great crusading columnists and links to journalism’s days of chattering typewriters and smoked-filled banter, an Irish-American both tough and sentimental who related to the underdog and mingled with the elite. Well-read, well-rounded and very well connected, Hamill was at ease quoting poetry and Ernest Hemingway, dating Jacqueline Onassis or enjoying a drink and a cigarette at the old Lion’s Head tavern in Greenwich Village. His topics ranged from baseball, politics, murders, boxing and riots to wars...
    General Hospital spoilers tease that the episode airing on Tuesday, August 4 will be a juicy one. New shows are back after more than two months of repeats and it did not take long for the chaos in Port Charles to escalate again. Nina Reeves stunned Nelle Benson with her court testimony in the custody case over Wiley and this prompted a confrontation that will play out in full during the next episode. Viewers were left hanging on the edges of their seats with this court hearing, as Nina had just taken the stand when ABC had to shift into General Hospital reruns in May due to the coronavirus pandemic. Would the Crimson editor stick with her original plan of supporting Carly and Michael in this battle, or would she support her new assistant as she had been asked? This testimony turned into a jaw-dropper as the Crimson editor exposed...
    You might never have come across Bon Appetit, a glossy monthly magazine which serves up a cosy mix of gourmet recipes, wine reviews and lifestyle tips to its 1.5 million readers.  It is hard to imagine a less controversial publication, or one that's more quintessentially American with its aspirational blend of self-improvement and conspicuous consumption – and it has been attracting record digital subscriptions thanks to lockdown tips for banana bread and avocado toast. But popularity counted for nothing when a picture appeared online showing its editor of ten years, Adam Rapoport, dressed as a Puerto Rican at a Halloween fancy dress party. At a stroke he was out, branded a racist. Then, in a grovelling mea culpa, he confessed: 'From an extremely ill-conceived Halloween costume 16 years ago to my blind spots as an editor, I've not championed an inclusive vision.' He added he was stepping down 'to reflect...
    Hawaiian Airlines flight attendant dies of COVID-19 after attending training course 5 Restaurant Chains That Now Require You to Wear Face Masks How One Vogue Editor Is Staying Cool in Silky Separates While WFH © Vogue As we continue our social-distancing pledge, the Vogue staff is working from home for the foreseeable future. This article is part of our This Week on Zoom column, where one Vogue editor shares their WFH outfits from the previous workweek—from the waist up, of course. Enduring a heat wave alone in my Brooklyn apartment isn’t an inspiring situation for getting dressed, let alone putting together fully realized outfits. But as someone who runs freakishly cold, I’ve been relishing not having to sit in the frigid office air and subsequently, slipping into some of my favorite silky pieces. Luxurious-feeling and light as a feather, silks and satins keep me cool and comfortable throughout the...
    Bastille Day, 2020, on Tuesday, July 14, wasn’t bloody like the original, but the mob won both times. In 2020, leftist “journalists” seized complete power and doomed neutral journalism. Two prominent non-liberal figures announced their departure from major outlets within a few hours of one another Tuesday. New York Times opinion columnist and editor Bari Weiss kicked off her departure with a poison pen resignation letter. And sometime conservative columnist Andrew Sullivan exited from New York magazine, in less dramatic fashion. BEN SHAPIRO: BARI WEISS VS. NY TIMES 'WOKE' GROUPTHINK – THE GREAT CULTURE PURGE OF 2020 MARCHES ON Weiss took The Times to task for bowing to the most leftist voices. “Twitter is not on the masthead of The New York Times. But Twitter has become its ultimate editor.” She depicted a major shift further left for one of the nation’s foremost leftist news outlets. “Op-eds that would have...
    Heavy/Twitter Bari Weiss (proper). Bari Weiss, a former author and editor for the opinion part of The New York Occasions, in response to her biography, resigned July 14 in a letter that was extremely essential of the Occasions and described it as a hostile work atmosphere for political centrists. Weiss’ letter has garnered a lot consideration, accusing the Occasions of exhibiting a persistent ideological bias to the political progressivism, giving Twitter backlash an excessive amount of consideration in editorial positions and permitting different writers on the paper to constantly bully her on inside communication platforms. Weiss, who’s 36, has had expertise at numerous papers, together with on the Wall Road Journal as an affiliate editor. Earlier than arriving on the Wall Road Journal in 2013, Weiss labored as a senior editor on the Pill, a Jewish-focused on-line journal, the place was accountable...
    Bari Weiss, the New York Times writer and editor whose independent views in the Opinion section made her a thorn in the side of the New York Times leftist editorial staff, is leaving the paper. Weiss issued an open letter that was addressed to New York Times publisher A.G. Sulzberger in which she notes that after the 2016 election of Donald Trump, the paper hired her as part of an effort to understand the perspective of American citizens who didn’t share the paper’s views. Weiss cites the numerous voices she had brought to the Times over the last four years, among whom were many people who have spoken out against brutal, tyrannical regimes. But then she continues with these blistering paragraphs: But the lessons that ought to have followed the election—lessons about the importance of understanding other Americans, the necessity of resisting tribalism, and the centrality of the free exchange...
    Dan Froomkin July 8, 2020 12:00PM (UTC) This article was co-produced with Press Watch, a new website that monitors and critiques American political coverage. Please consider supporting Press Watch by making a donation. Journalistic "objectivity" — as enforced by editors in our top newsrooms — encourages reporters to engage in credulous, both-sides stenography instead of calling out liars and racists. It discourages reporters from telling the hard truths — depriving readers "of plainly stated facts" that "could expose reporters to accusations of partiality or imbalance," as the Black journalist Wesley Lowery wrote recently wrote in a blistering New York Times op-ed. : Journalistic objectivity, in theory, is about observation and verification. But in its current newsroom practice, it is more about overly esteeming the status quo and casting a censorious white, center-right, male gaze on anything remotely controversial. Dean Baquet, the executive editor of the New York Times, considers it a "core value" of...
    An online battle has erupted over the Wikipedia page for Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., with a significant uptick in edits that reflects a pattern that's been seen ahead of past vice-presidential announcements and led Wikipedia to put the page under "discretionary sanctions." The trend was first reported last week by The Intercept. According to the revision history of the Harris article on Wikipedia, there have been 500 revisions to the page since May 9, most of which have been made by one highly prolific editor. That editor first started significantly changing the article in April, making additions that led another editor to say on the Kamala Harris "talk" page, "[y]ou seem to have gone through a database of press releases from Harris's office, cataloging every single one and adding it to the article. That is not how we write encyclopedic articles." Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., speaks during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing examining...
    As Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden continues to search for a running mate, the Wikipedia page of Kamala Harris — one of the finalists — is undergoing numerous edits to its content. According to The Intercept, the page is being scrubbed of “unflattering elements” of Harris’ career. According to the report, at least one editor has been removing mentions to more controversial aspects of Harris’ career, in including her”tough-on-crime” record, her support for Orange County prosecutors who engaged in misconduct, and her decision to forgo prosecuting Steve Mnuchin for mortgage fraud. “The edits, according to the page history, have elicited strong pushback from Wikipedia’s volunteer editor brigade, and have drawn the page into controversy, though it’s a fight the pro-Harris editor is currently winning.” The report claims that the user behind the edits is “Bnguyen1114,” who has allegedly made hundreds over the last several months. In addition, the user has...
    It's been a rough few days for the Philadelphia Inquirer. Over the weekend top editor Stan Wischnowski was forced to resign due to a column titled, "Buildings Matter, Too" — a play on the term Black Lives Matter that infuriated staff members of color. Now it's come to light that the son of another top editor at the paper used racist and homophobic slurs in two social media posts three years ago, the Inquirer reported.What are the details?Gabe Escobar — an 18-year-old incoming Temple University student and son of Inquirer editor and vice president Gabriel Escobar — used the N-word in one post and homophobic slurs in two others on Snapchat in 2017, the paper said. A Twitter user highlighted those posts last week, identified Escobar, and listed the phone number and email address for Temple's admissions office, the Inquirer said. "We're aware of this content...
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