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    City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer took shots Tuesday at ThriveNYC — the de Blasio administration’s beleaguered $1 billion mental health initiative – saying that the program has failed to show progress and suggesting that one of its key platforms be axed. “We’re spending $200 million a year on a mental health program, Thrive, with little accountability, with little data or outcomes to show progress,” Stringer said during his virtual budget briefing. When asked by a reporter what he would do differently about Thrive, Stringer indicated that he would disband one of the initiative’s signature programs, the mental health hotline NYC Well. “There’s a number of measures that experts will use to evaluate if the programs are working or not working,” Stringer said. “I will tell you this, that we can’t just say we’re throwing money at problems without seeing any kind of transparent numbers. As you know,...
    New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer is looking to loosen strict rules that govern private-equity firms managing the city’s pensions — a potentially risky policy switch that he claims will improve returns, The Post has learned. Specifically, Stringer — a Democrat running for mayor in this year’s election — is urging trustees of the city’s pensions to lift a blanket rule on Wednesday that has required private-equity firms to pay their own bills if they get into scrapes with regulators or end up in litigation with investors, according to a memo obtained by The Post. Lifting the rule — which was imposed in 2016 as a precaution after a slew of big buyout firms including Carlyle Group, Blackstone Group, KKR and TPG were forced to pay out nearly $600 million to settle a civil collusion case — could potentially saddle taxpayers with millions of dollars in liabilities. Indeed, city officials...
    More On: scott stringer NYC mayoral hopefuls quiet on COVID-19 nursing home deaths Jewish vote up for grabs in 2021 NYC mayoral race as primary approaches Yang tops Adams, Stringer in poll of Democrats vying for NYC mayor NYC’s pension funds to divest $4 billion from fossil fuels New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer is looking to loosen strict rules that govern private-equity firms managing the city’s pensions — a potentially risky policy switch that he claims will improve returns, The Post has learned. Specifically, Stringer — a Democrat running for mayor in this year’s election — is urging trustees of the city’s pensions to lift a blanket rule on Wednesday that has required private-equity firms to pay their own bills if they get into scrapes with regulators or end up in litigation with investors, according to a memo obtained by The Post. Lifting the rule — which was...
    More On: scott stringer NYC mayoral hopefuls quiet on COVID-19 nursing home deaths Jewish vote up for grabs in 2021 NYC mayoral race as primary approaches Yang tops Adams, Stringer in poll of Democrats vying for NYC mayor NYC’s pension funds to divest $4 billion from fossil fuels City Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer took shots Tuesday at ThriveNYC — the de Blasio administration’s beleaguered $1 billion mental health initiative – saying that the program has failed to show progress and suggesting that one of its key platforms be axed. “We’re spending $200 million a year on a mental health program, Thrive, with little accountability, with little data or outcomes to show progress,” Stringer said during his virtual budget briefing. When asked by a reporter what he would do differently about Thrive, Stringer indicated that he would disband one of the initiative’s signature programs, the mental health hotline...
    Andrew Yang has a double-digit lead over his two closest competitors in the race for the Democratic Party nomination for New York City mayor, according to a new poll. With 28 per cent support, the tech entrepreneur and former presidential candidate leads the pack in a crowded field of hopefuls vying to succeed outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio. Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and City Comptroller Scott Stringer placed in second and third place, respectively, and appear to be the only candidates with a realistic chance of closing the gap, according to Politico. Adams received 17 per cent of the vote while Stringer garnered 13 per cent support, according to the online survey conducted by Core Decision Analytics. The poll surveyed 842 Democratic Party voters online from January 20 through January 25. Andrew Yang is the frontrunner in the race for the Democratic Party nomination for mayor of New...
    Boosted by strong name recognition, Andrew Yang is the leading contender in the Democratic primary race for mayor, according to a poll released Wednesday. Yang garners 28 percent of likely primary voters followed by Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams at 17 percent and Comptroller Scott Stringer with 13 percent, according to the survey conducted by Fontas Advisors and Core Decision Analytics. One in four likely voters — 23 percent — indicated a preference for one of the other six candidates presented, while 19 percent of respondents were undecided. “Our poll found that New Yorkers seek mayoral candidates who offer clear plans to tackle the many pressing issues facing the city, and voters especially value proven experience demonstrated in government or the public sector,” said Adam Roseblatt, president of Core Decision Analytics. Rosenblatt noted that the crowded race to replace a term-limited Bill de Blasio is “still quite fluid at this...
    More On: mayoral race Thousands of Republicans, indies re-enroll as Dems ahead of mayoral primary Andrew Yang: ‘I’ve been trying to escape New York for a while’ Taxi advocate Fernando Mateo launches bid for NYC mayor ‘Bro culture’ bullying drove women on Andrew Yang’s 2020 campaign to therapy: report Boosted by strong name recognition, Andrew Yang is the leading contender in the Democratic primary race for mayor, according to a poll released Wednesday. Yang garners 28 percent of likely primary voters followed by Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams at 17 percent and Comptroller Scott Stringer with 13 percent, according to the survey conducted by Fontas Advisors and Core Decision Analytics. One in four likely voters — 23 percent — indicated a preference for one of the other six candidates presented, while 19 percent of respondents were undecided. “Our poll found that New Yorkers seek mayoral candidates who offer clear...
    C. Vivian Stringer has never gone through anything like the last month at Rutgers in her 50 years of coaching. The Rutgers women’s basketball team last played on Jan. 3 and has been on pause because of COVID-19 issues in the program for the past month. They’ll finally play again on Sunday at home against Nebraska. Ironically, that was the Scarlet Knights’ last opponent before being shut down. “I don’t know if there has been or will be anything that will help prepare anyone for this,” Stringer said. “Nothing in the world could have prepared any of us for this situation. We couldn’t even fathom something like this would happen. This COVID situation is for real and we have to be very careful and treat it with great respect.” The Scarlet Knights had a string of positive tests in early January that put the program on pause causing four...
    More On: nypd NYC Chanel store hit in gunpoint robbery ‘It’s astounding’: NYPD commissioner on spate of shootings during snowstorm ‘I feel lucky’: Mom struck by stray bullet grateful her kids weren’t hurt High-ranking NYPD cop accused of online harassment buried complaints: suit New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer, who is running for mayor this year, released a plan that calls for a series of NYPD reforms — including removing the police commissioner’s final say in discipline and disbanding the controversial protest cops unit, a new plan says. Stringer’s 50-page plan, A Blueprint for Transforming Policing, Enhancing Safety and Investing In Communities, comes less than a week after the City Council announced similar changes. “We must transform the City’s approach to public safety, and this report is a blueprint for that transformation,” Stringer said in a statement. The plan lays an expanded Civilian Complaint Review Board, saying that...
    Loading the player... Following the rise of Vice President Kamala Harris—at a time when the nation is praising Historically Black College and University alumni and Black Greek organizations—it could serve well to create policies aimed at advancing opportunities for Black professionals and entrepreneurs of these institutions, beyond student loan forgiveness.  Mellody Hobson, the president and co-CEO of Ariel Investments, thinks policymakers and corporations are still approaching equity and business with antiquated strategies by continuing to focus solely on traditional sectors of labor.  Read More: HBCU athletes sue NCAA for ‘systemic racism’ in playoffs qualifications Hobson contends the integration of equity in government contracting needs to evolve with the times to include Black professionals in the service industry that account for more than 68 percent of the United States’ gross domestic product. The businesswoman values efforts to promote equity in traditional labor jobs like construction and manufacturing, but she sees...
    Mayor Bill de Blasio celebrated action on the city’s long-discussed plans to divest employee pension fund investments from fossil fuel firms in a push for a “green energy”-backing local economy. The two employee pension funds — the NYC Employees’ Retirement System and Teachers’ Retirement System — will divest $4 billion in investments over five years, or about 2 percent of their $250 billion in assets. De Blasio was joined by partners in the initiative: city Comptroller Scott Stringer, who manages the city employee pensions funds; Public Advocate Jumaane Williams; and labor leaders who are trustees on pension boards of behalf of their workers, Henry Garrido of District Council 37 and Greg Floyd of Teamsters Local 237. “In New York City, we don’t just talk about fighting climate change — we put our money where our mouth is. Our city pension funds are divesting $4 billion from fossil fuels that are...
    New York : The first round of PPP loans did not reach enough businesses in the city, and certainly not many of the minority and women businesses or independent contractors. A new term for these forgivable small business loans opened on Monday, and New York officials don’t want history to repeat itself. On this occasion, the Paycheck Protection Program, which is how these business grants are called due to the COVID pandemic, is endowed with $ 284,450 million and Comptroller Scott Stringer proposed on Wednesday that in order to reach more entrepreneurs, the city should put a multi-ethnic and multilingual team is in place. The goal is to provide support to city organizations that are essential for information and direct assistance to reach all corners of the city, including immigrants. Coinciding with this request, the Mayor, Bill de Blasio, and the Department of Small Business Services (SBS) yesterday launched...
    With the US Treasury kicking off a new round of $284 billion in COVID-19 funding for small businesses on Wednesday, City Comptroller Scott Stringer announced a plan to help NYC get a bigger piece of the pie. The NYC mayoral candidate called on City Hall to compile “a comprehensive list” of financial institutions with access to federal Payroll Protection Program funding to share with small businesses. He also called on workers from the city’s Small Business Service agency to go door-to-door to encourage mom-and-pop shop owners to apply for the funding, as well as more bilingual outreach to immigrant communities. “We cannot lay back and think that people are just going to get this funding,” Stringer said at an event in Chinatown on Wednesday. “It didn’t happen last time and it won’t happen again unless this city government mobilizes.” Despite being located in the epicenter of the coronavirus...
    More On: Paycheck Protection Program Next round of PPP begins amid COVID-19 surge How COVID relief bill will help small businesses Feds seize $8.4 million from Florida ‘ministry’ in PPP fraud case Congress stuck after McConnell resists state aid in COVID-19 deal With the US Treasury kicking off a new round of $284 billion in COVID-19 funding for small businesses on Wednesday, City Comptroller Scott Stringer announced a plan to help NYC get a bigger piece of the pie. The NYC mayoral candidate called on City Hall to compile “a comprehensive list” of financial institutions with access to federal Payroll Protection Program funding to share with small businesses. He also called on workers from the city’s Small Business Service agency to go door-to-door to encourage mom-and-pop shop owners to apply for the funding, as well as more bilingual outreach to immigrant communities. “We cannot lay back and think...
    More On: COVID vaccine COVID-19 vaccine mess hinders Wall Street and NYC ‘Inexcusable’: NY pols blast vaccine rollout amid new UK strain cases New Rochelle mayor ‘regrets’ jumping the line for workers’ COVID-19 shots Pope Francis books COVID-19 shot, calls it everyone’s moral duty New York City’s online sign-up process for the COVID-19 vaccine is a confusing mess that must immediately be fixed, according to City Comptroller Scott Stringer. Stringer blasted the system in a series of Twitter threads Sunday night — a day before the state’s vaccination eligibility opened up to those category 1B, which includes teachers, first responders, public safety workers, public transit workers and people 75 and older. Those seeking to make an appointment to get vaccinated have to navigate one of three separate systems — one controlled by the city’s NYC Health + Hospitals and two by the city’s Health Department — none of which...
    Two City Hall hopefuls on Sunday panned the slow rollout of the coronavirus vaccine to city residents, while offering their own proposals to get the shots into the arms of New Yorkers more rapidly. Comptroller Scott Stringer sounded off on Twitter and Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams held a briefing outside the lower Manhattan headquarters of the city Department of Health, joining a chorus of critics objecting to the sluggish process that has seen much of the state’s vaccine reserves go untapped. “During the pandemic, our public hospital system has proven to be a national leader in #COVID19 testing,” he wrote in starting the thread. “That’s why this vaccine rollout has been so frustrating—we know we can do so much better. “This is the city that never sleeps—let’s act like it.” The first step, Stringer said, is immediately inoculating all healthcare workers on the front lines of the crisis. The city Department of Health...
    More On: COVID vaccine Scott Stringer slams ‘frustrating’ COVID vaccine rollout in NYC Fauci says US needs to ‘catch up’ with vaccine rollout Fauci fires back after Trump claims COVID deaths are ‘exaggerated’ Boris Johnson makes ominous prediction about COVID-19 lockdowns Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday said he will only get the COVID-19 vaccine when it is available for all races and income groups. “COVID exposed many existing injustices in our society,” the 63-year-old governor told the congregation of Harlem’s historic Abyssinian Baptist Church in a pre-recorded address. “COVID showed that racism is a public health crisis also,” he said, noting it “killed black people in this country at two times the rate of white people,” with testing also “more available in richer, whiter communities.” “This can’t happen again, and it can’t happen with this vaccine,” he said of the troubled roll-out of the shots in the Empire...
    More On: COVID vaccine Fauci says US needs to ‘catch up’ with vaccine rollout Fauci fires back after Trump claims COVID deaths are ‘exaggerated’ Boris Johnson makes ominous prediction about COVID-19 lockdowns Letters to the editor — Jan. 3, 2021 Comptroller and 2021 mayoral candidate Scott Stringer panned New York’s “frustrating” coronavirus vaccine rollout on Sunday, while offering his own proposals to get the shots into the arms of city residents more rapidly. Stringer sounded off on Twitter, joining a chorus of critics objecting to the sluggish process that has seen much of the state’s vaccine reserves go untapped. “During the pandemic, our public hospital system has proven to be a national leader in #COVID19 testing,” he wrote in starting the thread. “That’s why this vaccine rollout has been so frustrating—we know we can do so much better. “This is the city that never sleeps—let’s act like it.”...
    Mayoral wannabe Maya Wiley humiliated herself on Twitter when she mistook a fan of Nicole Kidman’s for the Oscar-winning actress — and went into “OMG!!!” mode over an online endorsement. The former federal prosecutor and counsel to Mayor Bill de Blasio apparently got so excited that she didn’t bother to look past a “Nicole Kidman” user name and figure out that a nobody with just 15 followers was announcing plans to raise $5,000 for her campaign. “WAIT!!! OMG!!! My team didn’t TELL me!” Wiley gushed. “I got no emoji for this one folks. Just….THIS is overwhelming!” Wiley tried to cover up her epic fail, but a screenshot was captured and tweeted Thursday by City and State reporter Jeff Coltin. Maya Wiley Twitter postTwitter Meanwhile, another mayoral hopeful, City Comptroller Scott Stringer, announced Friday that an actual, real-life star — Tony-winning actress Scarlett Johansson — will be joining him for an...
    More On: mayoral race Oh-oh: NYC’s next mayor might actually be worse than de Blasio Andrew Yang files paperwork to run for NYC mayor Taxi and bodega advocate eyes run for NYC mayor Max Rose might be the centrist mayoral candidate NYC desperately needs Mayoral wannabe Maya Wiley humiliated herself on Twitter when she mistook a fan of Nicole Kidman’s for the Oscar-winning actress — and went into “OMG!!!” mode over an online endorsement. The former federal prosecutor and de Blasio administration deputy mayor apparently got so excited that she didn’t bother to look past a “Nicole Kidman” user name and figure out that a nobody with just 15 followers was announcing plans to raise $5,000 for her campaign. “WAIT!!! OMG!!! My team didn’t TELL me!” Wiley gushed. “I got no emoji for this one folks. Just….THIS is overwhelming!” Wiley tried to cover up her epic fail, but a...
    More On: homeless shelters Man living at infamous UWS homeless shelter beaten by another resident Homeless men appeal forced relocation from UWS Lucerne Hotel Judge clears way for homeless to be moved from Upper West Side Suspect in custody after stabbing spree at San Jose, California church City homeless czar Steven Banks has a lot to answer for in the wake of city Comptroller Scott Stringer’s latest damning report on shelter conditions. It turns out Banks’ system has families with babies living in shelters with vermin infestations, exposed electrical outlets, mold and mildew. Stringer’s new audit found the reprehensible conditions in a random review of 13 shelters, all of which had at least one health or safety violation. Nearly all the 91 individual units examined, 92 percent, had at least one violation; over a third, 32 units, had four or more violations. In all, the auditors spotted 264...
    Former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang has officially entered the race to be New York City's next mayor, after filing paperwork with the Campaign Finance Board. CFB officials confirmed the receipt of Yang's paperwork on Wednesday, making him the biggest name to enter the race so far. Yang was a contender in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary, gaining steam with his debate performances and promises of a universal basic income of $1,000 a month for every American adult. He promised to accomplish that goal by taxing companies that benefited from the use of automation. The Campaign Finance Board revealed Yang filed necessary paperwork to enter Wednesday The entrepreneur didn't receive much support at the polls, however, leading him to drop out of the race after the New Hampshire primary in February. After that, he became a political contributor for CNN, though he remained politically active. He promised in November to...
    CHICAGO (WLS) -- A tribute took place Tuesday morning for two Chicago firefighters who died in the line of duty.RELATED: 2 firefighters dead, 17 hurt in South Shore fireEdward Stringer and Corey Ankim got trapped in a building while fighting a 311 alarm fire 10 years ago. It was in a vacant dry-cleaning property on East 75th St.At least 15 people went to the hospital after the roof collapsed.RELATED: Bronzeville fire breaks out at high-rise building, CFD saysFamily members of Stringer and Ankum were at the tribute for a ceremonial bell ringing to mark the 10th anniversary of their deaths.
    Homeless families with babies were forced to live in “shameful” conditions at city shelters, including vermin infestations, exposed electrical outlets, and mold and mildew, according to a scathing audit released Monday by city Comptroller Scott Stringer. The deplorable living quarters for some of New York’s most vulnerable were uncovered in a recent random review of 13 shelters — all of which were found to have at least one health or safety violation. A staggering 92 percent of the 91 individual units toured within those shelters had at least one violation, and 32 units across 11 shelters had a minimum of four violations. “As a parent, I find the conditions we uncovered shameful, distressing and unacceptable,” said Stringer, a 2021 mayoral candidate. “It is a stain on this city that babies in our care are sleeping alongside vermin, breathing in mold and mildew, and playing near live electrical outlets.” A total...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — A new audit shows many homeless babies in New York City are living in deplorable conditions in city shelters. The report by city Comptroller Scott Stringer says it found multiple health and safety issues in all 13 shelters that were inspected. Images show cribs next to exposed electrical outlets, mice and roach infestations, missing window guards, and other hazards. MORE: COVID-19 Pandemic Driving Homelessness In NYC To Record Levels, Advocates Say Stringer, who is running for mayor, said the conditions are unacceptable. “The city has utterly failed its responsibility to protect our most vulnerable children. As a parent I’m here today to say what we’ve uncovered is shameful and distressing,” Stringer said. In a statement, the Department of Homeless Services described the report as sensational, saying it overlooked the agency’s efforts to reduce infant deaths, and improve safety over the past few years. More From CBS New...
    More On: homeless Giant vagina mural incident shows UWS homeless fight getting ugly — and personal Bill that would bar NYPD from homeless outreach is ‘insulting’: Commish Shea This anti-cop madness would harm the homeless, too NYC council bill would bar officers from dealing with street homeless Homeless families with babies were forced to live in “shameful” conditions at city shelters, including vermin infestations, exposed electrical outlets, and mold and mildew, according to a scathing audit released Monday by city Comptroller Scott Stringer. The deplorable living quarters for some of New York’s most vulnerable were uncovered in a recent random review of 13 shelters — all of which were found to have at least one health or safety violation. A staggering 92 percent of the 91 individual units toured within those shelters had at least one violation, and 32 units across 11 shelters had a minimum of four violations....
    CHATOM, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama man and his son killed each other in a dispute over a dog, authorities said. Washington County Sheriff Richard Stringer told WALA-TV that Kelvin James Coker, 60, discovered his dog had been shot on Saturday. The man then drove to the home of his 32-year-old son, Kelvin Nicholas Coker, who claimed to have killed the animal. The older man shot first, shooting his son in the leg, and the younger man returned fire with a shotgun, Stringer said. Both men died from their wounds. The sheriff called the family “very dysfunctional.” Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Alabama, Associated Press
    Mayor Bill de Blasio must comply with a probe into the city’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, a judge ruled Thursday. Manhattan state Supreme Court Justice Lyle Frank said Comptroller and 2021 mayoral candidate Scott Stringer has broad authority under the law to request documents and compel testimony from City Hall and agencies to analyze the city’s handling of the pandemic. Stringer filed the lawsuit after accusing City Hall of stonewalling over documents, including requests via subpoena, related to his investigation. “This court takes judicial notice of the devastating impact this pandemic has had on the New York City economy. It is certainly appropriate for the comptroller to investigate the city’s response, and to make recommendations for the future,” Frank said in the four-page ruling. The judge shot down City Hall’s request to exempt the city’s public hospital system — Health + Hospitals Corporation — from Stringer’s document request, claiming...
    More On: Coronavirus in NY Outdoor dining to fully resume in NYC tonight Here’s when de Blasio expects every NYer can get a COVID vaccine NYC hospitals nix elective surgeries as COVID-19 rate hits 6% New Yorkers brave Winter Storm Gail to dine outside Mayor Bill de Blasio must comply with a probe into the city’s response to the coronavirus pandemic, a judge ruled Thursday. Manhattan state Supreme Court Justice Lyle Frank said Comptroller and 2021 mayoral candidate Scott Stringer has broad authority under the law to request documents and compel testimony from City Hall and agencies to analyze the city’s handling of the pandemic. Stringer filed the lawsuit after accusing City Hall of stonewalling over documents, including requests via subpoena, related to his investigation. “This court takes judicial notice of the devastating impact this pandemic has had on the New York City economy. It is certainly appropriate for...
    Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and city Comptroller Scott Stringer were awarded millions of dollars in public matching funds for their mayoral campaigns — while failed 2017 candidate Richard “Bo” Dietl was slapped with a slew of campaign finance violations. The two City Hall wannabes are the first in a large field of candidates eligible for taxpayer matched funds distributed by the Campaign Finance Board for the 2021 mayoral race. The CFB, which administers the program, awarded $4.38 million to Adams’ campaign and $3.3 million to Stringer’s — among the first candidates to plot bids for the mayoralty. Both Adams and Stringer received 8-to-1 matching funds based on private donations to their campaigns. To be eligible for the matching taxpayer dollars, candidates running for citywide office — mayor, comptroller, public advocate — must agree to a $2,000 cap on contributions from private donors. Candidates also must receive contributions from...
    More On: mayoral race 10 prominent candidates for NYC mayor — and their nuttiest proposals yet Outgoing SI Rep. Max Rose files paperwork to explore 2021 mayoral bid Where is the great leader that will take NYC to new heights?: Goodwin Stringer weak, Yang could be 2021 NYC mayoral contender, poll shows Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams and city Comptroller Scott Stringer were awarded millions of dollars in public matching funds for their mayoral campaigns — while failed 2017 candidate Richard “Bo” Dietl was slapped with a slew of campaign finance violations. The two City Hall wannabes are the first in a large field of candidates eligible for taxpayer matched funds distributed by the Campaign Finance Board for the 2021 mayoral race. The CFB, which administers the program, awarded $4.38 million to Adams’ campaign and $3.3 million to Stringer’s — among the first candidates to plot bids for the...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- San Francisco's Presidio is planning to open a new opportunity to the public next week. It's a trail running through a native marsh being restored near Crissy Field.The newly flooded Quartermaster Reach in the Presidio will eventually look like a natural marsh -- connecting a historic creek and watershed to Crissy Field and San Francisco Bay. And now, you'll be able to see it up close for yourself."There will be an amazing walk that will enable people to come and look at this newly restored salt marsh from a bridge and a trail that will extend all the way up through the watershed to the top of where the springs form that come down into the bay," says project manager Lew Stringer of the Presidio Trust.RELATED: Oyster beds created for wildlife restoration in new Crissy Field marshEMBED More News Videos Engineers in the Presidio created an...
    Tech entrepreneur and one-time Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang could shake up the crowded 2021 field to replace Mayor Bill de Blasio if he opts to jump in the race, according to a poll obtained by The Post. The survey also shows that Yang’s entry into the race would complicate city Comptroller Scott Stringer’s efforts to frame the race as a two-man fight with Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Twenty percent of respondents said that Yang would be their top pick of the 2021 primary were held today, while 14 percent listed Adams and just 11 percent named Stringer. Another heavily rumored candidate, former Council Speaker Christine Quinn netted just 7 percent, former top de Blasio adviser Maya Wiley also received 7 percent and soon-to-be former Congressman Max Rose got 6 percent. “Mayor Stringer may be in the same vein as Mayor Quinn, Mayor Ferrer,...
    Former Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang is weighing a potential bid for New York City mayor by calling elected officials to measure support for his run, Politico reported Tuesday. Yang is also reportedly talking with Tusk Strategies, the firm that worked with former Mayor Mike Bloomberg during his successful 2009 mayoral campaign, according to Politico. A person familiar with Yang’s plans told Politico he would join other Democrats in the 2021 primary. Yang’s team, according to Politico, previously conducted polling to gauge his chances as a third-party candidate. A survey of 1,000 Democratic voters, which was conducted from Nov. 30 to Dec. 6 by Slingshot Strategies, found Yang to be the top pick with 20% of respondents, The New York Post reported. Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams came in second with 14% and Comptroller Scott Stringer garnered 11%. (RELATED: ‘Trumpism Is Going To Be Here For Quite Some Time’: Andrew...
    More On: mayoral race Shaun Donovan snubs ex-boss Mike Bloomberg in NYC mayoral bid rollout Dem mayoral candidate suggests housing homeless in Daily News offices Maya Wiley staying on as MSNBC expert in 2021 despite NYC mayoral run Yankees boss: NY should legalize mobile sports betting to address fiscal crisis Tech entrepreneur and one-time Democratic presidential candidate Andrew Yang could shake up the crowded 2021 field to replace Mayor Bill de Blasio if he opts to jump in the race, according to a poll obtained by The Post. The survey also shows that Yang’s entry into the race would complicate city Comptroller Scott Stringer’s efforts to frame the race as a two-man fight with Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams. Twenty percent of respondents said that Yang would be their top pick of the 2021 primary were held today, while 14 percent listed Adams and just 11 percent...
    Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Buildings Department blew deadlines or failed to reinspect structures with dangerous conditions that threatened public safety more than 5,400 times, according to a blistering new audit from City Comptroller Scott Stringer. Stringer’s investigation revealed that the DOB failed to conduct 2,986 of the nearly 6,381 required reinspections within the 60-day timeline required under the administrative code — and that it never scheduled another 596 reviews. Additionally, the Comptroller’s office discovered that the DOB busted its 60-day deadline with another 1,819 subsequent followups. “No one should have to live or work in fear of debris or unstable scaffolding crashing down on them in a home, place of work, or at any other site in this city,” said Stringer. “Our audit of DOB’s internal procedures uncovered multiple failures that pose a direct risk to public safety,” he added. “DOB has a responsibility to protect the public –...
    Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Buildings Department blew deadlines or failed to reinspect structures with dangerous conditions that threatened public safety more than 5,400 times, according to a blistering new audit from City Comptroller Scott Stringer. Stringer’s investigation revealed that the DOB failed to conduct 2,986 of the nearly 6,381 required reinspections within the 60-day timeline required under the administrative code — and that it never scheduled another 596 reviews. Additionally, the Comptroller’s office discovered that the DOB busted its 60-day deadline with another 1,819 subsequent followups. “No one should have to live or work in fear of debris or unstable scaffolding crashing down on them in a home, place of work, or at any other site in this city,” said Stringer. “Our audit of DOB’s internal procedures uncovered multiple failures that pose a direct risk to public safety,” he added. “DOB has a responsibility to protect the public – and...
    New York City's official financial watchdog is suing Mayor Bill de Blasio's administration for allegedly refusing to turn over documents related to their handling of the coronavirus pandemic.   Comptroller Scott Stringer filed a lawsuit at the New York Supreme Court on Wednesday, six months after launching an investigation into the city's preparation and response to the outbreak in March.  Stringer, who recently announced he is running for mayor, has accused the city of failing to comply with the probe, claiming it has 'continually delayed' handing over documents since his initial request in May.  Comptroller Scott Stringer, who is running to replace Bill De Blasio as NYC mayor, filed a lawsuit against the city on Wednesday, accusing officials of failing to comply with his investigation into their response to the pandemic At the time, Stringer said New Yorkers deserved 'an objective assessment' on the city's handling of the health crisis...
    City Comptroller Scott Stringer is suing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration for failing to hand over records related to the mayor’s response to the COVID-19 crisis. The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in Manhattan Supreme Court, accuses City Hall of failing to comply with a subpoena Stringer issued in June as part of the comptroller’s probe. “The City’s refusal to timely and fully comply with the Subpoena is impeding and frustrating the Comptroller’s ability to complete the Investigation,” the suit reads. In May, Stringer — who is running to replace the term-limited de Blasio in 2021 — launched the investigation into the city’s handling of the pandemic, saying he wanted to know “what we knew, when we knew it and what we did about it.” “My office is examining city government’s response because New Yorkers deserve an objective assessment of what we did right and what we can do better going...
    City Comptroller Scott Stringer is suing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration for failing to hand over records related to the mayor’s response to the COVID-19 crisis. The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in Manhattan Supreme Court, accuses City Hall of failing to comply with a subpoena Stringer issued in June as part of the comptroller’s probe. “The City’s refusal to timely and fully comply with the Subpoena is impeding and frustrating the Comptroller’s ability to complete the Investigation,” the suit reads. In May, Stringer — who is running to replace the term-limited de Blasio in 2021 — launched the investigation into the city’s handling of the pandemic, saying he wanted to know “what we knew, when we knew it and what we did about it.” “My office is examining city government’s response because New Yorkers deserve an objective assessment of what we did right and what we can do better going forward,”...
    It didn’t take long for 2021 mayoral wannabe Comptroller Scott Stringer to lay down his big-spender marker. In a letter to Mayor de Blasio, Stringer made his case for “shovel-ready” projects to boost the city’s struggling economy. He wants a burst of borrow-and-spend to jump-start capital projects put on hold by the pandemic. Make use of low interest rates and the city’s good credit rating, he urges. In fact, it’s a play for the support of construction-trade unions — a key Democratic constituency. His proposal would put a lot of unemployed construction workers back to work, especially since private-sector work seems sure to contract. Last month, the New York Building Congress, a construction trade association, warned that the pandemic led construction spending this year to fall $10 billion short of the $55 billion spent in 2019. Hence Stringer’s push for the (near-bankrupt) city to borrow big — to win support...
    This story was originally published on Nov. 9 by THE CITY. Sign up here to get the latest stories from THE CITY delivered to you each morning. Mayor Bill de Blasio should jumpstart pandemic-snagged plans to build affordable housing and schools, and repair aging infrastructure — even if it takes long-term borrowing to help pay for such projects, City Comptroller Scott Stringer declared Monday. In a letter sent to de Blasio and obtained by THE CITY, the mayoral candidate argued that ample cash reserves, New York’s solid credit rating and historically low interest rates mean the city can afford to resume work on capital projects, despite serious budget problems.
    This story was originally published by Chalkbeat, a nonprofit news organization covering public education. Sign up for their newsletters here. For low-income families who cannot afford reliable internet service for remote schooling, the city should offer subsidies, said New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer. Families would get “internet passports” they could use to purchase broadband service, Stringer wrote Monday in a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio and Chancellor Richard Carranza.
    On Tuesday, Sporting News published a list of quarterbacks the Dallas Cowboys could potentially trade for in the aftermath of the injury Andy Dalton suffered during Sunday’s 25-3 loss to the Washington Football Team. Among these signal-callers was veteran Ryan Fitzpatrick of the Miami Dolphins, who was recently benched by his team in favor of rookie Tua Tagovailoa. In its entry for Fitzpatrick, the publication referred to the 37-year-old as an “interesting” upgrade over third-stringer Ben DiNucci, who was forced into action on Sunday after Dalton was taken out of the game with a concussion. With the Cowboys (2-5) scheduled to face the NFC East-leading Philadelphia Eagles (2-4-1) in Week 8, Sporting News stressed that the organization should ideally attempt a trade for a “viable veteran replacement” for Dalton, who took over behind center after Dak Prescott’s season-ending ankle injury in Week 5.   Patrick McDermott / Getty Images...
    Video of fatal Waukegan, Illinois, police shooting will be released, mayor says Tesco apologized after it claimed sanitary products were non-essential and therefore not for sale during lockdown NYCHA developments ill-prepared for winter amid COVID-19: Stringer © Provided by AMNY City Comptroller Scott Stringer says NYCHA residents are facing a COVID-19 nightmare this winter with the expected spread of the disease paired with the usual fare in their developments: poor heating, gas service and lead paint. With residents likely to spend the winter indoors to protect their health, they may be exposed to the elements of living conditions in decline which Stringer claimed in a Monday press conference has not been addressed with funding NYCHA already possesses but that the agency does not see a need to change their maintenance practices. "We came to them over the summer about the boilers, we continued to ask them for an action plan...
    More than 83,000 new coronavirus cases recorded in US for second-straight day Burger Kings new 2021 restaurants will have food lockers, conveyor belts that deliver Whoppers to your car, and modern, minimalist dining areas. Take a look inside. Do you know these lucrative Social Security secrets? Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft The 23 Hottest Gadgets of 2020 Ad Microsoft ...
    What the frack!? A group of climate activists halted work on a Brooklyn gas pipeline Thursday when they descended into the underground construction site and refused to leave. Environmental group No North Brooklyn Pipeline posted Thursday morning that “Brooklyn community members have locked down the National Grid’s North Brooklyn fracked gas pipeline halting construction.” A video shows two of the members underground with the pipeline around 10 a.m. An NYPD spokesman confirmed the unscheduled demonstr ation of roughly 20 activists at Montrose and Manhattan avenues in Williamsburg and “officers were on scene to keep the peace.” NYC Comptroller and mayoral hopeful Scott Stringer retweeted the group — which says it’s opposed to “fossil fuel expansion in North Brooklyn” and footing the bill — voicing his support. “New Yorkers are standing up against a fracked gas pipeline that will threaten our city and our climate,” Stringer wrote. “I’m with them every...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City As the ongoing coronavirus pandemic continues to widen inequality gaps in the city, city comptroller and mayoral candidate Scott Stringer is proposing a workforce development plan which includes making CUNY community colleges free to help “upskill” New Yorkers and create a more inclusive post-pandemic economy.  “This pandemic has upended our economy and displaced thousands of workers. If we don’t act right now to revolutionize how we support New Yorkers and get everyone on the ladder of opportunity, we risk leaving thousands of New Yorkers behind and deepening the inequality gap,” Stringer said in a statement. The CUNY system has long been considered a pipeline to upward mobility with a study conducted by Stanford University professor Raj Chetty arguing that the system propels more low researcher with one study claiming that the...
    Seven Democratic candidates for the 2021 mayoral race all agreed on two positions — they’d oust NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea and would not accept an endorsement from current Mayor Bill de Blasio. But the contenders were split on a variety of other issues from tearing down the statue of Christopher Columbus in Columbus Circle to personal marijuana usage. The first mayoral forum for next year’s election was hosted by the Jim Owles Liberal Democratic Club and excluded Democratic Candidate Loree Sutton because the group’s leader believes she’s too conservative. The included candidates were Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, Obama cabinet member Shaun Donovan, Former Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, City Councilman Carlos Menchaca, nonprofit leader Dianne Morales, city Comptroller Scott Stringer and former de Blasio counsel Maya Wiley. During a lightning round of yes or no questions, all seven participants replied in the affirmative that they would “fire” de Blasio’s...
    Dont Miss Out on Free Money by Making This 401(k) Mistake Pull Off Your Dream Road Trip With This Vintage Ford F-350 Motorhome Time Capsule Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft 23 Gadgets That Could Sell Out Before the Holidays Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/35 SLIDES © Frederick M. Brown/Stringer/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images North...
    De Blasio warns against violence after Cuomo’s new virus rules enrage Orthodox community McDonalds U.S. quarterly same-store sales rise 4.6%, fueled by Travis Scott promotion Most Americans don't know these lucrative Social Security "secrets" Ad Microsoft Incredible Blanket Puts Humans In A Deep Sleep, Melting Stress Away Ad Microsoft 23 Gadgets That Could Sell Out Before the Holidays Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/35 SLIDES © Joe Scarnici/Stringer/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images North America...
    New York City's wealthiest residents should be prepared to 'step up and help' close the Big Apple's gaping $4.2 billion deficit by paying higher taxes, Comptroller Scott Stringer said. The warning issued today comes just weeks after state Governor Andrew Cuomo issued a desperate plea urging the richest residents to return to the city to help save it from economic ruin. Stringer told Bloomberg TV he believes the city could save $400 million by refinancing debt and as much as $1 billion through efficiencies. The wealthy may need 'to pay a little bit more to get us through this crisis,' he said. 'People of great wealth have done great in the city in the last 10 or 20 years, they should be prepared if necessary to step up, to help out as well when that happens,' Stringer, who is running for mayor in 2021, continued. 'It seems reasonable that people...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- In this episode of Up Close, Scott M. Stringer serves as the 44th New York City Comptroller and has just announced that he is running for New York City Mayor to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio when his second term comes to an end in 2022.Stringer discusses the crucial issues facing New Yorkers at this time that include quality of life, the COVID-19 pandemic, and economic recovery.Plus, what happens when politics take precedent over good medicine, and are smart medical practices taking a back seat to political considerations?David L. Reich, MD, President, The Mount Sinai Hospital & Mount Sinai Queens, speaks about the friction between current data and politicized rhetoric and will discuss the National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project that he's now spearheading.Also, did President Donald Trump downplay the severity of the coronavirus so he wouldn't scare the American people?ABC News Assistant Political Director, Mary...
    New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer formally announced his candidacy for mayor Tuesday, pledging to build the city back from the coronavirus pandemic and economic crisis if he is elected to succeed Bill de Blasio in 2021. “This city is strong. Our people are strong. But they should not have to fight their way back on their own,” Stringer said in a speech outside his childhood home in upper Manhattan. In 2019, Stringer sat down with the Eagle to discuss the benefits of divesting the city’s pension funds from fossil fuels and focusing investments in the green economy. 
    If Mayor Putz had thrown in a “just kidding” line, his Tuesday press conference would have made more sense. Instead, he again looked like a mayor who doesn’t give a damn. “Except for that incident, overwhelmingly we had a peaceful weekend in central Brooklyn,” de Blasio told reporters. “That incident” was the shooting of a 6-year-old boy and his mother. And the “peaceful weekend” included the shootings of 26 other people around the five boroughs. If this is peace, what would war look like? Called on his disconnect, de Blasio fired back by saying he was only talking about central Brooklyn. So now he’s just the mayor of central Brooklyn? It is hard to imagine that New York will survive the nearly 16 months remaining in de Blasio’s reign of error, and even harder to believe he wants to do the work the job requires. Lazy by nature, he has coasted since...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City Announcing his bid for mayor in 2021, current city Comptroller Scott Stringer talked ambitious goals that place investment in communities to end gentrification and expressed a sense of “urgency” considering the ongoing hardships facing New Yorkers from COVID-19. Stringer plans to campaign on holding NYPD accountable in cases of abuse of power or excessive use of force, but hopes to strike a balance by still supporting cops where needed. “The virus exposed how we left large swaths of this city on their own. The fact is, we never closed the book on a tale of two cities; if anything, over the last eight years, we’ve written more chapters,” Stringer said. “None of this is at odds with keeping our neighborhoods safe. When I was kid there was something like 2,000 murders...
    Eyeing her own bid for Gracie Mansion, Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia blasted Mayor Bill de Blasio over massive cuts to her department that she said endanger public health and safety as she quit the administration Tuesday. “At a time when protecting public health is of the essence, cutting basic Sanitation services is unconscionable,” Garcia wrote in her resignation letter, which was obtained by The Post. “This budget crisis is incredibly severe, but I am disappointed to see so much of the work we have done over the last six years being walked back,” she added later. “If, as is often said, budgets are a statement of values, my values require me to resign in the face of these cuts, which will harm New Yorkers.” The cuts contained in the 2021 budget passed this summer forced the Sanitation Department to slash litter basket pickups by 60 percent in order to maintain...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer is running for mayor. Stringer tossed is hat into the ring Tuesday, making the announcement at Inwood Hill park in Upper Manhattan near his childhood home. Stringer has served as the city’s comptroller since 2014. Before that, he was Manhattan’s borough president after representing the Upper West Side in the state Assembly for more than a decade. Stringer joins former New York City Veterans Affairs Commissioner Loree Sutton in formally announcing a bid for mayor in 2021.
    Eyeing her own bid for Gracie Mansion, Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia blasted Mayor Bill de Blasio over massive cuts to her department that she said endanger public health and safety as she quit the administration Tuesday. “At a time when protecting public health is of the essence, cutting basic Sanitation services is unconscionable,” Garcia wrote in her resignation letter, which was obtained by The Post. “This budget crisis is incredibly severe, but I am disappointed to see so much of the work we have done over the last six years being walked back,” she added later. “If, as is often said, budgets are a statement of values, my values require me to resign in the face of these cuts, which will harm New Yorkers.” The cuts contained in the 2021 budget passed this summer forced the Sanitation Department to slash litter basket pickups by 60 percent in order to maintain...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia has submitted her resignation as she considers a possible mayoral run, while New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer also announced his candidacy Tuesday.Garcia's resignation becomes effective later this month, and the department says her last day will be September 18.At his daily news conference Tuesday, Mayor Bill de Blasio thanked Garcia for her service and wished her well.EMBED More News Videos Mayor Bill de Blasio comments on Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia's resignation. In the latest episode of Up Close, Garcia talked about her potential run.Garcia started as an intern in New York City's Department of Sanitation and worked her way up to commissioner of the department in 2014.It is the world's largest municipal waste management agency, with over 10,000 workers collecting 10,000 tons of garbage every day.Garcia is also head of New York's emergency food program, which has...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City In order to prompt more children to bike to school – and an overall boom in cycling – city Comptroller Scott Stringer is asking the Department of Education to adopt a program with CitiBike as in-person classes are expected to resume on a limited basis Sept. 21. Stringer cited data gathered between 2009 and 2015 that showed the number of kids pedaling to and from home dropped from 23% to 18% and as the DOE considers how to get students to and from safely considering COVID-19 and reduced capacity on buses. The comptroller’s proposal includes the implementation of a half mile of bike lanes around 50 schools in the city within the next year and that the DOE provides free bicycles or Citi Bike memberships to every low-income public high school...
    Alexa Ura August 29, 2020 4:04PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on The Texas Tribune. A persistent Texas voter, twice thwarted when he tried registering to vote while renewing his driver's license online, has for the second time convinced a federal judge that the state is violating federal law. In a 68-page ruling Friday, U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia of San Antonio found that Texas continues to violate the federal National Voter Registration Act by not allowing residents to register to vote when they update their driver's license information online. : Garcia found that DPS is "legally obligated" to allow voters to simultaneously register to vote with every license renewal or change-of-address application, and ordered the state to set up a "fully operable" online system by Sept. 23. The Texas attorney general's office did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but the state is likely to appeal...
    A federal judge has found the state of Texas guilty of violating the National Voter Registration Act for a second time by not allowing residents to register to vote when they update their driver’s license information online. A 68-page ruling by U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia ruled that the state is legally obligated to let voters register to vote any time they renew their license or register a new address. The ruling comes after Texas resident Jarrod Stringer, a former English professor, was denied the right to register to vote while renewing his drivers license online, reports the Texas Tribune. Stringer originally thought that he had registered back in 2014, and sued the state after being turned away at the polls when he went to vote at the University of Austin in San Antonio. In 2018, Garcia ruled that the State of Texas violated the National Voter Registration Act...
    A federal choose has discovered the state of Texas responsible of violating the Nationwide Voter Registration Act for a second time by not permitting residents to register to vote once they replace their driver’s license data on-line. A 68-page ruling by U.S. District Choose Orlando Garcia dominated that the state is legally obligated to let voters register to vote any time they renew their license or register a brand new tackle. The ruling comes after Texas resident Jarrod Stringer, a former English professor, was denied the best to register to vote whereas renewing his drivers license on-line, stories the Texas Tribune. Stringer initially thought that he had registered again in 2014, and sued the state after being turned away on the polls when he went to vote on the College of Austin in San Antonio. In 2018, Garcia dominated that the State of Texas violated the Nationwide Voter Registration...
    A federal judge has found the state of Texas guilty of violating the National Voter Registration Act for a second time by not allowing residents to register to vote when they update their driver’s license information online. A 68-page ruling by U.S. District Judge Orlando Garcia ruled that the state is legally obligated to let voters register to vote any time they renew their license or register a new address. The ruling comes after Texas resident Jarrod Stringer, a former English professor, was denied the right to register to vote while renewing his drivers license online, reports the Texas Tribune. Stringer originally thought that he had registered back in 2014, and sued the state after being turned away at the polls when he went to vote at the University of Austin in San Antonio. In 2018, Garcia ruled that the State of Texas violated the National Voter Registration Act, which...
    Stringer seeks to revamp procurement process NYC Comptroller Scott Stringer sent a letter to Mayor Bill de Blasio calling on the city to restore checks and balances to the emergency procurement process by rescinding Emergency Executive Order (E.E.O.) 101, Section 2.  The executive order suspended laws and regulations related to procurement in New York City – including the Comptroller’s Office’s charter-mandated role in approving and registering contracts related to the COVID-19 pandemic – since March 17, when the city needed to quickly purchase ventilators and personal protective equipment (PPE) at the height of the pandemic. “As we emerge from the darkest days of the pandemic and build our city back, it’s time to restore full oversight and accountability to city contracting,” said Stringer. Funeral director wants license back
    City Comptroller Scott Stringer wants to regain his oversight of city contracts — a power that was suspended to fast-track the purchase of emergency coronavirus supplies — after a major political donor to Mayor Bill de Blasio obtained a $90 million deal that he couldn’t fulfill. “It has been reported that a number of COVID-19 related contracts worth tens of millions of dollars have been canceled or not fulfilled,” Stringer wrote. “These same reports also indicate that many of these contracts were with vendors that lack the necessary capacity or relevant experience, or even have criminal backgrounds. Given these facts, it is imperative that my office resume its Charter-mandated role of safeguarding taxpayer funds.” The Post and other outlets reported that de Blasio donor Charles Tebele, whose Digital Gadgets company sells computer accessories, failed to deliver a $91 million city contract for N95 masks and ventilators in March at...
    City Comptroller Scott Stringer wants to regain his oversight of city contracts — a power that was suspended to fast track the purchase of emergency coronavirus supplies — after a major political donor to Mayor Bill de Blasio obtained a $90 million deal that he couldn’t fulfill. “It has been reported that a number of COVID-19 related contracts worth tens of millions of dollars have been canceled or not fulfilled,” Stringer wrote. “These same reports also indicate that many of these contracts were with vendors that lack the necessary capacity or relevant experience, or even have criminal backgrounds. Given these facts, it is imperative that my office resume its Charter-mandated role of safeguarding taxpayer funds.” The Post and other outlets reported that de Blasio donor Charles Tebele, whose Digital Gadgets company sells computer accessories, failed to deliver a $91 million city contract for N95 masks and ventilators in March at...
    Rat sightings across Big Apple have reportedly increased 60 percent since city officials slashed the Department of Sanitation's budget by more than $100 million two months ago. The troubling spike in rodent encounters has been attributed to a recent change in procedure spurred by the budget cut in June that reduced trash collections in New York City from daily to just three days per week. In April less than 1,000 rat sightings were reported in the city, but after the collection change was implemented that number ballooned to 1,650 – and city officials say the infestation is getting worse by the week. A number of politicians gathered in Harlem on Tuesday to pressure the city's government to reverse course. New York City Comptroller Scott M. Stringer said the current policy has created a ‘welcome mat for the rats of our city’. ‘These rats have the run of New York City,’...
    City streets could soon become the backdrop for a live action “Ratatouille” if officials don’t come up with creative solutions to the growing trash and rodent problem caused by coronavirus-induced budget cuts, local pols warned Tuesday. “These rats have the run of New York City,” said Comptroller Scott Stringer at a Harlem press conference about the infestation. “These rats are walking around waiting for a table at outdoor seating,” Stringer quipped, invoking the animated 2007 Disney film about an alliance between an anthropomorphic rat who wants to become a chef and a a restaurant’s garbage boy. “I’ve seen them walking upright. They come up to me and say, ‘Good morning Mr. Comptroller.’ They have become part of the fabric of this city because city government has failed to get trash and sanitation under control,” he said at the press conference with Rep. Adri ano Espaillat (D-Manhattan). City Hall cleaved...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — There’s a warning that trash piling up on New York City streets could force more small businesses to close. The problem started after city slashed sanitation funding and reduced trash pickups. RELATED STORY: Trash Piling Up Over NYC After Sanitation Department’s Budget Slashed By Over $100 Million City Comptroller Scott Stringer says small businesses relying on foot traffic and outdoor dining to stay afloat are now dealing with unwanted guests. “Instead of welcoming potential customers, the city has rolled out a different welcome mat for the rats of our city,” he said. “These rats have the run of New York City, and if we don’t get this under control now, we can forget about it.” RELATED STORY: Harlem Residents Fed Up With Overflowing Trash Bins Take Clean Up Effort Into Their Own Hands Stringer says rat sightings are up by 60%. He’s calling on Mayor Bill...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- New York City officials say mounds of garbage and an increase in rat sightings have hurt small businesses that are trying to recover amid the COVID pandemic.U.S. Representative Adriano Espaillat and New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer sent a letter to the NYC Department of Sanitation and the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on Tuesday to encourage the city to address the problem.They said they have received dozens of complaints from business owners across the city about overflowing litter bins and mounds of garbage on the streets, sidewalks and throughout public spaces.RELATED | Beware of ravenous rats, CDC warnsEspaillat and Stringer said piles of trash are driving away customers from small businesses that rely on foot traffic while rat sightings have increased from less than 1,000 in April to 1,658 in June."New York City's sanitation workers are heroes. Their commitment to our city's health...
    City streets could soon become the backdrop for a live action “Ratatouille” if officials don’t come up with creative solutions to the growing trash and rodent problem caused by coronavirus-induced budget cuts, local pols warned Tuesday. “These rats have the run of New York City,” said Comptroller Scott Stringer at a Harlem press conference about the infestation. “These rats are walking around waiting for a table at outdoor seating,” Stringer quipped, invoking the animated 2007 Disney film about an alliance between an anthropomorphic rat who wants to become a chef and a a restaurant’s garbage boy. “I’ve seen them walking upright. They come up to me and say, ‘Good morning Mr. Comptroller.’ They have become part of the fabric of this city because city government has failed to get trash and sanitation under control,” he said at the press conference with Rep. Adriano Espaillat (D-Manhattan). City Hall cleaved more than...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City City Comptroller Scott Stringer is telling the Department of Transportation that it is time to upgrade street signs across for readability so commercial vehicles and other cars can navigate easily. Stringer says the DOT is three years behind on the commitment to replace aging and vague signage throughout the city and despite budget cuts incurred from the pandemic, needs to prioritize these improvements for not only efficiency but safety. Following an audit in 2017, Stringer issued six recommendations for DOT to accomplish this, but claims they have only pursued two of them in that time. “Our streets form the physical foundation and framework of our city, and move millions of people and goods throughout the five boroughs every day. If we want New Yorkers to get around efficiently, we need reliable...
    Unpreparedness and disorganization at the city’s 11 public hospitals cost lives during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new report by Comptroller Scott Stringer. “This review found that NYC Health + Hospitals, and the larger system within which it has operated during the pandemic, faced an unprecedented situation for which no one was fully prepared. The lack of preparedness forced all players to improvise responses, sometimes successfully, sometimes not — but inevitably at a cost in human lives,” Stringer wrote Friday to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who had ordered the review on March 29. The virus has killed over 23,000 city residents since March. “Several deficiencies were noted, including inadequate access to needed supplies and equipment, a lack of systems and procedures for managing patient loads across hospitals, and insufficient protocols for deploying staff,” Stringer wrote. Stringer said the findings were preliminary, and he expects to issue a fuller report after...
    Unpreparedness and disorganization at the city’s 11 public hospitals cost lives during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new report by Comptroller Scott Stringer. “This review found that NYC Health + Hospitals, and the larger system within which it has operated during the pandemic, faced an unprecedented situation for which no one was fully prepared. The lack of preparedness forced all players to improvise responses, sometimes successfully, sometimes not — but inevitably at a cost in human lives,” Stringer wrote Friday to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who had ordered the review on March 29. The virus has killed over 23,000 city residents since March. “Several deficiencies were noted, including inadequate access to needed supplies and equipment, a lack of systems and procedures for managing patient loads across hospitals, and insufficient protocols for deploying staff,” Stringer wrote. Stringer said the findings were preliminary, and he expects to issue a fuller report after...
    The state Health Department announced Friday that it will grant $1 million in new funding for nursing homes to purchase technology like webcams and tablets to help residents connect with family and state ombudsmen amid the coronavirus crisis. In a new age of social distancing, the equipment is intended for residents in the facilities to increase access with the state’s Long-Term Care Ombudsman program — New York’s independent watchdog entity for nursing home residents. The move follows a blistering June audit from New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer’s office that criticized the state and city for chronically underfunding the ombudsman program, which was put under the microscope during the pandemic especially as all visitors — including these senior citizen advocates — were barred from the facilities thanks to statewide health restrictions. “Our analysis shined a light on the inadequate funding and support for long-term care ombudsmen, the eyes and...
    On the front lines of the war on COVID-19, there are many civilian heroes going out of their way, as volunteers and contributors. Also, many who are elected to serve are going the extra mile. In this column the Eagle hopes to give our readers an ongoing update on those fighting in the front lines. With the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic spreading fast in many states across the country, Gov. Andrew Cuomo today launched the national “Mask Up America” education and awareness campaign to urge all Americans to wear a mask while in public. Eight 30-second television spots, which will be rolled out throughout the month of July, have been produced by Jane Rosenthal of Tribeca Enterprises and directed by Kathryn Bigelow. They feature Robert De Niro, Kaitlyn Dever, Jamie Foxx, Morgan Freeman, and others. New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer has released a new analysis of the U.S. Small Business...
    The city comptroller’s job is to watch the budget, spot waste and protect taxpayer dollars. Alas, Scott Stringer is more interested in adding costs and bloating the bottom line — all to promote his own political ambition. Even as the pandemic ravages city revenues, New York’s supposed fiscal watchdog is pushing plans to boost hiring and outlays, though he’s careful not to mention costs or where funds would come from. In an op-ed last week, he calls for the creation of a “chief diversity officer,” reporting to the mayor, plus one for each of the city’s roughly 70 agencies, to drive “the representation of people of color and women across government” and oversee the city’s minority- and women-owned business programs. Yet anti-discrimination laws, the Offices of Citywide Equity and Inclusion and Equal Employment Opportunity, the Human Rights Commission and other safeguards already protect against bias. Indeed, that the city has...
    On the front lines of the war on COVID-19, there are many civilian heroes going out of their way, as volunteers and contributors. Also, many who are elected to serve are going the extra mile. In this column the Eagle hopes to give our readers an ongoing update on those fighting in the front lines. Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Friday announced that New York State will send the COVID-19 medication Remdesivir to Florida as the state struggles with a resurgence of cases. Florida is waiting for a further supply from the federal government and New York will provide enough Remdesivir to help the state care for 280 COVID-19 patients until the federal shipment arrives. “We will stand by our fellow Americans every step of the way as our nation fights COVID-19 together,” said Cuomo. On Friday, New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer released a comprehensive analysis outlining economic challenges facing...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City If a survey that City Comptroller Scott Stringer conducted is any indication, minority- and women-owned businesses (M/WBEs) across New York City are having the most difficult time weathering the economic storm wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic. Stringer announced Friday the results of a survey of more than 500 M/WBEs across the five boroughs, which concluded that 85% of owners indicated they won’t be able to survive the next six months with their current resources. Thirty percent of respondents indicated they may not make it past the next 30 days given the economic hardship. The economy was already heading south when the COVID-19 pandemic officially arrived in New York in March. Deprived of customers after capacity decreases and shutdown orders took effect, non-essential businesses had no choice but to close indefinitely —...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City With little clarity from City Hall or Albany as to whether New York City public schools will reopen in September, City Comptroller Scott Stringer unveiled on Tuesday a roadmap for getting the city’s children back into the classroom during the COVID-19 pandemic. Stringer’s report, “Strong Schools for All: A Plan Forward for New York City,” envisions a quickly revamped public school system that includes regular COVID-19 testing for students and staff; much smaller class sizes; realigned schedules for remote learning; and restricted movement within each school to help avoid infection. “It’s imperative that the DOE (Department of Education) act with urgency to provide a strategic roadmap to reopen city schools,” Stringer said in a July 7 statement. “As we approach the next academic year, new York City should be leading the...
    An employee takes the temperature of a building tenant outside the Empire State Building in midtown Manhattan, as the iconic tower prepares to open to more tenants and visitors following the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in New York City, New York, U.S., June 24, 2020.Mike Segar | Reuters Among the countless things transformed by the coronavirus pandemic is the perennial competition between the states for business, jobs and the revenue that comes with them. Make no mistake, the experts say, that battle is still going strong. But the battle lines have shifted dramatically. "If anything, this is going to increase competition among the states, which truthfully is always one of the inherent advantages that America has had," said Tom Stringer, a managing director and practice leader for site selection and incentives at BDO USA in New York, in an interview with CNBC. But rather than relentlessly trying to...
    The Department of Education gets an F for its planning ahead of the new school year, city Comptroller Scott Stringer said Thursday in a scathing letter to city officials. “While I can appreciate the complexities involved in making many of these decisions, there is no good reason why planning and preparation for the fall – as well as communication with parents and staff – is not more advanced,” Stringer wrote to Mayor Bill de Blasio and schools Chancellor Richard Carranza. To maintain social distancing, the Department of Education has broached the likelihood of staggered classes in September, with groups of students alternating between remote learning and in-person instruction. But beyond that, increasingly frustrated parents say they’re operating in the dark with the opening bell set to ring in just 76 days. “Parents, for instance, have no idea what days their children will be at school and what days they will...
    The Division of Schooling will get an F for its planning forward of the brand new college 12 months, metropolis Comptroller Scott Stringer stated Thursday in a scathing letter to metropolis officers. “Whereas I can recognize the complexities concerned in making many of those selections, there is no such thing as a good purpose why planning and preparation for the autumn – in addition to communication with dad and mom and workers – shouldn’t be extra superior,” Stringer wrote to Mayor Invoice de Blasio and faculties Chancellor Richard Carranza. To take care of social distancing, the Division of Schooling has broached the probability of staggered lessons in September, with teams of scholars alternating between distant studying and in-person instruction. However past that, more and more pissed off dad and mom say they’re working at nighttime with the opening bell set to ring in simply 76 days. “Mother and father,...
    The Department of Education gets an F for its planning ahead of the new school year, city Comptroller Scott Stringer said Thursday in a scathing letter to city officials. “While I can appreciate the complexities involved in making many of these decisions, there is no good reason why planning and preparation for the fall – as well as communication with parents and staff – is not more advanced,” Stringer wrote to Mayor Bill de Blasio and schools Chancellor Richard Carranza. To maintain social distancing, the Department of Education has broached the likelihood of staggered classes in September, with groups of students alternating between remote learning and in-person instruction. But beyond that, increasingly frustrated parents say they’re operating in the dark with the opening bell set to ring in just 76 days. “Parents, for instance, have no idea what days their children will be at school and what days they will...
    City Comptroller Scott Stringer subpoenaed City Hall Thursday for all records relating to the Big Apple’s response to the coronavirus pandemic — because, he said, Mayor Bill de Blasio refused to cough up the information. “The city has refused to provide my office with any of the documents we need to conduct this investigation or even suggest a date when they would start producing them,” Stringer fumed. Stringer wants “documents received, created, or issued by city government officials and agencies related to the public emergency and its potential impact on residents and businesses in advance of the March 22nd statewide stay-at-home order.” The comptroller, who is running to be replace the term-limited de Blasio in 2021, requested the information on a rolling basis on May 14. At the time City Hall welcomed the probe with a mayoral spokeswoman. Reps for the mayor did not immediately respond to a message about...
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