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    President Donald Trump speaks to supporters at Joint Base Andrews before boarding Air Force One for his last time as President on Jan. 20, 2021 in Joint Base Andrews, Maryland.Pete Marovich | Pool | Getty Images Former President Donald Trump's tax returns are back in the news. The Supreme Court rejected Trump's efforts to shield financial records from New York prosecutors on Monday. The unsigned order requires Trump's accountants to hand over tax and other documents. The legal battle over eight years of records, dating to 2011, was in connection to an investigation by Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. into potential tax violations involving the Trump Organization. A spokesman for Vance said that the office would quickly move to enforce its subpoena on the president's longtime accounting firm, Mazars USA. It's unclear when or if the tax documents will become public.VIDEO3:1903:19Tax season kicks off as IRS begins accepting 2020...
    Wall street leaves behind the falls of Thursday and dawns with a soft rebound after the request of Janet yellen of more economic stimuli to combat the negative effects of the pandemic. After the slight collection of profits of the last days, the words of the Secretary of the Treasury have liked investors. “We believe that it is very important to have a great plan that addresses the pain this has caused: 15 million Americans behind on their rent, 24 million adults and 12 million children who do not have enough to eat, small businesses that fail … “, Yellen said in a interview with CNBC. “I believe that the price of doing very little is much higher than the price of doing something great. We believe that the benefits will far outweigh the costs in the long term, “he added. On the rebound in inflation due to too...
    Sen. Angus King, I-Maine, at the announcement of the $900 billion Covid-19 relief bill on Capitol Hill on Dec. 1, 2020.Tasos Katopodis | Getty Images News | Getty Images The IRS may not have extended the deadline for Americans to file their tax returns as they did last year, but chances are millions of taxpayers will be applying for extra time to file their taxes this season. "There will be more extensions than normal this year, and that's OK as long as people pay their estimated taxes," said Tracy Marrin, a principal and director of tax consulting at financial services and advisory firm Rehmann. "It's better to extend and do the return properly rather than file and have to amend it later." Potential penalties and interest on taxes owed will begin accruing as of March 15 for corporate taxpayers and April 15 for individuals. Taxpayers can file for a six-month...
    PETER Barlow worries Carla Connor will cheat on him next week in Coronation Street as her ex Lucas Kempton returns again.  Lucas - who is played by Glen Wallace - will call at Underworld and insist he’s here to do business when Carla is unsettled by his arrival.  Visit our Coronation Street page for the latest gossip Find all Coronation Street spoilers here 4Lucas returns but insists it's strictly for business Peter isn’t happy either when Carla later tells him she’s going to Harrogate to meet someone from Lucas’ firm.  Later in the week, Peter approaches Carla and Lucas discussing their next strategy, but turns back before he reaches them after watching from afar.  Carla heads home to find Peter wallowing in self-pity and is baffled.  Later, Jenny persuades Carla to join her for a drink and send Sarah to the business meeting in Harrogate.  Carla sends...
    Former first lady Michelle Obama visits The Lower Eastside Girls Club to meet and greet the members and discuss her new book 'Becoming' on December 01, 2018 in New York City.Roy Rochlin | Getty Images News | Getty Images Michelle Obama is returning to Netflix this March. The former first lady will appear in a children's series called "Waffles + Mochi," which is part of her and husband Barack Obama's multiyear producing deal with the streaming service. The 10-episode cooking show features Obama alongside a couple of friendly puppet pals as they discover, cook and eat food from around the world. The series debuts on March 16. Additionally, "Waffles + Mochi" is collaborating with Partnership for a Healthier America, where Obama serves as honorary chair, to provide fresh ingredients to families during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. This children's program is the latest release from the Obamas' production company, Higher Ground...
    Reuters February 4, 2021 0 Comments The U.S. Treasury said it needs more time to decide whether to fight House Democrats in their effort to get former President Donald Trump’s personal and business tax returns, Bloomberg News reported on Wednesday. Given the transition to new leadership in the Biden administration, the Treasury needs more time to evaluate its position on the taxes, Bloomberg said, citing government lawyers as saying in a filing with Washington federal court. House Democrats have been examining whether Trump’s business dealings involved money laundering or left him vulnerable to foreign influence. (Reporting by Rama Venkat in Bengaluru; Editing by Kim Coghill)
    NCAA cancels Division III winter championships for a 2nd time amid COVID-19 pandemic Incredible hot tubs around the world Unilever Restores Revenue Forecast as Confidence Returns (Bloomberg) -- Unilever Plc restored its forecast for multiyear sales growth, signaling confidence in its ability to emerge from the pandemic in stronger shape. © Photographer: AFP/AFP Unilever logo. The company said Thursday it’s returning to a previous target for annual underlying growth of 3% to 5%. Profit should increase at a faster rate, Unilever also said. The consumer-goods giant dropped the guidance last year. Load Error After the pandemic led to the weakest revenue growth in almost two decades last year, Chief Executive Officer Alan Jope is defining new priorities, including plant-based foods and high-end beauty, seeking faster growth from categories increasingly in vogue with millennial shoppers. Such products helped advance underlying sales by 3.5% in the fourth quarter, beating the...
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Treasury said it needs more time to decide whether to fight House Democrats in their effort to get former President Donald Trump's personal and business tax returns, Bloomberg News reported on Wednesday. Given the transition to new leadership in the Biden administration, the Treasury needs more time to evaluate its position on the taxes, Bloomberg said, citing government lawyers as saying in a filing with Washington federal court. https://bloom.bg/3oN5T39 House Democrats have been examining whether Trump's business dealings involved money laundering or left him vulnerable to foreign influence. (Reporting by Rama Venkat in Bengaluru; Editing by Kim Coghill) Copyright 2021 Thomson Reuters. Tags: United States
    A Hudson Valley tax preparer and the owner of Eversley Tax has been sentenced to six months in prison for preparing false and fraudulent income tax returns. Eversley Barrett, of New Windsor, was sentenced on Friday, Jan. 29, to prison time after pleading guilty to 16 counts of an 84-count indictment, said Audrey Strauss, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. “Eversley Barrett abused his position of trust as a tax preparer by filing false tax returns on behalf of his clients and himself," said Strauss. "He caused over half a million dollars in losses to the IRS, all for his own unjust enrichment."  According to Strauss, Barrett included, among other things, tens of thousands of dollars of false and fraudulent deductions for business expenses and gifts to charity on tax returns he prepared for himself and his clients.  He also failed to report on his...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump is returning to a family business ravaged by pandemic shutdowns and restrictions, with revenue plunging more than 40% at his Doral golf property, his Washington hotel and both his Scottish resorts over the past year. Trump’s 2020 financial disclosure released as he left office this week was just the latest bad news for his financial empire after banks, real estate brokerages and golf organizations announced they were cutting ties with his company following the storming of the Capitol this month by his political supporters. The disclosure showed sizable debt facing the company of more than $300 million, much of it coming due in the next four years, and a major bright spot: Revenue at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, his new post-presidency home, rose by a few million dollars. Eric Trump, who with Donald Trump Jr. has run the Trump Organization the...
    The Internal Revenue Service may have let thousands of people claim $57 million worth of income tax deductions last year that they shouldn’t have received, a federal watchdog says. An audit by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration found holes in the IRS’ handling of the so-called qualified business income tax break established under Donald Trump’s 2017 tax reform package. The law allows certain owners of “pass-through” businesses — such as S corporations, partnerships and sole proprietorships — to deduct up to 20 percent of their business income from their individual income tax returns. The inspector general’s office said it found 12,980 returns filed last year that claimed about $57 million in “potentially erroneous” business-income deductions even though the IRS has developed more than a dozen rules to spot such faulty filings. The Jan. 13 report was heavily redacted, and details about what exactly was wrong with the...
    More On: irs Still waiting for stimulus? When delayed checks may arrive Millions of stimulus checks sent to wrong bank accounts, tax firms claim Why some taxpayers won’t get COVID stimulus checks right away Feds have delivered two-thirds of COVID stimulus check money The Internal Revenue Service may have let thousands of people claim $57 million worth of income tax deductions last year that they shouldn’t have received, a federal watchdog says. An audit by the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration found holes in the IRS’ handling of the so-called qualified business income tax break established under Donald Trump’s 2017 tax reform package. The law allows certain owners of “pass-through” businesses — such as S corporations, partnerships and sole proprietorships — to deduct up to 20 percent of their business income from their individual income tax returns. The inspector general’s office said it found 12,980 returns filed last...
    Stefani Reynolds/Bloomberg via Getty Images Nearly 13,000 taxpayers may have received a collective $57 million in "pass through" tax breaks in error last year, according to a new IRS watchdog report. The break — a Qualified Business Income Deduction — was created by the tax law signed by President Donald Trump in 2017. That law broadly cut taxes for businesses and individuals. More from Personal Finance:Here's how wealthy families will save on estate taxes under BidenPowerball surges to $730 million. Do this first if you winStates have tried seizing jobless benefits during the pandemic The QBI deduction allows certain business owners to deduct up to 20% of their business income from their taxes. Pass-through entities, such as sole proprietors, partnerships and S-corporations, may claim the deduction, though extra restrictions apply to owners of service businesses like doctors, lawyers and accountants.'Potentially erroneous' QBI deductionsThe IRS allowed business owners to claim $57...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Gov. Gavin Newsom has shut down hair salons and barbershops three different times since March due to COVID-19. Many people who own those businesses are wondering how they will survive.Victor Vanuelos started Elysian Barbershop two years ago, but like everyone in his industry in Los Angeles, his chairs are empty."It's been really difficult to see my life savings kind of go away and not know, just basically just to hold my place in line... it's been difficult," said Vanuelos.Sumi Ali also began a small business about two years ago: a new, online direct-to-consumer coffee roasting company called Yes Plz. That direct-to-consumer approach allowed for his business to see significant growth when the pandemic hit."We were kind of, from day one... we've been optimized for people's mailbox, so more people are drinking coffee at home in their kitchens and we're kind of made for that," said Ali.When...
    James King is the operator of the Titan Restaurant Group that led the legal challenge to the Anne Arundel County, Maryland, ban on indoor dining. Since the lawsuit has been dismissed and a new executive order allowing indoor dining at 25% capacity, King said he hopes restaurants across the county, not just those in his group, can manage to stay open. “We believe that as an industry, we have taken incredible measures to keep our patrons and our employees safe,” King said. “And that we can do so while remaining open.” King said his group of restaurants, including Smashing Grapes Kitchen and Wine Bar and The Blackwall Hitch, hasn’t had a single case of COVID-19 among its employees in eight months. “I think we’ve been able to show that if you follow the safety and sanitation guidelines, and if you take them seriously, you know, you can do this in...
    A former business partner of Hunter Biden reportedly said in an email that Biden didn't disclose hundreds of thousands of dollars in income on his tax returns. Eric Schwerin, the former president of Rosemont Seneca Partners, sent an email to Biden in 2017 that said he needed to "amend" his 2014 tax returns to include about $400,000 in income he made as a member of the board of Ukrainian gas company Burisma, according to NBC News. “In 2014 you joined the Burisma board and we still need to amend your 2014 returns to reflect the unreported Burisma income,” reads the email, dated Jan. 16, 2017. The email reportedly noted that Biden, the son of President-elect Joe Biden, made $1.2 million in income when factoring in the $400,000 he made as a board member of Burisma. NBC News said it was provided the email by Rudy Giuliani’s attorney Robert...
    ‘Tis the season for the 16th Annual Downtown Holiday Market in D.C., which will span two city blocks starting Friday, Nov. 20. The outdoor market is run by the DowntownDC Business Improvement District (BID), covers F Street Northwest between 7th and 9th Streets and features over 70 exhibitors. Some of the vendors will include Black-owned and minority-owned businesses from the D.C. Department of Small and Local Business Development’s (DSLBD) Made in DC program. Along with them will be collections from the District of Fashion Show local designers. And, six food vendors will also be spread across the market. Wider aisles on the street will allow guests to shop in a safe and socially distant shopping way in accordance with D.C.’s current COVID-19 guidance. Shoppers, vendors and market workers will be required to wear masks at all times within the market. Hand sanitizing dispensers will also be widely accessible. Contactless payment methods...
    A tall order, to be sure. A new New York Times story speculates on Donald J. Trump's "return" to his business empire and what that might look like, presuming Trump does not instead insist on being walled up in the White House basement rather than venture back outside into a world in which he can once again be prosecuted for whatever crimes he happens to commit. It's a bit rosy, to be honest. Freed from the pretense of having his adult failsons run his business, the only concession Trump was willing to make to concerns that running a line of for-profit hotels and resorts and what have you while acting as president was an avenue to massive political grift, it is true that Trump could now return to his tacky-tacky office and run things himself. It's less clear how that will work out in practice. Yes, Trump can now pursue...
    VIDEO2:3102:31Southwest CEO: It could take 10 years for business travel to bounce backSquawk on the Street Southwest CEO Gary Kelly told CNBC on Thursday the airline is focusing its operations on leisure fliers, citing the difficulty in predicting when business travel will rebound in earnest from the coronavirus pandemic. Kelly, appearing on "Squawk on the Street," said it usually takes about five years for corporate travel to begin expanding again after recessions. "You've got believe that will at least be the case now," he added. "And I've said before, it may be 10 years before business travel recovers. I don't know." "But we're going to be prepared to be more dependent upon consumer travel, and we will do well in that environment," Kelly said, shortly after the airline reported its largest-ever quarterly loss of $1.2 billion as the pandemic continues to dent demand. Southwest's third-quarter operating revenue of $1.8 billion...
    Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2017.Andrew Harnik/AP For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.The latest revelation from the New York Times coverage of President Donald Trump’s tax returns is that he has a bank account in China—one that has never before been mentioned. How did that happen? Trump’s Chinese account underscores why the public needs his tax returns. While the Times has gotten a hold of Trump’s tax information, he has long refused to provide it to the public, despite decades of presidential tradition and precedent. When asked for his tax returns, Trump often tries to obfuscate by pointing to his personal financial disclosure, a form required to be submitted by presidential candidates and federal office holders. Trump likes to brag about how long his form is. And it is long, and does include a lot of...
    Chris Wallace spoke with Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller on Fox News Sunday about recent reporting on Hunter Biden. Miller indicated in the interview that the reporting on alleged emails from Joe Biden’s son is something that President Donald Trump will bring up in the final debate. Wallace brought up what the president said recently calling the Bidens “an organized crime family” and asked Miller about that: “Two Senate-led Republican committees investigated what went on in Ukraine, and while they said that with hunter at Burisma end Biden handling the Ukraine account for the administration, while there was a perception of a conflict of interest, they found no actual wrongdoing. And as for these other business deals — and you talk about ‘the big guy’ and money — the fact is Vice President Biden has actually released his tax returns, unlike President Trump, and there’s no indication he ever got...
    Kennedy is returning to Fox Business. Host Lisa “Kennedy” Montgomery will relaunch her show during the 8 p.m. hour on Monday, she announced. The show was put on hiatus at the start of the coronavirus pandemic along with Trish Regan Primetime. "Due to the demands of the evolving pandemic crisis coverage, we are deploying all resources from both shows for staffing needs during critical market hours," the network said in a March statement. "FOX Business will run long form programming in primetime for the foreseeable future." Kennedy tweeted on Thursday, "Listen up freedomaniacs, liberty lovers, politicos and misfits of every stripe: I’M BACK, B*****S!!!" While Kennedy will be returning to her spot, it appears that Trish Regan will not. The network parted ways with Regan entirely days after she said the coronavirus was "another attempt to impeach the president." News Kennedy Fox Business Fox News
    New York (CNN Business)The bombshell New York Times report over the weekend detailing two decades' worth of Donald Trump's tax records answered a number of questions Americans have been asking since Trump announced his bid for the White House. Chief among them: How much federal income tax has the President paid? The answer, per the Times reporting: at least during much of the past two decades, Trump has paid less in federal income taxes than the average American taxpayer. Trump paid no federal income taxes in 10 of the 15 years beginning in 2000, according to the Times. In both 2016 and 2017, he paid just $750 in federal income taxes, about 16 times less than the average American tax filer paid in 2017, IRS figures indicate. Trump has denied the New York Times report and claimed that he pays "a lot" in federal income taxes. A lawyer for the...
    SHREVEPORT, La. (AP) — A Louisiana business owner has been sentenced to more than three years in federal prison for filing false tax returns. Robert Clifton Poimboeuf, 58, was sentenced Tuesday, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Shreveport said in a news release. He was part owner of D&G Holdings, LLC, a medical laboratory in the Shreveport area. The case involved tax returns filed from 2011 to 2015. Prosecutors said his scheme cost the Internal Revenue Service more than $1.9 million. Poimboeuf concealed from his tax return preparers at least two bank accounts reflecting income earned, and falsely characterized business receipts as non-taxable loans, according to the news release. U.S. District Judge Maurice Hicks Jr. also ordered Poimboeuf to pay the IRS more than $1.9 million in restitution, the release said. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Louisiana
    Donald Trump's tax returns show he wrote off at least $750,000 in potentially illegal 'consulting' payments to Ivanka. White House adviser and first daughter Ivanka Trump was recently implicated in a massive New York Times report detailing Donald Trump's tax returns and the minuscule $750 he payed in federal income tax. Ivanka was specifically accused of illegally receiving nearly $750,000 in payments from her father that he was able to write off as "consulting" fees. Ivanka's newly disclosed role in her father's efforts to evade federal income tax are the latest in a line of legal and ethical woes for the first daughter and former Trump Organization executive.
    Tax scandals plagued both men, but there are more than superficial similarities between the two disgraced White House occupants. Donald Trump's tax returns are the talk of the town, and news outlets and the Twittersphere are humming with comparisons to another White House occupant plagued by tax scandals: Richard Nixon. "'People have got to know whether or not their president is a crook,' Nixon said," tweeted Washington Post columnist Catherine Rampell on Monday. "The comment wasn't about Watergate, but rather funny business in his tax returns." A New York Times exposé published Sunday revealed that Trump's billionaire persona is largely a myth. Instead, Trump's financial records show massive debt, bumbling business dealings, and a penchant for avoiding taxes.
    The far-left New York Times claims it obtained copies of President Trump’s tax returns and is counting on ignorance to turn its nothingburger into some kind of scandal. The only real news in the returns is how they debunk three media conspiracy theories. Although the Times hides the news as though it doesn’t matter, and despite years and years of the media floating the idea, we now know there’s nothing about Russia in Trump’s tax returns. No secret loans. No oligarch connections. No nothing. Secondly, there’s no record of a secret payoff to Trump’s former attorney Michael Cohen that would suggest an illicit payment was made to porn star Stormy Daniels to cover up what she says was a one-night stand a dozen years ago. It’s not illegal to pay someone hush money. So this non-scandal has always baffled me. If anything, it’s illegal to blackmail someone for money, which is...
    A New York Times report that President Donald Trump paid just $750 in federal income tax the year he entered the White House — and, thanks to colossal losses, no income tax at all in 11 of the 18 years that the Times reviewed — is raising doubts about Mr. Trump's self-image as a shrewd and successful businessman. That Sunday's report came just weeks before Mr. Trump's re-election bid served to intensify the spotlight on Mr. Trump the businessman — an identity that he has spent decades cultivating and that helped him capture the presidency four years ago in his first run for political office. The Times' report deepens the uncertainty surrounding a tumultuous presidential campaign set against the backdrop of a viral pandemic, racial unrest in American cities and a ferocious battle over the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Mr. Trump...
    Ivanka Trump appears to have been paid hundreds of thousands of dollars in 'consulting fees' that helped reduce her father's tax bills while she was working as an employee of the Trump Organization. President Donald Trump's eldest daughter, who used to work as a top executive at the Trump Organization, appears to have been the recipient of some of the unexplained consulting fees set aside for his real estate deals and projects. The details emerged on Sunday in a New York Times report about Trump's previously private tax filing information.  The tax records show that Trump was able to partly reduce his tax bills between 2010 and 2018 by writing off about $26 million in consulting fees. A payment of $747,622 to a Trump Organization consultant is the exact amount Ivanka declared in her own public disclosure filings when she joined the White House as an adviser in 2017.  She...
    Donald Trump's disgraced former attorney Michael Cohen claimed last night that the president once brandished a $10 million tax refund check and yelled, 'Can you believe how f***ing stupid the IRS is?' Cohen tweeted that his new tell-all book 'Disloyal' had 'been proven 100% TRUE' after the New York Times reported that the president paid just $750 in federal income tax in both 2016 and 2017. Cohen, who is still serving the last two years of a prison sentence from 'home confinement' for lying to Congress, retweeted an excerpt from his book which described how he'd been with the president when he received a colossal tax rebate at Trump Tower in Manhattan. 'He held the check up for me to see, flabbergasted but also delighted.' Cohen wrote. '"Can you believe how f***ing stupid the IRS is?" Trump asked. "Who would give me a refund for ten f***ing million dollars? They...
    DONALD Trump spent $70,000 on his hair while he starred in The Apprentice, his tax records reportedly reveal. The documents, obtained by the New York Times, also show he paid $95,464 to his daughter Ivanka’s favorite stylist. 4Donald Trump hosted The Apprentice for 11 years Credit: Getty - Contributor 4Trump's businesses spent $95,000 on Ivanka's favourite stylist Credit: Getty - Contributor The bombshell report claims he paid only $750 federal taxes in 2017 and in the year became president, paid no income tax in 10 of the previous 15 years. The president dismissed the claims as "totally fake news", saying they were "made up”. The Times report details all the business expenses Trump has been able to write off against tax, through which he has been able to fund his extravagant lifestyle. During his time on The Apprentice from 2004-2015 he paid more than $70,000 on his hair. Nine of...
    It turns out trash fires don't pay very much in taxes. In an oddly subdued Sunday evening Donald Trump press conference dedicated mostly to repeating a laundry list of alleged voting conspiracies and crimes, Trump was asked about the new New York Times story revealing that Trump paid only $750 in taxes in 2016 and 2017—largely due to ongoing, massive business failures. His response? Total denial. "It's fake news. It's totally fake news.  Made up, fake." Trump, a relentless liar, yet again insisted that he will someday release his own taxes, the ones he still cannot release because they are "under audit," which will someday prove the New York Times is wrong. "The story is a total fake." That's it. That's his story and he's sticking to it, even after the Times got access to what they say is over "two decades" of Trump's private and business tax returns, including the...
    A nurse disinfects the hands of a patient at the Calesas healthcare centre in the Usera neighbourhood, under partial lockdown, in Madrid.OSCAR DEL POZO | AFP | Getty Images Europe is now grappling with a second wave of coronavirus infections that could once again wreak significant damage on the region's economy. The euro zone, the area that shares the single currency, saw its economy tank by 11.8% in the second quarter of 2020, hit by strict lockdown measures used to contain the spread of the virus. Economists predicted a rebound in the second half of 2020 but are now questioning those forecasts. Many governments are announcing new lockdown restrictions, or a slowing of reopenings, as they deal with a significant uptick in cases. "The likelihood of a double dip, i.e. another contraction in the fourth quarter, has increased significantly," Carsten Brzeski, a chief economist at ING, told CNBC Wednesday. He...
    The House Oversight Committee on Thursday released a detailed examination of Donald Trump's web of financial assets and alleged conflicts of interest – including 'hush payments' to porn star Stormy Daniels – hours before the president was to make the case for his reelection to the nation at the Republican convention. The detailed 58-page look at the president's financial structure and business relationships was a legalistic counterpoint to the more public counter-programming being delivered by Joe Biden's running mate Kamala Harris Thursday afternoon.  'President Trump's complex and opaque financial holdings, consisting of hundreds of interconnected business entities, is unprecedented for a president in the modern era,' the panel wrote. 'So is his refusal to divest those assets, a stark departure from longstanding norms established by past presidents.' Among the complex financial arrangements committee investigators spell out in their legal memo are the 'hush' payments that former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen...
    (CNN)The Manhattan district attorney's office said Monday that it has agreed not to enforce a subpoena to an accounting firm for President Donald Trump's financial records until after a federal appeals court has ruled on Trump's request for a stay pending appeal of his lawsuit. The deadline for the subpoena had been set to expire this week, but the appeals court said last week that it won't hear oral arguments in the case until September 1, which left a window of several days where prosecutors could have sought to obtain the records from the accounting firm, Mazars USA.A federal judge just blasted Donald Trumps pet legal strategyDistrict Attorney Cyrus Vance's letter filed with the court eliminated that possibility and extended the already lengthy effort by prosecutors to open a window into the President's financial history.Last year, Vance's office subpoenaed Mazars, seeking eight years of Trump's personal and business records and...
    By DEE-ANN DURBIN, AP Business Writer Marriott has reopened 91% of its hotels globally as business travel reemerges in China and worldwide occupancy, which tumbled to 11% in April, reached 34%. The company reported quarterly profits on Monday that fell far short of expectations, however, and revenue plunged. Shares dipped about 3% before the opening bell. In China, where business travel and even some group events resumed, occupancy levels reached 60%, about 10% lower than the same period last year, Marriott said. “The improvement we have seen in greater China exemplifies the resilience of travel demand once there is a view that the virus is under control and travel restrictions have eased,” CEO Arne Sorenson said in a prepared statement. Marriott had a net loss of $234 million for the second quarter after a $232 million profit in the April-June period last year. Adjusted for one-time items, Marriott lost 64...
    Marriott has reopened 91% of its hotels globally as business travel reemerges in China and worldwide occupancy, which tumbled to 11% in April, reached 34%. The company reported quarterly profits on Monday that fell far short of expectations, however, and revenue plunged. Shares dipped about 3% before the opening bell. In China, where business travel and even some group events resumed, occupancy levels reached 60%, about 10% lower than the same period last year, Marriott said. “The improvement we have seen in greater China exemplifies the resilience of travel demand once there is a view that the virus is under control and travel restrictions have eased,” CEO Arne Sorenson said in a prepared statement. Marriott had a net loss of $234 million for the second quarter after a $232 million profit in the April-June period last year. Adjusted for one-time items, Marriott lost 64 cents per...
    (Bloomberg) – The frenzied interest in bitcoin appears to have returned almost in full bloom. The largest cryptocurrency is rebounding again, while other risky assets, such as stocks, are nearing record levels and even gold is hitting new daily highs. After briefly surpassing $ 12,000 over the weekend for the first time in a year, before it experienced a sudden collapse that brought it to nearly $ 10,000, bitcoin is again rapidly approaching that higher level. Bitcoin peaked in late 2017, when it rose to nearly $ 20,000 before plummeting, and has since fluctuated significantly. The controversial digital alternative to traditional money attracted additional attention this week, after fixed income trader Dave Portnoy, founder of Barstool Sports, tweeted that he was ready to learn about bitcoin and invited cryptocurrency advocates Tyler and Cameron. Winklevoss to explain it to you. Original Note: Bitcoin Delirium Makes a Reappearance While Risk Assets Surge...
    NEW YORK - A Manhattan prosecutor trying to get President Donald Trump's tax returns told a judge Monday that he was justified in demanding them, citing public reports of "extensive and protracted criminal conduct at the Trump Organization."  Trump's lawyers last month said the grand jury subpoena for the tax returns was issued in bad faith and amounted to harassment of the president.  Manhattan District Attorney District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance Jr. seeks eight years of the Republican president's personal and corporate tax records but has disclosed little about what prompted him to request the records, other than part of the investigation relates to payoffs to women to keep them quiet about alleged affairs with Trump.  In a court filing Monday, though, attorneys for Vance said Trump's arguments that the subpoena was too broad stemmed from "the false premise" that the probe was limited to "hush-money" payments. FILE - Manhattan...
    PGA Tour to allow sponsor guests on site at future events Tata Harper Is Having a Birthday Sale—And Everything Is 25% Off Vanguard comes to defense of the 60/40 portfolio as it forecasts stock market returns for the next decade THE TELL CORRECTION: The previous version incorrectly described one of the time periods for which Vanguard made a forecast. © Getty Images It is tricky to balance assets correctly to make the most bread. The 60/40 portfolio has come in for its share of criticism recently, with Bank of America proclaiming its death last year. A 60/40 portfolio has 60% invested in stocks, and 40% in bonds or other safe asset classes. In a new note to clients, index fund powerhouse Vanguard Group points out how well the portfolio did in weathering the storm caused by the coronavirus pandemic. A 60/40 portfolio — with 60% in the MSCI All...
    Brad Keselowski honors graduates as Universal Technical Institute paves way for NASCAR dreams Soludos Has a New Vegan Leather Sneaker That Goes With Everything in Your Closet When will I get my tax refund? ‘We’re focused on the paper returns,’ the IRS says as it reopens offices TAXWATCH © Getty Images/iStockphoto The IRS had a backlog of 4.7 million paper tax returns as of mid-May. As tax season winds down, the Internal Revenue Service is gearing up its operations. Load Error The federal tax collector’s plans and procedures have been upended this year, like countless other government agencies and companies contending with the coronavirus pandemic. The IRS temporarily closed offices in March due to the COVID-19 public-health emergency and the filing deadline was pushed from April 15 to July 15. On top of that, lawmakers tasked the agency with distributing millions of stimulus checks, beginning in April....
    U.S. President Donald Trump walks to the White House residence after exiting Marine One on the South Lawn on June 25, 2020 in Washington, DC.Drew Angerer | Getty Images WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court said it will announce the last of the decisions from its current term on Thursday, which almost certainly means the court will reveal its rulings on whether Congress and a New York state prosecutor can get access to President Donald Trump's business records, including his tax returns. The Trump rulings will be announced beginning at 10 a.m. ET, unless the court is unable to reach a decision and wants them held over to be reargued next term, which seems unlikely. More from NBC News:Supreme Court ruling shows how civil rights and abortion access will be limitedSupreme Court ruling has some 'terrified' about potential harm to womenHarvard, MIT sue over rule that strips visas from international students...
    Kristen Doerer July 4, 2020 5:02PM (UTC) This article originally appeared on ProPublica. The Supreme Court is expected to rule on two cases regarding access to President Donald Trump's tax filings soon. At the heart of the cases: Can House committees and a New York grand jury subpoena financial institutions for Trump's personal and business tax filings? If the Supreme Court rules against Trump, it opens the possibility that the public could eventually see his personal tax return and business records, though experts say it would be unlikely to happen quickly. Here's why people want to see Trump's tax returns and what they may reveal about the president. : Why do presidents share their tax returns in the first place? Since Richard Nixon, presidents have shared their tax returns in some way or another with the public. Nixon perhaps explained why best: "I welcome this kind of examination because...
    ProPublica is a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative newsroom. Sign up for The Big Story newsletter to receive stories like this one in your inbox. The Supreme Court is expected to rule on two cases regarding access to President Donald Trump’s tax filings soon. At the heart of the cases: Can House committees and a New York grand jury subpoena financial institutions for Trump’s personal and business tax filings? If the Supreme Court rules against Trump, it opens the possibility that the public could eventually see his personal tax return and business records, though experts say it would be unlikely to happen quickly. Here’s why people want to see Trump’s tax returns and what they may reveal about the president. Why Do Presidents Share Their Tax Returns in the First Place? Since Richard Nixon, presidents have shared their tax returns in some way or another with the public. Nixon perhaps explained why...
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