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to the Confederacy:

    Actor and director Rob Reiner took to Twitter Wednesday demanding that the Senate convict former President Donald Trump, who he referred to as “the new leader of the Confederacy” during “our continuing Civil War.” “Our original sin is at the the root of our continuing Civil War. Donald Trump, the new leader of the Confederacy, heads the Sedition,” Reiner wrote. “If he is not held accountable with a Senate conviction, there will be no Appomattox,” the site of Robert E. Lee’s surrender to Ulysses S. Grant in 1865. Our original sin is at the the root of our continuing Civil War. Donald Trump, the new leader of the Confederacy, heads the Sedition. If he is not held accountable with a Senate conviction, there will be no Appomattox. — Rob Reiner (@robreiner) January 27, 2021 This is not Reiner’s first time trying to pressure lawmakers into impeaching Trump. Earlier this month, the...
    Protesters cheer as workers remove the statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson from it's pedestal during a driving rainstorm on Monument Avenue Wednesday July 1, 2020, in Richmond, Va. As of July 1, 2020 a new law allowed localities to remove statues. Steve Helber/AP Since the end of May, approximately 60 confederate statues have come down, according to an NPR report.  But in 28 jurisdictions in numerous states across the US, leaders have voted or otherwise decided to protect certain monuments dedicated to the Confederacy. Calls to topple or relocate monuments to Confederate soldiers were reignited following anti-racism and anti-police brutality protests that erupted across the US in May following the police killing of George Floyd. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Since the end of May, more than 60 Confederate symbols in US cities have come down, but officials in several US states have voted or...
    A protest in front of the Confederate Monument carved into granite on Stone Mountain in Georgia on June 16, 2020. Reuters/Dustin Chambers Stone Mountain Park in Georgia is shutting down on Saturday in anticipation of protests, the city said Friday. It comes after at least one white nationalist group pledged to show up on Saturday, with one telling followers to bring Confederate and US flags, WSB-TV reported. An antifa group pledged to stage a counterprotest as well, Reuters reported. Authorities had previously denied an anti-government militia permission to stage a rally in the park, citing previous violence, Reuters reported. Neither the white nationalists and antifa protesters have permission to protest on Saturday. The park is home to the Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial, a granite carving depicting three Confederate figures, and is a popular meeting place for white nationalists. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Georgia's Stone Mountain...
    A few words about this stupid and totally fabricated Gettysburg non-troversy… If President Trump chose the setting of Normandy for a speech, would that moron Rob Reiner claim this choice was “to celebrate your devotion to White Supremacy?” After all, there were all kinds of Nazis at Normandy. If President Trump chose Midway for a speech, would the basement-rated loons at CNNLOL claim Trump was pro-Imperial Japan? When it comes to America’s celebrity and media elites, you never know if they’re stupid or lying. My guess is both. But the idea that Trump mulling over Gettysburg as the setting for his convention speech somehow proves he’s a secret supporter of slavery and the Confederacy is one of the most anti-science and anti-history narratives these dishonest lunatics could come up with. Gettysburg symbolizes and memorializes only one thing, and that is a crushing and humiliating defeat that, like Normandy and Midway,...
    CNN’s Erica Hill on Tuesday weighed in on President Donald Trump potentially delivering his Republican National Convention nomination acceptance speech at the historic Civil War battlefield at Gettysburg, PA. Hill said Trump wants to speak at Gettysburg because he wants “to do his best to shore up the Confederacy” and preserve the Confederate flag and memorials. “I have to say, it’s not the same thing, but when we heard this, one of the first things I thought of was an interview that the president had at Normandy, and when we saw him there with all of those crosses in the background,” Hill stated. “And that really struck a chord with a number of people as well because it became so politicized. To think that now we’re looking at Gettysburg, where the president has in recent weeks really taken it upon himself to do his best to shore up the Confederacy, right,...
    The killing of George and the nationwide protests for racial justice reignited the demand to remove statues and monuments that glorify Confederate generals, soldiers, or advocates of slavery, and that symbolize the long legacy of segregation and oppression. Protestors have defaced and toppled monuments of Confederate leaders and slave owners and various local and state leaders have also ordered the removal of these symbols. “A real reckoning is here,” said Kirk Savage, an art historian at the University of Pittsburgh who has written extensively on Confederate imagery, in a statement to NPR. “Confederate monuments have become targets because they are powerful expressions of the brutal practices that led to Floyd’s murder; they are the artworks that gild the system.” Here are some statues and monuments have been removed either by protestors or government officials. 1. Jefferson Davis Source: Billy Hathorn/Wikimedia Commons Protestors tore down a statue of Jefferson...
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — For more than 150 years, Virginia’s capital city greeted visitors with a landscape steeped in Confederate heritage and dotted with its relics, including a collection of enormous statues to rebel fighters. Tucked away, or in many cases buried, was evidence of Richmond’s pivotal role in the lucrative domestic slave trade. Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children were jailed, bought and sold in the city, and shipped across the South in the decades preceding the Civil War. A push to rethink that historical landscape is underway as Richmond, like other cities across the United States, grapples with how to tell a more complete version of its past and the history of Black lives. Confederate statues have fallen, and city officials announced a major funding commitment Tuesday for an ambitious and long-envisioned memorial campus in Richmond’s former slave-trading district, Shockoe Bottom. “For hundreds of years, that...
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — For more than 150 years, Virginia’s capital city greeted visitors with a landscape steeped in Confederate heritage and dotted with its relics, including a collection of enormous statues to rebel fighters. Tucked away, or in many cases buried, was evidence of Richmond’s pivotal role in the lucrative domestic slave trade. Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children were jailed, bought and sold in the city, and shipped across the South in the decades preceding the Civil War. A push to rethink that historical landscape is underway as Richmond, like other cities across the United States, grapples with how to tell a more complete version of its past and the history of Black lives. Confederate statues have fallen, and city officials announced a major funding commitment Tuesday for an ambitious and long-envisioned memorial campus in Richmond’s former slave-trading district, Shockoe Bottom. “For hundreds of...
    By SARAH RANKIN, Associated Press RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — For more than 150 years, Virginia's capital city greeted visitors with a landscape steeped in Confederate heritage and dotted with its relics, including a collection of enormous statues to rebel fighters. Tucked away, or in many cases buried, was evidence of Richmond's pivotal role in the lucrative domestic slave trade. Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children were jailed, bought and sold in the city, and shipped across the South in the decades preceding the Civil War. A push to rethink that historical landscape is underway as Richmond, like other cities across the United States, grapples with how to tell a more complete version of its past and the history of Black lives. Confederate statues have fallen, and city officials announced a major funding commitment Tuesday for an ambitious and long-envisioned memorial campus in Richmond's former slave-trading district, Shockoe Bottom....
    Igor Derysh July 24, 2020 4:30PM (UTC) Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Tex., on Thursday introduced a bill aimed at banning the Democratic Party for what he described as its historic support of slavery and the Confederacy one day after he voted in favor of keeping Confederate statues at the Capitol. Gohmert, who joined more than 100 House Republicans to unsuccessfully oppose a resolution that would remove Confederate statues from the Capitol on Wednesday, responded to the defeat by introducing a resolution to ban organizations and political groups which historically supported slavery and Confederate states. : That list includes the Democratic Party, according to Gohmert. However, he did not mention that 72 Republicans who joined every Democrat in the House to vote to remove the Confederate statues. While Democrats were for decades the preferred party of defenders of slavery and segregation in the South, Gohmert's claims ignore the fact that the South overwhelmingly rejected...
    Congressman Introduces Bill That Would Have Democratic Party Change Name Or ‘Be Barred From Participation In The House’ Due To Past Support Of Slavery, Confederacy
    REPUBLICAN Representative Louie Gohmert introduced a resolution on Thursday that would ban the Democratic Party. Gohmert, of Texas, called on Congress to ban any political organization or party that has ever supported slavery of the Confederacy. 1Representative Louis GohmertCredit: AP:Associated Press More to follow… For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. The Sun is your go-to destination for the best celebrity news, football news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures, and must-see video. Download our fantastic, new and improved free app for the best ever Sun Online experience. For iPhone click here, for Android click here. Like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheSunUS and follow us from our main Twitter account at @TheSunUS.       Most read in US NewsHOW COULD HE?Man seen kneeling on crying two-year-old boy’s neck in BLM stunt faces jailNO HOPEBaby found dead in closet after child services placed him with violent...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday that Confederate statues on Capitol Hill are the ones that need to go - not depictions of slave-owning founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson.  'I do believe that if people have committed treason against the United States of America their statues should not be in the Capitol,' she told reporters at a press conference.  She also suggested President Trump was spending too much time 'preserving the relics of the Confederacy.'  House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said statues of people who 'committed treason' - meaning Confederates in the Civil War - have no place on Capitol Hil, but drew a distinction between them and slave-owning founding fathers like George Washington and Thomas Jefferson  Pelosi said there was legislation coming to remove the remaining 11 Confederate statues, though she doesn't have Senate GOP support. She also reminded reporters at her press conference she...
    CNN political analyst and Politico White House correspondent Ryan Lizza asked White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Monday whether President Donald Trump thought it was good that the Confederacy lost the Civil War. Their exchange was as follows: Lizza: Kayleigh, there’s a national conversation going on right now about the proper place of symbols of the Confederacy — statues, memorials, names — and that the president has repeatedly inserted himself into this debate. And I think a lot of people are trying to understand what his view of memorializing the Confederacy is, and the proper place of the Confederate flag. So, a couple questions. One: does he believe, does President Trump believe that it was a good thing that the South lost the Civil War? And then, two: is he interested in following NASCAR’s example and banning the Confederate flag at his own events? McEnany: Well, your first question is absolutely absurd. He’s...
    Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt, right, chums it up with Donald Trump and Moscow Mitch in early March as COVID took hold of the country. Democratic Sen. Cory Booker Thursday made an effort to pass a bill by unanimous consent that would have removed all Confederate statues from the U.S. Capitol. If no other senators had objected, the measure would have permitted their immediate removal, which House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had requested earlier this month of the Joint Committee on the Library. But true to form, one Republican senator did object, blocking the bill from moving forward. Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri, who chairs the Joint Committee on the Library, wanted some time to ponder whether removal of these monuments celebrating “men who advocated cruelty and barbarism to achieve such a plainly racist end," as Pelosi put it, was really warranted. Blunt thought it was all pretty hasty. "I'd certainly like to...
    Since she can't get rid of the Capitol complex's Confederate statues just yet, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Thursday that she's removing paintings of four House Speakers who sided with the south during the Civil War to mark Juneteenth. 'We didn't know about this until we were taking inventory of the statues and the curator told us that there were four paintings of speakers in the Capitol of the United States, four speakers who served the Confederacy,' Pelosi explained during her Thursday press conference.  The portraits came down later Thursday afternoon with House Clerk Cheryl Johnson watching.     Congressional Democrats have made it a mission to rid Capitol Hill of the remaining vestiges of the Confederacy on the heels of George Floyd's death and the subsequent 'Black Lives Matter' protests.  Legislation has been introduced in both chambers that would bar statues of those 'who served voluntarily with the Confederate States of America' to...
    (CNN)House Speaker Nancy Pelosi sent a letter to the House Clerk on Thursday asking for the removal of portraits of four former speakers of the House who served in the Confederacy, the latest effort by Congress to reexamine Capitol Hill's relationship to Confederate leaders and symbols. During her weekly news conference, Pelosi said the portraits will be removed on Friday, Juneteenth, the holiday that commemorates the date that Union Army Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger rode into Galveston, Texas, and told slaves of their emancipation. The holiday is the oldest regular US celebration of the end of slavery. Pelosi said Thursday she wasn't aware until recently that the former speakers served in the Confederacy.The former House speakers in question include Robert Hunter of Virginia, Howell Cobb of Georgia, James Orr of South Carolina and Charles Crisp of Georgia."There is no room in the hallowed halls of Congress or in any place...
    (CNN)In last week's memorial service for George Floyd, the Rev. Al Sharpton noted that the recent demonstrations against abusive policing were caused not just by Floyd's death after a white officer kneeled on his throat. Instead, it was the last straw after centuries of oppression. Mr. Sharpton noted, "Because ever since 401 years ago, the reason we could never be who we wanted and dreamed of being is you kept your knee on our neck." George Shepherd One weapon to suppress African Americans: monuments to white supremacists. Soon after the Civil War, Southern whites began reasserting their dominance. During the following 80 years of Jim Crow segregation, their methods included glorifying confederate leaders. Most of the large monuments began to appear in the early 20th Century, long after the war ended in 1865. The goal was not to preserve "Southern heritage," as the monuments' defenders now claim. Instead, the...
    (CNN)Crews in historic Old Town Alexandria quickly removed a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier named "Appomattox" Tuesday morning.The memorial was erected in 1889 to honor Confederate soldiers from the Virginia city and stands with its arms crossed and back to the north. It is one of many controversial Confederate monuments nationwide that has faced repeated demands for removal.Crews in historic Old Town Alexandria are seen removing a bronze statue of a Confederate soldier named "Appomattox."Alexandria's Mayor, Justin Wilson, tweeted photos of the statue's removal Tuesday morning saying, "Alexandria, like all great cities, is constantly changing and evolving."A spokesperson for the city told CNN in a statement that "the owner of the statue (United Daughters of the Confederacy) notified the City yesterday that they would remove the statue this morning." Confederate monuments haunt American democracyThe United Daughters of the Confederacy could not be immediately reached for comment.Read MoreThe symbolic removal...
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