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protest art:

    Plain boards that covered buildings to prevent damage if protests went awry were transformed into art pieces inspired by the protests of 2020. Now some of that artwork, particularly from Black Lives Matter Plaza in D.C., will be part of an art gallery commemorating last summer’s events. The partnership for the gallery started last summer. Josh Turnbull, general manager with Oxford Properties, said Oxford’s relationship with the PAINTS Institute started in June — when the city and country were deep in protests George Floyd was killed by police in Minneapolis. Oxford’s building in D.C.’s Gallery Place neighborhood will now showcase the art work. “The PAINTS Institute…is a community nonprofit group that provides arts-based programming to underserved communities,” said Turnbull. Turnbull said PAINTS was working with the Downtown Business Improvement District and was painting murals on the wood covering buildings in the Gallery Place/Chinatown area “to soften up the plywood that...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — A vision of what is to come for George Floyd Square in Minneapolis is taking shape. Barricades remain up near the intersection of East 38th Street and Chicago Avenue more than seven months after Floyd died. Jeanelle Austin, one of the memorial’s lead caretakers, says the existence of the square is an act of protest meant to disrupt. “We look at our protest as art,” Austin said. She says every offering, every piece of art, is a creative expression of pain and hope. The community’s been traumatized, she says, and the constantly-evolving intersection is needed. (credit: CBS) “We are going to hold the space with art peacefully until somebody can get it in their imagination that we have to do something differently,” Austin said. She has been in conversation with City Council Vice President Andrea Jenkins, including Thursday night in a community Zoom discussion. Jenkins said before...
    As people are joining with loved ones either virtually or in person, members of organizations like the Alliance of Families for Justice (AFJ) are finding community with one another in New York. In addition to pushing state officials to better protect incarcerated people, AFJ, a statewide advocacy group of family members with incarcerated loved ones, also offers support and guidance to one another. Typically the group meets biweekly via video conference, but on Dec. 23 AFJ members joined together at the National Black Theatre in Harlem to create protest art. The artwork included canvas paintings, watercolor, abstract drawings on poster board, and sculpture. Several of the sculpture pieces incorporated the interests of the AFJ members, like member Takeasha, who works as a cosmetologist. She created hairstyles on salon mannequins with messages related to AFJ’s mission, including a cornrowed style with the word “justice” and “AFJ” etched in braids. Her daughter...
    More On: black lives matter Video shows Proud Boys tearing down BLM sign outside black church One person shot at a violent protest in Washington state This woman allegedly drove through a crowd of protesters — and only got a ticket Multiple pedestrians struck during BLM protest in Midtown: NYPD INDIANAPOLIS — Neither woman could bring themselves to watch the video of George Floyd’s final moments, his neck pinned under a Minneapolis police officer’s knee. But as their city grieved, Leesa Kelly and Kenda Zellner-Smith found much-needed comfort in the messages of anguish and hope that appeared on boarded-up windows as residents turned miles of plywood into canvases. Now, they’re working to save those murals before they vanish. “These walls speak,” said Zellner-Smith, who said she was too numb to cry after Floyd’s killing. “They’re the expressions of communities. We want these feelings, hopes, calls to action to live...
    CHICAGO -- Some of the artwork many people saw on the boarded-up windows of Chicago businesses over the summer, is making a comeback. This time, as a public art display on the streets of a northside neighborhood."It is a display of art from 20 artists, 10 of which are board-ups that were throughout the city as part of the art initiative, Paint the City," said Christina Pfitzinger, executive director of the Edgewater Chamber of Commerce.Along with Paint The City, the Chamber partnered with Urban Art Restart to create one of Chicago's newest public art exhibits - Reflections: An Edgewater Experience."I think this has been a really challenging time and so what we did this month is take the opportunity to give our businesses the chance to really share their voices," Pfitzinger said. "They're using their windows to provide a canvas to really talk about what everyone's been talking about this...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY BOB KRASNER If any trees fall in East River Park, there will be plenty of people around to hear it — but the results of a recent protest were erased so quickly that not many had the chance to witness it. A diverse group of artists began work late on Oct. 9 and by evening had covered the park’s amphitheater and nearby grounds with art to call attention to the plight of the park. Yet by Saturday afternoon, all evidence of their discord had been power-washed away. The East River Park has become a focal point for activists as the city continues to push forward its plan to build a seawall to protect against a rising water level, destroying the current park in the process. The sprawling city park, used...
    EDGEWATER — Artists used the city’s boarded-up businesses as canvases to beautify and create social justice-minded art amid social unrest this summer. Many stores have returned to business as usual and shed their protective window coverings. But some of that street art has been preserved, and it is now on display in storefronts throughout Edgewater. A public art exhibit called “Reflections: An Edgewater Art Experience” has more than 20 works on display throughout the community until Oct. 31. Many of the pieces on display are murals that were created on the plywood of boarded-up businesses. Art at Armen’s Jewelry, 1142 W. Thorndale Ave., is preserved graffiti from boarded-up Chicago buildings. JOE WARD/BLOCK CLUB CHICAGO The window art is from the artist collective Paint the City, which formed this summer to create art with a message on the plywood that covered many businesses, among other things. “We always want...
    Tampa Museum Of Art While many white people were complaining about destruction of property and destruction of history during BLM protests, protests in Tampa’s Curtis Hixon Park were more interested in creating things than destroying them. The Tampa Museum of Art set up a protest sign-making station in support of peaceful protests for Black Lives Matter, and people were loving it. You should see the photos. tampamuseum.org —Jennifer Ring See all winners from Best of the Bay 2020.
    PARIS – A Congolese activist and four others are going on trial Wednesday on theft charges for trying to remove a 19th-century African funeral pole from a Paris museum, as part of campaign of protests against colonial-era plundering. Emery Mwazulu Diyabanza has staged similar actions in museums in the Netherlands and the southern French city of Marseille in recent months, inspired by global protests against racial injustice and colonial-era wrongs unleashed by George Floyd’s death in the U.S. in May at the knee of a white policeman. In the Paris case, Diyabanza and the other activists stand charged Wednesday of attempted group theft of a historical object, and if convicted, could face up to 10 years in prison and a 150,000 euro fine ($173,000), according to his lawyer. Arriving defiant at the courthouse, Diyabanza said it's about time that Africans, Latin Americans and other colonized communities take back what was...
    PARIS (AP) — A Congolese activist and four others are going on trial Wednesday on theft charges for trying to remove a 19th-century African funeral pole from a Paris museum, as part of campaign of protests against colonial-era plundering. Emery Mwazulu Diyabanza has staged similar actions in museums in the Netherlands and the southern French city of Marseille in recent months, inspired by global protests against racial injustice and colonial-era wrongs unleashed by George Floyd’s death in the U.S. in May at the knee of a white policeman. In the Paris case, Diyabanza and the other activists stand charged Wednesday of attempted group theft of a historical object, and if convicted, could face up to 10 years in prison and a 150,000 euro fine ($173,000), according to his lawyer. Arriving defiant at the courthouse, Diyabanza said it's about time that Africans, Latin Americans and other colonized communities take back what...
    SOUTH SHORE — A suburban teen captured hundreds of photos of the street art that was created in protest after police killed George Floyd in June, and now he’s releasing the photos in a book. Zachary Slaughter, of suburban Flossmoor, bought a camera with his eighth-grade graduation money. Then protests erupted in Chicago in response to Floyd’s killing in Minneapolis. Slaughter and his father, Chris, embarked on a tour of the city, capturing artistic statements against police brutality. “I saw a lot of good pictures,” said Zachary Slaughter, 14. “I like to draw, too, so it inspired me.” The Slaughters’ effort started as a way to safely get out of the house and bond. But they soon realized they could turn the photos into a larger project, culminating in a book of Zachary’s photography, “Boarded Up Chicago: Storefront Images Days After the George Floyd Riots.” For four days in mid-June,...
    New street art has been borne from a summer of protests in D.C., and the National Building Museum is opening an exhibition to showcase it all. “Murals That Matter: Activism Through Public Art” will spring to life on the museum’s west lawn (5th Street NW, between F and G streets) on Friday, Aug. 28 at 9 a.m. to coincide with the March on Washington. It’s being carried out in conjunction with STEM and arts nonprofit, P.A.I.N.T.S. Institute, and the DowntownDC Business Improvement District (BID). According to a news release, displaying the murals will be the museum’s way of speaking to the way that art can impact the built environment. It will be a combination of new pieces of art as well as preexisting ones. The exhibit will run until November. “Protest murals reflect the intersection of art and politics, a tradition as old as prehistoric cave drawings and as current...
    For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters. The 66-foot-tall painting depicts the artist’s 14-year-old daughter, her face covered by a handprint that symbolizes missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls, on the side of a downtown Colorado Springs building. Painting as an act of protest and education is artist Gregg Deal’s way of calling attention to “a silent epidemic,” he says. And his mural, Take Back the Power, just won the city’s Art on the Streets award. His daughter helped him paint it; she’s alive and well and wanted to help her father give voice to the many who are voiceless. “As a Native person, I get to be up there representing Native people and this epidemic,” she told the Gazette. “I think it’s very important that we get that type of representation.” To create the mural, her father partnered with the Haseya...
    Alex Brady July 25, 2020 3:00PM (UTC) Blane Asrat did not expect to see her artwork plastered across the front page news. On June 7, she went to downtown Oakland with a friend to help clean up after a protest only to see artists turning boarded-up storefronts into plywood canvases. Asrat, an aspiring illustrator, asked a nearby artist for some paint and began work on a portrait of a protester on the side of the Pacific Range Foods on 12th and Franklin Street. As she painted, onlookers took pictures, and one found its way onto the front page of The Mercury News. : A couple days later, Rachel Wolfe-Goldsmith (another Black artist who's been in Oakland for nearly a decade) helped organize Oakland's Black Lives Matter street mural on downtown Oakland's 15th Street. That day she pulled out the paint she keeps in her car and did an impromptu...
    SHANGHAI – To protest censorship during the COVID-19 outbreak, a Chinese artist known as Brother Nut kept his mouth shut for 30 days, using metal clasps, gloves, duct tape and other items. In the project – #shutupfor30days – he also sealed his mouth with packing tape with “404,” the error code for a webpage not found, written across it, a nod to the blocking of online content that is common in China for sensitive issues. “If you ask me how an artist should digest unfair treatment, such as violence or censorship, my first reaction is: keep fighting, with art,” said Brother Nut. The 39-year-old artist has built a reputation for statement-making projects in a country where the room for dissent has shrunk and censorship has intensified under President Xi Jinping. China faced a barrage of criticism over the virus that emerged late last year in Wuhan, from being slow to...
    SHANGHAI (Reuters) - To protest censorship during the COVID-19 outbreak, a Chinese artist known as Brother Nut kept his mouth shut for 30 days, using metal clasps, gloves, duct tape and other items. In the project - #shutupfor30days - he also sealed his mouth with packing tape with "404", the error code for a webpage not found, written across it, a nod to the blocking of online content that is common in China for sensitive issues. "If you ask me how an artist should digest unfair treatment, such as violence or censorship, my first reaction is: keep fighting, with art," said Brother Nut. The 39-year-old artist has built a reputation for statement-making projects in a country where the room for dissent has shrunk and censorship has intensified under President Xi Jinping. China faced a barrage of criticism over the virus that emerged late last year in Wuhan, from being slow...
    Powerful murals full of rage, anger, defiance, pain, sorrow and hope sprang up across blocks of downtown Oakland’s boarded-up streets during recent Black Lives Matter protests, displaying perhaps what words could not convey. The murals spoke powerfully to what was going on in the city, the nation and the world. Now, Black leaders are trying to capture lightning in a bottle, preserving the works of art along with the voices and the relevance of the moment. The plan, led by East Oakland’s Black Culture Zone, is to uninstall the murals, document who painted them, and store the art until it can be curated and put on display, possibly at the Oakland Museum of California, Oakland Art Murmur and city galleries. “It’s not a novel idea,” says Randolph Belle, who represents the Black Culture Zone, “but it’s an extremely complicated one.” It’s not as simple, Belle says, as taking the murals...
    Google “George Floyd Mural” images and the first thing you’ll see – also the second, third, fourth, tenth, fifteenth, fiftieth, ad infinitum – will be the mural painted at Cup Foods at 38th and Chicago by artists Xena Goodman, Cadex Herrera and Greta McLain, with help from Niko Alexander and Pablo Hernandez. You might ask “Who?” because most articles, Facebook posts, tweets, retweets and TikTok videos that feature the mural don’t include the artists’ names. George Floyd murals are everywhere. CNBC noted, “Murals have sprung up in Germany, Kenya and even in the bombed out ruins of Syria.” Stars and Stripes found one near Kabul’s Green Zone. CNN gathered images of several in Montreal, Manchester, Belfast, Berlin, Los Angeles, Oakland, Houston, Pensacola, Belgium; Nantes, France; and Naples, Italy. But who owns them? Who gets to acquire them, collect them, show them, store them, sell them? People have been asking these...
    Casey-Sanger said volunteers started removing almost everything from the fence late Tuesday night out of concern that it would suddenly be taken down early Wednesday morning. The National Park Service originally told the Associated Press that most of the fence would be dismantled Wednesday, but it later reversed course. In a statement Wednesday night, the Park Service said the Secret Service was "continuing to remove the temporary fencing around Lafayette Park, and the public will have access to Lafayette Park beginning on June 11." Some fencing will remain around damaged areas while the Park Service makes repairs. On the other, southern side of the White House, parts of the temporary fencing were also being dismantled. Hundreds of the signs and posters that hung on the fence sealing off the park to the north of the White House have now been moved across the street and taped to the walls of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Almost as soon as the towering black fencing was erected last week to seal off Lafayette Park, the barrier became an art gallery and a sounding board for the demonstrators protesting years of black deaths at the hands of police officers. Now, with much of the temporary fencing around the White House coming down, there’s an effort to preserve hundreds of pieces of instant American history. Both the Washington, D.C., government and several museums in the Smithsonian network have expressed an interest, but for now volunteers on the scene are working to gather up the items and keep them safe. “We’re trying to be as gentle as we can with everything,” said Natalie Casey-Sanger, a D.C. resident. “I’ve heard some people express hopes for long-term plans but nothing concrete.” Casey-Sanger said volunteers started removing almost everything from the fence late Tuesday night out of...
    WASHINGTON -- The Trump administration on Wednesday began to remove most of a new fence blocking demonstrators and other members of the public from in front of the White House.Officials abruptly erected the high, black metal fence, estimated to be more than a mile long, last week to block demonstrators from Lafayette Square outside the White House. That was as massive crowds rallied in Washington and around the country to protest the killing of George Floyd in police custody and other deaths of African Americans at the hands of police.Protestors worked to reclaim the space after the fence went up, covering a large portion of it with colorful handmade signs protesting racism and police brutality.As the fence comes down, the Smithsonian is looking to preserve some of the protest posters and memorials to Floyd. Curators from the National Museum of African American History and Culture surveyed the scene on Wednesday,...
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