Thursday, Feb 25, 2021 - 02:04:55
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In the column:

    For the last year or so, the growing homeless encampments near the intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Berendo Street have served as an example of how local government is failing two groups of people: Those living in the tents, and those living in nearby houses and apartments. The situation in this neighborhood along the East Hollywood/Los Feliz border is not unique, of course. Multiplanother storyy it by hundreds of times across Los Angeles County, with its staggering homeless population of nearly 70,000. What is a little different, though, is that the people who live indoors on Berendo were hoping things would get better after Nithya Raman was elected to the Los Angeles City Council last fall, ousting David Ryu in the district that serves the area. An encampment along Berendo Street in Los Feliz. “I understand people’s frustrations,” says new Councilwoman Nithya Raman, who is hosting meetings with...
    The camera always lies: it distorts, frames, crops, focuses and highlights the author’s gaze. In a way, cinema has sought to perfect the art of deception: Einsentein lengthened the Odessa ladder with editing tricks to exalt tension and drama, while Chaplin made us believe we were inside a machine. We have also seen dinosaurs, robots from the future, and aliens. Off-screen, photographs and videos are used as evidence of an objective reality: if a politician is recorded proclaiming offenses, a thief is caught in the act by a camera, or if we see a rocket launch into space, we accept these facts as true. We believe that audiovisuals are impartial and truthful. Today, however, the boundaries between cinema and reality are blurred. What used to cost thousands of dollars in special effects, today is achieved with filters for Instagram and Facebook. The anchors to reality are cut little by...
    The text messages were meant to encourage. They felt like back-handed compliments to Jordan Spieth. He had just posted his second straight 67 in the Phoenix Open, three shots off the lead, and it was cause for celebration. After all, Spieth had missed the cut six times in his previous 15 tournaments. The nine other times he made it to the weekend, his average finish was nearly 15 shots behind. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM "I was receiving texts that were like it was my first PGA Tour event ever," Spieth said. "And as much as I enjoyed that support, I mean, I'm not leading by three. I didn't win the golf tournament. Yeah, I know it's been a little while since I've been near the top, but like, come on guys. I expect to be here, you know?" Spieth knows better. His slump has been so...
    Former Princess Tessy of Luxembourg has claimed that she was 'put all the way at the back' behind a 'huge concrete column' at Grand Duke Jean's funeral in 2019.   The ex-royal, 34, who lives in London and spent much of lockdown with her two sons Prince Gabriel of Nassau, 14, and Prince Noah of Nassau, 12, shared an Instagram post about her ex-husband Prince Louis' grandfather earlier today. In the post, she commented: 'At his funeral, even though I was put all the way in the back with a huge concrete column in front of me so that I could not see anything, I knew he knew I was there for him.'  Grand Duke Jean, who reigned for 36 years but stepped aside in 2000 in favour of his eldest son Henri, died in April 2019, weeks after Tessy and Prince Louis were officially granted a divorce.  Former Princess Tessy of...
    Early last year, Angela Reiersen, a psychiatrist at Washington University in St. Louis, took ill with what she suspected was COVID-19. Because of a shortage of tests at the time, she never found out for sure, and she recovered before long. But the experience got her thinking about something. Reiersen had recently seen research suggesting that an antidepressant called fluvoxamine was useful in treating sepsis, a potentially fatal condition in which the body releases a dangerous imbalance of chemicals known as cytokines into the bloodstream in response to an infection. Might fluvoxamine also be effective in treating COVID-19? On March 25, Reiersen sent an email to a colleague, Eric Lenze, also a psychiatrist, asking what he thought of her idea. Lenze was equally intrigued. Fluvoxamine, one of a class of antidepressants known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, appears to activate a central nervous system protein that plays a...
    By halftime, with Alabama clearly unstoppable and cruising toward a perfect season, the mind began to wander toward an obvious question. Has Nick Saban, the greatest coach in the history of college football, assembled the greatest team of them all? CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Certainly, a case can be made for a group that breezed through a Southeastern Conference-only schedule in a pandemic-plagued season while barely breaking a sweat. "I think we're the best team to ever play," quarterback Mac Jones said. "There's no team that will ever play an SEC schedule like that. I'm so happy to win this game and kind of put the icing on the cake." Hold up, though. It was only a year ago that LSU romped to the national title with a juggernaut of a team led by Heisman Trophy winner Joe Burrow and a horde of NFL-bound players.  Come...
    In the span of several hours, Los Angeles lost two of its biggest personalities, and the city won’t be the same without them. Former L.A. City Councilman and four-decade public servant Tom LaBonge died unexpectedly Thursday night at his home in Silver Lake at age 67. And then we all woke to the news Friday morning that Hall of Fame Dodger manager Tommy Lasorda, a World Series champion, had died at 93. I knew LaBonge pretty well; Lasorda not so much. But for me they were both true originals, and in a sprawling metropolis that can make us feel like strangers to one another, they were rah-rah homers who made us feel connected to the place — and to each other. “Tom LaBonge was the heart of L.A. and Tommy Lasorda was the soul of L.A.,” said Mayor Eric Garcetti, describing LaBonge as “someone who just loved everybody” and Lasorda...
    I struggled to open the door to my wife’s business the Monday after Thanksgiving , but the problem wasn’t the lock. It was me. I was angry. And my rage was rising. She had to shut down her Santa Ana market for the busiest retail weekend of the year — Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, and Pozole Sunday — because of a COVID-19 scare. It’s one thing to write about pandemic-triggered shutdowns and how they have wrecked small businesses and livelihoods. It’s quite another to live the pain. We shut down until everyone tested negative for the coronavirus because it was the right thing to do — but, man, did it hurt. So I was already annoyed as I fumbled with my keys. Then, a random guy passed by and asked if I needed help. He then must’ve seen the sign on my wife’s store that told people about...
    Justin Thomas and Viktor Hovland ended the first and last tournaments with birdies. Along the way, the PGA Tour staged 37 events that allowed 91 players to earn $1 million or more. It only sounds like it was a normal year. Far from it. There was no golf for three months. There were no roars for the last nine months. No one was announced as the “Champion Golfer of the Year” for the first time since 1945. Through the COVID-19 pandemic, golf stopped and golf returned and golf finished. And even with the shutdown, on quiet golf courses, there were still plenty of tales from the tour that went beyond birdies and bogeys and virus test results. ___ Tim Smith of the San Diego Police Department has been part of the security detail for Tiger Woods for more than a decade at Torrey Pines. He has seen a lot,...
    As the primary English communicator of her Cambodian American family, Suely Saro became accustomed to speaking up at a young age. First, it was the kindergarten lunch tickets she had to request for her and her brother. In elementary school she was placed in the English learners class and had to petition to be moved out of it. A few years later she spoke up to argue her way into the honors classes that she needed for college. Soon she was preparing income assistance applications and other official documents for her parents, other family members, and even the friends of family members. She learned that there were people whom government reached, and those it did not. “I felt a sense of responsibility to ensure that not just my parents but that the whole community was protected and advocated for. And that eventually extended to everyone who was marginalized or disenfranchised,”...
    The New York Times staffer who edited Sen. Tom Cotton’s infamous “Send in the Troops” column has resigned from the paper more than six months after its publication. Rubenstein, a young editorial assistant, was thrust into the media spotlight last summer after the Times itself reported that he edited the notorious June submission in which Cotton called for the feds to deploy American troops into cities to suppress protests against police brutality. The column sparked a staff-wide revolt and prompted the resignation of opinions editor James Bennet. Rubenstein left the newspaper this week, The Daily Beast has confirmed. His exit was announced—with little fanfare—in an internal Slack channel for Times staffers on Thursday. Neither Rubenstein nor the newspaper immediately responded to a request for comment. Prior to his ouster, Bennet initially defended the column as being crucial to the opinion page’s mission to show readers the “counter-arguments, particularly those made...
    Even in a year cut short by the COVID-19 pandemic, there was no shortage of memorable shots that helped shaped a year like no other on the PGA Tour. A big drive gave Collin Morikawa his first major. A big putt gave Viktor Hovland his first win. And a big iron — in Bryson DeChambeau’s case, a really big iron — allowed players to consider an unconventional approach to the game. What follows are shots from every club in the bag — a few more than 14, so think of it as Arnold Palmer’s bag when he played the shootout at Bay Hill — to review 2020 on the PGA Tour. DRIVER Morikawa never planned to drive the green on the par-4 16th at Harding Park during the practice rounds for the PGA Championship. Tied for the lead on Sunday, it was his best play on the 294-yard hole and...
    It turns out that at the Los Angeles Fire Department, coronavirus testing duty isn’t the only way to make a small fortune in overtime pay. Last month, when I wrote about firefighters who had raked in as much as $200,000 in overtime pay at testing sites, story leads began trickling into my mailbox. And one tipster told me about the jackpot available to those who work in the division that inspects fire safety systems in buildings under construction. That was an understatement. I checked payroll records on two inspectors, and when you combine their regular salaries with the massive amounts of overtime pay they hauled in, their total compensation since January of 2018 was roughly $1 million each. Not bad, right? On average, California doctors don’t earn that much. But in the Los Angeles Fire Department, there’s a long tradition of overtime pay being there for the taking. In...
    It was a year of upheaval, unrest, staying close to home, and so many other things. In The Current’s first issue of 2020, I shared five ways that gardeners could support nature in their landscapes: ■ Create a pollinator island of native plants that bloom in spring, summer and fall. ■ Reduce your lawn by 20 percent. ■ Make a rain garden to hold stormwater on your property and reduce run-off. ■ Plant a tree. ■ Make a compost pile for your kitchen scraps and other organic waste to use as natural fertilizer on your garden. Email me at rootsandshoots@highlandscurrent.org and share your stories. I’ll compile them for a New Year’s column. Everyone needs a break With the exception of that New Year’s column, Roots and Shoots will be going offline and returning in February in time to dive into the planting season. In the meantime, here are some seasonal...
    With Kamala Harris only weeks away from being sworn in as the next vice president of the United States, Holly Mitchell is well aware that some Black Angelenos have put her at the top of their wish lists as a possible successor. Fortunately for voters in Los Angeles County, who overwhelmingly elected Mitchell to the Board of Supervisors last week, she is “100% focused and committed to the job she got hired to do” and is “looking and thinking of nothing else.” But it’s understandable why her name is being bandied about. An appointment by Gov. Gavin Newsom would take Mitchell, 56, from being the only Black woman serving in the California state Senate to being the only Black woman serving in this U.S. Senate — and only the third to do so in the nation’s history, following Harris and Carol Moseley Braun of Illinois. It’s a reminder...
    It was the moment that Black people everywhere were supposedly waiting for. Kristen Welker of NBC News, the moderator of the final debate between Donald Trump and Joe Biden, asked the presidential candidates what they would say to Black parents who must have “the talk” with their children about the police. Did they understand, she pressed, why these parents feel they have no choice but to prepare their sons and daughters for the possibility of being targeted “for no reason other than the color of their skin”? What followed was a tortured back and forth, in which Trump insisted he wasn’t racist while sounding racist and Biden offered up yet another mea culpa for his involvement in the 1994 crime bill that led to the overpolicing of Black people. “It was a mistake,” Biden said. “I’ve been trying to change it since then.” Dare I say we have more immediate...
    I presumed he was a crotchety old man with racist tendencies, after he berated me publicly for not wearing a mask as I strolled along a quiet street in our suburban Northridge neighborhood. Why else would he single out my daughter and me, the lone Black people among the walkers, runners and bicyclists enjoying the balmy evening. It took months for me to realize that the man, whose name I now know is Charles Dirks, treats every unmasked person he spots to the same loud harangue: “Where is your mask? You need to wear a mask!” The retired political science professor considers it his civic duty in the era of COVID-19. “People have got to be saved,” he insists. “Even if they don’t want to hear it.” His wife, Xiaoping Liu Dirks, views his crusade a little less charitably. “He’s passionate about so many things,” she said. “That’s something wonderful...
    SACRAMENTO —  Proposition 19 is simple: either aging homeowners get a big new property tax break or their offspring heirs keep an old one. Either the parents benefit, or their children do. Most of these state propositions can be annoyingly complicated if you let them. State Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra sometimes doesn’t help by writing ballot titles and summaries that attempt to lead voters toward the position of his Democratic Party. His two predecessors — Kamala Harris and Jerry Brown — did the same. More on that another day. Proposition 23 also might seem complicated, but really boils down to a simple question: Should kidney dialysis clinics be required to hire an extra doctor to be on hand while patients are undergoing treatment? Never mind that the doctor probably isn’t needed. That’s the official public narrative of Proposition 23. There’s another behind-the-scenes truth about the measure. A labor union is...
    Bruce Abraham, 67, can recall his first trips to Vroman’s Bookstore in Pasadena. He was 5 at the time. “It would be heartbreaking to see this place fall,” said Abraham, a retired paralegal who lives in Sunland and visits the store “several times a week” for periodicals, books and browsing. Upstairs, in the children’s book section, Alicia Procello and her son Martise told me they’re longtime customers, too. I asked Martise, now 12, how old he was when he first came in. “Two,” he said. “You can’t reinvent this place,” said his mother. And let’s hope nobody has to. But Vroman’s has put out a plea for help to customers, saying the coronavirus may do them in. So has Chevalier’s Books in Larchmont Village, another beloved local institution. They’ve joined a growing list of local mom-and-pop stores and independent restaurants that are in trouble or have already shut the door...
    In July, as federal troops were confronting demonstrators in Portland, Oregon, longtime 9News meteorologist Marty Coniglio tweeted a photo that compared the action to Nazi Germany. A fixture on the channel's popular morning show, he was off the air the next day...for good. This week, Coniglio explained why he did what he did in a column for Westword, which starts with this: "Better to be a good American than a good employee. Distilled to its most elemental expression, that is the reason why I blew up a 35-year career in broadcast media to add my voice to the alarms sounding about the current state of our Republic." You can read Marty Coniglio's complete piece here (and see the Tweet below). Thousands of people did, and posted more than a hundred comments on the Westword Facebook page, most applauding the longtime TV personality and wishing him the best. Says Al: "Better...
    Carlos Condit gets back in the win column at UFC Fight Island 4 By: Daniel Cunningham October 3, 2020 ShareTweetFlipRedditIn the featured prelim of tonight’s UFC Fight Island 4 card, Carlos Condit (31-13) took on former ultimate fighter winner, Court McGee (19-10). For Condit, he entered the octagon trying to snap a five fight losing streak that dated back to UFC 195 in 2016. In the first round of the fight, Condit looked to be a little tentative. Court McGee was doing a good job early on of getting off first. However, Condit really started to find his range in the final minute of the first round of the fight. Then, in the final seconds of the first, Condit broke McGee’s nose with a shot that put the former ultimate fighter winner on the canvas. Condit would assume control for the...
    The following article is an opinion piece and reflects the views of only the author and not those of AllOnGeorgia. By: State Representative Vernon Jones.  Jones is a Democratic politician from Georgia. Jones was chief executive officer of Dekalb County, Georgia, from 2001 until 2009, and in the Georgia House of Representatives from 1993 to 2001. Jones was elected to the Georgia House in 2016. What you think of Joe Biden’s debate performance will depend on how closely you’re paying attention. Biden is hoping for a passive audience that won’t notice when he misdirects or substitutes bland platitudes for substantive answers. This isn’t Biden’s first rodeo. He has more experience debating in front of a national audience than any other candidate who competed in this election cycle, starting with his failed candidacy in 1988. Biden held his own during his...
    There’s a story many of us tell ourselves in this country. That, no matter how unfair things might be at a given moment, if we’re informed and engaged, vote consistently for the politicians who represent the interests of the majority of Americans, eventually we will be governed by laws and policies that reflect those interests. That the arc of the moral universe is long, and so on and so forth. I fear this past week has been a harbinger of the chaos to come if a majority of the American people stop believing in this story. When people — understandably — have so little faith in our system of government to be fair that they resort to vigilante justice. Like the protesters on Thursday night who, rather than wait for the police officers who were supposed to be protecting them, piled into the back of a pickup truck and...
    The last time the World Series was held in a single ballpark, there was a bit of a conundrum over where the two managers would stay. It was 1944. World War II was raging. The major leagues carried on with rag-tag rosters. And the lowly St. Louis Brown actually managed to win the AL pennant. That set up a “Streetcar Series” against St. Louis’ far more popular Cardinals, who cruised to the NL pennant while sharing Sportsman Park with the Browns. Here’s the catch: Since there was a shortage of housing during the war, and the teams were never at home at the same time during the regular season, the two managers — Luke Sewell of the Browns and Billy Southworth of the Cardinals — shared an apartment. Of course, they’d both have to be in St. Louis for the World Series. “However admirable this display of interleague cooperation might...
    When it came time to confront a global pandemic, we should’ve known college football would whiff on the tackle. This flimsy collection of largely autonomous fiefdoms, each concerned mainly with hoarding wealth and power, was never going to make the right call against a fearsome opponent like the coronavirus. Not this sport, which has always been perfectly content to rake in billions of dollars off the backs of unpaid laborers, poisoning our system of higher education by transforming campuses into no-wage professional franchises. Those in charge followed their usual game plan when faced with a potentially deadly game of roulette. They followed the money. “We’re kind of undergoing a natural experiment to see what happens” was the ominous assessment of Cyrus Shahpar, director of the epidemic prevention team at Resolve to Save Lives, an organization that works with countries around the world in dealing with the outbreak of diseases. ...
    Former Rep. Jason Lewis, the Republican Senate candidate for Minnesota, said that the explosion of riots and civil unrest “widens the silent majority” and could very well put Minnesota in President Trump’s victory column in November on Tuesday’s edition of Breitbart News Tonight with host Washington Political Editor Matthew Boyle Lewis, who is challenging Democrat incumbent Sen. Tina Smith (D-MN) in the Gopher State, said that the riots, coupled with Democrat leadership’s refusal to condemn the lawlessness, essentially widens the silent majority. “I think it widens the silent majority. So remember the silent majority from the Nixon era we were talking about, but now you really expand that because the riots are trying to intimidate people, right? Trying to get everybody to conform, which is the goal of the cancel culture and everything else,” he said. “But all that does is drive people underground. So these polls you mentioned are probably...
    Standing among barren shelves, empty bins and massive beer posters at Pancho’s Mini Market in a barrio near USC, Teresa Gonzalez had a simple message for anyone who still thinks the coronavirus is a joke. “Cuídense,” the 63-year-old said, repeating it thrice. Take care of yourselves. “It’s a sad reality,” she continued in Spanish, as her daughter Mabel and granddaughter Camila nodded in wearied, masked agreement. “Look around us. It destroyed our dream.” Teresa and her husband, Francisco — universally known as Pancho — ran this mercadito for nearly 30 years. She was in charge of inventory; he ran the register from 8 in the morning until 9 at night. There were only five days since he acquired the store in 1991 that Pancho hadn’t shown up to work: Mabel’s high school and college graduations, her quinceañera and wedding and the kindergarten graduation of Camila a few years back. But...
    On the eve of the Republican National Convention, it’s worth noting that no one has made a greater case for reelecting Donald Trump — if not adding him to the lineup at Mount Rushmore — than the president himself. But don’t take my word for it. Take his. “I’m a big environmentalist… We have the cleanest air, the cleanest water we’ve ever had…Nobody has more respect for women than Donald Trump!...Nobody would fight harder for free speech than me... I am the only one that knows how to build cities... Many people have commented that my fragrance, “Success” is the best scent & lasts the longest. Try it & let me know what you think!... “We will immediately repeal and replace ObamaCare — and nobody can do that like me. We will save $'s and have much better healthcare!... How do you get impeached when you have done NOTHING...
    Manila, Aug 18 . .- The Taal volcano in the Philippines, located about 80 kilometers from Manila, expelled a “weak vapor emission” from about 20 meters high in the last 24 hours, the Institute of Volcanology reported on Tuesday. and Seismology in the Philippines (Phivolcs). El Taal, one of the smallest active volcanoes in the world, erupted last January forcing the evacuation of hundreds of thousands of people who lived in the vicinity. The alert was raised for several weeks to level 4 (of a total of 5) due to the risk of an “explosive eruption”, but since March it remains at alert 1, which means that “sudden phreatic explosions may occur, driven by steam or by earthquakes; slight ash fall or accumulations of volcanic gas “. Phivolcs reported today that in the last 24 hours there have been five volcanic earthquakes in the vicinity of Taal, one of the...
    A rumbling volcano in Indonesia erupted Monday, sending a towering column of ash more than 3 miles into the sky and raining down on nearby villages. Mount Sinabung, located on Indonesia's Sumatra Island, has been active since 2010 and had a spike in activity in recent days, including a pair of smaller eruptions over the weekend. Indonesia’s Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation Center said there were no reports of deaths or injuries from the eruption but that lava flows were possible. "People living nearby are advised to be on alert for the potential appearance of lava," the agency said. THE 'RING OF FIRE' EXPLAINED Residents in nearby villages were advised to stay at least 3.1 miles from the crater's mouth. Mount Sinabung spews volcanic materials into the air as it erupts, in Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Aug. 10, 2020. (AP Photo/Sugeng Nuryono) An area around the volcano has been barricaded off for years, but...
    Hillary Clinton has joked that New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd 'had too much pot brownie' after Dowd wrote that the Democrats had not had a male/female combination for the president and vice president in 36 years. Dowd's article, published on Saturday, mused over Joe Biden's potential running mate. Biden has promised to choose a woman, and he is due to announce his decision imminently. California Senator Kamala Harris, former National Security Adviser Susan Rice, and the governor of Michigan, Gretchen Whitmer, are all believed to be in the running, among others.  'It's hard to fathom, but it has been 36 years since a man chose to put a woman on the Democratic ticket with him, writes @MaureenDowd,' the newspaper tweeted from the @nytopinion account. Clinton, who chose a man - Senator Tim Kaine - as her running mate, was quick to respond. Hillary Clinton, who had a man...
    Father Greg Boyle, the local saint of unconditional compassion, has been unceremoniously booted out of his office at Homeboy Industries and relegated to the parking lot. “Come to my tent,” the padre advised, saying “the homies” had pitched him temporary quarters, and one of them observed that it “feels like Afghanistan in here.” Boyle is 66 and has long been under care for leukemia, so staff and homies thought he’d have a lower risk of getting the coronavirus if he moved outside. I found Boyle at his desk in an open-air, white canopy lair, with a fan, a palm and woven flooring that would have made Lawrence of Arabia proud. I wanted to ask about the miracle that visited Homeboy several days ago, when the $2.5-million Conrad N. Hilton Foundation Humanitarian Award rained down on the nonprofit — which has had its share of financial struggles over the years...
    Jon Rahm is the No. 1 player in the world. The best player in golf? That depends on the week. Webb Simpson looked to be tough to beat when he won the RBC Heritage, giving him two victories, a runner-up finish and a third place in his last six PGA Tour events. But then Dustin Johnson won the Travelers Championship, renewing conversations that when he puts in the time, no one has a greater package of talent. During his two weeks off, however, golf became obsessed with super-sized Bryson DeChambeau and his 200 mph ball speed that carried him to victory in Detroit, his seventh straight top 10. And then two days after DeChambeau took a 10 — ideal for gymnastics, not so much for golf — on the 15th hole at Muirfield Village to miss the cut, Rahm built an eight-shot lead at the turn and held on for...
    More than 280 journalists at The Wall Street Journal and its parent company Dow Jones penned an extraordinary letter to their publisher protesting the spread of 'misinformation' in the paper's opinion section.  In the letter sent to Dow Jones CEO Almar Latour on Tuesday, the group of reporters, editors and other employees called for a clearer divide between the paper's news and opinion divisions and raised alarm about the accuracy of the latter division.   'Opinion's lack of fact-checking and transparency, and its apparent disregard for evidence, undermine our readers' trust and our ability to gain credibility with sources,' the letter states.  'Many readers already cannot tell the difference between reporting and Opinion. And from those who know of the divide, reporters nonetheless face questions about the Journal's accuracy and fairness because of errors published in opinion.' The employees cited several examples of offending articles, including a column Vice President Mike...
    I’ve spent many afternoons trying to make sense of the infinitely jumbled world of commerce that is the Los Angeles swap meet. It’s mostly clothing, jewelry, electronics and luggage stores, but there’s also baby Jesus statues of every skin tone, oil paintings of Michael Jordan with his arm around Kobe Bryant and LeBron James, replica samurai swords, banh mi and live music. Vendors produce custom T-shirts so rapidly that their slogans read like a screen-printed alternative to the newspaper front page: “Rest in peace Nipsey Hussle,” “RIP Kobe and Gianna,” and the overly optimistic “I survived coronavirus 2020.” These days you’ll see a lot of masks, gloves and face shields. And inevitably, you will turn a corner and find yourself caught in the menacing gaze of a parakeet from a swap meet pet shop. I’ve been thinking a lot about swap meets lately, because as we confront deep economic uncertainty...
    Lynn Lorenz, a retired teacher who lives on a bluff above the Newport Beach harbor, emerged from her home Thursday morning wearing a mask. Nobody turned and stared, as if she were wearing a lampshade over her head. But Lorenz definitely stood out. On the first 15 minutes of her daily stroll, we saw more than a dozen people, and nobody was wearing a face covering. Not walkers, not runners, not dog owners, not a woman headed to the park with three kids. Lorenz said she’s gotten dirty looks from people for being masked. As if she’s the one who’s a bad neighbor. “They’re thinking either that I’m a liberal, or that in Newport Beach, having to wear a mask is an infringement on their rights,” Lorenz said. Jumping into the fray is nothing new for Lorenz. I met the former French and history teacher several years ago when she...
    Hurricane fallout creates financial ruin for Puerto Ricos seniors with reverse mortgages Joblessness falls to 11.1% as more states reopen The Outpost Director Rod Lurie On Grappling With Loss, Portraying Death In War (Guest Column) © Courtesy of Simon Varsano My son was declared dead at exactly the second that I had the creative epiphany of my my life. A few minutes earlier, after his mother and I decided to disconnect the myriad machines keeping him alive, one to every organ in his body, we stood there, all of us, and waited for the last movement of his chest. My daughter was the only person who spoke. She said to me, “Dad, I know you think you can’t make this movie. But you have to. You have to finish it. It would destroy Hunter if you didn’t.” When his heart did finally stop, names and images of soldiers began...
    These colleges plan to reopen in the fall In Trump country, simmering doubts about president Williams column: Johnny Manziel says his football career is ’in the past’ ... and he’s OK with that © Provided by Lubbock Avalanche-Journal Johnny Manziel was one of college football’s most exciting players in two seasons at Texas A&M, but success in pro football wasn’t in the cards for him. Now out of the game at age 27, living in Scottsdale, Arizona, and playing all the golf he can, Manziel says he couldn’t be happier. [RYAN REMIORZ/THE CANADIAN PRESS VIA AP/FILE] Search Johnny Manziel's name and right below the obligatory link to his Wikipedia page, Google shows you a list of questions that "People also ask." One of those questions being, "Where is Johnny Manziel now, 2020?" I can answer for this weekend: At Hillcrest Golf & Country Club and, by all appearances,...
    AS lockdown is coming to some kind of an end, so is my time writing this column. Don’t worry, I will still be writing down and voicing my ramblings in various forms, both here in the paper and in other exciting ventures. Stewart Williams - The Sun 3 After three years of keeping Fabulous Daily readers entertained Peta says farewell in her final column Writing through coronavirus itself has been a strange one – documenting all the small things that have been happening slowly while it felt like there was no movement at all. Like everybody else, I’ve been living through this huge event in our lives, and at times I’ve felt like I have had nothing to write because not much was happening when in fact everything was changing. You guys were lucky at times to have not just got bullet points of who had annoyed me most...
    There is no escaping it: NASCAR is a white-dominated sport with a predominantly white fan base and a longstanding reputation as being far from inclusive. Its evolution, such as it is, has been halting and awkward. One step forward, seemingly a half step back. The stock car series listened to Bubba Wallace — far from the first to ask — and banned the Confederate flag from its events earlier this month. In some sports, that might have been enough. Not in NASCAR; everyone figured some fans would ignore it and force someone to somehow enforce the ban. No one figured on what came next and that was this: NASCAR held a race on Monday while federal agents were a stone’s throw away trying to find out who left a noose in Wallace’s garage stall at Alabama’s Talladega Superspeedway. It could have been the lowest point in NASCAR’s 72-year...
    It’s been three months and a few days since Adam Silver pulled the plug on NBA games, the first domino in a long row of events to fall to the COVID-19 pandemic. Enough time for Silver and leaders of other major sports to take stock of the new enemy and the dangers it poses. Enough time to begin sorting out a path back to what will surely be a new normal. They’ve now got a body of work to analyze, and it’s a mixed bag. Though nothing could really prepare those in charge of the country’s major sports for the ravages of the pandemic, some have risen to the challenge better than others. With that in mind, here are the pandemic grades — let’s be optimistic and call them midterms — for commissioners who have been forced to write a new playbook: ROGER GOODELL The NFL commissioner might have scored...
    Sen. Tom Cotton criticized The New York Times over an op-ed the newspaper published Friday calling on cities to abolish their police departments, saying that the column would put Americans’ lives in “danger.” “Running this column puts lives in danger,” Cotton wrote on Twitter in response to an op-ed from activist Mariame Kaba entitled “Yes, We Mean Literally Abolish the Police.” Cotton was using the same line of argument that a group of New York Times staffers adopted to force the newspaper to apologize for running an op-ed from the Arkansas Republican published on June 3. In the op-ed, Cotton called on the National Guard to tamp down on looting and rioting that stemmed from protests over the death of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man who died in police custody in Minneapolis on May 25, video showed. A group of Times staffers openly revolted over the Cotton op-ed, saying...
    They’ve always been an outlier, a major college hockey program in the Deep South. As with most pioneers, they’ve teetered on the brink of failure, shouldered through plenty of skepticism and ridicule. That only made it more imperative to save the Chargers of the University of Alabama in Huntsville. When the word came down in one of those end-of-the-week news dumps that UAH was whacking its men’s hockey team, it hit especially hard. “Complete shock,” said Tony Guzzo, a Michigan native who played for the Chargers from 1993-97 and now lives in Huntsville. “It came out of nowhere. No one was expecting it.” Thankfully, an impromptu fundraising campaign that got a boost from NHL goalie and UAH alum Cam Talbot raised more than $1 million, bringing word Friday that the Chargers will return to the ice for at least one more season. UAH also eliminated its men’s and women’s tennis...
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