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    If you or someone you love is in crisis and dealing with suicidal thoughts or mental health issues, here are some organizations that offer help and hope.SUICIDE PREVENTION RESOURCES: If you or your child needs help right away, call the National Suicide Prevention Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), call 911, or take your child to the nearest crisis center or emergency department.How to Help Your Child Cope with Grief1. Be honest and give accurate information appropriate to your student's ability to understand and wish to know.2. Provide extra affection and reassurance regarding safety issues as needed. A death may bring up fears about their own health and safety or that of a loved one.3. Give choices, i.e., "would you like to go to the funeral service?"4. Listen! When we show we are interested in their thoughts, youth have a lot to say about death and grief.5. Encourage open expression of emotion...
    If you or someone you love is in crisis and dealing with suicidal thoughts or mental health issues, here are some organizations that offer help and hope.SUICIDE PREVENTION RESOURCES: If you or your child needs help right away, call the National Suicide Prevention Line at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), call 911, or take your child to the nearest crisis center or emergency department.How to Help Your Child Cope with Grief1. Be honest and give accurate information appropriate to your student's ability to understand and wish to know.2. Provide extra affection and reassurance regarding safety issues as needed. A death may bring up fears about their own health and safety or that of a loved one.3. Give choices, i.e., "would you like to go to the funeral service?"4. Listen! When we show we are interested in their thoughts, youth have a lot to say about death and grief.5. Encourage open expression of emotion...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Families on Long Island on Thursday called for more funding to help the increasing number of people suffering from mental illness and substance disorders. Experts say the coronavirus pandemic is putting so many more children and adults at risk, CBS2’s Cindy Hsu reported. Vincent D’Antoni was kind and funny but battled ADHD and anxiety. His mom says in high school he started smoking marijuana, which lead to oxycodone, heroin and deep depression. He died of an overdose in 2017 at 25 years old. “I wake up each morning and I think about those families and those moms that are going through such crisis and that they may eventually lose their child,” mother Sharon Richmond said. READ MORE: COVID Impact: Hunger Remains Big Concern For Children During Pandemic, Especially In The Classroom Richmond shared her story in an effort to save others. She said Vincent didn’t meet her...
    There's currently a mental health crisis among children and teenagers, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Children's Hospital Association.The two organizations are calling on the federal government, including President Joe Biden, to prioritize the topic in proposals addressing the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.They report suicide attempts are up 20%, and disruptive behavior disorders skyrocketed this summer.Amy Knight, president of the Children's Hospital Association, joined ABC 7 Chicago Thursday to talk about the issue.The health organizations point out that Congress should provide new funding to support a range of additional activities at the state and local level to support children, including telehealth, training for crisis response, primary and emergency mental and behavioral health care, school-based services, outpatient programs and partial hospitalizations.Beyond the awareness campaign, CHA and the AAP are working together and with other child health-focused organizations on longer term solutions to better integrate pediatric mental and...
    Joe Prude speaks at a press conference Sept. 2, 2020 after calling Rochester police to help his brother, Daniel Prude. Yet another grand jury has voted not to indict New York cops accused of killing a Black man after being called to the scene to help him. Daniel Prude was naked, unarmed, and having a mental health crisis when Rochester police officers Mark Vaughn, Troy Taladay, and Francisco Santiago brutally apprehended him and placed him in a spit hood on March 23.  Attorney General Letitia James announced on Tuesday during a news conference that although her office determined "there was sufficient evidence" to present Prude’s case to a grand jury, the current laws on deadly force failed Prude. She called for the state to analyze the use of spit hoods in responding to those in mental health crises. "And while there is no evidence that the spit hood placed over Mr. Prude's head directly contributed to his death, it...
    By JENNIFER PELTZ, Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — New York City police will stay out of many mental health crisis calls and social workers will respond instead in parts of northern Manhattan starting this spring, an official told lawmakers Monday. The test program will begin in three Harlem and East Harlem police precincts that together accounted for a highest-in-the-city total of over 7,400 mental health-related 911 calls last year, said Susan Herman, who heads a wide-ranging city mental health initiative called ThriveNYC. The details fleshed out a plan the city outlined broadly in November, aiming to keep psychiatric crises from escalating into confrontations and to provide people with more health-focused help. The experiment “will be a critical step forward in the city’s commitment to treat mental health crises as public health problems, not public safety issues," Herman told a City Council committee. She said the city hopes to make...
    NEW YORK (AP) — New York City police will stay out of many mental health crisis calls and social workers will respond instead in parts of northern Manhattan starting this spring, an official told lawmakers Monday. The test program will begin in three Harlem and East Harlem police precincts that together accounted for a highest-in-the-city total of over 7,400 mental health-related 911 calls last year, said Susan Herman, who heads a wide-ranging city mental health initiative called ThriveNYC. The details fleshed out a plan the city outlined broadly in November, aiming to keep psychiatric crises from escalating into confrontations and to provide people with more health-focused help. The experiment “will be a critical step forward in the city’s commitment to treat mental health crises as public health problems, not public safety issues,” Herman told a City Council committee. She said the city hopes to make the program citywide...
    New York : The mental health of New Yorkers has been severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, aggravating the worrying situation that had already been registered in the Big Apple with unfortunate consequences, such as the case of young Rigoberto López, who last week murdered two people with a knife in the Subway, and criticized procedures of NYPD officer care to mental emergencies, which in the last six years have left 16 people dead. Therefore, the city ​​Council is currently promoting a package of three laws that seeks to address the New York mental health crisis and improve response actions when emergencies occur in patients with mental and emotional conditions. So he mentioned this Monday Manhattan Councilmember Diana Ayala, who promoted a virtual audience with members of the City Council’s Mental Health, Disabilities and Addictions Committee, to hear from community members, activists and experts in case management of mental...
    Angelo Quinto. John Burris Angelo Quinto, a 30-year-old Navy veteran, died on December 26, 2020.  His sister had called 911 three days earlier as he experienced a mental health crisis. His family says Quinto was unresponsive after officer on scene knelt on his neck. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. A family in California whose son died after a police officer knelt on his neck for nearly five minutes during a mental health crisis has filed a legal claim saying they plan to sue the police department for wrongful death. Angelo Quinto, a 30-year-old Navy veteran who was born in the Philippines, died on December 26, 2020, three days after his encounter with police at his family's Antioch, California, home. Quinto's family told the San Francisco Chronicle that Quinto experienced paranoia and anxiety, and his sister called 911 when he started acting erratically on December 23. When...
    San Francisco has sued its own school district, citing a record number of suicidal children and worsening mental health among students due to continued school closure. The lawsuit filed Thursday is the city’s attempt to pressure the district to reopen for in-person instruction after nearly a year of virtual learning. San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera cited cases of deteriorating mental health among students and statistics showing a surge in suicidal children in emergency rooms. “Distance learning is not the same thing as school, not even close,” Herrera said in a statement. “We know that teachers are doing heroic work every day trying to keep kids engaged and learning. So are overburdened parents.” Distance learning is not the same thing as school, not even close. That’s why today I filed for an emergency court order to open SF public schools. We’ll be in court March 22 for a hearing on...
    San Francisco said the lack of in-class learning is fueling a growing “mental health crisis” among students who have been isolated and out of classes for nearly a year in a lawsuit against its own school district. San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera filed the lawsuit on Thursday in San Francisco Superior Court. The motion, which was announced last week, contains troubling testimony from area hospitals that treatment for suicidal children has increased as well as treatment for other mental health disorders. The University of California, San Francisco Benioff Children’s Hospital reported a 75% increase in youth hospitalizations for mental health services and a 66% increase in suicidal children in the emergency room, according to the Associated Press. While it did not provide exact numbers, UCSF Children’s Emergency Department at Mission Bay reported surging numbers of suicidal children and youth with eating disorders, depression, and anxiety issues....
    By SCOTT BAUER, Associated Press MADISON, Wis. (AP) — A broad coalition of Wisconsin law enforcement agencies, health care professionals, local governments and others on Thursday recommended bolstering regional services as part of a multi-faceted approach to better handling of emergency mental health detentions. The recommendations, some of which require approval by the Legislature, represent an attempt to address a longstanding and worsening issue across the state. The problem is that with county facilities at capacity, law enforcement agencies are increasingly forced to make sometimes hourslong trips to the only state facility that will take emergency mental health detentions in Oshkosh. Officers have also complained for years that the system forces them to spend too much time waiting in emergency rooms for doctors to clear people for transport and driving them to facilities rather than patrolling. A 2019 state Department of Justice survey of 154 police and sheriff’s departments found...
    Bring on the Heat With the Best Heat-Protection Sprays for Your Strands Cowboys Say Leaving Dak Prescott Out of Hype Video Was an Error Why Craig Ferguson Refused to Tell Britney Spears Jokes During Her Mental Health Crisis in 2007 Replay Video SETTINGS OFF HD HQ SD LO Skip Ad Craig Ferguson took an honorable, yet uncommon stand against telling jokes about Britney Spears after she appeared to publicly struggle with mental health issues in 2007. As fans discussed Spears' career following the release of the New York Times' unauthorized Framing Britney Spears documentary, a clip of the former Late Late Show host, 58, refusing to tell jokes about Spears, 39, resurfaced. By Tuesday, it had nearly three million views on Twitter. © getty images (2) "I’m starting to feel uncomfortable about making fun of these people," the former Late Late Night host said on his show Referring to...
            by Bethany Blankley  Children and young adults are experiencing increased mental health issues, and suicide also is on the rise within the age group at least in part because of ongoing state shutdowns, according to several reports. Within months of governors and local authorities shuttering schools, children were increasingly brought to emergency room doctors and specialists, according to a by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “Beginning in April 2020, the proportion of children’s mental health–related ED visits among all pediatric ED visits increased and remained elevated through October,” the report states. “Compared with 2019, the proportion of mental health–related visits for children aged 5–11 and 12–17 years increased approximately 24%. and 31%, respectively.” According to an August 2020 CDC survey, state shutdowns negatively impacted the mental and emotional health of the youngest people who participated. Those under age 18 experienced the highest rates...
    Children and young adults are experiencing increased mental health issues, and suicide also is on the rise within the age group at least in part because of ongoing state shutdowns, according to several reports. Within months of governors and local authorities shuttering schools, children were increasingly brought to emergency room doctors and specialists, according to a by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “Beginning in April 2020, the proportion of children’s mental health–related ED visits among all pediatric ED visits increased and remained elevated through October,” the report states. “Compared with 2019, the proportion of mental health–related visits for children aged 5–11 and 12–17 years increased approximately 24%. and 31%, respectively.” According to an August 2020 CDC survey, state shutdowns negatively impacted the mental and emotional health of the youngest people who participated. Those under age 18 experienced the highest rates of anxiety, depression and...
    CBS News’ Norah O’Donnell questioned Joe Biden about the need to ramp up vaccine production and calls to reopen schools in the president’s pre-Super Bowl interview Sunday. With more and more public health officials saying children should be back in schools soon, the Biden administration has faced growing questions about this issue. Just last week, CDC Director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said that schools can safely reopen without needing to vaccinate teachers first. White House press secretary Jen Psaki then tried to say Walensky was speaking in her “personal capacity.” O’Donnell said to Biden, “About 20 million American children have not been in the classroom for nearly a year. There’s a mental health crisis happening.” “There really is,” Biden said. “Women are dropping out of the workforce. Is this a national emergency?” O’Donnell asked. Biden said it is. When O’Donnell asked if it’s “time for schools to reopen,” Biden said, “I...
    With police dealing more and more frequently with calls involving mental health crises, San Jose Police Department is taking a significant step toward changing how officers respond to those situations in a move lauded by health professionals. A pilot program launched in October to connect dedicated San Jose police officers with behavioral health clinicians to respond to escalating mental health emergencies across Santa Clara County will now become a permanent full-time unit in the San Jose Police Department, a department spokesperson confirmed Friday. The decision, first reported by NBC Bay Area, comes less than a week after officers in the police department’s Mobile Crisis Response Team responded to the bludgeoning and stabbing of a decades-old 65-pound tortoise named Michelangelo with a garden post in a San Jose preschool garden. The mobile crisis response team arrested the suspect, George Robles, booked him on charges of felony vandalism and animal abuse at...
    Siegfried Modola/Getty Images Denver's Support Team Assisted Response program responds to nonviolent calls for help in the city. It sends health care workers in response to crisis calls, not police officers. In the first six months, the STAR team responded to 748 calls. No one they helped was arrested. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. During the first six months of the Support Team Assisted Response (STAR) program, Denver health professionals responded to 748 incidents. None of the calls required police assistance or ended in someone being arrested, according to a report published by the local news website, Denverite. The STAR program was created in 2020 as an alternative response team dedicated to assisting people who have mental-health issues. It also provides crisis help to those experiencing depression, poverty, homelessness, and substance abuse. Before the program, calls to 911 in Denver were directed to the police or...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Some New Yorkers are growing more concerned about a recent rash of subway shoving incidents and the curtailment of NYPD involvement in dealing with mentally ill people. They’re imploring City Hall to do something about it, CBS2’s Marcia Kramer reported Thursday. There are pictures of subway stations that the mayor and police commissioner ought to study: homeless people sleeping on benches or passed out on the walkway, a man lighting up a cigarette or something stronger, and another pulling up his pants after relieving himself on the tracks. The pictures were all taken at the Fulton Street station, where an unhinged man pushed a straphanger onto the tracks earlier in the week. Or, they could listed to the voices of riders who think there should be more policing. “I really don’t feel safe. You see a lot of people homeless inside the trains,” said Bernadita Suriel from...
    Elba Pope, the Rochester, N.Y., woman whose nine-year-old daughter was handcuffed and pepper-sprayed by police this week, said she told officers her daughter was having a mental health crisis but was ignored. Pope said she told officers her daughter was having a breakdown and begged them to bring in a trained specialist instead of detaining her, but that they refused, according to The Washington Post. Mayor Lovely Warren (D) said Monday three officers would be suspended in connection with the incident. Attorneys for Pope have filed a formal notice of intent to sue the city for “emotional distress, assault, battery, excessive force, false arrest, false imprisonment,” according to the newspaper. Body camera footage shows Pope’s daughter sobbing as police attempt to force her, handcuffed, into a car. Pope has said she initially called police to file a report about the potential theft of her car, but that her daughter fled the...
    Nearly one year into the pandemic, California’s infection rate has risen to one of the worst in the world, with health care systems in major hubs such as San Diego and Los Angeles fast approaching capacity. At the same time — and in some of the very same areas — another public health crisis is readying itself to overwhelm the Golden State. There’s a mental health epidemic occurring within this pandemic, and early evidence shows that California is at risk of losing more lives to preventable causes — overdose and suicide deaths — if this dual crisis continues unchecked. Not long after our battle with COVID-19 began, it was predicted that because of the novel virus, the state of California could see 10,509 additional deaths of despair — and that’s under a moderate economic recovery scenario. In 2018, there were more than 18,500. Unfortunately, looking at data from San Diego,...
    The police shootings of Daniel Prude and Walter Wallace Jr. highlight both how ill-equipped police officers are to deal with mental-health crises and the pain and guilt that family members can feel after calling the police to intervene. Insider spoke with five mothers who called the police during their sons' mental-health crises, only for the officers to kill their sons. This is part one in a six-part series. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. One exhausted mother in North Carolina feared that her depressed son would take his own life. She hadn't left the house in days, but she needed a respite, and he needed treatment. A mom in California was told that her son had a knife and was expressing suicidal thoughts. She didn't want to take a chance by dismissing it as just a teenage cry for help. Another mother had done everything in her power...
    Authorities have released body camera video of the moment an unarmed black man was shot dead by a white cop while he was suffering from a mental health crisis.  Patrick Warren Sr, 52, died on January 10 after being shot three times in the chest by Killeen Police Officer Reynaldo Contreras outside his home in central Texas.  Warren's loved ones claim they had requested help from a mental health professional for the husband and father-of-three - but the officer turned up to their home instead.    Killeen Police Chief Charles Kimble on Tuesday released body camera footage from the incident, under pressure from the family who have demanded transparency and the arrest of Contreras.  Kimble said the footage showed that Contreras followed protocol for use of force, adding: 'I don't see where he could've done anything else.' The Killeen Police Department on Tuesday released bodycam footage showing the moment Patrick Warren Sr,...
    This article is republished from Wisconsin Watch, the nonpartisan, nonprofit Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism. It was Wednesday, Dec. 21, 2016. David Fischer had just arrived for work at his dairy farm in Rio, Wisconsin. A slight breeze punctuated the freezing, grey morning. His drive to work is just 2 minutes. From where he parked his pickup truck on the farm’s gravel driveway, he could see his house on the top of a hill. Fischer, who owns the roughly 350-cow dairy farm with his wife, Amy, was ready for another day of work alongside his twin sons, 33-year-old Kevin and Brian, and a handful of other employees. Article continues after advertisement Like most days, the lifelong dairy farmer had plenty to do. He didn’t expect anything different from his usual 12- or 13-hour work day on his farm about 50 minutes north of Madison. Fischer set off toward the north...
    The family of an unarmed black man shot dead by a white cop while he was suffering a mental health crisis have released doorbell footage of the killing as they call for the officer to be arrested and bodycam footage to be handed over.   Patrick Warren Sr., 52, died Sunday after allegedly being shot three times in the chest by Killeen Police Officer Reynaldo Contreras outside his home in the 1600 block of Carrollton Avenue in Killeen, Texas. His devastated family said they had requested help from a mental health professional for the husband and father-of-three but that the officer turned up to their home instead.  Doorbell footage released by the family's attorney Wednesday shows Warren Sr. coming out of his front door with his arms in the air in front of him.  Separate footage shows the 52-year-old getting up from his knees on the front lawn before three shots ring out...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The MTA is asking Mayor Bill de Blasio for more NYPD officers to patrol subways and buses. The transit agency cites a recent increase in crime and worsening mental health crisis in the city, CBS2’s Kiran Dhillon reported Friday. Since November, six woman have been randomly and brutally attacked at Morgan Ave. station in Bushwick. The troubling assaults represent one of the reasons why Sarah Feinberg, interim president of the New York City Transit Authority, asked the mayor for heightened police presence throughout the system. “It’s anyone’s guess why we’re seeing an uptick in these incidents. But the bottom line is it doesn’t matter why they’re happening. They’re totally unacceptable. We have to do a better job protecting our workers and our customers. And I need the NYPD and the city to partner with me on that,” Feinberg said. MORE: ‘They Call Us Heroes. Well, Protest...
    Needles are piling up on subway tracks in parts of Manhattan as the city’s “mental health crisis” wreaks havoc on the subway system, according to the city’s transit chief. In her letter asking for more police help from Mayor de Blasio, interim transit boss Sarah Feinberg cited “hundreds of needles” on platforms and tracks, along with instances of assaults involving the mentally ill and multiple suicides and attempted suicides. “Just in the last month, we have experience multiple instances of violent assaults, including one homicide, involving individuals suffering from mental health challenges,” Feinberg wrote. “In stations in Upper Manhattan and on the Lower East Side, hundreds of needles are being disposed regularly on the platform and on the track bed. And, just last week, morning rush hour trains were held up for some time while police had to engage with an individual on the roadbed who refused to leave...
    Maddie Cole in eighth grade stopped running cross country. She’d competed the year before, but the air quality in her native Sacramento was so bad that she got sick during a race; she soon learned she had asthma. The next year the sky above Sacramento turned gray with smoke from the 2018 Camp fire. Maddie and her classmates went to school with masks on. “It felt,” she said, “like a futuristic apocalypse.” The situation has only worsened as wildfires and their devastation have become so routine that she and her classmates are “just used to it,” said Maddie, now 16 and a junior. This fall “it was just like, ‘Yeah, California’s on fire again. It’s that time of year.’” Neither the polluted air nor the wildfires punctuating Maddie’s adolescence are random. Both are being exacerbated by climate change, and the future they portend has left Maddie feeling helpless, anxious and...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – The pandemic has changed the holiday season for all of us this year and caregivers are especially feeling that impact. A new AARP survey shows 44% of caregivers say the pandemic has had a negative impact on their mental health. “Their care recipients are also having a negative impact on their mental health. So they’re facing that challenge of being isolated and having more isolation,” says Amy Goyer, a family and caregiving expert with AARP. Goyer says the holidays add a lot of pressure. 77% of caregivers say the pandemic will affect their plans. AARP suggests talking with loved ones about doing phone calls, or video chats, or sending greeting cards. “Focus on what is most meaningful for the holidays. Adapt your traditions and create new traditions,” Goyer says. MORE FROM CBSMIAMI.COM Fight Led To Deadly Shooting Inside Miami-Dade Apartment Despite Arrival Of Vaccines, Holidays Are No...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – Educators and therapists say the pandemic has created a serious mental health crisis for students. For nine months, Dr. Veronica Brown, principal of Manchester Avenue Elementary School in South L.A., has been unable to hug her students or even see them in person. “I thought about the kids,” Brown told CBS Los Angeles Tuesday. “I thought about, oh my goodness, who are they gonna turn to now? Because they turn to us for everything.” She says that over the past several months, she has seen more stress and pain in their lives. “Sometimes, they’ll tell us that such-and-such passed away, and then there’s that moment where we say, ‘oh my goodness, let’s give him a big hug everybody,'” Brown said. Brown has tried to implement virtual programs to help. One of those, Tiger Talk Mondays, is named after the school’s mascot. “Our teachers are actually talking...
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) – Educators and therapists say the pandemic has created a serious mental health crisis for students. For nine months, Dr. Veronica Brown, principal of Manchester Avenue Elementary School in South L.A., has been unable to hug her students or even see them in person. “I thought about the kids,” Brown told CBSLA Tuesday. “I thought about, oh my goodness, who are they gonna turn to now? Because they turn to us for everything.” She says that over the past several months, she has seen more stress and pain in their lives. “Sometimes, they’ll tell us that such-and-such passed away, and then there’s that moment where we say, ‘oh my goodness, let’s give him a big hug everybody,'” Brown said. Brown has tried to implement virtual programs to help. One of those, Tiger Talk Mondays, is named after the school’s mascot. “Our teachers are actually talking to our...
    Police-provided video shows Bronx cops Brendan Thompson (far left) and Herbert Davis before the shooting death of Kawaski Trawick (far right). If actions form the measuring stick, New York City’s foremost figures fall disappointingly short of proving they care at all about Black people. They fall short repeatedly. They fell short when the city’s police union endorsed a man for president who defended white supremacists. They fell short when the department took five years to fire a white cop shown in viral video choking Eric Garner to death, Garner having been accused of little more than selling loose cigarettes outside a store on Staten Island. They fell short when New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who happens to be married to a Black woman, passed over a Black man three times in a row to serve as police commissioner. But there’s something especially triggering about the department’s recent example of indifference in the shooting death of Kawaski Trawick, 32, a...
    When children and teens are overwhelmed with anxiety, depression or thoughts of self-harm, they often wait days in emergency rooms because there aren’t enough psychiatric beds in the U.S. The problem has only grown worse during the pandemic, reports from parents and professionals suggest. With schools closed, routines disrupted and parents anxious over lost income or uncertain futures, children are shouldering new burdens many are unequipped to bear. And with surging numbers of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, bed space is even scarcer. By early fall, many ERs in the northeastern state of Massachusetts were seeing about four times more children and teens in psychiatric crisis than usual, said Ralph Buonopane, a mental health program director at Franciscan Hospital for Children in Boston. "I’ve been director of this program for 21 years and worked in child psychiatric services since the 1980s, and it is very much unprecedented,” Buonopane said. His hospital receives...
    By LINDSEY TANNER, AP Medical Writer When children and teens are overwhelmed with anxiety, depression or thoughts of self-harm, they often wait days in emergency rooms because there aren’t enough psychiatric beds. The problem has only grown worse during the pandemic, reports from parents and professionals suggest. With schools closed, routines disrupted and parents anxious over lost income or uncertain futures, children are shouldering new burdens many are unequipped to bear. And with surging numbers of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, bed space is even scarcer. By early fall, many Massachusetts ERs were seeing about four times more children and teens in psychiatric crisis weekly than usual, said Ralph Buonopane, a mental health program director at Franciscan Hospital for Children in Boston. ”I’ve been director of this program for 21 years and worked in child psychiatric services since the 1980s and it is very much unprecedented,” Buonopane said. His hospital receives ER...
    When children and teens are overwhelmed with anxiety, depression or thoughts of self-harm, they often wait days in emergency rooms because there aren’t enough psychiatric beds. The problem has only grown worse during the pandemic, reports from parents and professionals suggest. With schools closed, routines disrupted and parents anxious over lost income or uncertain futures, children are shouldering new burdens many are unequipped to bear. And with surging numbers of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, bed space is even scarcer. By early fall, many Massachusetts ERs were seeing about four times more children and teens in psychiatric crisis weekly than usual, said Ralph Buonopane, a mental health program director at Franciscan Hospital for Children in Boston. ”I’ve been director of this program for 21 years and worked in child psychiatric services since the 1980s and it is very much unprecedented,” Buonopane said. His hospital receives ER transfers from around the state....
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – A new survey from Nationwide Children’s Hospital shows more and more parents are worried about the long-term effects of the COVID pandemic on children’s mental health. Sixty-six percent of parents are worried their children’s mental health will suffer even more as the pandemic continues into the winter, according to the survey. Fifty-seven percent said they’re running out of ways to keep their kids positive. Dr. Parker Huston, a pediatric psychologist, said for kids to feel a sense of security and normalcy, parents need to be consistent. “Have a schedule no matter for kids what the learning environment might be, to have one, two, or even three schedules if necessary, and keep those routines,” Dr. Huston said. He also encourages parents to check in regularly with their kids about how they’re feeling. Dr. Huston said, “Ask questions like: What was the best part of your day today? What...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff HARRISBURG, Pa. (KDKA) — This year has been difficult one for many people, and the holidays can bring on even more unwanted stress. The Wolf Administration says active duty military members, veterans and their loved ones may experience more mental health challenges during the holidays. This holiday season could be made even worse due to the coronavirus pandemic. The state is encouraging those who are struggling to reach out for help if you need it. “If you’re struggling with feelings of loneliness, sadness or stress, be honest about them so you don’t have to go through them alone,” state Department of Human Services Secretary Theresa Miller said. “Being vulnerable may not be easy, but your feelings are very common and normal.” So what can you do if you are experiencing these feelings? The state has online resources available for you right now, along with a Veterans...
    SAN FRANCISCO (CBS SF) – San Francisco’s new Street Crisis Response Team — a team dedicated to responding to 911 and 311 calls regarding people having mental health crises — launched on Monday, Mayor London Breed announced. The launching marks the first phase of the pilot program, which is part of Breed’s ongoing efforts to create non-law enforcement alternatives for non-violent emergency calls. Under the first phase of the program, teams made up of behavioral health and medical professionals will respond to 911 calls in the city’s Tenderloin neighborhood and focus on calls involving non-violent people experiencing mental health crises. The teams will then connect them to services supported by the city’s Department of Public Health and ensure follow-up care, Breed’s office said. The team includes behavioral health peer specialists, who are people who have surpassed homelessness, substance use and, or mental health issues and become skilled to help others...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- San Francisco launched its first Street Crisis Response Team Monday that will respond to mental health and addiction-related 911 calls in the city.The new program is one of city's efforts to respond to people experiencing homelessness, suffering from mental health or addiction issues."The goal of this pilot program is to meet people in distress with the right services and professionals who can get them the help they need," Mayor London Breed said in a tweet.The program is designed to "reduce law enforcement responses to non-violent activity," letting police focus on public safety. Starting this morning, our first Street Crisis Response Team is now operating and responding to 911 calls relating to mental health or addiction in San Francisco.This will allow us to reduce law enforcement responses to non-violent activity and let them focus on public safety. pic.twitter.com/19SkI8MBbq— London Breed (@LondonBreed) November 30, 2020The goal of this...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- San Francisco launched its first Street Crisis Response Team Monday that will respond to mental health and addiction-related 911 calls in the city.The new program is one of city's efforts to respond to people experiencing homelessness, suffering from mental health or addiction issues."The goal of this pilot program is to meet people in distress with the right services and professionals who can get them the help they need," Mayor London Breed said in a tweet.The program is designed to "reduce law enforcement responses to non-violent activity," letting police focus on public safety. Starting this morning, our first Street Crisis Response Team is now operating and responding to 911 calls relating to mental health or addiction in San Francisco.This will allow us to reduce law enforcement responses to non-violent activity and let them focus on public safety. pic.twitter.com/19SkI8MBbq— London Breed (@LondonBreed) November 30, 2020The goal of this...
    Suicides are on the rise among women in Japan. Photo: BEHROUZ MEHRI / / . / . Suicides in Japan have authorities on alert. According to official statistics, a total of 2,153 people died by suicide in Japan during an October. The figure is higher than the total number of deaths from coronavirus in that country, which is 2087. The pandemic would be one of the causes in the increased suicides as it has brought more stress to the population. Related: “The satisfaction of saving a life is paramount”: the diver who has prevented more than 100 suicides Social isolation, anxiety, and economic insecurity have triggered a mental health crisis across the globe. The numbers for Japan stand out because there were no closings that occurred in other countries. “We didn’t even have closures, and the impact of COVID is minimal compared...
    The coronavirus pandemic has upended millions of lives across the country, causing mass unemployment and interruptions in the regular routines of Americans. It has also exacerbated mental health problems for people of all ages, and especially young adults.
    CARROLLTON, Ga. (AP) — A west Georgia county is launching a mobile crisis unit to handle emergency psychiatric calls. The Times-Georgian reports Carroll County will launch the unit next year, responding to any call that 911 dispatchers identify as a mental health crisis. A two-person team will be dispatched. One member will be Chiquita Thomasson, a Carrollton police officer and certified paramedic. The second member will be a licensed professional counselor yet to be selected. The team won’t wear uniforms and will drive an unmarked, donated 2020 Ford Explorer. Thomason said the aim is to avoid the intimidation that police can sometimes bring, encouraging people to see the team as there to help, not arrest or hospitalize them. The team will also check on people encountered in earlier calls. Thomasson said psychiatric calls arrive daily to police agencies, ranging from anxiety to people experiencing a full-blown manic state. She said...
    CANCELLING Christmas to curb the coronavirus outbreak could spark a mental health crisis, Sage experts warned. Scientists who advise Number 10 fear the consequences of blocking ‘valued’ time with friends and family. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 5SAGE have warned of the impact on mental health if Christmas rules are too strictCredit: Getty - Contributor They said suppressing "social mixing can lead to negative emotions", including depression. It could also cause anger and conflict, with frustrations directed at those who have imposed the measures. If people cannot see each other, they will break the rules anyway, it was claimed, meeting in places that are not Covid safe. The stark warning was made in an official paper from the SPI-B, a sub-group of the Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (SAGE). Paul Hunter, a professor in medicine, University of East Anglia, agrees that banning Christmas...
    The New York City subways chief publicly and desperately pleaded with the mayor on Thursday to address aggressive mentally ill people who commit violence in the transit system — just hours after an unidentified attacker shoved a 40-year-old woman into the path of an oncoming train. “It’s not fair to the woman, to the people who are using the system. It’s not fair to the woman who experienced this today. We have a crisis in this city and it absolutely has to be addressed,” NYC Transit Interim President Sarah Feinberg fumed in a briefing at the 14th Street-Union Square station. “It’s gotta be addressed, and I’m desperate for this mayor or the next mayor to take it on because we’ve got a long way to go.” The strong words came on the heels of the 8:30 a.m. attack — the second in as many days. The incident took place...
    The New York City subways chief publicly and desperately pleaded with the mayor on Thursday to address aggressive mentally ill people who commit violence in the transit system — just hours after an unidentified attacker shoved a 40-year-old woman into the path of an oncoming train. “It’s not fair to the woman, to the people who are using the system. It’s not fair to the woman who experienced this today. We have a crisis in this city and it absolutely has to be addressed,” NYC Transit Interim President Sarah Feinberg fumed in a briefing at the 14th Street-Union Square station. “It’s gotta be addressed, and I’m desperate for this mayor or the next mayor to take it on because we’ve got a long way to go.” The strong words came on the heels of the 8:30 a.m. attack — the second in as many days. The incident took place shortly...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- Along with coronavirus cases, San Francisco mental health professionals say teen suicide, anxiety and depression are also on the rise.TAKE ACTION: Get help with mental health issues"Kids have hit a wall," said Christine Garcia, a San Francisco psychologist who says on Halloween night eight teenagers ended up in a San Francisco emergency room after attempted suicides. "Typical is usually one or two at most, and eight is an insane number."Garcia is the director of Edgewood Center for Children and Families in San Francisco. They run 28 different mental health programs for young people, and last year, helped more 11,000 Bay Area kids, teens and young adults. The pandemic has led to an influx of referrals, particularly for their inpatient program for the sickest patients. "We've had 65 to 70 referrals for just 20 beds."The reasons range from direct impacts of COVID. "This kiddo," said Garcia describing...
    CHICAGO (CBS)– Community leaders are calling for a budget amendment to fund a program that world keep police from responding to mental health crises. It’s in response to Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s co-responder approach, which teams up officers, paramedics and mental health experts on certain crisis calls. Opponents say police presence in those cases only leads to further trauma. The group is calling for $5.2 million to fund the program under the banner “Treatment Not Trauma.” It proposes development of a 2-1-1 crisis line with an option to request support from a non-police team for non-violent situations. Also From CBS Chicago: Neighbors In Horror After 3 Hunting Dogs Take Over Block In Ashburn, Maul And Kill Shih Tzu Thanks To A Simple Facebook Post, Pilsen Teen Not Only Finds Virtual Special Needs Program At Park District, But Also Gets To Star In Furniture Commercial U.S. Customs And Border Protection Seizes...
    This content was republished with permission from WTOP’s news partners at Maryland Matters. Sign up for Maryland Matters’ free email subscription today. Baltimore-area leaders celebrated the Health Services Cost Review Commission’s decision to award $45 million in grant funding to hospitals in the Greater Baltimore Region Tuesday morning. “I want to thank the Health Services Cost Review Commission for making this funding available, and the 17 hospitals who are involved in this unprecedented collaboration,” Baltimore City Mayor-Elect Brandon M. Scott (D) said at a news conference Tuesday. “It will be a game-changer for our region — we will look back at this one day and look at this as something that we did that forever changed the trajectory of our region in the right way.” The multi-jurisdictional program intends to divert people experiencing mental health crises and substance abuse problems from languishing in emergency rooms and police custody. “Right now, we are living in a moment...
    For decades, the city has been battling with growing mental illness and substance abuse crises, which the pandemic has only magnified. In recent months, our mental health is declining and overdoses across the city are rising. I’ve personally seen the toll that these conditions can take on families and communities. My experience isn’t unique. Most New Yorkers know someone who struggles with substance abuse or mental health challenges, if not both. To overcome these, we need to move beyond conventional solutions and adopt innovative strategies that focus investments where they’ll have the greatest impact. In my experience leading our nation’s response to homelessness under President Obama, as well as emergencies like the housing crisis, Hurricane Sandy, and the Ebola outbreak, I’ve witnessed the trauma crisis can bring, but also the impact government can have when it pursues creative, forward-thinking solutions like the ones our city needs today. In rebuilding our health, we must start by establishing the city’s first...
    GRAND PRAIRIE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – Two and a half years after a standoff that resulted in Grand Prairie police shooting and killing a man believed to be mentally ill after he pointed a gun at officers, the police body cam video has been released. Back in April 2018, someone witnessed 37-year-old Carlos High slumped down in car outside an Ikea and Grand Prairie and called police, requesting a welfare check. When police arrived, they saw High had a rifle on him and told him to put his hands up. As High got his gun, an officer shot and killed him. Angela Luckey, president of the NAACP’s Grand Prairie chapter, says for two and a half years High’s family has been asking police to release the body cam footage detailing what happened next with no success. Now, a judge has ordered its release. “The shooting of Carlos High, Sr., it does...
    For the first time ever, some mental health 911 calls in New York City will be handled by health professionals and mental health crisis workers – not police officers. On Wednesday, the city's Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that new mental health teams will be the default responders to mental health emergencies in two "high-need communities." NYPD officers and FDNY Emergency Medical Services Technicians currently respond to almost every mental health 911 call, "regardless of the severity of health needs, whether a crime is involved, or whether there is an imminent risk of violence," according to a press release from de Blasio's office.  In what the mayor's office calls a "health-centered pilot" program, new Mental Health Teams will now be the default response to mental health emergencies in two communities. The teams will be comprised of health professionals and crisis workers from FDNY Emergency Medical Services, and will begin their work in...
    Heavy police presence in Brooklyn, New York, following a protest on June 12, 2020 in New York City. Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images New York City will launch a program to send behavioral health experts to respond to mental health calls in lieu of police. The program is modeled after a mobile crisis intervention unit in Eugene, Oregon. The effort comes as cities around the US and abroad protest the police killings of Black people, some of whom were experiencing mental health emergencies at the time of their death. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Cities across the US are starting to rethink who should be responsible for responding to mental health crises. On Tuesday, the City of New York announced a pilot program to launch next year that will send teams of mental health experts to respond to 911 calls related to psychological and substance-related issues...
    New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) and his wife, first lady Chirlane McCray, have announced a new pilot program for parts of the Big Apple that will see mental health teams deployed in lieu of police officers in response to some emergency calls. What are the details?A news release sent out by the mayor's office on Tuesday explained that "Mental Health Teams of Emergency Medical Services health professionals and mental health crisis workers will be dispatched through 911 to respond to mental health emergencies in two high-need communities." The news alert did not reveal which "high-need communities" would serve as the testing grounds for the initiative, but did explain that the "new Mental Health Teams will use their physical and mental health expertise, and experience in crisis response to de-escalate emergency situations, will help reduce the number of times police will need to respond to 911 mental health...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — A big change may be coming to how the city deals with 911 calls involving mentally ill individuals. The mayor announced a new pilot program that will put health professionals in charge of these calls. It’s sparking a lot of reaction and criticism, CBS2’s Andrea Grymes reports. In October 2016, police were called to the Bronx apartment of 66-year-old Deborah Danner, a woman who suffered from schizophrenia. The responding sergeant convinced her to drop a pair of scissors but shot and killed her when she grabbed a bat and stepped towards him. MORE — NYC To Pay Family Of Deborah Danner $2 Million Settlement Neighbors say Danner’s mental illness was well-known. “I could tell myself she wasn’t right,” neighbor Maria Nieves said. Now, Mayor Bill de Blasio is trying to make sure people like Danner get the help they need. He announced a new pilot program,...
    Mayor Bill de Blasio unveiled a new initiative in two New York City communities where social workers and EMTs will respond to 911 mental health calls, eliminating the need for police response in most of these situations.  “One in five New Yorkers struggle with a mental health condition. Now, more than ever, we must do everything we can to reach those people before crisis strikes,” de Blasio said in a statement. “For the first time in our city’s history, health responders will be the default responders for a person in crisis, making sure those struggling with mental illness receive the help they need.” BUSINESS RUN BY JEWISH SING MOM CITED FOR COVID VIOLATION, WHILE BIDEN SUPPORTERS CELEBRATE ACROSS CITY The move comes after a year of social reckoning surrounding policing across the country, with some activists calling to defund the police and reallocate money and resources away from officers and towards...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- New York City is launching a pilot program to have health responders - and not police - respond to 911 mental health calls.The 911 EMS mental health teams will consist of EMS health professionals and mental health crisis workers."One in five New Yorkers struggle with a mental health condition. Now, more than ever, we must do everything we can to reach those people before crisis strikes," Mayor Bill de Blasio said. "For the first time in our city's history, health responders will be the default responders for a person in crisis, making sure those struggling with mental illness receive the help they need."EMBED More News Videos NYC officials discuss the plan to add new mental health teams amid the pandemic. The pilot program is set to begin in two high-need communities in February 2021.First Lady Chirlane McCray, the leader of the initiative, said there are...
    NEW YORK (AP) — Mental health workers will replace police officers in responding to some 911 calls under a pilot program announced Tuesday by New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. The program, to be rolled out next year in two neighborhoods, will give mental health professionals the lead role when someone calls 911 because a family member is in crisis, officials said. The pilot program is modeled on existing programs in cities including Eugene, Oregon, where teams of paramedics and crisis workers have been responding to mental health 911 calls for more than 30 years. A main goal of such programs is to avoid bad outcomes from interactions between police officers and people suffering from mental illness or addiction such as the March 30 death of Daniel Prude in Rochester, New York. “This is the first time in our history that health professionals will be the default responders to...
              Richmond Commonwealth’s Attorney Colette W. McEachin determined that the officer shooting of Marcus-David Peters was justified, according to a report of her investigation into the May 2018 incident. McEachin’s report, released last week, describes Peters, a Black man, having a likely mental crisis that resulted in him running nude on I-95. Peters then approached a responding officer who fired first a Taser and then a gun at Peters. McEachin wrote, “The officer’s ultimate decision to use lethal force was a reasonable response to the imminent danger presented to himself and the public by Mr. Peters’ continued violent behavior due to his mental deterioration.” The investigation is the second investigation into the use of force; a report by McEachin’s predecessor came to the same conclusion, according to The Richmond Times-Dispatch. The paper reported that McEachin began her investigation at the family’s request as protests...
    Michael Moza was still wearing his hospital wristband when Detroit police killed him in a hail of gunfire during a car chase early Wednesday morning. Moza, who’d just turned 30, was struggling with schizophrenia and had tried checking into a psychiatric hospital hours before he died. But his family says the hospital released Moza without the medication he desperately needed. Maegan Davis, Moza’s sister, told The Daily Beast he was upset when he visited her Tuesday night. “I told the doctor, ‘If anything happens to me, it’s on you,’” Moza said of the medic who allegedly let him go. Now Davis is piecing together Moza’s final moments, before he became the third person with mental illness to be fatally shot by Detroit cops since July. “He didn’t deserve this,” Davis said. “I can't emphasize enough what a kind, soft, goodhearted person he was.” In a press conference Wednesday, Police...
    Police shot a man in southwest Detroit on Wednesday morning after he opened fire on officers, according to Fox 2 Detroit. Moza fired gunshots into a home on the 2300 block of Cabot street, police said, according to Detroit News. Officers chased the shooter and tracked Moza’s vehicle. Moza shot at the police and they returned fire, killing him, per the outlet.  “I’ve been talking about the broken system,” Police Chief, James Craig, said to Fox 2. “It falls on deaf ears. When are we going to challenge and find out what’s going on at the crisis center? Why are people being released? Too many lives are being lost.” Craig gave his condolences to the family. “He was at the Detroit Receiving Hospital earlier that day asking for help,” the victim’s sister, Priscilla Moza, said to the local outlet. “He’s schizophrenic and they let him leave without giving him...
    Loading the player... The Philadelphia Police Department has released the 911 calls and bodycam footage showing the fatal encounter with 27-year-old Walter Wallace Jr.. As theGrio previously reported, law enforcement had responded to three disturbance calls from Wallace Jr.’s home and the last visit on Oct. 26 resulted in him being fatally shot. He died after two police officers claimed he “advanced” on them with a knife, and they shot Wallace Jr. “several times.” He later died at the hospital. Read More: Walter Wallace Jr. received mental health care days before shooting The Philadelphia police officers who killed #WalterWallaceJr while he was having a mental health crisis did not have Tasers.They shot him at least 14 times.His mother said family had told the officers Wallace was having a crisis: "They stood there and laughed at us." pic.twitter.com/WgGUkrhZE7— AJ+ (@ajplus) October 29, 2020 In a press conference on Wednesday, Philadelphia...
    Protesters and police in riot gear come face to face during unrest in Philadelphia Tuesday night. Joshua Lott/The Washington Post The Philadelphia Police Department will take a number of steps to train officers to respond better to situations involving mental health crises after the death of Walter Wallace Jr., a 27-year-old Black man killed by police in late October.  Two officers fired at and killed Wallace late last month. Wallace had been walking toward the officers with a knife and refused to put it down, police said. Wallace's parents said their son was having a mental-health crisis.  Bodycam footage of the interaction between Philadelphia police officers and Wallace was released on Wednesday.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Philadelphia officials on Wednesday revealed reforms to the police department in response to the fatal shooting of Walter Wallace Jr. last month. Wallace was a 27-year-old Black man shot...
    (CNN)When I hear about the many fatal police encounters involving people, particularly Black men and boys, who are suffering from some sort of mental health episode, I cringe not only at the sad details, but at the way many people are so quick to say, "train the police."It is simply not a long-term solution to expect officers to be able to, for example, accurately differentiate a real threat from someone who is in crisis and needs mental help. There needs to be a specific system put in place that routinely incorporates the expertise of mental health experts to de-escalate these situations.Camille ProctorI cannot read the story of Walter Wallace Jr. and others like him who were in crisis when they encountered law enforcement, without thinking of my 14-year-old son, Ari, who was diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder when he was two. By now many people are familiar with "the talk"...
    Loading the player... Walter Wallace Jr. received mental health care at a crisis center three days before he was fatally shot by Philadelphia police officers.  Wallace Jr. regularly used the outpatient services at the West Philadelphia Consortium, a mental health crisis response center, and had recently resumed treatment, according to executive director John White, per Inquirer.com.  “His mother told me that when he came home Friday and she asked him how it went, he told her that he was doing much better and that we had gotten him ready to start looking for a job,” said White of Wallace Jr.’s last visit to the center.  Read More: Walter Wallace Jr.’s family does not want officers charged, lawyer says But for whatever reason, Wallace became triggered and began to spiral out of control on that fateful night. theGRIO previously reported, Wallace Jr. was having a mental health crisis when...
    Reuters October 29, 2020 0 Comments The Philadelphia police officers who shot and killed a Black man suffering a mental breakdown should probably not be charged with murder, a lawyer for the man’s family said on Thursday, saying the police lacked training and experience to handle the situation. Shaka Johnson made the comments after viewing the bodycam footage of Monday’s incident, in which 27-year-old Walter Wallace was gunned down by two officers responding to what his relatives say was a call for help with a mental health crisis. Johnson said the footage shows one of the officers saying “shoot him” before they both fired at Wallace, who was not heeding their orders to drop a knife. He said the footage also showed Wallace in an “obvious mental health crisis”. He said he did not think the officers should face murder charges and that he hoped the investigation into Wallace’s...
    PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — The attorney for the family of Walter Wallace Jr. says the 27-year-old was executed by two Philadelphia police officers while he was suffering a mental health crisis. The Wallace family plans to file a wrongful death lawsuit. The family’s attorney says the video shows a person who’s clearly having a health health crisis. He says people can be heard screaming “he’s mental”. @CBSPhilly pic.twitter.com/F4Q0XybLgg — Kimberly Davis CBS3 (@KimberlyDavisTV) October 29, 2020 The family is not calling for charges on the discharging officers, but they are calling for the city to invest in less lethal weapons for Philadelphia police officers. The Wallace family says they believe a wrongful death occurred and a wrongful death suit will follow. “I would like to see justice done for what they did to my son. I wouldn’t wish this on no one,” Kathy Wallace, Walter’s mother, said. The family...
    (CNN)When Walter Wallace, Jr. was shot and killed Monday in a fatal police shooting, one detail stuck out: He had bipolar disorder, and his family said he was in crisis when the shooting occurred. The initial call to 911 was for an ambulance, said Shaka Johnson, an attorney for Wallace's family. But it was police who arrived first, he said, and the ambulance never made it.Now, the 27-year-old Wallace is dead -- the latest instance of a mental health crisis call becoming fatal.While police departments have come under heightened scrutiny in recent months amid a racial reckoning stemming from fatal encounters with Black and Latino Americans, so have their actions in mental health emergencies. Here are five other recent cases:Daniel PrudeRead MoreDaniel PrudeIn March, 41-year-old Daniel Prude was having a mental health episode when his brother called the Rochester Police Department for help, his family said. Officers handcuffed Prude, who...
    (CNN)Walter Wallace Jr. could have not been a threat to police officers in Philadelphia when he was shot and killed, his family says. "He can't hurt a damn fly. He had mental issues," his father, Walter Wallace Sr., told CNN's Chris Cuomo on Prime Time Tuesday night. Wallace, a 27-year-old Black man, was shot and killed during a confrontation with police in West Philadelphia Monday after officers responded to a report of a person with a weapon. Philadelphia Police Sgt. Eric Grippafter told CNN affiliate KYW that officers saw a man with a knife who "was brandishing it, and waving it erratically." Walter Wallace Jr and his mother."It could have been dealt with in a different way. He could have called a superior to handle the situation," Wallace said.His family has said he suffered from bipolar disorder and was in crisis during the time of the shooting. Shaka Johnson, an...
    Walter Wallace Jr.'s parents, Walter Wallace Sr. and Cathy Wallace, giving a Tuesday night press conference at their home. WPVI Walter Wallace Jr., 27, was shot dead by two Philadelphia police officers Monday afternoon, as he walked toward them while holding a knife. His parents held a press conference Tuesday, saying the police were aware their son was having a mental-health crisis, and that officers had been called to his house three times on Monday. Wallace's mother, Cathy, said that during one of their visits, the officers "stood there and laughed at us," according to the Associated Press. On the final call, Wallace's brother had called for an ambulance, but police officers were sent to the scene instead, the family's attorney said.  Wallace was the father of nine children, and expecting a tenth when he died. His wife, whom he married earlier this month, was due to be...
    Emergency mental health services will be expanded in Dutchess County, while Sheriff's Deputies will be assigned and mandated to use body cameras and take mandated implicit bias and procedural justice training per County Executive Mark Molinaro's 2021 executive budget. “We have a duty here in our community to strengthen what works, fix what is broken, and come together to build a safer and freer home for all," said Molinaro of the measures toward police reform in the 2021 budget.  "Despite the challenges 2020 has presented us, my Executive Budget enhances our County’s mental health crisis services to be more nimble and responsive to the needs of the community, while giving law enforcement the tools necessary to protect and serve us." The budget also calls for efforts to expand the officer candidate pool, continued improvements to the county's 24/7 crisis intervention team, an expansion of the Mobile Crisis Team and the collaboration...
    The coronavirus pandemic has contributed to an alarming “national mental health crisis,” according to an American Psychological Association report. The American Psychological Association’s (APA) annual “Stress in America” report highlighted the results of a survey that the organization conducted. The results, which showed the coronavirus pandemic is having an outsized effect on Americans’ mental health, have caused the APA to sound the alarm, the report said. “Our 2020 survey is different,” the report said. “It reveals that Americans have been profoundly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, and that the external factors Americans have listed in previous years as significant sources of stress remain present and problematic.” (RELATED: Trump Signs Executive Order Establishing Coronavirus Mental Health Working Group) “The unusual combination of these factors and the persistent drumbeat of a crisis that shows no sign of abating that is leading APA to sound the alarm: We are facing a national mental...
    A sheriff's office in Nevada County, California, is launching a program to partner deputies responding to certain types of non-criminal 911 calls with a licensed therapist. The pilot program, which comes as police departments across the country are facing increased scrutiny, aims to reduce the risk of deadly confrontations with people who are in distress.  Nevada County Sheriff Shannan Moon, who said she plans to launch the new Mobile Crisis Team by the end of the year, told CBSN that the program is designed to give someone experiencing a mental health crisis "the best service they can receive."  Moon said that deputies responding to mental health 911 calls generally transport people to the local emergency room to speak with a therapist. Now, dispatchers will assign calls related to mental health, substance abuse, or homelessness to a deputy and a mental health professional who are paired up in a patrol car, according...
    ROCKFORD, Ill. (AP) — Winnebago County sheriff's deputies and Rockford police officers will pair with mental health experts when responding to emergency psychiatric and suicidal episodes as a new approach over arrests. Law enforcement will team with Rosecrance crisis-intervention specialists to create a three-month pilot program, beginning next month, in efforts to divert people in psychiatric crises away from the criminal justice system and into treatment instead, Winnebago County Sheriff Gary Caruana said. Each specially trained unit will include two officers from the city, two deputies from the county and two Rosecrance crisis response workers, according to the Rockford Register Star. The pilot program will begin Nov. 1. “We have long acknowledged the need to quickly help individuals who are experiencing a serious mental health episode, and through this pilot program we will identify how we can truly help individuals who need professional services, not jail,” Caruana said in a...
    SAN JOSE (KPIX 5) — The San Jose Police Department is launching a new unit aimed at de-escalating situations involving people going through a mental health crisis. This week, San Jose Police Officers with specialized mental health training are hitting the streets to work side by side with clinicians from the county’s Mobile Crisis Response team. “And so we would have an expert, a clinician on the scene and able to assist the officers. This is really the wave of the future,” said Police Chief Eddie Garcia. Recent studies show about ten percent of police calls nation-wide involve someone going through a mental health crisis. In 2014, 19-year-old Diana Showman was in a mental crisis when she approached San Jose officers and pointed a cordless drill which she painted black to look like a gun during a standoff on Blossom Hill Road. “She raised her hand and she was shot...
    The plans are the result of months of unrest over police brutality, with protestors nationwide demanding police reform. Mario Tama/Getty Images The Los Angeles City Council voted on Wednesday in favor of plans to create an unarmed crisis response team for nonviolent 911 calls in hopes of reducing police brutality. The team would be used to respond to calls that do not require force, including calls related to mental health crises, substance abuse, and suicide threats, among others. The measures, which were welcomed by the Los Angeles Police Department, are the result of months of unrest over police brutality. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. The Los Angeles City Council voted on Wednesday in favor of plans to create an unarmed crisis response team for 911 calls that do not require the use of force. The approved measures, which passed unanimously, will create a new classification for...
    SAN JOSE — Starting this week, clinicians who handle escalating mental-health crises in Santa Clara County will have swift access to a specially trained team of San Jose police officers when they go on calls in the Bay Area’s largest city. It marks a notable boost for the county’s Mobile Crisis Response Team, which for the past two years has deployed behavioral-health experts to help safely resolve psychiatric emergencies. Until now, county clinicians staffed a 24-hour hotline and depending on the severity of a matter, referred callers to services or sent colleagues into the field. For field calls with potential safety risks, clinicians contacted a city’s police dispatchers so they could be met by whichever crisis-trained officer was on duty. But a new grant-funded pilot program in San Jose looks to speed that up by giving them direct access to two on-call officers and a sergeant who get trained beyond...
    Los Angeles (CNN)The Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to move forward with a proposal to create unarmed crisis response teams to respond to nonviolent emergency 911 calls, instead of Los Angeles Police Department officers.The measure, which passed 14-0, allows the city to seek non-profit partners to implement the unarmed crisis response pilot program. It also creates a new classification of city employees who will respond to nonviolent 911 calls.These mental health crises ended in fatal police encounters. Now, some communities are trying a new approach"Calling the police on George Floyd about an alleged counterfeit $20 bill ended his life," said Los Angeles City Council member Herb Wesson Jr. "If he had been met with unarmed, trained specialists for the nonviolent crime he was accused of, George Floyd would be turning 47 years old today. This plan will save lives."City Council President Nury Martinez called approval of the plan "a...
    (CNN)For Shelby Rowe, a bead artist and mother of three adult children, the most difficult day of the coronavirus pandemic came in August.It was the day her son, Trevor, was rushed to the hospital.He was already battling Covid-19, and on that day, he was having difficulty breathing."That fear that I could lose my child and not be able to visit him, that definitely affected my mental health," Rowe said. "The pandemic has brought a lot more uncertainty and fear and given me more anxiety than I think I've ever experienced."CDC study sheds new light on mental health crisis linked to coronavirus pandemicRowe, who also works in suicide prevention in Oklahoma City, is not alone.Read MoreAlmost 41% of US adults in a survey by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported struggling with their mental health or substance use -- both related to the coronavirus pandemic and some of...
    Monica Lewinsky has revealed that a group of armed men tried to carjack her in 2011, sending her into an emotional crisis that required years of therapy.   Lewinsky, who became a household name in the 90s after her affair with Bill Clinton almost cost him his presidency, opened up about the traumatic experience in a personal essay for Vanity Fair on Thursday. Nine years later, the 47-year-old said she's come to see The Gun Incident, as she calls it, as a metaphor for the coronavirus pandemic because Americans have spent months 'threatened with death and disruption'.  Lewinsky said that she never would have made it through that dark period in her life without counseling - and she doesn't believe that people will make it through the current health crisis without access to help as well.   She is now calling for the federal government to establish a 'mental health czar' on the...
    LOS ANGELES (CNS) -- Los Angeles County took a step forward Wednesday in overhauling its crisis response system, approving a direct line for law enforcement to access county mental health teams and quickly triage 911 calls.Supervisor Janice Hahn said the 911 system was failing the public. She pointed to a recent article about 39-year-old Eric Briceno, who the Los Angeles Times reported was beaten and Tasered to death by deputies who responded to a mental health call in March."Eric's parents had called 911 for help, but they didn't get the help they needed,'' Hahn said. "Even though L.A. County has created the (Mental Evaluation Teams) and the (Psychiatric Mobile Response Teams) to respond to mental health crises exactly like this, neither of them were dispatched when Eric's parents called 911.'"Blanca Briceno, Eric's mother, was interviewed by the newspaper at her Maywood home."We called them to come and help us, to...
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