Thursday, Feb 25, 2021 - 11:37:13
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    DENVER (CBS4) – A new bill introduced in the Colorado state senate on Tuesday would ban the use of indigenous American mascots in the state. This ban would apply to all public schools in the state. (credit: CBS) If passed, any and all public schools in Colorado, including charter and public higher education institutions would be barred from using indigenous American names or mascots. If a school does not abide by the ban, they would be forced to pay a fine of $25,000 per month until the name is changed. That money would go to the state education fund. Senator Jessie Danielson and Representatives Adrienne Benavidez and Barbara McLachlan are sponsoring the bill. It has been assigned to the Senate Education Committee but has not yet received a hearing date. Maine is the only other state to pass legislation banning indigenous monikers, doing so in 2019.
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana is seeing the ranks of its homeschooled students grow larger during the coronavirus pandemic. The number of homeschooled students was 33,001 in October, the latest data available from the state, a 4% increase over the previous year and a 10% hike for homeschooled students who hope to qualify for college scholarships. “There are so many who have pulled their kids out of school because of COVID,” said Christopher Chin, president of Homeschool Louisiana, a networking group for parents and students. The number of students taught at home has grown by 23% in the past five years and 76% in the past decade, according to a report from The Advocate. Homeschooled students make up 5% of the state’s total student population. Chin said some families have opted for homeschooling because of what he called the lack of planning by school officials and the pitfalls for...
    More On: schools About 150 people defy UK lockdown, gather for wedding at London school Some schools won’t stream inauguration over concerns of potential violence 17,000 NYC teachers have requested coronavirus vaccine Los Angeles students required to get COVID-19 vaccine before returning to school Schoolchildren have gotten the short end of every stick all pandemic long, from unpredictable closures and virtual learning to stressed-out teachers and a wholesale dropping of standards and accountability. But the New York state teachers’ union is eager to hide the bad news by killing standardized exams. The tests would help show how each child has fallen behind, and so guide future education. But the New York State United Teachers union, joined by the state Board of Regents, has written to ask (tell, more like it) state Education Commissioner Betty Rosa to suspend standardized testing for grades 3-8 and high school. The Regents-NYSUT letter notes...
              Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed Laurie Cardoza-Moore from Proclaiming Justice to the Nations to the newsmakers line to discuss and celebrate that PJTN has been relieved of their hate status from the Southern Poverty Law Center after five years turmoil. Leahy: We are joined on our newsmaker line now by our good friend Laurie Cardoza-Moore. She’s the founder and president of Proclaiming Justice to the Nations. This is a group that educates, advocates, and moves to activate Christians, Jews, and all people of conscience in building a global community of action and prayer. In support of Jews and Israel Laurie, welcome back. You have some news for us. Good morning. Moore: Good morning Michael....
    In his State of the Commonwealth address Wednesday night, Gov. Ralph Northam laid out his agenda for 2021, which includes managing the COVID-19 pandemic, rebuilding the Virginia economy, getting children back into school and further addressing criminal justice reform. Getting the state back to normal hinges on a successful COVID-19 vaccine rollout and Virginians taking the vaccine when it is available to them, Northam said in the address. This is the first step in reopening schools and rebuilding the economy, he said. “We now have the best tool: vaccines,” Northam said. “As a doctor, I can tell you the incredible effort and cooperation it took to develop these vaccines. It shows us what we can do when people work together for the common good. … I urge you to get vaccinated when your turn comes. I will do it, and so will my family.” Northam has been...
    ARLINGTON Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – After the violent attack at the U.S. Capitol, Governor Abbott wouldn’t say if he’s called for more security at the Texas Capitol as state lawmakers prepare for their new legislative session. He said, “That’s something the Texas Department of Public Safety always remains on top of. They will continue to remain on top of that.” In a statement, the Texas Department of Public Safety said, “…While we do not discuss operational details, DPS will continue to adjust our operations, including deploying additional personnel and resources as needed to maintain public order and address potential threats.” The Governor appeared at a news conference Monday, Jan 11, in Arlington after he toured a mass COVID-19 vaccination site and updated the public about not only the vaccine but new infusion centers in Irving and Fort Worth that administer monoclonal antibodies to coronavirus patients. Earlier Monday, Texas Comptroller Glenn Hegar...
    LONDON (Reuters) - British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Thursday that in the post-COVID-19 future the state would need to lead by investing in infrastructure, education and technology, the Daily Telegraph reported. "Sometimes we will need to regulate differently or better, and that may mean taking advantage of Brexit’s freedoms; and we will also need the state to lead, to make the investments in infrastructure, education and technology that will create the framework for business to invest," Johnson wrote in the newspaper. (Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge; editing by Kate Holton) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: Ireland, France, European Union, international trade, United Kingdom, Europe, Germany
    An Indian state has passed a law to ban all Islamic schools and convert them into regular schools, drawing criticism that the move aims to suppress Muslims in the Hindu-majority country, numerous sources reported. Assam, India will be converting more than 700 madrasas — government-run Islamic schools — into general education schools by April. The state is run by Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), which has been at the center of ongoing tensions between India’s Muslims and Hindus.  The schools are being closed because they provide sub-standard education compared to regular schools, and do not address “the temporal world and its earthly concerns” in their curriculum, according to the government. Madrasas include education focused on the Quran, Islamic law and subjects offered in most schools, like math and science. Once the schools are converted, they will no longer be able to teach students the Quran....
    More On: teachers Teacher suspended over rant at anti-lockdown protesters Zoom doom: Teacher robbed during video call with student Chicago Teachers Union deletes tweet claiming school reopening push ‘rooted’ in sexism, racism Teachers who refuse COVID-19 test to be removed from payroll: NYC DOE Darrion Cockrell’s mother was a drug addict who had two of her six kids by age 16. His father was murdered when he was 4. After he was placed in foster care, school was just another nightmare for him. He joined a gang at 10. But with the help and inspiration of educators and his adoptive parents, Cockrell became a teacher himself — and such a good one that the Missouri Department of Education named him Teacher of the Year earlier this year. His students call him “Mr. DC.” “Missouri is fortunate to have so many high quality educators, and Darrion will be a...
    LAKE OSWEGO, Ore. -- The activism of Jennifer Dale began when she watched her third grade daughter struggle with distance learning, kicking and screaming through her online classes.The mother of three initially sent emails to her local school officials with videos of the disastrous school days for her middle daughter, Lizzie, who has Down syndrome. Over time, she connected with other parents and joined several protests calling for school buildings to reopen.Now she helps organize events and has become a voice for what has become a statewide movement of parents calling for children to return to school in Oregon, one of only a handful of states that has required at least a partial closure of schools as long as local coronavirus infections remain above certain levels."This just isn't plausible anymore. It's not fair to the kids, who I am afraid aren't getting an adequate education," Dale said during an interview...
    By SARA CLINE, Associated Press/Report for America LAKE OSWEGO, Ore. (AP) — The activism of Jennifer Dale began when she watched her third grade daughter struggle with distance learning, kicking and screaming through her online classes. The mother of three initially sent emails to her local school officials with videos of the disastrous school days for her middle daughter, Lizzie, who has Down syndrome. Over time, she connected with other parents and joined several protests calling for school buildings to reopen. Now she helps organize events and has become a voice for what has become a statewide movement of parents calling for children to return to school in Oregon, one of only a handful of states that has required at least a partial closure of schools as long as local coronavirus infections remain above certain levels. “This just isn’t plausible anymore. It’s not fair to the kids, who I am...
    After months of delays and pandemic upheaval, California officials on Tuesday released the long-awaited Master Plan for Early Learning and Care, a 113-page blueprint to remodel the state’s Byzantine child-care system and dramatically expand public preschool. “The Master Plan shows how one state can achieve goals that are soon to become national ones,” the authors noted. “California can use the Master Plan to signal its fitness as an early partner with the incoming Biden administration,” which advocates early-education reform and better access to child care. But critics say the forward-looking document does little to shore up the existing infrastructure, even as it crumbles underfoot. Unlike K-12 schools, preschools and day-care centers have been allowed to operate throughout the pandemic. Yet since March, almost 400 child-care centers have closed permanently, and at least 5,700 licensed family child-care homes have gone under, leaving tens of thousands of working parents in the...
    After more than a year of roiling controversies over how to teach ethnic studies in K-12 through college classrooms, discord erupted anew in a debate last week over course content and how to meet legal requirements, with many wondering: Can California get it right this go-round? The state’s top instructional-policy makers for K-12 education painstakingly debated hundreds of changes to a draft model curriculum for ethnic studies Wednesday and Thursday, just months after a stinging veto by Gov. Newsom, who refused to sign a bill requiring ethnic studies in high school without clear course guidelines in place. At the heart of the current tensions is how to create a curriculum that is faithful to the discipline of ethnic studies — which focuses on the experiences and contributions of Asian, Black, Latino and Native/Indigenous Americans — while also accommodating myriad additional groups who demand inclusion and say their stories have...
    As public-school systems prove utterly incapable of handling the challenges of the pandemic, New York parents are rushing to put their kids in private and religious schools. But the State Education Department seems bent on destroying those alternatives. That’s right: The SED under interim Commissioner Betty Rosa has renewed its drive to dictate private-school curricula. And if it gets away with that, you can bet more mandates will follow. The pretext here is the real problem of a handful of yeshivas that stand credibly accused of not even trying to teach basic math and English. But state and city education bureaucracies have repeatedly bungled all their attempts to address this (perhaps intentionally, thanks to political pressure). Then came the SED bid to regulate all private-school curricula, which rightly infuriated targets that include some of New York’s top schools. In the latest round, the department’s received more than 140,000 comments opposing...
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (WJZ) — Question 2 on the 2020 election ballot in Maryland asks residents if they think sports betting should be legal, allowing for revenue to be generated for education. Surrounding states have legalized sports betting. Maryland State Senator Craig Zucker said he wants to see the money being spent stay in the region. “It’s important to keep them in Maryland and to make sure the revenue goes toward our education system here,” Zucker said. Zucker said with budgets being slashed due to the current pandemic, this is a way for schools to make much-needed money. “We estimate that it will bring in anywhere between $20-$40 million of revenue a year for education,” he said. President of the State Education Association, Cheryl Bost, said this is just step one. “The details will be in the legislation as to who gets those licenses, how many and what’s the tax rate...
    We live in a racially illiterate country. We are taught to see white supremacy only in the actions of overt bigots, right-wing militias, and politicians who support them. White supremacy is not an individual act. It is a system of relations that permeates all institutions, including schools. Curricula is a primary mechanism of white supremacy in schools because it shapes how we think, understand, and act in the world. If our goal is building a just society, any attempt at a true reckoning of our nation’s racist foundation must include re-examining what we choose to teach our children in school. Historian Carter G. Woodson wrote, “If you control a man’s thinking you do not have to worry about his actions.” What we are taught in school maintains the status quo of racial hierarchy in our thoughts and actions. Centering ethnic studies across all curricula in Minnesota would be a crucial...
    More and more states around the country are legalizing sports betting, with visions of millions of dollars pouring into state and local government coffers. That’s especially true now that revenues have slowed because of the COVID-19 pandemic, and many local governments are staring at shortfalls. Betting has been legalized in D.C.; voters in Maryland are in the process of deciding the question, and gaming companies are putting in their applications in Virginia. But will it work? And how? And for whom? This week, WTOP’s series “Betting on the Future: A look at sports betting in the DMV” is assessing the state of gambling in each area jurisdiction. This week, WTOP has been highlighting sports betting around the D.C. area and all the promises that proponents of sports betting have been making about the money it could generate. Now, it’s time to look at where the money actually goes — when...
    By STEPHAN BISAHA, Kansas News Service WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas’ teacher shortage finally shows signs of shrinking. But districts still can’t find enough educators to keep schools running under coronavirus safety demands. “We were through the worst of it before all this happened,” said Mischel Miller, the director of teacher licensure at the Kansas State Department of Education. Kansas News Service reports that new state data give schools plenty of reasons to be optimistic about the shrinking teacher shortage. Desperately needed special education teachers are finally showing up. More teachers are moving to Kansas than are leaving the state. And a larger number of Kansans ditched other careers for the classroom. Yet keeping schools pandemic-safe requires more than filling long-open vacancies. Schools need significantly more teachers to make class sizes small enough for social distancing. And those hundreds of remaining vacancies are being filled with educators who fall short...
    On October 15, Governor Jared Polis finally joined friends and family of Stephen Brackett over Zoom to announce the Flobots and Youth on Record co-founder would be the State of Colorado’s second music ambassador. The event was originally scheduled for mid-March, but COVID-19 closures shut down that plan, and the announcement was postponed. Nonetheless, Brackett has already been busy at work, leading music-education workshops in person and developing a statewide virtual curriculum. More than half a year after he assumed the post — with live music all but shut down by the pandemic, a majority of venues facing closure, and music-education programs long slashed by budget cuts, Brackett’s ingenuity as music ambassador is definitely being put to the test. Related Stories The Flobots' Stephen Brackett Joins Youth on Record Staff Three Albums Later, the Flobots Have Perfected Protest Songwriting My Youth on Record: Interrupted Is a Podcast for Creatives During COVID-19...
    Colorado State University-Pueblo will offer a new hemp agriculture degree program next fall, funded in part by the United States Department of Agriculture. CSU-Pueblo already offers other cannabis degree programs and has been home to the Institute of Cannabis Research since 2016; current undergraduates can pursue a bachelor's degree in cannabis biology and chemistry or a minor in cannabis studies. Starting next year, however, students can narrow their studies to focus on industrial hemp, thanks to a new research program starting up at several colleges around the country. CSU-Pueblo's Industrial Hemp Education, Agriculture and Research (InHEAR) program will require students to take courses specifically tailored toward agricultural hemp research and either do an internship with one of CSU-Pueblo’s hemp industry partners or conduct research at the Institute of Cannabis Research. Development of the new curriculum is funded by a $275,000 grant from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture; similar degrees are...
    Zoom In IconArrows pointing outwards The U.S. economy added fewer jobs than expected during September, a development some economists see as another sign the rebound from the springtime recession could be slowing. The Labor Department reported Friday that payrolls increased by 661,000, below the 800,000 estimate that economists polled by Dow Jones had expected. The unemployment rate drifted lower to 7.9%. CNBC studied the net changes by industry for September jobs based on data contained in the employment report. Leisure and hospitality continued to post strong numbers after being battered earlier in the year as Covid-19 and efforts to contain its spread froze travel plans and shuttered restaurants around the country. The sector, which added 318,000 jobs last month, saw about 60% of that growth from restaurants and bars that re-hired workers as the third quarter ended. Despite job gains totaling 3.8 million over the last five months, employment in food services and...
    Andrew Wommack Ministries International defied the Colorado Attorney General's office when it staged an event for around 800 people during a late June-early July Bible conference. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment subsequently declared the gathering a COVID-19 outbreak, after two positive staff cases, six positive attendee cases and one probable attendee case. Now, Wommack and company are coming back for more. The organization sued Governor Jared Polis, among others, in federal court over safety protocols that could cramp its style during the AWMI Minister’s Conference, slated to start on October 5. On September 29, the court denied a ministry motion for a temporary restraining order to allow the event, prompting an appeal to the Tenth Circuit Court mere hours later. AWMI is represented by Liberty Counsel, which describes itself as "an international nonprofit, litigation, education, and policy organization dedicated to advancing religious freedom, the sanctity of life, and the...
    Washington and Lee University is coming under scrutiny for offering a course on “How to Overthrow the State,” though the school’s president says the course has been “sensationalized” by the media. Officially titled “Writing Seminar for First-Years,” the course places students “at the head of a popular revolutionary movement aiming to overthrow a sitting government and forge a better society.” “How will you attain power? How will you communicate with the masses? How do you plan on improving the lives of the people? How will you deal with the past?” the description states. “From Frantz Fanon to Che Guevara to Mohandas Gandhi and others, we explore examples of revolutionary thought and action from across the Global South,” reads the course description on WLU’s website. Students who take the course will produce a “Manifesto, drafting a white paper that critically analyzes a particular issue” and “write a persuasive essay on rewriting...
    Washington and Lee University has defended its course titled 'How to Overthrow the Government, which requires students to write a revolutionary manifesto, after coming under fire from critics led by former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. The president of the private liberal-arts university in Virginia on Monday issued a statement defending the course, which is one of 15 introductory writing seminars that first-year students are required to take. The controversy exploded after the course description gained notice, stating in part: 'This course places each student at the head of a popular revolutionary movement aiming to overthrow a sitting government and forge a better society.' 'How will you attain power? How will you communicate with the masses? How do you plan on improving the lives of the people? How will you deal with the past? From Frantz Fanon to Che Guevara to Mohandas Gandhi and others, we explore examples of revolutionary thought...
    Donald Trump is continuing to do battle with interpretations of history he claims are unamerican, Kevin Liptak of CNN wrote on Sunday. Trump issued a tweet on Sunday morning where he said his Department of Education would investigate whether California schools, as well as other states in the country were using the New York Times Magazines‘ 1619 Project in their public school curriculum. The collection – which won a Pulitzer Prize when it was first published – reframes United States history around the date of August 1619, when the first slave ship arrived on America’s shores. Trump appeared to be sending out the message in response to an unverified account on Twitter that claimed California was using the reporting as part of its curriculum. The announcement came just two days after Trump directed federal agencies to stop conducting racial sensitivity training related to “white privilege” and “critical race theory.” In...
            by Lindsey Burke  Normally when a business shuts its doors, it doesn’t still get to charge its customers for a product they can no longer access. It certainly doesn’t get to charge its customers twice for the privilege. Yet, that’s exactly what we’re seeing from some public school districts. They refuse to open their doors for in-person learning—citing safety risks—but they are able to open these same school buildings to charge overworked and tired parents for day care. This is double-dipping into parents’ pocketbooks, and it likely runs afoul of state constitutions. Even though they are not offering in-person instruction, parents (and all taxpayers) are required to pay taxes to pay for district schools. As frustrating as that may be for parents, some districts—including Fairfax County, Virginia; Howard County, Maryland; Gilbert, Arizona; and Durham, North Carolina—have decided to open up classrooms to groups of children,...
    Two weeks ago, the Orange County Board of Education gained national attention when it endorsed reopening public schools without social distancing or face masks. Now, the board plans to file a lawsuit against Gov. Gavin Newsom and the state’s public health officer, Sonia Y. Angell, asking that state orders be set aside that have most schools opening online in the fall. The suit will seek in-person teaching and the resumption of campus activities. The board voted 4-0 during a closed session Tuesday night, July 28, to file the lawsuit. “We have made the decision to put the needs of our students first by filing this lawsuit,” the board’s majority said in a statement. Trustee Beckie Gomez, who attended part of the special meeting but was not present for the discussion and vote, did not support her colleagues “We’ve kinda gone off track here,” she said in an interview Tuesday night....
    AUSTIN (CBSDFW.COM) – Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has issued has given the green light for school officials, both public and private, to decide whether, when, and how to open school. The legally nonbinding letter, which was in response to a request from Stephenville Mayor Doug Svien, gives schools permission to disobey local public health orders that would stop them from reopening. “Education of our children is an essential Texas value and there is no current statewide order prohibiting any school from opening,” said Attorney General Paxton. “While local health authorities may possess some authority to close schools in limited circumstances, they may not issue blanket orders closing all schools on a purely preventative basis. That decision rightfully remains with school system leaders.” The letter concludes: “Government action, no matter how urgent or expedient it is believed to be, may not exceed the constitutional limitations that have been placed upon it...
    A teachers union in Florida has sued the governor and the state Board of Education over an executive order calling for schools to open five days a week for in-person instruction in August, NPR reported. The lawsuit, which was filed by the Florida Education Association, names Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran, and Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez. The union believes August is too early to safely bring students and teachers back into schools, "Any sensible person would tell you we have got to get the positivity rate down," union president Fedrick Ingram said, according to NBC News. "This is a life or death situation. We don't want to be reckless; we don't want to be irresponsible." What does the order say? The order, issued by Corcoran, states, "Upon reopening in August, all school boards and charter school...
    CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Democratic lawmakers revived a proposal Saturday to collect an additional $54 million in mining tax revenue per year to avoid making cuts to education amid the coronavirus pandemic and economic downturn. The proposal would cap the deductions that Nevada mining businesses can claim to 60% of current levels. Democratic leaders reintroduced the bill in the state Senate a day after a similar plan failed to win the two-thirds votes needed to increase taxes. They are expected to vote on the bill late Saturday night. On the Democrats' first attempt to cap deductions, Republicans blasted them for attempting to rush through a last-minute proposal and trying to raise taxes on small businesses during an economic downturn. Sen. Keith Pickard, a swing-seat Republican from Henderson, took issue with how the dollars made available by the bill would be unrestricted general fund revenue. He said he would have...
    The coronavirus pandemic, calls for racial equity and police reforms will reshape the college experience for students across California. During a broad conversation hosted by the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC), the leaders of the state’s three public higher education systems — UC, CSU and the community college system — urged students and their families to recognize that sweeping changes at colleges and universities will not just last a few weeks or months, but potentially years. “This is not a grin and bear it for two or three months, this is a couple year, three year issue,” said CSU chancellor Timothy White, who in 2019 announced plans to retire later this year. Online learning  With the number of COVID-19 cases continuing to rise in the Golden State and prompting new shut-down orders, White said the CSU will offer slightly less than 7% of the classes offered on campus in...
    TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/NSF) — More than a week after Education Commissioner Richard Corcoran ordered schools to reopen in August, members of the State Board of Education on Wednesday said his order has sparked confusion, fear, and angst. Corcoran deflected blame to the media and said his order was designed to offer parents and school districts “complete flexibility” about returning students to classrooms. But the order, which Corcoran issued July 6 as coronavirus cases soared in Florida, said all school districts must reopen brick-and-mortar schools at least five days a week starting in August, unless local and state health officials direct otherwise. Download The New CBS4 News App Here Board of Education member Michael Olenick offered the sharpest criticism Wednesday, saying there appeared to be a “disconnect” between what Corcoran was saying and what the order stated and called on him to rescind the part of the order that...
    By BILAL SULEIMAN, The Bismarck Tribune BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Bismarck State College is going through a period of considerable flux, adapting to major changes with how higher education is delivered due to the coronavirus pandemic while also navigating a transition in leadership at its highest level. Longtime President Larry Skogen retired June 30 after 13 years at the helm. Doug Jensen was named his successor by the state Board of Higher Education in March. He comes to Bismarck from Rockford, Illinois, where he was serving as president of Rock Valley College. The philosophies and leadership styles of the incoming Jensen and the outgoing Skogen are similar in nature but differ in origin. Skogen had a long career with the Air Force before getting into higher education, while Jensen “never dreamed of going to college” while growing up in Pittsburgh. “My goal was to graduate from high school and to...
    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday delivered a ruling civil liberties advocates warned could make taxpayers “underwrite religious education”—opening a massive crack in the bedrock principle of church and state separation. The decision in the case, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, was 5-4, with the court’s conservatives in the majority. As NBC News put it, the ruling “further lowered the wall of separation between church and state and will likely affect laws or constitutional provisions in more than two-thirds of the nation that bar public funding for churches and religious schools.” CNBC laid out the background: The case concerned a scholarship program enacted in Montana in 2015, which provided individuals and businesses with up to $150 in tax credits to match donations to private, nonprofit scholarship organizations. Shortly after the program was enacted, the Montana Department of Revenue put in place a rule that barred scholarship recipients from using funds from the program to pay...
    The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that Montana's state Constitution discriminated against religious schools when it barred families from using a tax credit scholarship to enroll children in those schools – a major victory for the Trump administration's school choice agenda and one that could have seismic implications for dozens of other states with similar prohibitions in their constitutions.[ READ: Trump Bolsters Rights of Religious Groups ]"Drawing on 'enduring American tradition,' we have long recognized the rights of parents to direct 'the religious upbringing' of their children," Chief Justice John Roberts writes in the deciding 5-4 opinion in Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue. "Many parents exercise that right by sending their children to religious schools, a choice protected by the Constitution. But the no-aid provision penalizes that decision by cutting families off from otherwise available benefits if they choose a religious private school rather than a secular one, and for no other...
    COLLEGE PARK, Md. (WJZ) — The University of Maryland is honoring longtime state Senate president Mike Miller by renaming its administration building for him. The Main Administration Building in College Park will now be known as the Thomas V. Miller, Jr., Administration Building. In a video announcing the renaming, the university called Miller a visionary leader who helped shape the campus into what it is today. “Senator Miller not only shaped Maryland’s entire system of higher education, he helped build our university’s modern campus, the video said. “He provided state support for dozens of projects, including the Bioscience Research Building, Xfinity Center, The Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center, the Physical Sciences Complex and Cole Field House.” Miller is the longest-serving state Senate president and advocated for higher education institutions during his tenure. He stepped down in October as he battles prostate cancer.
    CONNECTICUT (WABC) -- Connecticut officials unveiled Thursday their plan for full-time in-school education to resume in the fall.Governor Ned Lamont and Education Commissioner Miguel Cardona announced details of the framework to allow all students in all school districts statewide the opportunity to have access to instruction at the beginning of the 2020-21 academic year, as long as public health data continues to support the model.They said that while Connecticut has determined reopening schools for in-person instruction can be achieved based upon the state's successful COVID-19 containment efforts, the model will be supported with more intensive mitigation strategies and specific monitoring, containment, and class cancellation plans."While we've made good strides to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 in Connecticut, the virus hasn't gone away and we need to do what we can to keep students and staff safe while also doing our best to provide our young people with access to an...
    By CEDAR ATTANASIO, Associated Press/Report for America SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The leader of one of the largest Native American tribes in the U.S. called Wednesday for the governor of New Mexico to end efforts to fight a court ruling that orders improvements in education for members of his tribe and other vulnerable groups. The comments from Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez come ahead of a court hearing next week in which Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham will ask a state judge to dismiss a consolidated lawsuit representing Native American and Hispanic plaintiffs. “The lawsuit needs to be pursued so Native students can be provided adequate education programs and services necessary to learn and thrive," Nez said. “Our students deserve an educational environment that prioritizes their culture and unique needs. It is time for our Native students to have the same opportunities as other students.” In 2018, a judge...
    BALTIMORE (AP) — Data from the Maryland Department of Education shows the state’s school systems are still suspending about 1,200 students in pre-kindergarten through second grade every year despite a 2017 law intended to virtually eliminate such suspensions. The data also shows Black students are suspended at a higher rate than all other races, The Baltimore Sun reported. The percent of students suspended in pre-kindergarten through second grade was cut in half, and is now .5% across the state. State officials said about three-quarters of the suspensions were for threats, attacks and fighting and a quarter were for disruption and disrespect. A small number was for weapons and arson, according to the report. Black students are suspended at twice the statewide rate — or 1% of Black students in that age group — down from 2% several years ago, the data indicated. The Maryland Department of Education staff presented a...
    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana's public schools can apply for funding to improve their remote learning capabilities during the coronavirus pandemic through a $61.6 million grant program, Gov. Eric Holcomb announced Monday. The deadline is July 17 to apply for the needs-based, competitive funding through the Governor’s Emergency Education Relief, which is financed by the federal CARES Act. Traditional public school corporations, public charter schools, accredited non-public schools, higher education institutions and other education-related entities are eligible to apply for the funding. The grants will toward paying for digital learning devices, technologies to boost internet connectivity and to support partnerships that advance remote learning. The state expects to award dozens of grants through the program, which is a collaboration between the governor’s office, the Indiana Department of Education, the Commission for Higher Education and the State Board of Education. “Teachers, administrators and superintendents have faced this pandemic with innovative solutions to...
    Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn's bill to make Juneteenth a federal holiday.is a "really telling moment" about where America is as a country, Fox News contributor Juan Williams stated Friday. In an interview on "America's Newsroom" with host Sandra Smith, Williams explained the historical significance of the day. TEXAS GOP SEN. CORNYN INTRODUCES BILL TO MAKE JUNETEENTH A FEDERAL HOLIDAY "[Juneteenth,] initially -- if you go back in history -- was Jubilee Day. And, the whole idea was that it was a celebration of the end of slavery in Texas," he remarked. "But, what happened subsequently as people then began to celebrate not only in Galveston -- which is where the Major General Gordon Granger initially issued the announcement of the end of slavery in Texas two years after President Lincoln's emancipation proclamation -- but then it moved on to Austin, to the state capital, and most of all, to Houston where there is no an Emancipation Park that was the site of a huge, huge Juneteenth celebration in the '70s when this really...
    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Modified school days, more outdoor class time, mask-wearing and health screenings for students and staff are among the steps Indiana schools should consider before reopening from their coronavirus closures under recommendations released Friday by the state Department of Education. All schools across the state closed in mid-March and shifted largely to online coursework. The guidelines are not mandatory, however, and the state is leaving the ultimate decision on resuming classes, sports and other activities to local schools. Specific social distancing recommendations outlined in the report include scheduling groups of students to attend in-person school on alternate days or half days to minimize the number of students in the building. The education department also suggests keeping the same students and staff members together as much as possible and increasing space between student desks. TOP STORIES Trump celebrates economic rebound, warns not to switch to left-wing policies Lincoln Memorial,...
    (CNN)New Jersey students will start learning about climate change in kindergarten and keep studying the crisis through graduation under the state's new education standards.The State Board of Education adopted the new guidelines on Wednesday --which outline what will be taught to New Jersey's 1.4 million students.Greta Thunberg: Our actions can be the difference between life and death for many othersIt's the first state to include climate change education in it's K-12 learning standards, officials said in a statement.New Jersey's first lady Tammy Murphy pushed for the new standards and met with 130 educators statewide. She said New Jersey is already dealing with problems caused by climate change, including disappearing shorelines, algae blooms, super storms and hot summers.Read More"This generation of students will feel the effects of climate change more than any other, and it is critical that every student is provided an opportunity to study and understand the climate crisis...
    GLENVILLE, W.Va. (AP) - Harrison County schools Superintendent Mark Manchin has been named president of Glenville State College effective July 1, the college announced Tuesday. Manchin was selected as the school’s 25th president after interviews with five finalists on the Glenville campus last week. Among his roles during a 44-year career in education, Manchin also has served as executive director of the West Virginia School Building Authority and oversaw school systems in McDowell and Webster counties. TOP STORIES Chattanooga police chief tells officers OK with George Floyd death to turn in badges George Soros, 89, is still on a quest to destroy America Active-duty troops on short alert status outside Washington, Pentagon says The native of Farmington also served as a state senator from Kanawha County and on the Board of Governors at West Virginia University. “I am excited for the opportunity to lead Glenville State College...
    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) - Louisiana’s new state education superintendent will start the job June 8 after receiving confirmation Monday from state senators. Cade Brumley, who has worked as superintendent of Jefferson Parish schools, was selected last month by the Louisiana Board of Elementary and Secondary Education to oversee public schools statewide. The Louisiana Senate approved his hiring Monday in a list of appointees, with no public discussion, after a closed-door review of all the confirmation requests. “Strong leadership will be important to the success of our short- and long-term work to address unfinished learning due to COVID-19 closures and to ensure that students and schools are positioned for a strong start next year. This will be a huge responsibility, but we have the right leader for it,” board President Sandy Holloway said in a statement after the vote. TOP STORIES George Soros, 89, is still on a quest to...
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