Thursday, Mar 04, 2021 - 07:32:17
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    The CEO of the company that owns Jeep said he's open to changing the name of two of his top-selling SUVs, the Cherokee and the Grand Cherokee, in the wake of complaints from the Cherokee Nation tribe. Carlos Tavares, chief executive of Stellantis, didn't go as far as saying that change was forthcoming, however.  'At this stage, I don't know if there is a real problem,' Tavares said to the Wall Street Journal. 'But if there is one, well, of course we will solve it.  Asked if the company would change the name if it were 'pushed,' Tavares seemed to bristle.  'We are ready to go to any point - up to the point where we decide with the appropriate people and with no intermediaries,' he told the Journal.  Stellantis CEO Carlos Tavares said he would be 'open' to the change, although he also said he wasn't sure if there was...
    Okta CEO Todd McKinnonOkta Okta, whose cloud software allows office workers to access all of their apps through a secure online service, said on Wednesday that it's spending $6.5 billion to acquire rival Auth0. Okta's shares plunged about 13% in extended trading after the announcement. The all-stock deal equals about 21% of Okta's market cap as of Wednesday's close. Okta said it expects the transaction to close by the end of July. With more large businesses counting on cloud-based applications, Okta has seen its revenue surge since its 2017 IPO. The company said in its earnings statement on Wednesday that fourth-quarter revenue jumped 40% to $234.7 million. Its net loss widened to $75.8 million from $50.4 million a year earlier. Auth0 last raised private capital in July at a $1.92 billion valuation. Salesforce Ventures led the round. Okta co-founder and CEO Todd McKinnon was previously a vice president at Salesforce....
    VIDEO4:1204:12Cannabis company Parallel CEO Beau Wrigley on going public via SPACSquawk on the Street Cannabis company Parallel is prioritizing research and development to position itself ahead of its competitors, CEO Beau Wrigley said Tuesday. "We've invested a lot in R&D and that differentiates us from a lot of other companies out there because there's so much technology and capability that can go into some of the rare cannabinoids that people aren't really even working with yet that can drive enormous well-being benefits to people going forward," said Wrigley, in an interview on CNBC's "Squawk on the Street." Last week, Parallel announced its $1.9 billion deal with Ceres Acquisition Corp, a special purpose acquisition company co-founded by music entrepreneur Scooter Braun. The deal is expected to close this summer. Parallel currently has about 50 dispensaries in the U.S. and is hoping to expand nationwide. The company expects it will...
    More On: disney ‘WandaVison’ overtakes ‘Bridgerton’ in audience viewership All the best ‘WandaVision’ merch the internet has to offer ‘Loki’ series starring Tom Hiddleston expands Marvel Cinematic Universe Disney slaps ‘The Muppet Show’ with ‘offensive content’ disclaimer Disney Chief Executive Bob Chapek said the pandemic has likely permanently narrowed the window for movies to play only in theaters. Pre-pandemic, cinemas depended on an exclusive 90-day window to screen films before they were made available to home distribution channels, such as pay TV and streaming services. But now, studios are tinkering with that timeframe, either shortening it or doing away with it altogether. “The consumer is probably more impatient than they’ve ever been before, particularly since now they’ve had the luxury of an entire year of getting titles at home pretty much when they want them,” Chapek said late Monday at a virtual conference hosted by Morgan Stanley. “I’m...
    A fourth COVID-19 vaccine could be on the horizon for the U.S., Novavax’s CEO reportedly said Monday.  Stanley Erck said he believes the FDA could potentially grant his company’s vaccine candidate as early as May. Appearing on CNBC’s "Closing Bell," Erck said his company’s Phase 3 trial is ongoing, but that it hopes the FDA will allow for data from a U.K. trial to be considered during the emergency use authorization application process. Pending approval, the company has agreed to supply the U.S. with 110 million doses.  (iStock) In late January, Novavax announced its protein-based vaccine showed a 89.3% efficacy against coronavirus in a U.K.-based trial, which it noted was during a peak period of transmission and when the B.1.1.7 variant was in circulation. MERCK, JOHNSON & JOHNSON PARTNER ON COVID-19 VACCINE MANUFACTURING The shot, NVX-CoV2373, uses a full-length perfusion spike protein created with recombinant nanoparticle technology and the...
    Target delivered another strong quarter during the pandemic, but even CEO Brian Cornell was caught off guard by what it saw after the holidays. Store traffic and sales typically slow for retailers after the spree of spending and gift-giving in November and December. Instead, the retail chief said sales picked up at Target in the first few weeks of January. "January was a really surprising month for me," Brian Cornell said in an interview with CNBC's "Squawk Box" on Tuesday. "I think if I do this for another 20 years, we're unlikely to see January comps grow at a rate of over 30%." Cornell said shoppers flocked to stores to redeem gift cards and freshen up their homes, wardrobes and kitchen pantries. He said customers were "shopping for newness." "We saw a great response to anything new in our assortment, from home to apparel to beauty," he said. That lifted...
    WHO cautions against premature return to normal; Ivory Coast gets first COVAX vaccine shipment in UN initiative: Latest COVID-19 updates Tired of reading glasses? Eye drop submitted for FDA approval may help you read without them. A Trader Joe's worker says he was fired after writing directly to the chain's CEO calling for stronger Covid-19 safety protocols in his store. © From Trader Joe's Trader Joe's on 670 Columbus Ave in New York, NY. Ben Bonnema, a Trader Joe's employee at a store in New York City, wrote an email to Trader Joe's chief executive Dan Bane on February 26 urging the store to improve its air filtration, not allow anyone inside the store without a mask and adopt a "3 strikes" policy for removing uncooperative customers. "We put our lives on the line everyday by showing up to work. Please, show up for us by adopting...
    Dr. Nita Patel, Director of Antibody discovery and Vaccine development, lifts a vial with a potential coronavirus, COVID-19, vaccine at Novavax labs in Gaithersburg, Maryland on March 20, 2020, one of the labs developing a vaccine for the coronavirus, COVID-19.Andrew Caballero-Reynolds | AFP | Getty Images The Food and Drug Administration could authorize Novavax's Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use as early as May, the company's CEO, Stanley Erck, told CNBC on Monday. Novavax's phase three trial in the U.S. is still ongoing, with 30,000 participants, Erck said. The company hopes the FDA will allow it to use data from its clinical trial conducted in the U.K. when it files its emergency use application later this year, he added. U.K. health regulators will likely review the vaccine in April, followed by the FDA "probably a month after that," he told CNBC's "Closing Bell" in an interview. That timeline could get pushed...
    New York (CNN Business)A Trader Joe's worker says he was fired after writing directly to the chain's CEO calling for stronger Covid-19 safety protocols in his store. Ben Bonnema, a Trader Joe's employee at a store in New York City, wrote an email to Trader Joe's chief executive Dan Bane on February 26 urging the store to improve its air filtration, not allow anyone inside the store without a mask and adopt a "3 strikes" policy for removing uncooperative customers."We put our lives on the line everyday by showing up to work. Please, show up for us by adopting these policies," Bonnema said in his letter.Bonnema on Saturday posted the letter on Twitter and said he was fired for sending it to the CEO. He also posted a termination letter he received from Trader Joe's. Bonnema's account went viral on social media and prompted calls for a boycott of Trader...
    VIDEO34:4534:45Altice USA CEO says pay-TV providers will eventually stop offering cable TVTech When French telecommunications company Altice acquired U.S. cable companies Cablevision and Suddenlink, Chairman Patrick Drahi made a bold statement: Altice USA would rival Comcast and Charter in size, becoming one of the three dominant U.S. cable operators. Fast forward nearly six years, and Altice USA has about 5 million customer relationships, compared with about 31 million each for Comcast and Charter. (Altice USA did announce a $310 million acquisition of Morris Broadband on Monday, which will give it about 36,000 more customers.) CEO Dexter Goei explained to CNBC what prevented Altice USA's rapid expansion, why he thinks cable and wireless will eventually merge in the U.S., and why it's only a matter of time before cable TV becomes extinct. ***** (This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.) Alex Sherman, CNBC: It's been more than five...
    A Trader Joe’s worker said he was fired for asking the CEO of the grocery chain to improve precautions against the coronavirus. Ben Bonnema, who worked at one of the company's stores in New York City, tweeted a copy of a letter Friday addressed to CEO Dan Bane and said “trader joe's just fired me for sending this letter to the ceo, saying i don't share the company values. i guess advocating for a safer workplace isn't a company value?” In the letter, Bonnema asked Bane to require masks for all customers, improve in-store air filtration, limit capacity based on carbon dioxide levels and develop a “three-strikes” policy for non-compliant customers. trader joe's just fired me for sending this letter to the ceo, saying i don't share the company values. i guess advocating for a safer workplace isn't a company value? pic.twitter.com/3TKi5B8HSJ— Ben Bonnema (@BenBonnema) February 26, 2021 For customers...
    CEO Peter Beck stands at the base of the fairing, or nosecone, of the Neutron rocket the company is developing.Rocket Lab Rocket Lab is going public in the next few months through a SPAC merger and CEO Peter Beck spoke to CNBC to break down the space company's opportunities thanks to the deal's cash pile. "This is just like a supercharger – we have all the things we need now to go and do the things that we've dreamed of," Beck said. The company is merging with Vector Acquisition in a deal that gives Rocket Lab a $4.1 billion enterprise value, with the move expected to be complete in the second quarter. Rocket Lab is the leader in the small launch marketplace, with its Electron rocket carrying nearly 100 small satellites to orbit over the past couple of years. The company has also built a spacecraft manufacturing business, to...
    VIDEO4:4004:40J&J CEO: Our science is well positioned to deal with variantsSquawk Box Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky told CNBC on Monday that the company's Covid-19 vaccine will be an important tool in the fight against the coronavirus because it prevents hospitalizations and keeps people from dying. The FDA on Saturday authorized J&J's Covid-19 vaccine for emergency use, making it the third shot to be approved for distribution in the U.S. and the only vaccine that requires just one dose. Clinical trial data shows J&J's vaccine is 66% effective overall at protecting against Covid-19, compared with about 95% for Pfizer's and Moderna's vaccine. Some people have questioned whether they should get J&J's vaccine due to the lower effectiveness rate. While the efficacy rate is lower, the most important finding of the vaccine is that it prevented 100% of virus-related hospitalizations and deaths, Gorsky said. "There's a lot of different ways...
    Washington (CNN)The chief executive officer of Goya Foods, Robert Unanue, made a series of false claims about the 2020 election at the Conservative Political Action Conference on Sunday -- a little more than a month after the company board took action to limit his polarizing public political remarks. In 2020, Unanue's compliments of then-President Donald Trump generated controversy and calls for a boycott of Goya, which markets itself as "the premier source for authentic Latino cuisine." After Unanue questioned the legitimacy of the election in a Fox Business interview in January 2021, Goya's board voted to prevent Unanue from speaking to the media without board permission, according to a source familiar with the board's action. On Sunday, though, Unanue appeared on the CPAC stage in Orlando and said: "It's just an honor to be here. But my biggest honor today is gonna be that -- I think we're gonna be...
    Montana pileup accident: Two people were injured in a 30-vehicle pileup in whiteout conditions CDC Traces Covid-19 Outbreaks in Gyms, Urging Stricter Precautions © Shoshy Ciment/Business Insider Trader Joe's Shoshy Ciment/Business Insider A New York man said he was fired by Trader Joe's after he requested the company make changes to better protect workers. Ben Bonnema said on Twitter he was fired after sending a letter to the company's CEO. In the termination letter he shared, the company said he did not share the grocery chain's "core Values." Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. A New York City man said he was fired by Trader Joe's after he sent a letter to the company's CEO requesting the company make several changes he said would more thoroughly protect the grocery chain's employees from COVID-19.  Load Error In a tweet Friday evening, Ben Bonnema said...
    AUSTIN (CBSDFW.COM) — For the second day in a row, members of the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) are being grilled by lawmakers in Austin about the state power grid and the blackouts that left Texans in the cold and dark, and cost some their lives. Peaking during the Senate hearing in Austin the CEO Of Oncor, Allen Nye, testified that his team saw energy numbers so low that Texas was on the brink of a statewide blackout that could have lasted until St. Patrick’s Day. READ MORE: Frisco Firefighters Respond To Multiple House Fires In 24 Hours, No Injuries “But at 2:02 [a.m.] we came within two one-thousandths of one percentage point of tripping into the first layer of the under frequency relays… the last safety blanket this state has between having electricity and having a total blackout for up to a month,” he said. Texas lawmakers...
    Dan Price, CEO of Gravity Payments, center with long hair, talks to employees in 2015 after announcing the pay increase (Katherine Jones / Idaho Statesman / Tribune News Service via .) The CEO who became famous for raising his employees’ base annual salary to $ 70,000 has made headlines again for his harsh statements against millionaires who practice philanthropy trying to avoid paying taxes. Dan Price, CEO of the credit card processing company Gravity Payments, criticized American elites, claiming that the average billionaire donates a smaller portion of their money to charity each year than ordinary non-citizens. rich. “One of the biggest public relations scams of capitalism is philanthropy,” he said. One of capitalism’s biggest PR scams is the “philanthropist.” The average billionaire donates 1% of their fortune to charity yearly – less than non-billionaires. But when you donate $ 200 you don’t get glowing articles, a hospital named...
    VIDEO1:4901:49Fisker CEO: Our goal is not to appeal to just Tesla drivers but all car buyersMad Money with Jim Cramer The founder and CEO of
    AT&T to Spin Off Long-Suffering DirecTV in Deal With TPG The Autoblog staffs favorite wheel designs Unique Tip If Your Car Has Automatic Headlights Ad Microsoft
    The CEO of the group that controls Texas’s energy grid, says he wouldn’t have done anything differently amid the state’s power emergency. Bill Magness, the CEO of the Energy Reliability Council of Texas (CEO) testified on Thursday during a hearing in front of the Texas State Senate Business and Commerce Committee according to NBC News. During the hearing, Magness was asked by Texas Sen. John Whitmire (D) if he felt like it was his responsibility to ensure that the state did not have to experience mass power outages during the extreme winter weather that battered the Lone Star state and others in the South last week.   "It's our job to keep the grid balanced, and if I'm looking at it, the problem was at the sites of the various generation,” Magness said, according to the news outlet. “I'd just say, I feel a great deal of responsibility...
    This Ohio school reduced spacing measures and is open to all, 5 days a week Joe Biden speaks to Saudi Arabias King Salman before release of Khashoggi murder report Unique Tip If Your Car Has Automatic Headlights Ad Microsoft
    Bill Gates is squaring off with Elon Musk on the subject of Bitcoin, suggesting that anyone who isn't the richest man in the world should be wary of purchasing cryptocurrency.  Gates, the world's third richest man after Musk and Jeff Bezos, took a shot at the Tesla CEO after the electric vehicle maker announced taking a $1.5 billion stake in Bitcoin. 'Elon has tons of money and he's very sophisticated, so I don't worry that his Bitcoin will sort of randomly go up or down,' Gates told Bloomberg on Thursday.  'I do think people get bought into these manias who may not have as much money to spare, so I'm not bullish on Bitcoin. My general thought would be that if you have less money than Elon, you should probably watch out,' he said. Bill Gates is squaring off with Elon Musk on the subject of Bitcoin, suggesting that...
    Goldman Sachs CEO has slammed working from home as an 'aberration' and said it is not the 'new normal' as he revealed the company is not likely to be offering it as a permanent option. David Solomon, 59, insisted the firm would 'correct' the remote working situation 'as soon as possible' while speaking during a virtual conference organized by Credit Suisse on Wednesday. The Goldman Sachs boss, who is based out of the company's New York headquarters, suggested the measure does not suit his investment bank, despite suggestions from other firms that they may seek to retain a form of remote working even after restrictions lift. 'I do think for a business like ours, which is an innovative, collaborative apprenticeship culture, this is not ideal for us,' he told the annual Credit Suisse virtual financial services forum. Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon, 59, claimed in a virtual financial services...
    Fact check: Sign on gendered language is from Australian cafe, not Whole Foods Market US court orders NKorea to pay $2.3 bn over 1968 USS Pueblo seizure Unique Tip If Your Car Has Automatic Headlights Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/5 SLIDES © Provided by Best Life The Pfizer CEO Says This Is How Often You'll Need a COVID Vaccine Right now, most Americans are still awaiting their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. Mounting research has shown that both existing vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer—and one from Johnson & Johnson awaiting approval—are highly effective at protecting against the disease. But receiving a COVID vaccine this year may not offer the kind of protection needed in one go, according to Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, who says the shots may need to become an annual event. Read on...
    Costco CEO Craig Jelinek said that the retailer will boost its minimum wage to $16 an hour starting next week, up from its current baseline pay of $15 an hour. That will hike Costco's lowest pay rate to $1 an hour above that of many competitors, including Amazon.com and Target. Jelinek announced the pay boost while speaking at a U.S. Senate Budget Committee hearing on worker wages at large companies such as Costco, Walmart and McDonald's. Costco's philosophy is that higher pay reduces employee turnover, increases loyalty and ultimately improves efficiency and the bottom line, Jelinek said. The company has 180,000 workers in the U.S. Providing competitive pay "makes sense for our business," Jelinek said. "We try to take care of our employees because they play a significant role in our success." The announcement comes at a moment of debate over the federal minimum wage, which has remained at...
    Freelance contractor Upwork had its best growth year as a public company last year and CEO Hayden Brown sees no sign of momentum that started before the coronavirus pandemic slowing down when the economy reopens. Younger workers, scarred by a job market battered by two recessions in just over a decade, are increasingly seeking more control and flexibility over their careers. The trends have only been heightened by the remote work world, giving companies an opportunity to adjust and tap into a global talent pool of independent professionals, she told CNBC Wednesday. "The paradigm has totally shifted," Brown, appearing on "Mad Money," said, explaining that recessions in 2007 and 2020 dampened workers' trust and loyalty. "We've seen that again for years. That's not a new trend, but it has certainly accelerated today with more than half of Gen Z freelancing and 59 million Americans freelancing." Gen Z, short for Generation...
    A CEO who slashed his own pay by $1 million and upped his employees' minimum salary to $70,000 has said billionaire philanthropy is 'one of capitalism's biggest PR scams'. Dan Price, founder and CEO of the credit-card processing company Gravity Payments, hit out at billionaires who enjoy praise for their charitable giving when they actually donate a smaller fraction of their fortunes than the average American.  Price said the average billionaire donates just 1 percent to charity each year while research from Giving USA shows the average American parts with 2 percent of their fortune.  The 36-year-old entrepreneur, who became a millionaire at the age of 31, also cast doubt on the motives behind philanthropic giving among the nation's richest claiming it 'helps them avoid having to face steeper bills' by paying more taxes.  Price weighed in on the debate as Washington state lawmakers are currently mulling a billionaire wealth...
    VIDEO4:2304:23Marriott International CEO Tony Capuano on his plan for the companySquawk on the Street The hospitality industry has been suffering as tourism dried up during the pandemic, but as Covid vaccine distribution gains headway, Marriott CEO Tony Capuano expects its business to bounce back. "As the vaccine gets widely distributed, we see pretty strong and steady prospects for demand growth," Capuano told CNBC's Seema Mody in an interview Wednesday. Capuano was recently tapped as the hotel chain's CEO, following the death of its former leader Arne Sorenson on Feb. 15. Sorenson had been battling pancreatic cancer. Sixty percent of Marriott's bookings in 2019 were from business travelers. Since more companies now are adapting to remote workplaces, some industry watchers are worried the trend will dent the hotel industry forever, but not Capuano. Marriott's customers have told the company that they're "anxious to get out there and be face to face...
    Dominion Voting Systems CEO John Poulos said that the lawsuit against MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell would “definitely not be the last” against people making false claims about the company after the 2020 presidential election, according to CNBC. It’s “definitely not the last lawsuit,” Poulos said during a Tuesday interview with CNBC. US President Donald Trump listens as Michael J. Lindell, CEO of MyPillow Inc., speaks during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on March 30, 2020. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images) Dominion Voting Systems currently has a lawsuit filed against Mike Lindell, CEO of MyPillow, for $1.3 billion for defamation. Dominion has also filed lawsuits against former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and attorney Sidney Powell as well.  “We are not ruling anybody out,” Poulos said when asked by CNBC whether Dominion would sue...
    Victory for net neutrality law in California Senior Iraq MP target of international extortion bid Dominion Voting Systems will "definitely" file more lawsuits against those who pushed false claims about its role in the 2020 election, CEO John Poulos told CNBC. Dominion has filed defamation suits against Trump's personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell. Asked directly if Dominion would sue Fox News, Poulos said, "We are not ruling anybody out." Dominion Voting Systems CEO says companys intention is to get the facts on the table CNBC See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next How you can save $1 million for retirement USA TODAY How much the most populous states pay mail carriers GOBankingRates Creepy ways your company can spy on you while you work from home Veuer ...
    VIDEO2:2002:20Brinks CEO says cash use is growing, despite pandemic impacts on economyMad Money with Jim Cramer While digital retail sales have surged during the coronavirus pandemic as homebound consumers spend more time on money online, cash is still king, according to the chief executive of Brinks. Doug Pertz, CEO of the cash management company know for its money-carrying armored trucks, told CNBC's Jim Cramer Tuesday that data show cash circulation in the U.S. economy is even higher than pre-pandemic levels. "Potential investors confuse that cash is going down," but "the strength of cash is just as strong as it was before, and the amount of cash [used] in the economy is just as strong," he said in a "Mad Money" interview. Despite the growing popularity of digital transactions in an increasingly contactless world, physical money remains a mainstay for in-person retail purchases. The results have not changed materially from a...
    Happy Tuesday MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories:Reassess your life and career every 7 years by asking these 3 questions Here's a response to feeling burned out at work or depleted by relationships.Nearly half the states are taxing companies over PPP loans that have been forgiven How is your state treating COVID loans made to companies? Financial guru Dave Ramsey is selling his $15.45 million Tennessee estate It's no surprise that the massive estate of the prominent radio host Dave Ramsey, in Franklin, TN, has turned out to be a great investment — that is, if he can sell it for anywhere near his $15.45 million asking price.We put our extravagant neighbors in touch with our financial adviser. They called her ‘lousy.’ So how come WE are the ones who retired early? ‘Warren Buffett and Harry Potter couldn’t get those two retired early.’I’m 28, have zero debt, a 401(k), Roth...
    VIDEO3:3603:36Dominion Voting Systems CEO says company's intention is to get the facts on the tableClosing Bell Dominion Voting Systems, a primary target of baseless conspiracy theories about the 2020 presidential election, will "definitely" file more lawsuits against those who pushed those false claims, the company's CEO said Tuesday. CEO John Poulos, whose company filed a $1.3 billion defamation suit a day earlier against MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, confirmed that more legal action was coming in an interview with CNBC's Eamon Javers on "Closing Bell." It's "definitely not the last lawsuit," Poulos said. Asked directly if Dominion would sue Fox News, Poulos said, "We are not ruling anybody out." Dominion since January has also filed suits against former President Donald Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and the pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell.Combination of Mike Lindell, Rudy Giuliani and Sidney Powell who are being sued by Dominion Voting Systems.Reuters | Getty Images |...
    VIDEO2:5102:51Lucid Motors CEO discusses financial details of SPAC deal with Churchill CapitalSquawk on the Street Lucid Motors CEO Peter Rawlinson on Tuesday touted what he called the electric car company's "world class tech," but acknowledged challenges around automobile production. Rawlinson, former Tesla engineering executive, appeared on CNBC the morning after Lucid announced a reverse merger with special purpose acquisition company Churchill Capital Corp IV to go public. It's the largest SPAC transaction involving an EV company. SPACs are an alternative to initial public offerings for firms that want to become publicly traded stocks. CCIV shares sank nearly 48% to $30 per share in early Tuesday trading, before recovering some of those losses, giving the merged company a market value of more than $50 billion, according to Reuters, bigger than Ford Motor. By comparison, direct competitor Tesla has a market cap of more than $637 billion. Ahead of Monday night's announcement and subsequent...
    MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell said Monday that he believes he will lose up to $65 million this year over retailers boycotting his business after he repeatedly made unsubstantiated claims about the 2020 presidential election being stolen from former President TrumpDonald TrumpFauci: U.S. political divide over masks led to half a million COVID-19 deaths Georgia bishop says state GOP's elections bill is an 'attempt to suppress the Black vote' Trump closer to legal jeopardy after court ruling on tax returns MORE. Lindell made his projection in an interview pushing back on claims that his support of Trump is helping him to sell his pillows. “I lost 20 retailers, and it’s cost me $65 million this year that I won’t get back, OK?” Lindell told Business Insider. “There’s your story. Print it right. Don’t try and twist this." Dominion Voting Systems filed a $1.3 billion defamation lawsuit against Lindell on Monday for his repeated unfounded accusations that...
    VIDEO4:4404:44MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor on his expectations for bitcoin's trajectorySquawk Box MicroStrategy CEO Michael Saylor told CNBC on Tuesday he believes bitcoin will continue appreciating in value to the point where the cryptocurrency becomes a "stabilizing influence" for the entire global financial system. He predicted, in a bold call, that bitcoin's market value would be worth $100 trillion one day. Saylor's comments on "Squawk Box" came as the price of bitcoin fell more than 10% Tuesday, dipping below $50,000 per unit. The move lower took the market value of the world's largest cryptocurrency back under $1 trillion, just a few days after the volatile digital asset eclipsed that level for the first time. However, Bitcoin was still up 60% since the start of the year and up more than 360% in the last 12 months. "There's a $500 trillion monetary planet and the outer layer is currency, then you've got...
    Is that so? The CEO of Royal Caribbean Cruises has wagered that the cruise line’s new coronavirus protocol will make sailing "safer than a walk down Main Street" when cruising resumes at an undetermined date amid the global pandemic. Chairman and CEO Richard Fain was optimistic during a fourth-quarter earnings call on Monday, according to a transcript from The Motley Fool. Though Royal Caribbean’s fleet is floating idle due to the suspension of global operations, Fain said administrators are hard at work behind the scenes to establish protocol for a safe and healthy return to cruising. Royal Caribbean has suspended most of its global operations through April. Richard Fain, the chairman and CEO of Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd., is seen speaking during a panel discussion in Miami in 2015. (Mark Elias/Bloomberg via Getty Images) Guided by the Healthy Sail Panel, headed by former FDA commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb and...
    More On: 2020 presidential election Former Sen. Loeffler reportedly launches voter group in Georgia Baltimore Symphony Orchestra scolds flutist for social media conspiracy theories GOP will do fine — with or without Donald Trump Millions raised by Lincoln Project went to companies run by group’s founders My Pillow founder Mike Lindell says he has lost $65 million in revenue this year because of mass boycotts over his ongoing claims that the presidential election was stolen. The 59-year-old CEO revealed the devastating cost to his business — even as he scoffed at claims made in a $1.3 billion lawsuit that his alleged “big lie” over election fraud was “because the lie sells pillows.” “I lost 20 retailers, and it’s cost me $65 million this year that I won’t get back, OK?” Lindell told Insider. “There’s your story. Print it right. Don’t try and twist this,” he told the outlet. Lindell...
    75-year-old protester shoved to ground by police in Buffalo files lawsuit Malaysian court halts Myanmar deportation after outcry © Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell walks out ahead of then-President Donald J. Trump to speak with members of the coronavirus task force and reporters in March. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images Dominion Voting Systems sued MyPillow and its CEO, Mike Lindell, for defamation and is seeking $1.3 billion in damages. The lawsuit claims Lindell turbocharged sales for his business while pushing election fraud claims. Lindell told Insider he's actually losing tens of millions of dollars. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell said he expects to lose $65 million in pillow revenue this year following retailer boycotts over his claims that the 2020 election was rigged. Load Error Those losses, Lindell told...
    Mike Lindell, the CEO of MyPillow, said he expects to lost $65 million in revenue this year, after his company was boycotted by retailers over his unsubstantiated claims of electoral fraud. Lindell, 59, was sued by Dominion Voting Systems for $1.3 billion on Monday in a defamation lawsuit, in response to his continued claim that the election was stolen, and Dominion's machines switched Donald Trump's votes. In the suit Lindell was accused of making the wild claims in a bid to appear more frequently on television, and promote his company. Mike Lindell was sued by Dominion Voting Systems on Monday and is facing a boycott Mike Lindell, CEO of MyPillow, said that a boycott of his pillows would cost him $65 million Dominion Voting Systems, pictured in Georgia, were accused by Lindell of switching votes 'Lindell — a talented salesman and former professional card counter — sells...
    NYC to allow Central Park ice rinks to stay open for rest of season Facebook will restore news in Australia after talks with the government © Gravity Payments KEY WORDS Load Error He’s not buying what America’s billionaires are selling. The CEO known for increasing his employees’ base pay to $70,000 says wealthy people donating their money and getting rewarded with “glowing articles, a hospital named after you and a massive tax write-off” amount to “one of capitalism’s biggest PR scams.” Dan Price, the CEO of the credit-card processing company Gravity Payments, slammed America’s elites on Twitter charging that the average billionaire donates a smaller share of their money to charity each year than the average non-billionaire. As evidence, Price cited a recent ranking of the biggest charitable contributions of 2020, which included deep-pocketed donors such as Amazon founder Jeff Bezos. Critics of wealth inequality have pointed out...
    VIDEO4:2104:21Royal Caribbean CEO sees correlation between cruise bookings and vaccination numbersThe Exchange Royal Caribbean CEO Richard Fain told CNBC on Monday the cruise operator has seen a number of optimistic signs in its early booking data that suggest a positive recovery from the coronavirus pandemic. "Some of the things we thought was going to happen aren't happening. They're better than we thought," Fain said in an interview with CNBC's Seema Mody. The age of customers who are signing up to take trips is one example where reality has diverged from the company's expectation, according to Fain. "We really thought older people would be more cautious. Turns out they want to get out of the house, too," said Fain, explaining that a likely factor is that older people have received priority access to Covid vaccines. Cruise history is another unexpected characteristic of the customers who are booking trips, said Fain, who...
    Vogue's former editor-at-large Andre Leon Talley has claimed he is being forced out of his $1 million New York home by the ex-CEO of Manolo Blahnik who is alleging he actually owes $500,000 in rent.  Talley, 72, has been living at the 11-room colonial home in White Plains, just outside of Manhattan, since 2004 and claims that he is now the rightful owner. He says his former friend George Malkemus, who is the ex-CEO of Manolo Blahnik USA, originally bought the home for him for just over $1 million and they had a 'gentleman's agreement' that he would pay him back over time.  In court documents seen by the New York Post, Talley claims he provided the $120,000 down payment for the home and had paid back $1,075,588 by January 2020. He also alleges that he personally invested more than $200,000 for home improvements over time.  Vogue's former editor-at-large Andre Leon Talley, 72, has been...
    The best pound-for-pound movie boxers Almost Every State Is In Debt Thanks to COVID-19 — What Now? The Seattle Mariners promoted Kevin Mather to the role of president and CEO in 2017. In 2018, he apologized when it became public that he had been involved in multiple sexual harassment cases while working for the team that required settlements to two separate victims. It was an indictment of the backroom rich boys club that had so long been a part of baseball front offices, where harassers and offensive people were allowed to continue moving up the ranks simply because of who they were. It’s the kind of trend we saw repeated with the Houston Astros, New York Mets, and others. © Provided by The Comeback Mather has skated by in the years but he’s back in the headlines again now that video from a call with the Bellevue Breakfast Rotary...
    There is supposedly a general mood of optimism and confidence in the Ferrari camp as we draw closer to the 2021 F1 season. Having worked on their car in key areas, especially the power unit, the ‘Prancing Horse’ looks set to bounce back from a miserable campaign last year. They have also added 26-year-old Carlos Sainz to their ranks, who will look to forge a strong relationship with star driver Charles Leclerc. Together, their aim remains simple: elevate the Scuderia’s reputation in a gradual path to restoring glory. Speaking in a recent interview, Formula 1 CEO Stefano Domenicali touched upon Ferrari being a ‘fundamental part of his life.’ In addition, he talks about a key objective that the team is seeking this year. Have nothing to recommend to my friend Mattia Binotto, said Domenicali The former Ferrari boss stated, “We are talking about a fundamental part of my life. I...
    Texas TikTok users capture the destruction from this weeks snowstorm Cuomo is an abuser: NY Assemblyman Ron Kim alleges governor threatened him Clorox continues to ramp up production of its disinfecting wipes to meet consumer demand, CEO Linda Rendle told CNBC on Friday. The company is making 1.5 million canisters per day, up from about 1 million last quarter, she said. "People are adopting cleaning as more of a thing around safety and wellness, not just a chore," said Rendle. Clorox CEO Linda Rendle on global market, consumer demand and outlook CNBC See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next How you can save $1 million for retirement USA TODAY How much the most populous states pay mail carriers GOBankingRates Creepy ways your company can spy on you while you work from home Veuer Major...
    Elon Musk tweets in defense of Tesla’s $ 1.5 billion bitcoin purchase as Bitcoin price hits a new record. February 19, 2021 3 min read This story originally appeared on ValueWalk Tesla CEO Elon Musk is talking more about the automaker’s bitcoin purchase. In response to a comment from Binance CEO Changpeng Zhao, I have called Tesla’s $ 1.5 billion bitcoin purchase “adventurous enough for an S & P500 company.” Tesla CEO defends bitcoin purchase Zhao told Bloomberg in an interview that he was surprised that Musk was “so gung-ho on Dogecoin.” Binance is the biggest cryptocurrency exchange in the world by volume, and it recently launched Dogecoin futures. However, Zhao also pointed out that Tesla purchased $ 1.5 billion worth of bitcoin rather than Dogecoin. In response, Musk tweeted that Tesla’s bitcoin purchase “is not directly reflective” of his opinion. He also...
    James Quincey, Chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company speaks during an interview with Reuters in Lagos, Nigeria, November 5, 2019.Temilade Adelaja | Reuters The biggest source of growth for Coca-Cola over the next few years will likely be the zero-sugar version of the company's namesake soda. "Actually, the best growth driver in '21 and probably for the few years is probably going to be Coke Zero Sugar," Coke CEO James Quincey said in an interview that aired Friday on CNBC's "Closing Bell." The drink launched nationwide in 2017 as an updated version of Coke Zero, which was 12 years old at that point. Coke Zero Sugar was meant to resemble the traditional Coke soda more closely, but still appeal to health-conscious consumers by leaving out the sugar. And the product has paid off for the company, fueling sales growth even during the coronavirus pandemic. "Coke Zero grew in 2020...
    VIDEO4:1004:10GameStop hearing didn't properly address trading restrictions: Fmr. TD Ameritrade CEOSquawk on the Street Former TD Ameritrade CEO Fred Tomczyk told CNBC on Friday he believes retail stock market investors have never had it better when it comes to competing against Wall Street pros. "When you think about what the retail investor has today, they have free trading, free research, free investor education, and they have faster and better trade execution than ever," Tomczyk said in an interview on "Squawk on the Street." "The playing field between the retail and the institutional investor is more level than I've ever seen it," added Tomczyk, who led the brokerage firm as president and chief executive from 2008 to 2016. He's now on the board of Cboe Global Markets. Tomczyk's comments came one day after the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services held a hearing focused on the GameStop short squeeze that began...
    The new CEO of Parler called allegations that the social media platform was used to help coordinate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack a “political hit” job and said that Big Tech firms view his company as a “business threat.” Interim CEO Mark Meckler pledged Parler's "independence from the Big Tech oligarchy," and that it would only work with vendors that are committed to "free speech" and that won't come under attack from the "woke mob," during an interview with the Epoch Times on Thursday. Parler was founded in 2018 and billed itself as a platform that protects free speech. It has been popular with conservatives and jumped to the most downloaded app on Apple in November after the presidential election. A handful of Big Tech companies, including Amazon, Apple, and Google, moved to take down Parler in early January, citing its role in enabling the Capitol attack. Parler announced...
    By Sonali Paul MELBOURNE (Reuters) - Australia's Woodside Petroleum sees the military coup in Myanmar as "a transitionary issue" that would not affect its drilling in waters off the Southeast Asian nation, its chief executive said. His comments came as Australia, India, Japan and the United States called for democracy to be restored quickly in Myanmar two weeks after the military overthrew the elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi. Woodside Chief Executive Peter Coleman said the company does not see the coup holding back gas exploration work this year, including pre-engineering work for the A-6 gas field, which Woodside plans to develop with France's Total SA. "At the moment we see this as being a transitionary issue. You've got an emerging democracy working through their processes," Coleman told Reuters. "I look at it and say in the fullness of time the Myanmar people will work this out. At the...
    Texas was 'seconds and minutes' away from 'monthslong' power outages the embattled CEO of ERCOT said Thursday as he defended the grid's rolling blackouts.  A week of below-freezing temperatures knocked about a third of the state's generating capacity offline, resulting in the greatest forced blackout in U.S. history and exposing weaknesses of Texas' unique approach to power grid management.  The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, or ERCOT, operates the power grid that covers most of the state and was behind the decision to have rolling blackouts which left up to 4 million people enduring outages in subfreezing temperatures.  Its CEO Bill Magness told The Texas Tribune Thursday that if operators had not acted 'immediately' in implementing them Monday morning the state would have faced an 'indeterminately long' electricity crisis.  He said: 'It was seconds and minutes [from possible failure] given the amount of generation that was coming off the system.'  ...
    By Gram Slattery and Sabrina Valle RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) - Recent comments by Petrobras Chief Executive Roberto Castello Branco regarding the possibility of a truckers' strike will have consequences, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said on Thursday, adding that "something will happen in the coming days." Bolsonaro did not further specify what measures he would take with respect to the state-controlled company, adding that there would be no political interference at Petroleo Brasileiro SA, as the firm is formally known. In late January, Castello Branco said truckers threatening to strike due to what they perceived as high domestic diesel prices were not the company's problem. Petrobras has repeatedly said it sells fuels domestically in line with international prices. But investors have been jittery about possible political interference at Petrobras for the last two weeks. Earlier in February, the company announced it was changing its fuel pricing policy to allow domestic...
    Jeff Green, CEO of The Trade DeskScott Mlyn | CNBC The Trade Desk CEO and co-founder Jeff Green says last year was a wake-up call to the advertising industry, as consumers move away from watching traditional TV and toward streaming and online video instead. "2020 was a wake-up call to the advertising industry when it came to TV," Green said on the company's fourth-quarter earnings call on Thursday. He said the company's connected TV business, where it sells ads on streaming platforms, doubled in Q4 from a year ago. The Trade Desk, which has a burgeoning business in the area of connected TV, has a lot to gain as ad revenue shifts away from traditional linear television. With more people in their living rooms streaming shows and movies during the pandemic, The Trade Desk has seen more opportunities to show them ads on streaming platforms. Green has said that...
    VIDEO1:3601:36Walmart CEO: Government should provide additional stimulusSquawk Alley When Walmart CEO Doug McMillon went to the White House last week, he said he gave a clear message: Americans urgently need another round of stimulus checks. Walmart's stores and websites reflect consumers' spending patterns, the retail chief said in an interview with CNBC's Courtney Reagan on "Squawk Alley." The company could tell when they stocked up on food and cleaning supplies in the early part of the pandemic and gravitated toward bikes, puzzles and hair color as they remained stuck at home. When shoppers got the most recent stimulus checks at the end of the year, he said a new pattern emerged: More shoppers put the extra dollars toward buying necessities. "We can see in our customer behavior that some customers — as they received this most recent stimulus — are spending it more on basics, more on private brands, smaller...
    Maryland selects Transurban, Macquarie to develop toll lanes for Beltway, I-270 Former state GOP chair launches Senate bid in Ohio CHICAGO (AP) — Boeing said Wednesday that two of its directors are retiring, a sign of further change on the company's board as it faces a shareholder lawsuit alleging weak overview during the 737 Max crisis. Load Error The Chicago-based aircraft maker said Arthur Collins Jr., chairman of the committee that sets executive compensation, and Susan Schwab won’t stand for reelection at Boeing's annual shareholder meeting in April. Boeing directors and executives were named in a shareholder lawsuit filed in a Delaware court that alleges the board failed to properly oversee management during engineering problems with the 737 Max. The plane was grounded for 20 months after two crashes that killed 346 people. The crisis has cost Boeing billions. Last month, former KPMG CEO Lynne Doughtie...
    The former CEO of Facebook has slammed Mark Zuckerberg's 'sad' decision to block news in Australia, while encouraging Aussies to delete the app out of protest.  The US social media giant has infuriated Australians after blocking them from reading and sharing local news in response to a world-first law to make tech giants pay media companies for the content they use. From Thursday, when Australians went to reliable Facebook news accounts they were met with a message saying 'no posts' were available. Even overseas news was hidden.  Stephen Scheeler, former Facebook Australia and New Zealand chief executive officer, said Facebook's controversial move 'looks and feels ugly' and blasted CEO Mark Zuckerberg's motivations.  'It shouldn't have happened. But unfortunately it did. But there's no good answers. If you're Rio Tinto and you blow up an Aboriginal sacred site, there are consequences, people lose their jobs. But at Facebook nobody ever loses...
    The Daily Caller’s Caity McDuffee talked to Parler’s interim CEO, Mark Meckler, about the relaunch of the app after it was shut down by Google and Apple following the Capitol riot. Meckler was first asked whether or not former President Donald Trump would be welcome on the app, since he has been kicked off of almost every single social media platform. “As long as he follows our community guidelines, we’d be happy to have Donald Trump on the platform. There is no direct communication taking place with Donald right now, or anybody else in the president’s team,” Meckler said. Meckler also discussed if he is considering suing Facebook after director Sheryl Sandberg placed blame on Parler to only later find out her website was the most used platform to plan the Capitol riot.(RELATED: Parler Relaunches After Amazon Removes It) “Well certainly Sheryl Sandberg ought to check her own house before...
    CHICAGO (AP) — Boeing said Wednesday that two of its directors are retiring, a sign of further change on the company's board as it faces a shareholder lawsuit alleging weak overview during the 737 Max crisis. The Chicago-based aircraft maker said Arthur Collins Jr., chairman of the committee that sets executive compensation, and Susan Schwab won’t stand for reelection at Boeing's annual shareholder meeting in April. Boeing directors and executives were named in a shareholder lawsuit filed in a Delaware court that alleges the board failed to properly oversee management during engineering problems with the 737 Max. The plane was grounded for 20 months after two crashes that killed 346 people. The crisis has cost Boeing billions. Last month, former KPMG CEO Lynne Doughtie replaced Caroline Kennedy, daughter of President John F. Kennedy, on the board. In 2020, two new directors joined, and the board created a safety committee. The...
    Steve Huffman CEO, Reddit, delivers remarks on 'Redesigning Reddit' during the third day of Web Summit in Altice Arena on November 08, 2017 in Lisbon, Portugal.Horacio Villalobos | Corbis | Getty Images Reddit CEO Steve Huffman will tell members of Congress on Thursday that no significant activity on the company's online community WallStreetBets last month was driven by bots or foreign agents, according to a copy of his prepared remarks. The hearing before the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on Financial Services comes after the WallStreetBets community sparked a trading phenomenon that sent GameStop stock soaring 400% in a week, reaching as high as $483 a share. As trading volume skyrocketed, online trading platform Robinhood was forced to temporarily suspend trading in GameStop and other hot stocks in order to meet its deposit obligations with clearinghouses, locking some traders out of realizing gains and sparking at least one lawsuit. ...
    VIDEO4:0704:07Generac CEO on generator demand and the need to improve infrastructurePower Lunch Severe weather and associated power outages across the United States in the past year have elevated demand for backup generators, bottlenecking suppliers such as Generac. As millions of Texas residents continue to battle through a dayslong massive power shut-off in response to unprecedented snowfall across the state, Generac CEO Aaron Jagdfeld said requests for alternative home powering sources have surged. "We can't make them fast enough, and we're doing everything we can to supply more product in the market," he said Wednesday on CNBC's "Power Lunch." With demand for heat at extreme levels, utilities in Texas, an energy-independent state, cut off power to millions to reduce stress on power grids. The rolling shut-offs have led consumers to seek out automatic home backup generators, much like power shut-offs did during high heat and fire risks in California last year,...
    Dominion Voting Systems has said it will 'imminently' sue MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell for 'tripling down' on his election fraud claims.  An attorney representing the voting firm told The Daily Beast Tuesday: 'He has doubled down and tripled down.' Lindell has repeatedly  pushed his voter fraud conspiracy theories; he released a movie called Absolute Proof which falsely claims a Chinese cyberattack 'flipped' the 2020 election. The Dominion attorney added: 'He has made himself a higher public profile with his documentary.'  There is no evidence of election fraud involving Dominion or any other entity, with dozens of lawsuits filed by Donald Trump and his supporters tossed and recounts coming up with the same vote counts.   The decision to sue Lindell comes weeks after Dominion filed a defamation lawsuit against Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani, who led the former president's efforts to spread baseless claims about the 2020 election. Lindell said Tuesday that being sued by Dominion...
    VIDEO4:5004:50IMAX CEO cites 'pent-up demand' for massive weekend in ChinaClosing Bell Imax broke its box-office records in China over the Lunar New Year holiday weekend and the results foretell what will happen when more U.S. movie theaters resume operations this summer, CEO Rich Gelfond told CNBC on Tuesday. The company, which produces immersive movie experiences, said it grossed $25 million between Friday and Sunday, representing a 45% increase from a pre-pandemic record. "It tells you [that] when it's safe to go outside and people want to go, they're going to run to go to the movies," said Gelfond, who appeared on "Closing Bell" after trading ended for the day on Wall Street. "Detective Chinatown 3," a comedy adventure that was postponed from its Lunar New Year release last year, generated a large portion of Imax's ticket sales during the three-day period. The film brought in $23.5 million, the best results...
    MAGA diehard and pillow magnate Mike Lindell is the next target of a Dominion Voting Systems lawsuit over his wild claims about nonexistent election-fraud conspiracy, with the lead attorney representing Dominion telling The Daily Beast he expects to file the suit “imminently.” Lindell, a staunch Donald Trump ally and founder of the MyPillow company, became a prominent voice and financial backer in attempts to overturn the 2020 presidential election and, alongside Trumpist attorneys Lin Wood and Sidney Powell, made a series of false allegations that China and others somehow hacked voting machines and swung the 2020 election to Joe Biden. “He has doubled down and tripled down. He has made himself a higher public profile with his documentary,” Tom Clare, an attorney representing Dominion, told The Daily Beast on Tuesday afternoon. Clare confirmed in a brief phone call that Dominion would be filing suit against Lindell “imminently.” The suit would...
    Arne Sorenson, CEO, Marriott International speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, January 21, 2020.Adam Galica | CNBC Marriott International announced Tuesday the death of its CEO Arne Sorenson, who had been undergoing treatment for pancreatic cancer. This story is developing. Please check back for updates.Related Tags Breaking News: Business Travel Marriott International Inc Retail industry Business
    Steve Ballmer, chairman of the Los Angeles Clippers and co-founder of Ballmer Group, speaks during the GeekWire Summit in Seattle, Washington, U.S., on Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019. The summit draws attendees from across the globe to explore what's next in tech, business, science and society.David Ryder | Bloomberg | Getty Images Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer said Thursday that he regretted not getting into cloud computing earlier. The remarks point to Amazon's success in building a business around renting computing and storage resources to companies, governments and schools. Amazon moved into the market well before Microsoft, IBM, Oracle and other information-technology providers, and has held on to its lead. Microsoft's Azure cloud delivered over $7 billion in revenue in the fourth quarter, according to two analysts' estimates, while Amazon's competing Web Services business generated $12.7 billion in revenue during the same period. The success of AWS has propelled its leader,...
    VIDEO5:0805:08Taylor Morrison CEO Sheryl Palmer on buying power, commodity pricesClosing Bell Taylor Morrison CEO Sheryl Palmer told CNBC Thursday the strength in the housing market has broadened out in recent months, adding another layer to the pandemic-era residential real estate boom. "It's a phenomenal dynamic we're seeing out in the marketplace," Palmer said in an interview on "Closing Bell," one day after the nation's fifth largest homebuilder reported fourth-quarter revenue of $1.6 billion, up 6% year over year. Net sales orders were up 46% compared with the same period a year earlier. "We're seeing strength across pretty much all geographies as well as all consumer groups. That's a shift from a few months ago," said Palmer, who has led Scottsdale, Arizona-based Taylor Morrison since 2007. The housing market has been one of the hottest parts of the U.S. economy as it digs out of the pandemic-induced recession. However, Palmer said...
    Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi told CNBC on Thursday the company discussed but "quickly dismissed" the idea of buying bitcoin with corporate cash like Telsa. However, Khosrowshahi said Uber would consider accepting cryptocurrencies as payment. The comments come after Tesla announced earlier this week that it bought $1.5 billion worth of bitcoin with some cash on its balance sheet and plans to begin accepting the digital coin as payment for its products. Tesla's moves caught Wall Street's attention and some wondered whether the electric-vehicle maker's decision would be a tipping point for further crypto adoption. In an interview on "Squawk Box," Khosrowshahi was asked whether Uber had considered similar actions to Tesla. "It's a conversation that's happened that has been quickly dismissed," he said. "We're going to keep our cash safe. We're not in the speculation business," he stressed. "The upside in our company is in the business that we've built,...
    Trivago CFO Axel HeferSource: Trivago LONDON — The chief executive of European travel booking firm Trivago believes attitudes toward the world's biggest technology companies have changed. Axel Hefer, who has been at the helm of Trivago for almost five years, told CNBC's "Squawk Box Europe" Wednesday that there has been a "change in sentiment" in Europe and across the world when it comes to tackling the power that firms like Google have. "There is an increasing understanding that you need to set some rules that are specific to the digital world, as you've done in the offline world a long time ago," said Hefer. "Over the next couple of years, we do expect some more rules and regulation and that should lead to more innovation-based competition, rather than increasing economies of scale that just dominate the different verticals." Hefer added that "mega platforms control our daily life" and it's...
    The holiday shopping season produced the best end-of-the-year quarter for Mattel in more than a dozen years after toy sales increased by double digits, outpacing the industry, CEO Ynon Kreiz told CNBC's Jim Cramer Wednesday. In its fourth-quarter report released after Tuesday's close, Mattel posted $1.6 billion in sales, up 10% from the year-ago quarter. It marks the first time the toymaker's sales grew double digits in a holiday quarter since 2006 when the figure rose more than 14%. "This was an exceptional quarter for Mattel with our best performance in years with strong consumer demand and another milestone year for the company," Kreiz said in a "Mad Money" interview. The performance, which followed double-digit growth in the third quarter, is one sign that the company's multi-year recovery plan is yielding results under Kreiz's leadership. He highlighted that the company is also improving cash flows. Mattel had its first growth...
    VIDEO5:4505:45Cisco CEO on Q2 earnings and outlook: 'We're in the midst of the recovery'Squawk on the Street Cisco Systems is working to innovate its videoconferencing platform, Webex, to make virtual participation in an in-person meeting a more productive experience, CEO Chuck Robbins told CNBC on Wednesday. Webex and competing offerings from Zoom and Microsoft have seen a surge in user growth during the coronavirus pandemic, as companies were forced to pivot to remote working and business travel was sharply curtailed. In an interview on "Squawk on the Street," Robbins said he envisions a hybrid model going forward — with a return to the office accompanied with more flexibility around remote work than before the pandemic. "In the future world, we're going to have people sitting in conference rooms and we're going to have people at home," Robbins said, in response to a question from CNBC's David Faber about how videoconferencing...
    The debate over how long currently approved vaccines will offer protection against the novel coronavirus is ongoing, but at least one industry giant reportedly believes that for the next several years it may be an annual shot, similar to the flu jab. "Unfortunately, as [the virus] spreads, it can also mutate," Alex Gorsky, Johnson & Johnson CEO recently told CNBC. "Every time it mutates, it’s almost like another click of the dial so to speak where we can see another variant, another mutation that can have an impact on its ability to fend off antibodies or to have a different kind of response not only to a therapeutic but also to a vaccine." Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine, which is pending FDA emergency use authorization, is a one-dose jab that was developing using an adenovirus rather than mRNA technology relied on by Moderna and Pfizer. Interestingly, Johnson & Johnson’s vaccine showed...
    Buffalo, Minnesota: Shooting supect Gregory Ulrich is familiar to police, authorties say McConnell signals to GOP Trump impeachment is a conscience vote Expect to get COVID-19 shots for years to come, Johnson & Johnson CEO says © Scott Halleran/Getty Images KEY WORDS Expect to get annual coronavirus shots for years to come, Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky said Tuesday. In an interview with CNBC, Gorsky said mutations of the coronavirus will necessitate regular changes to vaccines. Video: High Hopes: Vaccine Update with J&J CEO Alex Gorsky at CNBC Healthy Returns (CNBC) High Hopes: Vaccine Update with J&J CEO Alex Gorsky at CNBC Healthy Returns CNBC See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next How you can save $1 million for retirement USA TODAY How much the most populous states pay mail carriers GOBankingRates Creepy ways your company can...
    Lloyd Austin takes first steps to repair a battered Pentagon Dog show: Pet pooches play more when humans are watching Cisco CEO says employees are tired of having to work from home and want to come back to the office People aren't enjoying working from home anymore, Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins said on Tuesday. Cisco won't be bringing employees back to the office at least through the middle of the summer. © Provided by CNBC Parents work from home with their two sons due to the coronavirus outbreak in Paris in 2020. People have changed their minds about working from home since the coronavirus prompted office closures last year, Cisco CEO Chuck Robbins said during an earnings conference call with analysts on Tuesday. At first people liked their new, distributed arrangements, but now some people are yearning to be back at work, he said. Load Error ...
    Nearly eight years since the release of "Grand Theft Auto V," the biggest game under the Take-Two Interactive umbrella is selling better than ever, CEO Strauss Zelnick told CNBC's Jim Cramer Tuesday. The video game, the latest major release of the "Grand Theft Auto" title series from the game developer's Rockstar Games division, sold about 20 million units in 2020 and has now sold 140 million units since its release, according to figures released in Take-Two's corporate earnings reports. "We're grateful for the incredible work that Rockstar Games has done with 'Grand Theft Auto' and 'Grand Theft Auto Online,'" Zelnick said in an interview on "Mad Money." "It's absolutely amazing that 'Grand Theft Auto' has sold more units in calendar 2020 than it did in any year since its original release in 2013. It's just extraordinary." Since the first release of the action-adventure franchise in the late 1990s, Rockstar Games...
    President Joe Biden said that he would not watch the Senate impeachment hearings for former President Donald Trump at the White House Tuesday, suggesting he had more important things to do. “I am not…look I told you before, I have a job. My job is to keep people,” Biden said. “We have already lost over 450,000 people and we could lose a whole lot more if we don’t act and act decisively and quickly.” He said that the job of impeachment was up to the Senate and that he would focus on controlling the coronavirus pandemic and rebuilding the economy. “The Senate has their job and they are about to begin it and I am sure they are going to conduct themselves well,” he said. “That’s all I am going to say about impeachment.” Biden spoke to reporters at a meeting with business leaders to discuss his planned $1.9 trillion...
    History repeats itself Covid-19 cases are falling, but are we past the peak? Cisco Shares Fall After CEO Says Pandemic Drag Is Lingering (Bloomberg) -- Cisco Systems Inc. shares fell after the company reported a big decline in enterprise sales and Chief Executive Officer Chuck Robbins warned Covid-19 is still crimping growth. Sales in the fiscal second quarter totaled $12 billion, in line with a year earlier. Product revenue was $8.57 billion, down from the same period a year ago. Service sales were $3.39 billion, up about 2%, the company said in a statement Tuesday. Revenue from Cisco’s Enterprise segment, which serves large companies, fell 9% year-over-year in the period. During a conference call with analysts, Robbins said the pandemic is “not fully behind us.” Cisco shares slipped more than 5% in extended trading. © Bloomberg Cisco fell in extended trading after reporting quarterly results A large portion of...
    Officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggested that testing people for the coronavirus before they board domestic flights could help reduce transmission as Delta Air Lines CEO Ed Bastian slammed it as a 'horrible idea'. CDC Director Rochelle Walensky on Monday said during a press briefing that requiring air travelers to receive a negative COVID-19 test before boarding could be 'another mitigation measure to try and decrease the spread'. She said that that additional screening at places where people gather like airports could help detect more asymptomatic cases.  However, Walensky did not say if the CDC will be moving forward with such a policy, which the Biden administration has previously said it is 'actively considering'. Late last month, Dr Marty Cetron, the director for the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the CDC, was asked about whether new domestic travel testing requirements might be employed.  ...
    Alex Gorsky, Chairman and CEO of Johnson & Johnson, celebrates the 75th anniversary of his company's listing on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange, September 17, 2019.Brendan McDermid | Reuters People may need to get vaccinated against Covid-19 annually, just like seasonal flu shots, over the next several years, Johnson & Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky told CNBC on Tuesday. "Unfortunately, as [the virus] spreads it can also mutate," he told CNBC's Meg Tirrell during a Healthy Returns Spotlight event. "Every time it mutates, it's almost like another click of the dial so to speak where we can see another variant, another mutation that can have an impact on its ability to fend of antibodies or to have a different kind of response not only to a therapeutic but also to a vaccine." This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.Related Tags Biotech and Pharmaceuticals Biotechnology Coronavirus:...
    Testing, testing, 1, 2, 3. The CEO of Delta Air Lines has criticized a possible coronavirus testing requirement for domestic travel, after Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg mentioned an "active conversation" with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help stop the spread of COVID-19. In an interview published Monday with the Associated Press, Delta CEO Ed Bastian pushed back against the notion of testing people before flights in the U.S., citing already-weak demand and limited capacities for testing for medical purposes. Delta CEO Ed Bastian has pushed back against the notion of testing people before flights in the U.S. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File) DELTA EXTENDS MIDDLE SEAT POLICY "I don't anticipate that is coming. I certainly hope not," Bastian said when asked about his thoughts on the CDC considering such a mandate. "The level of travel that we are carrying domestically in the U.S. — not just Delta, but...
    More On: airlines Don’t drink and fly: Drunk maskhole attacks flight attendant over face-covering rule Four travelers eat 66 pounds of oranges to avoid extra airline fees TSA agents can deny entry to maskless travelers after Biden executive order Pilots out of practice due to pandemic? Some say yes The CEO of Delta Air Lines blasted the Biden administration on Tuesday for considering a proposal to require a negative coronavirus test for all domestic travelers, calling it a “horrible idea” that would fail to keep passengers safe and hamstring an already struggling industry.  ​”It will not keep domestic flyers safer,” CEO Ed Bastian said on CNN Business, asserting that airplanes have high-quality air filters that constantly refresh the air every few minutes to reduce the chance of transmitting the virus.  “Travel domestically in the air transportation system is the safest form of transportation. I think we all know that. Incidents...
    Fired Parler CEO John Matze says he was 'betrayed' and stabbed in the back by heiress investor Rebekah Mercer over his termination - as House Democrats demand a list of investors and creditors after it emerged Trump was offered a stake in the social media company. The 27-year-old has claimed that he was fired by the Parler board last week by after trying to ban QAnon conspiracy theories and crackdown on white supremacists on the social media app he co-founded.   He blamed Mercer, a conservative mega-donor and daughter of hedge fund billionaire Robert Mercer, for his termination.    'I feel like it was a stab in the back by somebody that I thought I knew. And so for me, you know, I would never do business with her again,' Matze told Axios on HBO.  'I thought I knew her. She invited my family on trips with them and everything. I thought that she was, generally speaking, I...
    Milwaukee truck plunge: Driver survives 70-foot drop off an icy roadway as freezing weather snarls traffic across Midwest Judge declines to send Capitol riot suspect back to jail after violating orders Huawei CEO says hed welcome phone call from Biden in first remarks on new U.S. president Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said he'd welcome a phone call from U.S. President Joe Biden in his first remarks since the change of administration in Washington. "I would welcome such phone calls and the message is around joint development and shared success," Ren said. The Trump administration took actions to hamper Huawei's access to key software and components. © Provided by CNBC Ren Zhengfei, CEO of Huawei speaking with CNBC at Huawei headquaters in Shenzhen, China. TAIYUAN, China — Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said he'd welcome a phone call from U.S. President Joe Biden, in his first public remarks since...
    Ren Zhengfei, CEO of Huawei speaking with CNBC at Huawei headquaters in Shenzhen, China.Justin Solomon | CNBC TAIYUAN, China — Huawei CEO Ren Zhengfei said he'd welcome a phone call from U.S. President Joe Biden, in his first public remarks since the change of administration in Washington. Ren is hoping for a softer approach toward the Chinese telecommunication giant he founded after around two years of pressure from Washington. Huawei was labeled a national security threat under the Trump administration, which took actions to hamper the company's access to key software and components. Washington alleged Huawei's networking equipment could be used to spy on Americans. Huawei has repeatedly denied those claims. "I would welcome such phone calls and the message is around joint development and shared success," Ren said in Chinese comments translated by an official interpreter during a briefing with reporters. "The U.S. wants to have economic growth and...
    Hacker tries to dump chemical into Florida citys water California salon owner charged in Capitol riot lingers in L.A. jail CEO of Americas biggest mall owner says some retailers are excited for growth opportunities in 2021 Simon Property Group, the biggest U.S. mall owner, is expecting this year to be better than last, as some retailers start to think about opening new stores. However, CEO David Simon cautioned, "it's going to take some time" to get back to 2019 levels. He mentioned Florida as one example of a positive sign, saying business at its malls and outlet centers is "clicking along," citing "real domestic traffic increases." © Provided by CNBC Shoppers walk through the King of Prussia mall in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. Simon Property Group, the biggest mall owner in the country, is expecting this year to be better than last, as some retailers start to...
    Shoppers walk through the King of Prussia mall in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania.Jennah Moon | Bloomberg | Getty Images Simon Property Group, the biggest mall owner in the country, is expecting this year to be better than last, as some retailers start to think about opening new stores in its malls, and tenants are in a better position to pay their rent on time. "The [retailers] that want to grow their business are excited," CEO David Simon said Monday evening during a call with analysts. "The healthy retailers that believe in their business — believe in their plans — are making deals." However, he cautioned, "it's going to take some time" to get back to 2019 levels. Simon's remarks came after the mall owner on Monday reported weaker year-over-year profits and sales for the fourth and holiday quarter, as the Covid-19 pandemic continues to take a toll on the industry,...
    The former CEO of Parler, a Twitter alternative popular with conservatives, said he was against a potential deal with then-President Donald Trump. Members of the Trump campaign and Parler executives met over the summer of 2020 about a potential deal that would make Parler the former president’s primary social media outlet in exchange for a 40% stake in the company, BuzzFeed News reported Friday. They also reportedly revisited the conversation again in November 2020 after President Biden won the election. "I didn't like the idea of working with Trump, because he might have bullied people inside the company to do what he wanted. But I was worried that if we didn't sign the deal, he might have been vengeful and told his followers to leave Parler," Parler CEO John Matze told Axios. The meeting, which took place at Mar-a-Lago, was set up by Jeffrey Wernick, an early Parler investor and...
    New York (CNN Business)Chevron has built a $170 billion fossil fuels empire that has made the 141-year-old company synonymous with the oil-and-gas industry.But the climate crisis is forcing oil companies large and small to rethink their once-reliable business models. While US oil companies have been far more reluctant than their European rivals to shift away from their cash cows, even Chevron CEO Michael Wirth concedes his company may look different in 2040. Twenty years from now well be earning our profits from energy. But our company looks quite different today than it did 20 years ago," Chevron CEO Michael Wirth"Oil and gas will still be a very big part. Will it be the biggest part? Time will tell," Wirth told CNN Business. "Twenty years forward there are things we are not doing today at any scale that no doubt we will be doing at a very large scale."The Chevron...
    New York (CNN Business)As conservative media has largely abandoned false accusations that electronic voting companies conspired in an attempt to overturn election results, MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell has emerged as one of America's most prominent voices still promoting that debunked conspiracy theory.That could get him sued just like the right-wing media operations that once made those same claims."Mike Lindell is begging to be sued, and at some point we may well oblige him," Michael Steel, spokesman for Dominion Voting Systems, told CNN's Chief Media Correspondent Brian Stelter on "Reliable Sources" Sunday.Dominion and rival voting tech company Smartmatic have filed lawsuits against several right-wing media companies and personalities. That has led conservative media companies to make substantial changes to their coverage, including on-air corrections about electronic voting systems' role in the 2020 elections and a near-halt of discussion about the topic. Fox Business recently announced it dumped top-rated Lou Dobbs from...
    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg made an appearance on the invite-only Clubhouse app where he dished about his firm’s progress in virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technology. Under the name ‘Zuck23,’ Zuckerberg said ‘we should be teleporting, not transporting’ and believes the futuristic work being done at Facebook’s Reality Labs group could soon make it happen - at least virtually. ‘One of the things that [VR] will unlock is the ability to live anywhere you want and be present in another place and really feel like you are there,’ the CEO said. ‘It is going to unlock a lot of economic opportunity because people will be able to live where they want and increasingly work where they want and kind of teleport into place.' ‘I am also pretty optimistic about the impact on climate, in reducing the amount of commuting that people have to do.’ ‘I think the advance...
    Biden to use Defense Production Act to increase supply of Covid-19 vaccines and tests Stimulus checks: Why you wont get another payment for weeks -- if at all Ford CEO confident in electric-vehicle strategy, says automaker wont cede the future to anyone "We're not going to cede the future to anyone" when it comes to electric vehicles, Ford CEO Jim Farley told CNBC on Friday. He said Ford's EV strategy is focused on investing in auto segments where it's "the dominant player." Ford announced a day earlier it's boosting its EV investment to $22 billion through 2025. Ford CEO on the production impact of global chip shortages CNBC See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next How you can save $1 million for retirement USA TODAY How much the most populous states pay mail carriers GOBankingRates Creepy...
    VIDEO3:4603:46Ford CEO on the production impact of global chip shortagesSquawk on the Street Ford Motor CEO Jim Farley on Friday touted the automaker's electric-vehicle strategy, telling CNBC the company intends to strongly compete in the growing market segment. Farley's comments on "Squawk on the Street" came one day after Ford reported better-than-expected fourth-quarter earnings. As part of that announcement, Ford said it's increasing its electric-vehicle investment to $22 billion through 2025, almost double what it had previously pledged to spend. Shares of Ford were higher by 2.7% during Friday's session to roughly $11.70 apiece. "We're not going to cede the future to anyone," Farley told CNBC's Phil LeBeau. "Our electric strategy is very specific. We're going to invest in segments where we're the dominant player and we have scale, like the F-150, the Transit van, our Mustang." While Ford is committing new capital for the years ahead, Farley said the company's...
    Evan Spiegel, CEO of SNAP Inc.Stephen Desaulniers | CNBC Snap CEO Evan Spiegel told CNBC on Friday that while Apple's upcoming iPhone privacy changes will certainly be disruptive for advertising, it's ultimately the right choice for its consumers. "We feel like we're well prepared for these changes and frankly because these changes are in line with our privacy philosophy, we've never allowed device specific targeting, for example, and we've always taken a very protective stance when it comes to our users' data," Spiegel said in a "Squawk Alley" interview. "We generally view this as a good thing overall for consumers, even if it's a little disruptive for advertisers in the near term." To target mobile ads and measure how effective they are, app developers and other industry players currently often use Apple's identifier for advertisers (IDFA), a unique string of letters and numbers on every Apple device. But once a privacy...
    More On: 2020 presidential election Malliotakis among 11 GOPers voting to strip Marjorie Taylor Greene of committee assignments Andrew Yang: ‘I’ve been trying to escape New York for a while’ Pennsylvania official at center of Trump election concerns resigns Biden is failing on COVID by the standards he set as a candidate My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell has made a three-hour documentary expounding on his baseless conspiracy theories about the 2020 presidential election. Lindell claims the movie will show “100 percent” that China and other countries flipped votes in President Biden’s favor — even though Donald Trump’s own law-enforcement officials found no evidence of any such thing. “Everyone needs to share it with everyone you know, because anyone that sees this, even if it’s nine Supreme Court justices, every one of them would say, ‘Wow, this is an attack on our country,” Lindell said in a rambling interview with...
    How we got WiFi to students in our family shelters (opinion) Senate approves budget to sideline GOP on Biden’s $1.9T stimulus Demand for smores spiked in areas with most COVID-19 cases, the CEO of Hershey says - and the company tracked infection rates to decide its ad spend © Scott Olson/Getty Images Hershey's Milk Chocolate Scott Olson/Getty Images Hershey CEO Michele Buck said demand for s'mores ingredients spiked in areas with high COVID-19 rates. The company tracked cases and adjusted its ad spending to target those areas, Buck told CNBC. Q4 profits for Hershey rocketed 41.5% to $405.1 million, the company said Thursday.  Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. As COVID-19 spread around the US, so did demand for s'mores, according to The Hershey Company.  Load Error "This past year, we noticed that wherever COVID case counts were elevated, we were seeing increasing...
    VIDEO4:5004:50Tapestry CEO on its surging $1.3B digital business, post-pandemic planClosing Bell Tapestry CEO Joanne Crevoiserat told CNBC on Thursday the company saw a surge in demand for a heart-shaped Kate Spade bag that went viral on TikTok last month. "We were able to harness that. The bag sold out. We got it restocked. We're learning how to engage that community better and better," Crevoiserat said in an interview on "Closing Bell," after the retailer reported better-than-expected earnings for its holiday quarter earlier in the day. Crevoiserat's comments provide another example of the potential social media platforms like TikTok represent for Tapestry and other consumer brands. Its influence appears to stretch categories, too. For Tapestry, the increasingly popular app drove sales for its crossbody heart bag while toy companies also have seen sales growth linked to TikTok during the pandemic. TikTok's potential for brands is perhaps best exemplified...
    VIDEO1:5301:53Merck's Ken Frazier: 'Not in my plans' to run for officeHalftime Report Among the first things Ken Frazier says he reads in the mornings are the obituaries in the New York Times. "It's not morbid," Frazier, 66, said Thursday in a telephone interview. "The reason you read them is because most of us spend our life polishing our resume ... and my dad used to say, 'It's what they say about you at the end that matters. Did you care about people?' That's not on your resume." Frazier has quite the resume, which will get an update in June when he retires as chief executive officer of Merck after 10 years at the helm. Frazier will become the pharmaceutical giant's executive chairman for some period of time, while the company's chief financial officer, Robert Davis, becomes CEO. Frazier's time leading Merck saw a dramatic shift in the way some forms...
    VIDEO4:5404:54Hershey CEO says wherever Covid case counts were elevated, there was an increase in S'mores ingredient salesClosing Bell Hershey is seeing strong demand for its chocolates and seasonal candies as people are cooped up inside their homes, searching for every small occasion to celebrate. "Throughout the entire year, seasons was one of the key drivers as consumers really wanted the comfort and the normalcy associated with seasonal traditions and rituals at a time when Covid uprooted their lives," said Hershey CEO Michele Buck in an interview Thursday with CNBC's Sara Eisen on "Closing Bell." One notable example, was a trend Hershey spotted that as coronavirus cases spiked around the country, demand for s'mores ingredients rose. No doubt, families were seeking pleasure by setting up barbecues in their backyards and roasting s'mores by the fire. Hershey said its chocolate sales were 40% to 50% higher in areas with an increased number of Covid-19 cases than areas...
    ’This storm is deadly’: blizzard causes multi-vehicle crash in Iowa Democrats press ahead with move to discipline extremist congresswoman Parlers former CEO says he was fired for wanting to moderate right-wing extremism on the platform © Provided by Business Insider Parler CEO John Matze Fox News Parler's former CEO says he was fired because he wanted to quell right-wing extremism on the app.  Extremists turned to the app in January after Facebook and Twitter cracked down on misinformation.  A Parler executive said Matze's characterization of his firing was misleading, but provided no details.  Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. John Matze, the former chief executive of right-wing social media app Parler who was fired last month, says his ousting by the company's board was in response to his push for more strict moderation of extremism and violence on the platform. Load Error He...