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DOJ’s Antitrust:

    Senator Amy Klobuchar speaks at the Democratic 2020 U.S. presidential candidates debate at Saint Anselm College in Manchester, New Hampshire, U.S., February 7, 2020.Brian Snyder | Reuters There is growing hostility to mergers and acquisitions (M&A) among an increasing number of policymakers in Washington, D.C. Last year, some in Congress called for a merger moratorium banning all M&A during the pandemic. Then, in a surprise announcement, the FTC — over the objection of two commissioners — said it would no longer quickly approve the vast majority of transactions notified to the government that cannot plausibly reduce competition. Most recently, Senator Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., introduced antitrust reform legislation that would give the government even greater power to block M&A it deems problematic. While these proposals are well-intentioned, they threaten to throw sand in the gears of the economy and to do far more harm than good. Adding friction to M&A...
    Republican Rep. Beth Van Duyne (Texas) is joining a previously uniformly progressive push to keep a former Big Tech adviser out of one of the top antitrust roles in the Biden administration. The first-year lawmaker wrote a letter to the president urging him against appointing Renata Hesse to head the Justice Department’s antitrust division Thursday on the heels of reports that she is a front-runner for the position. Hesse has advised both Google and Amazon, most notably helping shepherd through the e-commerce giant’s $13 billion acquisition of Whole Foods. “While I do not doubt Ms. Hesse’s acumen as a lawyer, I am deeply concerned her experience fighting for Big Tech’s ability to exercise market dominance to engage in massive acquisitions and anti-competitive practices will undermine her ability to neutrally oversee DOJ’s enforcement of antitrust laws,” Van Duyne wrote in the letter to Biden obtained by The Hill. The Hill has...
    Attorney General nominee Merrick Garland hopes to tap a former Facebook lawyer as the leader of the DOJ’s antitrust division, according to a report released Thursday. The Intercept reported Thursday that Garlands hopes to install Susan Davies, a former Facebook lawyer, to lead the antitrust division. Davies represented Facebook in a lawsuit brought by an advertiser, Sambreel Holdings LLC, contending that Facebook kicked it off the tech giant’s platform after Facebook lured away all of its clients and banned users from downloading it. Davies has also reportedly worked for clients to facilitate mergers, fending off antitrust enforcement. The Intercept wrote that Garland’s potential hiring of lawyers such as Davies could prove insufficient in their task of preventing consolidation and anticompetitive behavior. The outlet reported:  But when it comes to antitrust enforcement, the framework in place during the Obama years proved to be insufficient to the task of slowing or reversing...
    Leaked transcript shows church effort to block CVA: EXCLUSIVE N.Y. Deaths Surge; Biden to Unveil Covid Relief: Virus Update Google Closes Fitbit Deal Amid Ongoing U.S. DOJ Review (Bloomberg) -- Alphabet Inc.’s Google closed its $2.1 billion takeover of Fitbit Inc. even though the U.S. Justice Department said it is still conducting an antitrust investigation of the deal. © Bloomberg A Fitbit Inc. wearable device sits on display at the IFA Consumer Electronics Show at the Berlin Messe exhibition hall in Berlin, Germany, on Friday, Sept. 4, 2020. The electronics sector has found a way to thrive amid the global pandemic, with 5G demand helping the industry remain a rare catalyst for Asian factories. In a blog post Thursday, Google said it completed the acquisition and highlighted the company’s binding commitments to protect user privacy. Shortly after the blog was published, the Justice Department’s antitrust division released a statement...
    Visa CEO Alfred Kelly speaks at Boston College's Chief Executive Club luncheon, September 27, 2018. Brian Snyder | Reuters Visa has ended its takeover efforts of Silicon Valley start-up Plaid about two months after the Department of Justice filed an antitrust lawsuit on grounds that it would limit competition in the payments industry. The company said the decision to end the merger was mutual. About a year ago, on Jan. 13, 2020, Visa announced that it planned on acquiring Plaid in a deal worth $5.3 billion — roughly double the start-up's last private valuation. The company's API software, often referred to as the "plumbing" behind fintech companies, lets start-ups connect to users' bank accounts. The company says it integrates with more than 11,000 banks. Plaid CEO Zach Perret said in a statement the company will work with Visa as an investor and partner going forward. The deal hit a snag late last...
    Capitol riot live updates: Air Force veteran fired after reported participation; Apple suspends Parler from App Store Pence to attend Biden inauguration DOJ critical of NCAAs view of antitrust compliance; association president Mark Emmert wants voting delay on rules proposals NCAA President Mark Emmert on Saturday said in a letter to the Justice Department’s antitrust division leader that he has “strongly recommended” to association governing groups that they delay votes scheduled for this week on proposed changes to rules regarding athletes’ ability to transfer and to make money from the use of their names, images and likenesses. These $19k SUVs Will Make You Trade in Your Car Ad Microsoft This is a slam dunk if you want a one-card wallet in 2021 Ad Microsoft ...
    The NCAA is set to delay a potential landmark vote on legislation that would permit college athletes to be compensated for their fame for the first time after the association received a warning from the Department of Justice about potential antitrust violations. NCAA President Mark Emmert on Saturday emailed a letter to Makan Delrahim, assistant attorney general of the DOJ's antitrust division, saying he strongly recommended putting off votes on new name, image and likeness rules by two key legislative bodies that had been scheduled for next week. The letter was obtained by The Associated Press. The New York Times was first to report on Emmert’s letter to the Department of Justice. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM USA Today reported Friday that Delrahim had sent a letter to Emmert, expressing concerns about the NCAA’s NIL proposal and the restrictions it put on athletes’ ability to access the...
    Google called for the court to dismiss the lawsuit in the filing and challenged issues point-by-point. The response won’t necessarily hold sway. The DOJ contended in its lawsuit that Google’s high-profile deals with phone makers like Apple and Samsung make it harder for rivals to assail the company’s search leadership — that can still be true regardless of how easy it is to switch to other search engines. There would still be problems even if Google succeeded in ending the lawsuit. The tech firm is facing two multi-state lawsuits, one led by Colorado and one by Texas, that accuse it of abusing its commanding positions in advertising and search. Google could face significant repercussions if any one of the cases succeeds, provided there isn’t a settlement instead.
    Google is pushing back in court this week on antitrust claims brought against it by the Justice Department two months ago. In a legal filing with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Google denied or partially rejected almost 200 specific complaints against it. On only one count, that Google was a “founded in Menlo Park garage 22 years ago,” did the company side with the Justice Department. It said that people use its search engine “because they choose to, not because they are forced to or because they cannot easily find alternative ways to search for information on the Internet." In October the Justice Department sued Google for abusing its dominance in online search and advertising — the government’s most significant attempt to protect competition since its groundbreaking case against Microsoft more than 20 years ago. And last week U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta set a tentative...
    Google is pushing back in court this week on antitrust claims brought against it by the Justice Department two months ago. In a legal filing with the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, Google denied or partially rejected almost 200 specific complaints against it. On only one count, that Google was a “founded in Menlo Park garage 22 years ago,” did the company side with the Justice Department. It said that people use its search engine “because they choose to, not because they are forced to or because they cannot easily find alternative ways to search for information on the Internet.” In October the Justice Department sued Google for abusing its dominance in online search and advertising — the government’s most significant attempt to protect competition since its groundbreaking case against Microsoft more than 20 years ago. And last week U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta set a...
    Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairman Joe Simon speaks during a press conference on September 4, 2019, at the FTC headquarters in Washington, DC.Mandel Ngan | AFP | Getty Images With its groundbreaking antitrust lawsuit against Facebook, the Federal Trade Commission is facing more than just a fight against a multi-billion dollar tech giant — it's battling to regain credibility that could determine its future. The FTC was roundly criticized by lawmakers on both sides of the aisle following privacy settlements tech hawks deemed to be toothless. In July 2019, the agency settled a privacy investigation into Facebook following the Cambridge Analytica scandal for $5 billion, representing about 9% of the company's 2018 revenue. Shortly after, it settled alleged violations of children's privacy on Google-owned YouTube for $170 million. "The FTC is foolish & foolhardy to rely on money alone to punish decades of past privacy violations & ongoing profiteering," Sen....
    It’s one of three antitrust lawsuits Google is currently facing in the US. The DOJ and 11 states filed suit against Google in October. The two others emerged just this week. One of them is led by Texas and has support from nine other attorneys general. It focuses on the company’s ad tech.  A group of 38 attorneys general filed the other suit. It’s similar to the DOJ case in that it accuses Google of maintaining its dominant market position in search and search advertising through anti-competitive behavior. In its response, the company said redesigning Google Search would “harm American consumers and businesses.”
    The Google logo outside if its New York City offices, which were closed on May 19, 2020 due to the coronavirus pandemic.Ben Gabbe/Getty Images The Justice Department's antitrust lawsuit against Google likely won't go to trial until late 2023, Judge Amit Mehta said at a status hearing on Friday. Both parties agreed that seemed like a likely timeline and the judge set September 12, 2023, as a tentative date to start the trial. The proposed timeline shows just how long Google (and likely Facebook) will be fighting antitrust challenges from the U.S. government. Google now faces three lawsuits from different groups of states and the DOJ, some of which could be consolidated before the same judge. That means both that scrutiny of Google's business is likely to remain in the spotlight for several years, and that any changes potentially ordered by the court would also take a long time. In...
    California Attorney General Xavier Becerra speaks at a media conference in Los Angeles, California, U.S. August 2, 2018.Lucy Nicholson | Reuters California is seeking to join the Justice Department in its antitrust lawsuit against Google, according to a court filing the state submitted on Friday. The move makes Google's home state the first Democratic enforcer to seek to join the DOJ and eleven Republican attorneys general in the lawsuit. California did not join the initial group of 50 states and territories that launched an investigation into the search giant last year, but Politico later reported it had been pursuing its own probe. State Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who recently became President-elect Joe Biden's pick to lead the Department of Health and Human Services, said in the filing that California would not seek any changes to the original complaint announced in October. "By using exclusionary agreements to dominate the market, Google...
    Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives to testify following a break during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee joint hearing about Facebook on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images Facebook now faces a legal challenge alleging anticompetitive practices. Facebook first disclosed it was being investigated on antitrust grounds by the Federal Trade Commission in July 2019. A coalition led by New York's Letitia James announced a probe into the business shortly after. Facebook has faced accelerating scrutiny around both its handling of user data and competition practices since 2017 when news investigations revealed its service had been used by political data firm Cambridge Analytica to gain information about users without their consent ahead of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The FTC settled with Facebook for $5 billion last year after probing its data practices, which tech hawks in...
    More than 40 states apparently plan to sign on to a New York-led antitrust lawsuit against Facebook. While it is not known what antitrust violations they plan to include, according to CNBC, one allegation frequently made is that Facebook has strategically bought out small potential rivals at large prices to protect their grasp on the social media market. Some of those purchases include Instagram in 2012 and WhatsApp in 2014. Facebook has also faced increased pressure in Congress from both sides of the aisle in recent years, with Democrats accusing the company of being a platform for fake and misleading information, while Republicans have charged that the company censors conservative views. Former Federal Trade Commission Chairman William Kovacic said that the bipartisan nature of the complaints against tech giants in recent years should give authorities the confidence to carry out antitrust investigations. “The supportive chorus of elected officials is giving...
    It’s only been a few months since the US Department of Justice filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, but it sounds legal battles are on the horizon. According to The Wall Street Journal, both federal and state antitrust authorities will be filing new lawsuits against Google and Facebook. This would mark the first time that Facebook has been sued by the government on antitrust grounds. Google has made plenty of statements in the past defending its practices, essentially saying that consumers aren’t forced to use Google products and services and that they exist as part of a competitive technology marketplace. Broadly speaking, the case against Google is that it uses its dominance in search and search advertising to box out potential competitors; among its tactics is paying to have Android phone manufacturers set Google search as default and pre-loading devices with Google apps. The company also pays to have Google...
    Put yourself in the well-shined shoes of some ambitious lawyer in the Department of Justice – someone who's managed to win a coveted spot on the team bringing the antitrust case against Google. This is the case of a lifetime. Billions of dollars are at stake in a precedent-setting legal action against one of the world's biggest and most visible companies. Win this one and you can resign from your civil service job and walk into a partnership at some big silk-stocking law firm. But you've got a problem. You can't go into court with some vague complaint about how Google is just too big. It's not against the law to be worth more than $1 trillion. To win the case, your team has to show first that Google has "monopolized or attempted to monopolize" some market. That's not going to be easy. Google operates in two distinct markets. The...
    The Department of Justice is investigating antitrust concerns surrounding Penske Media’s deal to buy The Hollywood Reporter, The Post has learned. Sources close to the situation said the DOJ has begun a formal and “active investigation” of the merger, concerned that it would put three of the four major trade publications that cover Hollywood under a single roof, sources close to the situation said. In late September, PMC CEO Jay Penske, son of auto-racing kingpin Roger Penske, inked a $225 million deal to acquire 80 percent of The Hollywood Reporter’s parent MRC — a merger that would also give PMC control of the influential music trade magazines Billboard and Vibe. The deal is slated to close by the end of the year. Sources said DOJ officials have been reaching out to third parties — including ad agencies that work with digital media companies and in-the-know Hollywood talent agencies that rep...
    What lies ahead for the Cubs this offseason? The Best Vegetarian Restaurant In Every State DOJ seeks to block Visas $5.3 billion acquisition of start-up Plaid over antitrust concerns The Department of Justice files an antitrust lawsuit to block Visa's planned acquisition of fintech start-up Plaid, alleging it would limit competition in the industry. The attorneys cited Visa CEO Al Kelly's description of the $5.3 billion Plaid deal as an "insurance policy" to neutralize a "threat to our important US debit business." "Visa rarely faces any significant threats to its online debit monopoly. Plaid is such a threat," the Justice Department says. © Provided by CNBC Plaid co-founder and CEO Zach Perret. The Department of Justice is looking to block Visa's planned acquisition of fintech start-up Plaid on grounds that it would limit competition in the payments industry. Load Error U.S. attorneys for the...
    Plaid co-founder and CEO Zach Perret.Plaid The Department of Justice is looking to block Visa's planned acquisition of fintech start-up Plaid on grounds that it would limit competition in the payments industry. U.S. attorneys for the DOJ outlined potential for the deal to extend a Visa "monopoly" on debit transactions. For antitrust reasons the $5.3 billion acquisition, which was announced in February, "must be stopped," according to the complaint. "By acquiring Plaid, Visa would eliminate a nascent competitive threat that would likely result in substantial savings and more innovative online debit services for merchants and consumers," the Justice Department said in the complaint, which was filed in a Northern California federal court. The DOJ cited Visa CEO Al Kelly's description of the deal as an "insurance policy" to neutralize a "threat to our important US debit business." Plaid is a San Francisco-based financial technology firm that uses APIs to connect...
            by Tim Huelskamp, Ph.D.  It’s safe to say that Big Tech hasn’t had a great month. Google received a beating at the Supreme Court for allegedly stealing the coding needed to create Android. Congress subpoenaed Facebook and Twitter for deliberately blocking news coverage potentially damaging to one political party — a move that culminated in a high-profile hearing yesterday. And now, the Department of Justice has charged Google with illegally maintaining its search and advertising monopoly. Amid all this progress in holding the Big Tech giants accountable, it would be a shame if former Google staffers in the DOJ’s Antitrust Division take actions that inadvertently undercut the entire process. Unfortunately, that’s exactly what leaders in the tech accountability movement fear may happen. Turning Point USA Chairman Charlie Kirk worries that a review of little-known antitrust agreements, called consent decrees, between the federal government and monopolies in the music industry may help the...
            by Thomas Catenacci  Apple has ramped up development of its own search engine technology as antitrust U.S. and European Union regulators scrutinize Google, according to a Financial Times report. The Silicon Valley tech giant has subtly started the transition away from its reliance on the Google search engine, The Financial Times reported. Apple’s latest software update iOS 14, for example, directs users directly to links when they search for a term on their device’s home screen. “Apple’s position is very unique because it has the iPhone and iOS. It controls the default browser,” Sridhar Ramaswamy, former head of advertising at Google, told the FT. The increase in Apple’s search technology capabilities evidenced by iOS 14 signal the potential for a full attack on Google, several industry experts told the FT. While Apple is tight-lipped when it comes to internal projects, the company hired John Giannandrea in...
    West Indies players get all clear before tour to New Zealand The most surprising election upsets in U.S. history Visa $5.3 Billion Plaid Deal Triggers DOJ Antitrust Worries (Bloomberg) -- Visa Inc.’s $5.3 billion acquisition of Plaid Inc. has raised competition concerns at the U.S. Justice Department, which is nearing a decision about whether to sue to block the deal, according to two people familiar with the matter. © Bloomberg Visa Inc. credit and debit cards are arranged for a photograph in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, April 22, 2019. Visa Inc. is scheduled to release earnings figures on April 24. Lawyers at the Justice Department’s antitrust division who are investigating the takeover are worried the deal could allow Visa to acquire a potential competitor, said the people. The division’s leadership hasn’t made a final decision about whether to sue. Load Error Regulators have long had antitrust concerns...
    5 questions going into Gervonta Davis vs. Leo Santa Cruz Spooky American ghost towns Visa Plaid Acquisition Sparks DoJ Antitrust Concern Visa's acquisition of Plaid Inc. reportedly has sparked U.S. Justice Department concern about competition, and the agency is close to deciding whether it should sue to block the deal. © TheStreet Visa Plaid Acquisition Sparks DoJ Antitrust Concern Shares of San Francisco-based Visa, which is scheduled to report fourth-quarter earnings on Wednesday, at last check were down 1.5% to $190.15. Load Error Lawyers at the Justice Department's antitrust division who are investigating the takeover are worried that the acquisition could enable Visa to acquire a potential competitor, Bloomberg reported, citing two people familiar with the situation. The division's leadership hasn't made a final decision about whether to sue. Plaid is a data network used by many financial apps and services including Acorns, Betterment, Expensify and...
    Video of Trump rally appears to show attendee making hand gesture commonly used by white supremacists Fast-food giants like Chipotle and Dunkin are doubling down on TikTok. Here are the top 7 brands winning over Gen Z customers Googles long-time rivals say DOJ antitrust suit shows its lost its halo in the eyes of regulators The Justice Department's new antitrust lawsuit against Google has given some of the tech company's long-time rivals a level of validation. Yelp's Luther Lowe and Foundem's Shivaun Raff have pushed regulators to look into Google's competitive practices for about a decade. Three Google opponents called the lawsuit a good first step, though they hope state attorneys general will expand the case. © Provided by CNBC Foundem creators Shivaun and Adam Raff stand outside of the European Court of Justice for Google's appeal hearing in its competition case in 2020. When Shivaun Raff...
    Foundem creators Shivaun and Adam Raff stand outside of the European Court of Justice for Google's appeal hearing in its competition case in 2020.Shivaun Raff When Shivaun Raff began speaking with European regulators about her complaints of Google's exclusionary conduct over a decade ago, she seemed to stand more or less alone. "Where is everyone?" she recalled regulatory staff asking her husband/co-founder at the time. "Why are you the first people that have come to talk to us?" In 2020, Raff is far from alone in her complaints against Google. Though her vertical search start-up Foundem was the lead complainant in the European Union's investigation into Google's shopping comparison business, many others have joined her fight in the years since. Rivals from around the world have gone public with their complaints that Google unfairly wields its dominance in internet search to edge out competitors, among complaints about its opaque advertising...
    Former Google boss Eric Schmidt has said social media networks 'serving as amplifiers for idiots and crazy people is not what we intended' as he hit back at the Department of Justice's blockbuster antitrust lawsuit.  Schmidt, 65, who stepped down from Google’s parent company Alphabet Inc. in 2019, said the 'most obvious candidate for regulation are the excesses in the social-networking space'.  He told The Wall Street Journal: 'The context of social networks serving as amplifiers for idiots and crazy people is not what we intended. Unless the industry gets its act together in a really clever way, there will be regulation.' The Justice Department on Tuesday announced it was suing Google for abusing its dominance in online search and advertising. Google has already called the lawsuit 'deeply flawed'. Former Google boss Eric Schmidt, pictured last year, has said social media networks 'serving as amplifiers for idiots and crazy people is...
    Pedestrians wearing protective masks walk past a Microsoft Technology Center in New York, on Wednesday, July 22, 2020.Jeenah Moon | Bloomberg via Getty Images Lawyers who prosecuted Microsoft over alleged antitrust violations in the late 1990s saw some familiar tactics in the Justice Department's complaint against Google filed Tuesday. But it's far from a carbon copy of the complaint, according to five lawyers involved in the Microsoft case interviewed by CNBC. The DOJ cited its landmark antitrust case against Microsoft on page five of its complaint against Google, which was filed in the same federal district court that ruled favorably for the government. The suit is not the sprawling indictment of Google's search and advertising businesses that some had expected. But its argument does touch on various parts of its businesses, alleging Google cut off competitors from key distribution channels in part through exclusionary contracts, including its lucrative payments to...
    The government’s quest to rein in Big Tech just took a major step forward. Two weeks after the House antitrust subcommittee issued its landmark report outlining the anticompetitive abuses of the top players, the Department of Justice made its long-awaited move against Google. The DOJ’s antitrust division announced Tuesday that it is suing Google parent Alphabet Inc. over antitrust law violations surrounding its search engine, saying the company has become “the monopoly gatekeeper of the internet.” The landmark case alleges Google abused its market-dominant position and stifled competitors, specifically citing its exclusionary distribution agreements with Apple Inc. and other technology companies that made its search engine the default option on mobile devices and browsers. Google, in a blog post rebuttal, called the suit “deeply flawed,” adding consumers choose to use its free search engine because they prefer it. Eleven Republican state attorneys general signed on to the case. For months now, we’ve known that the DOJ has been preparing an...
    Purdue Pharma pleads guilty to federal criminal charges related to opioid crisis We tried store-bought pumpkin pies from 5 major grocery stores and Wegmans tasted practically homemade The DOJ antitrust lawsuit against Google could pose a risk to Apples valuation, analyst says © Mandel Ngan/Getty Images; Denis Balibouse/Reuters Mandel Ngan/Getty Images; Denis Balibouse/Reuters The Department of Justice's antitrust lawsuit against Google could pose a risk to Apple's valuation, according to a Wednesday analyst note from Bank of America. As detailed in the lawsuit, Apple has received up to $12 billion per year in high margin licensing fees from Alphabet for setting Google as the default search option on iPhones. If that agreement is determined to violate antitrust policies, it could represent a significant hit to Apple's earnings and a risk to its $2 trillion valuation. "Any changes to the rev share agreement could lead to a potential rev/margin...
    An additional seven states may join the Department of Justice’s landmark antitrust lawsuit filed against Alphabet Inc.’s Google in the coming weeks, New York Attorney General Letitia James (D) announced Tuesday. James, along with the attorneys general of Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Utah, said in the following joint statement regarding the DOJ’s suit against Google: Over the last year, both the U.S. DOJ and state attorneys general have conducted separate but parallel investigations into Google’s anticompetitive market behavior. We appreciate the strong bipartisan cooperation among the states and the good working relationship with the DOJ on these serious issues. This is a historic time for both federal and state antitrust authorities, as we work to protect competition and innovation in our technology markets. We plan to conclude parts of our investigation of Google in the coming weeks. If we decide to file a complaint, we would file a motion...
    Google CEO Sundar Pichai testifies during a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, December 11, 2018.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images Google and Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai and the company's top lawyer, Kent Walker, urged employees to keep their heads down amid the Department of Justice's high-profile antitrust lawsuit, according to separate emails to employees Tuesday. "While we can expect some tough criticism and even misleading claims about our work, it's important not to get distracted by this process, including speculating on legal issues internally or externally," Walker wrote in an internal email to workers, which Google confirmed to CNBC. The notes were previously reported by Business Insider. "I've had Googlers ask me how they can help, and my answer is simple: Keep doing what you're doing," Pichai wrote in his note. "Scrutiny is nothing new for Google, and we look forward to presenting our...
    New York Attorney General Letitia James announced Tuesday that an additional seven states may join the antitrust lawsuit filed by the Justice Department against Alphabet Inc.’s Google in the coming weeks.  James and the attorneys general of Colorado, Iowa, Nebraska, North Carolina, Tennessee and Utah, released a joint statement Tuesday, saying they plan to conclude parts of an ongoing bipartisan investigation into Google’s anti-competitive market behavior in the coming weeks. They will then decide whether to file a complaint and would file a motion to consolidate with the case filed by the DOJ on Tuesday. It would be litigated cooperatively, “much as we did in the Microsoft case.” LAWMAKERS HAIL DOJ ANTI-TRUST LAWSUIT AGAINST GOOGLE AS ‘LONG OVERDUE’ “Over the last year, both the U.S. DOJ and state attorneys general have conducted separate but parallel investigations into Google’s anti-competitive market behavior. We appreciate the strong bipartisan cooperation among the states and the good...
    Bill Gates, (R) talks with Steven Ballmer, who was named President of Microsoft July 21, 1998 in Redmond, Washington.Jeff Chistensen | Getty Images The Department of Justice's long-expected antitrust lawsuit against Google draws explicitly from the government's antitrust case against Microsoft almost 20 years ago, offering a narrowly focused argument that has a better chance of holding up than the Microsoft case did. The Microsoft case included several lines of argument, but the core of it was whether Microsoft illegally bundled its web browser, Internet Explorer, with its market-dominating Windows operating system, in turn closing out opportunities for other browsers, including Netscape Navigator. After many twists and turns, including a breakup order that was overturned on appeal, Microsoft and the government reached a fairly narrow settlement in 2001. That settlement did not establish that Microsoft's bundling of Internet Explorer with Windows was illegal, nor did it require Microsoft to unbundle...
     Presented by the Walton Family Foundation   To view past editions of The Hill's 12:30 Report, click here: http://bit.ly/1M1mIfw To receive The Hill's 12:30 Report in your inbox, please sign up here: http://bit.ly/1Tt4hqN   --> A midday take on what's happening in politics and how to have a sense of humor about it.* *Ha. Haha. Hahah. Sniff. Haha. Sniff. Ha--breaks down crying hysterically.   NEWS THIS MORNING I know, I know. Google lawsuits happen a lot. But this one is big:   Via The New York Times’s David McCabe and Cecilia Kang, “The Justice Department accused Google of maintaining an illegal monopoly over search and search advertising in a lawsuit filed on Tuesday, the government’s most significant legal challenge to a tech company’s market power in a generation.” https://nyti.ms/3dIw2Mj  For example: “…through several exclusive business contracts and agreements that lock out competition. Such contracts include Google’s payment of billions of dollars to...
    MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Florida Attorney General Ashley Moody’s office announced Tuesday that Florida is joining forces with the U.S. Department of Justice and 10 other state attorneys general in filing a civil antitrust lawsuit against internet giant Google. The lawsuit seeks to prevent Google from “unlawfully maintaining monopolies through anticompetitive and exclusionary practices in the search and search advertising markets.” Download The New CBS4 News App Here Attorney General Ashley Moody said, “Google is one of the largest and most powerful companies in the world. Regardless of its size, all companies have an obligation to compete fairly in the marketplace. Our investigation into Google revealed that the global tech behemoth allegedly used its size and scale to build a moat around its core markets—general search services and search advertising. “We believe Google’s conduct violates state and federal antitrust laws and that a successful outcome in this...
    The Department of Justice (DOJ) on Tuesday filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, alleging that the company has a monopoly over online search and used anticompetitive practices to maintain that status. In the suit, it called on the court to bring “structural relief” on the search giant, essentially asking for the company to be broken up. Hide Eleven states have signed on with DOJ in the suit. Hide The suit serves as one of the largest pushes against the tech industry in decades and has been long-anticipated. DOJ alleges that Google pays partners to keep other search engines off their browsers and devices, and through these arrangements has managed to grab hold of 80% of all search in the U.S. In the lawsuit, DOJ called Google a self-reinforcing monopoly, where it takes in gobs of revenue, then pays it out to distributors to help keep Google...
    Bridging divides – political and otherwise – to make a positive impact How to Practically and Specifically Help Restaurants This Election Year Google was just hit with an antitrust lawsuit from the DOJ. Heres what antitrust means and how trust-busting laws attempt to keep the biggest firms in US history from growing too powerful. © Provided by Business Insider An 1889 political cartoon. Nawrocki/ClassicStock/Getty Images Antitrust laws were created to keep the big conglomerates, or trusts, that were forming across oil, railroad, steel, and other sectors in the late 1800s and early 1900s from growing too large and powerful. Now, regulators are coming after 21st-century big tech — the Department of Justice filed an antitrust case against Google over antitrust concerns on Tuesday. Google as well as Apple, Amazon, and Facebook have been under heavy scrutiny this year with a congressional investigation into online market competition. The investigation...
    Lawmakers in the House and Senate on Tuesday welcomed the Justice Department’s (DOJ's) move to file an antitrust lawsuit against Google that claims the tech behemoth used its power to preserve its monopoly via its search engine. "Today’s lawsuit is the most important antitrust case in a generation,” Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., said in a statement. “Google and its fellow Big Tech monopolists exercise unprecedented power over the lives of ordinary Americans, controlling everything from the news we read to the security of our most personal information. And Google in particular has gathered and maintained that power through illegal means.” The DOJ suit alleges that Google has used its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and boost profits. The suit could be an opening shot in a battle against a number of Big Tech companies in the coming months. "For years, Google has entered into exclusionary agreements,...
    (Reuters) - The U.S. Justice Department and 11 states filed an antitrust lawsuit against Alphabet Inc's Google on Tuesday for allegedly breaking the law in using its market power to fend off rivals. Alphabet's shares were off 0.5% in premarket trading. COMMENTS: ROBERT PAVLIK, CHIEF INVESTMENT STRATEGIST, SENIOR PORTFOLIO MANAGER, SLATESTONE WEALTH LLC, NEW YORK “(The DOJ) can charge them all they want but these companies probably have more money than the Treasury. In order for anything to have real bite, you need Congress and they want to break them up.” “But given the fact there’s so much animosity, even though they agree something needs to be done with big tech it’s going to take a long time push through. But you’ll probably see pressure on the stocks.” “(Big tech’s) leadership role would change but their parts are worth more than the whole. As a shareholder I’d say ‘break them...
    The Justice Department will file a historic and long-anticipated antitrust lawsuit against Google over its allegedly anticompetitive business practices, especially how it has used its search dominance in the online advertising arena to defeat its competitors, a senior DOJ official confirmed to the Washington Examiner. The federal lawsuit, first reported on Tuesday by the Wall Street Journal, is expected to be filed in Washington, D.C.’s district court. The Justice Department and many state attorneys general have been investigating the tech giant for more than a year, focused on the anti-competitive conduct in Google's online advertising business fueled by its dominance in the search engine and search advertising sphere, connecting online publishers and advertisers to hundreds of millions of users, and where Google controls around 90% of global searches. Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim told the Washington Examiner in November that the Justice Department's investigation into online platforms...
    The Justice Department filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google parent Alphabet on Tuesday, accusing the search juggernaut of maintaining an illegal monopoly. The lawsuit alleges that Google broke the law in how it dealt with rivals to its search and advertising businesses, and accuses the tech giant of disadvantaging competitors in order to keep its own search engine dominant and sell more ads. At issue are a number of tactics, including entering a massive contract worth billions of dollars with Apple to make Google the default search engine on the iPhone, as well as ensuring that its search engine is pre-loaded onto smartphones using Alphabet’s Android operating system, the New York Times reports . Google did not immediately respond to a request for comment. The Justice Department has since last year been digging into Google’s search business and its advertising business, which claims about a third of the world’s...
    U.S. Attorney General William Barr delivers opening remarks at a summit on "Combating Anti-Semitism" at the Justice Department in Washington, July 15, 2019.Erin Scott | Reuters The Department of Justice will file its antitrust lawsuit against Google Tuesday, which will reportedly focus on the tech giant's dominance in online search. Eleven Republican state attorneys general have joined the DOJ as plaintiffs in the case: Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, South Carolina and Texas, according to an open docket of the case filed Tuesday morning. The lawsuit is the culmination of a more than year-long investigation into the company's business practices. Google was previously the subject of a U.S. antitrust investigation by the Federal Trade Commission over its search product, but the agency closed that probe in 2013 without charges. A leaked document published by The Wall Street Journal later showed staff had recommended bringing a case...
    A recent report alleges that the Justice Department plans to charge Google with violating antitrust laws this week in the largest action taken against a U.S. tech firm in two decades. Axios reports that insiders expect that the Justice Department will charge Google with violating antitrust laws as early as this week in what could be the biggest action taken by the government against a U.S. tech firm in decades. The suit will reportedly focus on the company’s monopolistic behavior and could target the company’s advertising business which the Justice Department has also been investigating. Politico reports that one remedy proposal under discussion is to require Google to sell its Chrome web browser. Breitbart News recently reported that a report from top Democratic Congressional lawmakers about the Masters of the Universe including Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google, determined that the companies engage in a range of anti-competitive behavior and that antitrust...
    Oilers have been talking to Coyotes about Oliver Ekman-Larsson The best deals to look for on Amazon Prime Day 2020 Ubers push to expand its food delivery empire just hit another roadblock as the DOJ scrutinizes its plan to buy Postmates © Reuters Uber has become increasingly reliant on food delivery during the pandemic. Reuters The DOJ is taking a closer look at Uber's plans to buy Postmates, Uber disclosed in a regulatory filing Friday. The "second request," as it's called, puts the deal on hold indefinitely until both companies "substantially comply" with the government's request for more details and it gives the deal a green light. But the DOJ's request signals it's "concerned about the deal," Sam Weinstein, a former DOJ antitrust lawyer, told Business Insider. Uber pivoted to buy Postmates after merger talks with Grubhub reportedly fell through over similar  antitrust concerns as the platform faces...
    A recent report claims that Google’s search engine is about to face major challenges as the DOJ readies an antitrust lawsuit accusing the tech giant of crushing competition to protect its monopoly. A recent report from Bloomberg claims that Google’s Search product, one of Google’s most profitable businesses, could soon be facing major legal issues as the U.S. government reportedly readies an antitrust lawsuit against the internet giant, accusing it of its massive power to protect and extend its search engine monopoly. The DOJ has conducted a 14-month investigation and is now reportedly focusing on whether or not Google alters search results to favor its own products and whether it restricts access to users to shut out rivals, according to sources close to the investigation. Google controls approximately 90 percent of the online search market in the United States, rivals to the company have long claimed that it uses its...
    MOUNTAIN VIEW (AP) — As the Trump administration moves toward antitrust action against search giant Google, it’s campaigning to enlist support from sympathetic state attorneys general across the country. And President Donald Trump is pushing his campaign against Big Tech on Wednesday, touting curbs on legal protections for social media platforms he denounces as biased against conservative views. The anticipated lawsuit against Google by the Justice Department could be the government’s biggest legal offensive to protect competition since the ground-breaking case against Microsoft almost 20 years ago. Lawmakers and consumer advocates accuse Google of abusing its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and boost its profits. For over a year, the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission have pursued sweeping antitrust investigations of big tech companies, looking at whether Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple have hurt competition, stifled innovation or otherwise harmed...
    WASHINGTON – As the Trump administration moves toward antitrust action against search giant Google, it’s campaigning to enlist support from sympathetic state attorneys general across the country. And President Donald Trump is pushing his campaign against Big Tech on Wednesday, touting curbs on legal protections for social media platforms he denounces as biased against conservative views. The anticipated lawsuit against Google by the Justice Department could be the government’s biggest legal offensive to protect competition since the ground-breaking case against Microsoft almost 20 years ago. Lawmakers and consumer advocates accuse Google of abusing its dominance in online search and advertising to stifle competition and boost its profits. For over a year, the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission have pursued sweeping antitrust investigations of big tech companies, looking at whether Google, Facebook, Amazon and Apple have hurt competition, stifled innovation or otherwise harmed consumers. And...
    A report by the New York Times suggests that the Justice Department is close to presenting its antitrust case against Alphabet, the parent company of Google. The report also mentions that there’s disagreement among the team, as attorney general William Barr is described as wanting to announce the case in September to make it an an example of action taken by the Trump administration. That push seems like an “arbitrary” decision that overrides the advice of career lawyers who think rushing things will strengthen Google’s case. Google, through a spokesman, is quoted saying it will continue to “engage” with the investigations, which have focused on its dominance in online search and advertising, and reportedly uncovered “powerful” evidence of anticompetitive behavior. A report in the Washington Post backed up the NYT findings, and mentioned that some state AGs are targeting Android as well.
    The U.S. Department of Justice could file an antitrust case against Google parent Alphabet by the end of the month, The New York Times reported citing unidentified sources. The case will focus on alleged monopolistic practices the tech company employs, using its dominance in internet searches and how it exploits that to control online advertising. Justice Department officials have told the lawyers working on the case to complete their work by the end of September, the Times said citing three anonymous sources, who complained that the deadline was opposed by the majority of the attorneys. They argued they needed more time and there was disagreement as to how broad the case should be, but Attorney General William Barr believed the investigation – which is now in its 15th month – was proceeding too slowly, the Times said citing an anonymous senior Justice Department official. Barr, who worked for the telecom...
    The New York Times claims in a new report that the Department of Justice has plans to file antitrust charges against Google within the coming weeks. The New York Times reports that the Justice Department plans to bring an antitrust case against Google within the next few weeks after Attorney General William P. Barr reportedly overruled lawyers who said they needed more time to build a case against the tech giant. The New York Times writes: Justice Department officials told lawyers involved in the antitrust inquiry into Alphabet, the parent company of Google and YouTube, to wrap up their work by the end of September, according to three of the people. Most of the 40-odd lawyers who had been working on the investigation opposed the deadline. Some said they would not sign the complaint, and several of them left the case this summer. Some argued this summer in a memo that ran hundreds of pages that...
    The feds are reportedly gearing up to bring an antitrust lawsuit against Google by the end of September. Justice Department lawyers have been instructed to finish up their inquiry into the search giant this month as Attorney General William Barr is eager to take on the search giant. The majority of the government’s lawyers feel that Barr’s timeline is rushed, according to the New York Times, with a number of them saying they would not sign the complaint. The DOJ’s lawyers reportedly wanted more time to build their case, but were overruled by the Attorney General who felt that the department was moving too slowly. Representatives for Google and the Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Both the federal government as well as a collection of state AGs have reportedly been digging into Google’s advertising business, which claims about a third of the...
    The feds are reportedly gearing up to bring an antitrust lawsuit against Google by the end of September. Justice Department lawyers have been instructed to finish up their inquiry into the search giant this month as Attorney General William Barr is eager to take on the search giant. The majority of the government’s lawyers feel that Barr’s timeline is rushed, according to the New York Times, with a number of them saying they would not sign the complaint. The DOJ’s lawyers reportedly wanted more time to build their case, but were overruled by the Attorney General who felt that the department was moving too slowly. Representatives for Google and the Department of Justice did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Both the federal government as well as a collection of state AGs have reportedly been digging into Google’s advertising business, which claims about a third of the world’s...
    The Justice Department will reportedly file antitrust charges against Google later this month focused on how it has used its search dominance in the online advertising business. Attorney General William Barr is planning to bring the case against the tech behemoth earlier than expected, the New York Times reported Thursday, citing career DOJ lawyers, in order to allow the Trump administration to take credit for the action. Most of the approximately 40 Justice Department lawyers working on the Google investigation opposed ending their work by the end of September but were overruled by Barr. The Justice Department and some state attorney generals have been investigating Google over the past year or so, focused on the anti-competitive conduct in Google's online advertising business fueled by its dominance in the search engine sphere, connecting online publishers and advertisers to hundreds of millions of users. A bipartisan coalition of the top legal officers...
    Department of Justice (DOJ) attorneys who are involved in an antitrust investigation targeting Google believe the agency is moving too fast in pursuit of a lawsuit against the tech giant, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday. A group of lawyers concentrating exclusively on the DOJ’s investigation into the company’s search practices worry that there is not enough evidence that Google is using its dominance in that field to stifle competition, the report noted, citing people familiar with the probe. A separate group within the agency is focused on probing the company’s online advertising business, The WSJ reported. The group of attorneys focused on Google’s advertising practices also believes that a lawsuit should not be rushed as they weed through the complex issues related to that aspect of the company’s business, The WSJ reported. (RELATED: ANALYSIS: DOJ Investigators Involved In Antitrust Probe Don’t Appear To Be Scrutinizing Claims Of Bias...
    CLARKSVILLE, Tennessee — Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) and Bill Hagerty, former U.S. ambassador to Japan and current GOP frontrunner for U.S. Senate in Tennessee, told Breitbart News exclusively that they believe Google’s “monopoly power” is a threat to Americans. Cotton, who was in Tennessee last week campaigning with Hagerty for the GOP nomination for U.S. Senate in his contested primary, sent a letter last week to Attorney General Bill Barr requesting that the Justice Department pursue antitrust action against Google over concerns it may use its outsized market share power to silence free speech or influence the outcome of elections. “Google dominates the online search market,” Cotton said when asked about the letter in a joint interview with Hagerty here in Tennessee. “I think their market share is well over 90 percent. That’s plainly monopoly power. Our antitrust laws say a company can acquire monopoly power by building a better mousetrap. What...
    Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) is pushing the Department of Justice (DOJ) to probe whether search giant Google is in violation of antitrust laws on a number of fronts, a new letter he wrote to Attorney General Bill Barr provided to Breitbart News exclusively shows. “In recent weeks, news outlets ​have reported ​that the Department of Justice is nearing a decision about whether to take enforcement action against Google for anticompetitive behavior that violates U.S. antitrust law,” Cotton wrote to Barr, citing a recent Politico report on looming DOJ action against Google. “I ask that the Department also investigate whether Google’s dominance of online searches violates antitrust law”: Cotton wrote to Barr that Google dominates search volume, citing a report from Business Insider on how the Silicon Valley powerhouse currently has 90 percent of online searches worldwide conducted through its platform. He noted that while the mere fact Google is...
    EXCLUSIVE: House Judiciary Committee ranking member Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, revealed Thursday that a Justice Department (DOJ) whistleblower who alleged antitrust misconduct by Attorney General Bill Barr had failed to disclose information to the panel about his previous unsuccessful complaints concerning the same matters.Career DOJ employee John Elias garnered widespread media attention by alleging in testimony that Barr sought unfounded reviews of cannabis companies because he "did not like the nature of their underlying business." Elias also charged that the Trump administration sought to harass automakers with antitrust inquiries after the automakers angered the president by announcing they would comply with state emissions rules. Assistant Attorney General Makan Delrahim, however, wrote to Jordan on July 1 that Elias -- who previously served as Delrahim's acting chief of staff -- had offered testimony that was "misleading and lack[ing] critical facts." Delrahim added that Elias also lacked any first-hand knowledge about the "matters about which he testified" --...
    State attorneys general met with the Justice Department on Friday to make preparations for an anticipated antitrust case against Google. However, sources say that search bias — which is crucial to Google’s ability to sway elections and control the flow of political information — is not yet a major part of the DoJ’s case. Politico reported on the gathering of state AGs and the Justice Department ahead of the meeting on Friday. Politico’s report suggests that the focus is currently on the criticisms of Google from its corporate competitors, namely its dominance of the digital ads market and its alleged tendency to favor its own products and services. Unlike previous probes into the tech company, prosecutors started by analyzing Google’s control over the technology used to serve, buy and sell the online advertising that funds many websites. News publishers and other advertisers have complained about Google’s dominance in the “ad tech” market. — Search 2.0: Investigators have...
    Igor Derysh June 24, 2020 5:19PM (UTC) Attorney General William Barr improperly targeted marijuana companies with anti-trust investigations, because he "did not like" the nature of their business, a career Department of Justice official plans to testify to Congress on Wednesday. John Elias, a senior official at the department's antitrust division, plans to tell the House Judiciary Committee that his division was "forced for political reasons to pursue unjustified investigations of the fledgling legal marijuana industry," The New York Times reported. : Elias will accuse the Justice Department of inappropriately using its antitrust power to investigate 10 proposed mergers and acquisitions, because Barr "did not like the nature of their underlying business," according to his written opening statement. In the statement, Elias says the investigations consumed a large portion of the division's resources. "These mergers involve companies with low market shares in a fragmented industry; they do not meet established criteria for...
    Officials from the DOJ and some state attorneys general are reportedly set to meet on Friday to discuss an antitrust probe of  Google. Reuters reports that U.S. Justice Department officials and some state attorneys general have set a meeting for Friday to discuss an antitrust probe of Google. The federal government and nearly all state attorneys general have now opened investigations into allegations that Google has broken antitrust laws. The federal probe is focusing heavily on search bias, advertising and Google’s Android mobile operating system. Breitbart News reported in November of 2019 that the attorneys general which are representing 48 states, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C will be writing up subpoenas known as civil investigative demands (CID) to support the investigations. Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton is leading the probe, which initially focused mainly on Google’s advertising business. But at a recent meeting, Paxton expressed his support for expanding the purview of...
    U.S. Attorney General William Barr has made it abundantly clear that he opposes the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes. And CNN reports that John Elias, a Department of Justice whistleblower, is expected to testify, on June 24, that Barr “improperly went after cannabis suppliers because of his personal feelings about the industry.” Elias, a career DOJ employee, is — according to CNN’s Caroline Kelly— expected to discuss “Barr’s perceived motivations behind” the DOJ’s “multiple investigations into mergers in the cannabis industry.” Elias has alleged, “Rejecting the analysis of career staff, Attorney General Barr ordered the (DOJ’s) antitrust division to issue second request subpoenas. The rationale for doing so centered not on an antitrust analysis, but because he did not like the nature of their underlying business.” According to Kelly, “Elias also suggests that multiple people in the (antitrust) division were aware of Barr’s anti-cannabis inclinations — and that in...
    Google is getting unwanted fat off the struggling information business by applying its posture as the nation’s dominant look for engine to power publishers into unfair agreements, according to a new analysis report. The Alphabet-owned web company has develop into these kinds of a potent pressure for driving World wide web traffic that it even dictates how news publications format their internet internet pages, the surprising information-field paper states. This has resulted in news companies staying “forced to establish mirror-graphic web-sites.” Google does this by telling news providers that they have “no option but to put into practice Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) conventional — or else get rid of important placement in cell look for and the resulting lookup targeted visitors,” in accordance to the paper by Information Media Alliance, which phone calls alone the “voice of the news media industry.” Google then takes advantage of the AMP...
    Google is getting fat off the struggling news industry by using its position as the nation’s dominant search engine to force publishers into unfair agreements, according to a new research report. The Alphabet-owned internet company has become such a powerful force for driving Web traffic that it even dictates how news publications format their web pages, the shocking news-industry paper says. This has resulted in news organizations being “forced to build mirror-image websites.” Google does this by telling news companies that they have “no choice but to implement Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) standard — or else lose critical placement in mobile search and the resulting search traffic,” according to the paper by News Media Alliance, which calls itself the “voice of the news media industry.” Google then uses the AMP format for quick-loading pages to cash in at the expense of publishers, including by sending news created by others...
            by Peter Hasson and Chris White   Department of Justice investigators who are conducting an antitrust probe targeting Google do not appear to be scrutinizing claims that the tech giant manipulates its search function, leaks about the probe and a source familiar with it indicate. Google critics argue that Google Search must be a focus of the investigation, pointing to the company’s sheer dominance in the market: Google consistently accounts for roughly 90% of online information searches, and company employees have expressed a willingness to artificially manipulate search results on the platform. Google did not comment on allegations of search bias, or on the pending antitrust investigation. “We continue to engage with the ongoing investigations led by the Department of Justice and Attorney General Paxton, and we don’t have any updates or comments on speculation,” Google spokeswoman Julie McAlister told the Daily Caller News Foundation. The company’s goal is focusing on...
    Investigators with the Department of Justice involved in an antitrust probe targeting Google do not appear to be scrutinizing claims that the company manipulates its search feature, leaks of the investigation and a source with knowledge indicate.   Researchers and critics argue Google’s search feature is subject to manipulation and can potentially impact a national election or direct less traffic to the Silicon Valley giant’s competitors.  DOJ investigators are instead focusing on Google’s ad technology and are considering whether to require the tech company to provide Android users a preference menu for potential search engines, media reports show. Department of Justice investigators who are conducting an antitrust probe targeting Google do not appear to be scrutinizing claims that the tech giant manipulates its search function, leaks about the probe and a source familiar with it indicate. Google critics argue that Google Search must be a focus of the investigation, pointing...
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