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    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri protesters who repeatedly block traffic without permission could face felony charges under a bill passed Thursday by the GOP-led state Senate. Senators voted 24-9 to send the measure to the Republican-led state House. Lawmakers pitched the change after protests last summer in the St. Louis area over the death of George Floyd, including demonstrations that blocked major highways. Republican critics have argued the protest method might block ambulances and puts demonstrators at risk of being hit. But Missouri Democrats said the measure could have a chilling effect on protests. Blocking traffic without permission would first be punished as an infraction if the bill is enacted. The second offense would be a misdemeanor punishable by up to six months in jail. A third offense would be a felony, and violators would face up to four years in prison. The legislation also targets calls to “defund...
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Republican-led Missouri House on Wednesday passed another bill to require voter photo identification at the polls, an attempt to reinstate the policy after it was gutted by the state Supreme Court. House lawmakers voted 109-46 to send the bill to the GOP-led state Senate. The bill is aimed at addressing a Missouri Supreme Court ruling last year that permanently blocked a central provision of a 2016 voter ID law. At issue was a provision of the law that law required voters without a photo ID to make a sworn statement to cast a regular ballot. The new bill would give voters two options: either show a photo ID to cast a regular ballot or cast a provisional ballot. The provisional ballot would be counted if the voter returns later that day with a photo ID or if election officials can verify their signature based...
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Republican-led Missouri House on Monday advanced another version of a voter photo identification law that was gutted by the state Supreme Court last year. The court in 2020 permanently blocked a central provision of the 2016 law that required voters who lacked a photo ID to make a sworn statement in order to cast a regular, non-provisional ballot. In response, Republicans are trying to pass a new voter ID bill that is similar to the 2016 law but doesn’t include the sworn statement provision that the judges found objectionable. The new measure would give voters only two options, instead of three: either show a photo ID to cast a regular ballot or else cast a provisional ballot. The provisional ballot would be counted if the voter returns later that day with a photo ID or if election officials can...
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri House on Thursday passed a bill to ban local police from enforcing federal gun laws, an effort to stymie implementation of any new federal gun restrictions enacted under Democratic President Joe Biden. The Republican-led House voted 103-43 in favor of the bill Thursday. “We're telling Robert Beto O'Rourke and everybody else that hell yes we're standing up to preserve the Second Amendment rights of our constituents,” said Republican Rep. Nick Schroer, referring to the former Texas congressman and 2020 Democratic presidential candidate. If enacted, the Missouri measure would penalize local police departments if their officers enforce federal gun laws. Those agencies could be sued by those who broke federal gun laws and would face minimum $50,000 fines. “We’re literally defunding our law enforcement agencies to give that money to criminals,” St. Louis Democratic Rep. Peter Meredith said before...
    As genuine as a $3 bill. On Monday, the FBI released a statement about the indictment of an elected Missouri state representative for allegedly being involved in a fraud scheme that involved fake medicine, money, and COVID-19. Patricia “Tricia” Ashton Derges (R-Nixa) is facing a 20-count indictment for her part in promoting and trying to make money off of scared clients looking for a miracle treatment Derges said she could provide to treat COVID-19. As special agent in charge for the Office of Inspector General of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Curt L. Muller says: “Ms. Derges knowingly provided false information and made false claims about the medical treatment she was providing, and these falsehoods may have significant consequences for the patients she served.” The 63-year-old Derges tipped off the feds in April when she appeared on a Springfield television station claiming to provide a “regenerative” treatment using stem cells at the Ozark Valley Medical Clinic. Derges...
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Several Republican Missouri lawmakers on Tuesday filed legislation to ensure people with pre-existing conditions can access health insurance if the Affordable Care Act is undone. The proposals would amend the state Constitution to require that health insurance companies cover people with pre-existing medical conditions without charging them more. People with pre-existing conditions are already protected under former President Barack Obama's health care law. The Missouri proposal would be a safety net if that law is tossed out, Republican sponsor Sen. Karla Eslinger said. “I just want to make sure that no Missourian could be penalized for having pre-existing conditions,” the Wasola lawmaker said. She said health insurance protections are especially important now because many people lost their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic and might get different health insurance under new employers. House Majority Leader Dean Plocher is among GOP lawmakers sponsoring the proposal, signaling that...
    Old acquaintances of Sen. Josh Hawley, a rising firebrand from the Trump era, claim the Missouri Republican is not the man they once knew. Andrea Randle carpooled with Hawley when they both attended Lexington Middle School and recalls the now-41-year-old as being very sociable. One of the three black students in her grade at the time, Randle said she wrote to Hawley about her concerns after George Floyd, a black man, died in Minneapolis police custody over the summer. Though she never received a reply, Randle said she was surprised by Hawley's public comments saying Floyd's death was not the result of systemic racism. “He’s not who he was,” Randle told the Kansas City Star. After graduating from Rockhurst High School, an all-boys Catholic preparatory school in Kansas City in 1998, Hawley attended Stanford University, followed by Yale Law School. Hawley later clerked for Chief Justice John Roberts. Hawley now...
    Facebook, Google and Microsoft announced Monday they won't be giving out any political donations on the heels of the capitol siege, while a growing number of businesses said they will cut off campaign contributions to Republicans who voted to challenge the Electoral College count.    HALLPAC, Hallmark's political action committee, told Popular Information's Judd Legum that it had requested a $3,000 donation back from Sen. Josh Hawley, a Missouri Republican, and one of the ringleaders of the so-called 'treason caucus.'  Hallmark is based in Kansas City, Missouri.   HALLPAC also asked Sen. Roger Marshall, the newly minted GOP senator from Kansas, for a $5,000 donation to be returned.  Hawley was the first senator who said he'd support a House GOP plan to challenge some of the Electoral College votes from swing states - an effort President Donald Trump supported, as it extended the farce he was feeding to his supporters that the election...
    A freshman representative blasted his fellow Republicans for 'lying' about the possibility of overturning the election results in Congress because they wanted to fundraise off of the chaos and their loyalty to President Donald Trump. Congressman Peter Meijer of Michigan, an Iraq and Afghanistan veteran, said accused the  is not happy with how his first week of service in the House of Representatives went down, claiming his fellow Republicans who objected to the Electoral College results – even after a pro-Trump mob descended on the Capiotl Wednesday – either did so to earn favor with the president and his supporters or felt threatened. 'As we moved to accept Arizona's electors, a fellow freshman lingered near a voting terminal, voting card in hand.  'My colleague told me that efforts to overturn the election were wrong, and that voting to certify was a constitutional duty,' Meijer detailed in an op/ed in The...
    By Thomas Beaumont and Jim Salter | Associated Press O’FALLON, Mo. — A Republican colleague rebuked him on the Senate floor. A home-state newspaper editorial board declared he has “blood on his hands.” But for Josh Hawley, the Missouri senator who staged an Electoral College challenge that became the focus of a violent siege of the U.S. Capitol, the words of his political mentor were the most personal. “Supporting Josh Hawley … was the worst decision I’ve ever made in my life,” former Missouri Sen. John Danforth told The Associated Press on Thursday. “He has consciously appealed to the worst. He has attempted to drive us apart and he has undermined public belief in our democracy. And that’s great damage.” Aside from President Donald Trump, who roiled up supporters just before they stormed the Capitol, no politician has been more publicly blamed for Wednesday’s unprecedented assault on American democracy...
    Josh Hawley had the world at his feet. His uncanny knack for self-promotion combined with his unbending conservatism had made him a favorite of the MAGA-hat-wearing right that hangs on every word that Donald Trump tweets. But then came Wednesday and the picture that will haunt his ambition to move into the White House in four years’ time. His clenched left fist raised high, his face a mask of steely determination, as he salutes the crowd marching on the Capitol. Hawley might claim he couldn’t have known that that crowd was about to turn into a rioting mob that would smash its way into the Capitol and occupy both the House of Representatives and the Senate for hours in scenes that horrified the world, leaving four people dead. ‘The responsibility of violent criminal acts is with violent criminals,’ Hawley told CNN’s Manu Raju on Thursday. But history is bound to...
    O’FALLON, Mo. (AP) — A Republican colleague rebuked him on the Senate floor. A home-state newspaper editorial board declared he has “blood on his hands.” But for Josh Hawley, the Missouri senator who staged an Electoral College challenge that became the focus of a violent siege of the U.S. Capitol, the words of his political mentor were the most personal. “Supporting Josh Hawley … was the worst decision I’ve ever made in my life,” former Missouri Sen. John Danforth told The Associated Press on Thursday. “He has consciously appealed to the worst. He has attempted to drive us apart and he has undermined public belief in our democracy. And that’s great damage.” Aside from President Donald Trump, who roiled up supporters just before they stormed the Capitol, no politician has been more publicly blamed for Wednesday’s unprecedented assault on American democracy than Hawley. The 41-year-old first-term senator, a second-tier...
    O’FALLON, Mo. (AP) — A Republican colleague rebuked him on the Senate floor. A home-state newspaper editorial board declared he has “blood on his hands.” But for Josh Hawley, the Missouri senator who staged an Electoral College challenge that became the focus of a violent siege of the Capitol, the words of his political mentor were the most personal. “Supporting Josh Hawley … was the worst decision I’ve ever made in my life,” former Missouri Sen. John Danforth told The Associated Press on Thursday. “He has consciously appealed to the worst. He has attempted to drive us apart and he has undermined public belief in our democracy. And that’s great damage.” Aside from President Donald Trump, who roiled up supporters just before they stormed the Capitol, no politician has been more publicly blamed for Wednesday’s unprecedented assault on American democracy than Hawley. The 41-year-old first-term senator, a second-tier player...
    Sen. Hawley giving a weird power sign to the crowds that only hours later would invade our Capitol, leaving one woman dead. After the worst of Wednesday’s Capitol building insurrection that left one woman dead, The Kansas City Star editorial board published a stinging condemnation of Republican Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley. The editorial denounced Hawley as being one of the public figures most responsible for today’s bloodshed and sedition, saying that “Hawley’s actions in the last week had such impact that he deserves an impressive share of the blame for the blood that’s been shed.”  The headline of the article makes it very clear: “Sen. Josh Hawley has blood on his hands in Capitol coup attempt.” Hawley’s craven ambition for higher office has been apparent the past couple of weeks, as he has very publicly been a promoter of sending out $2,000 checks to Americans in need (knowing Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell wouldn’t let it happen) while also stoking...
    A day after four of Missouri’s six Republican congressional representatives said they will object to certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory during Wednesday’s Joint Congressional Session, one of the two remaining GOP reps has broken party ranks while the other remains mum. “While I may not like the outcome of the election, that does not mean I can, nor should I, try to usurp the powers of the individual States of our republic,” U.S. Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Ballwin, said in a Tuesday statement. “To allow Congress to alter the decided outcome of the election would irreparably damage our system of government and defy the Constitution.” In a joint statement issued Monday, Missouri Republican U.S. Reps. Sam Graves, Tarkio; Vicky Hartzler, Harrisonville; Billy Long, Springfield; and Jason Smith, Salem, said they will be among 140 GOP Congressional reps expected to raise objections to the election results at the behest of...
    By JIM SALTER, Associated Press O'FALLON, Mo. (AP) — The effort by Sen. Josh Hawley and others to challenge Democrat Joe Biden’s election victory is a “radical” and “highly destructive attack," former U.S. Sen. John Danforth said Monday. The written statement from the 84-year-old three-term Republican senator was especially stinging since Danforth has long been a supporter of Hawley, publicly backing his successful run for Missouri attorney general in 2016 and his 2018 Senate bid, when he defeated incumbent Democrat Claire McCaskill. Hawley was the first Republican senator to say he would join with several House Republicans in objecting to state Electoral College tallies. Since then, 10 other Republican senators and senators-elect have joined President Donald Trump’s effort to overturn the November election. “Lending credence to Trump’s false claim that the election was stolen is a highly destructive attack on our constitutional government,” Danforth, of St. Louis, said in a...
    By: KDKA-TV News Staff ALLENTOWN, Pa./WASHINGTON (KDKA) — A Missouri Senator is objecting to Pennsylvania Senator Pat Toomey issuing a public statement on Saturday, which called for Republican senators to accept Joe Biden as President-elect. Reporters say that Senator Josh Hawley sent an email to the Senate GOP Conference Saturday night, reports which Hawley retweeted on his official account. In the email, Hawley said that Toomey was “making unfounded claims about the intentions of our fellow Senators.” Related: Pa. Senator Pat Toomey Speaks Out Against Republican Senators Seeking To Oppose Certification Of Election Results Hawley proceeded to list what he called “irregularities” with the 2020 election and is now one of several Republican lawmakers who intend to object to the certification of the Electoral vote. “But instead of debating the issue of election integrity by press release, conference call or e-mail, perhaps we could have a debate on the Senate...
    Washington (CNN)Republican Sen. Josh Hawley threw a political grenade into Washington last week when he announced his intentions to object when Congress counts the Electoral College votes on Wednesday -- a move that pits the youngest senator against Senate GOP leadership as well as some rank-and-file members who will now have to cast a highly consequential vote as a result of his decision. Hawley, 41, who was elected to represent Missouri in 2018 and is widely believed to have higher political ambitions, became the first senator to announce plans to object to the election results -- a significant development since both a House member and a senator are required to mount an objection when Congress counts the electoral votes.Though his objection won't change the outcome of the election and will only delay the inevitable affirmation of President-elect Joe Biden's victory over President Donald Trump, his commitment to Trump's baseless crusade...
    Calls to boycott Walmart grew on Wednesday after a member of its social media team went rogue and trolled a powerful Republican senator for saying he would challenge President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. The official Twitter account of the world’s largest retailer trolled Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri after he became the first member of the upper chamber to voice his support for contesting the electoral college vote. Hawley, the junior senator from Missouri who was elected in 2018, said that ‘some states, particularly Pennsylvania, failed to follow their own state election laws.’ ‘At the very least, Congress should investigate,’ he said in a statement. Senator Josh Hawley of Missouri got into a Twitter spat with Walmart, the world's largest retailer, on Wednesday Hawley on Wednesday became the first United States senator he would challenge President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. Shockingly, the Twitter handle run by Walmart, the Arkansas-based retailer worth more...
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri House will investigate an incoming lawmaker accused of sexually and physically abusing his children years ago when they were young, Republican leaders announced Monday. House leaders in a joint statement said the House Ethics Committee will launch an investigation of the claims of abuse against incoming Republican Rep. Rick Roeber when the Legislature convenes in January. Roeber's adult children first spoke publicly of the abuse to the Kansas City Star, which published details in September. Voters in suburban Kansas City elected Roeber in November. After his election, Roeber's children wrote a letter begging the House's presumptive incoming speaker, Republican Rep. Rob Vescovo, not to allow him to serve. “To think that this man would have a say over laws that impact thousands of children is just too much,” according to the letter signed by three of his children. “A...
    U.S. Senator Josh Hawley (R-MO) attends a confirmation hearing of Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., October 12, 2020.Susan Walsh | Pool | Reuters As questions loom on Capitol Hill over whether or not there will be second stimulus checks , one senator is introducing a bill to make those payments a reality. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., said in an interview Wednesday that his plan for second checks includes $1,200 per individual, $2,400 per couple and $500 per child. "The most important thing that Congress can do is send direct assistance checks to every working family who needs them," Hawley said. Hawley said he will not be discouraged if Congress cannot come to a compromise on the ongoing coronavirus relief negotiations.VIDEO6:2206:22House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on relief proposal: It's a very good compromiseSquawk Box"If Congress cannot agree, I will go to the floor and ask for...
    Joining socialist Sen. Bernie Sanders’s call for cash payments to people as part of coronavirus relief is unusual for a conservative, but Sen. Josh Hawley is not the typical Republican many expected when he arrived in Washington. Lurking beneath the elite pedigree — Stanford University, Yale Law School, clerk for Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts — is a conservative populist. It is a surprise to Republicans who thought the Senate was gaining a movement conservative when Hawley was elected from Missouri in 2018. But party insiders familiar with Hawley’s career insist populism has been a staple of his portfolio going back a decade, when the notion of a President Trump was laughable. “He really is a populist at heart,” said Gregg Keller, a Republican operative in Missouri who advised Hawley’s Senate campaign. With bipartisan negotiators working furiously to reach agreement on coronavirus relief before year’s end, Sanders...
    The inevitable conclusion of President Donald Trump’s term in office means the future of the Republican Party is up for grabs. Among the possible successors who could claim the mantle of leadership is Republican Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley.
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Republican leaders in the Missouri Senate postponed work on coronavirus aid funding Monday after numerous senators and staffers tested positive for COVID-19. Senate President Pro Tem Dave Schatz and Republican Majority Leader Caleb Rowden said they're delaying work until after Thanksgiving because it "is in the best interest of protecting members, staff and the public.” They said there's been a number of cases but didn't specify which lawmakers have been sickened and how many staffers are ill. A Senate Republican spokesman said he's only aware of one senator and one staffer who tested positive. The delay comes after Senate Republicans met last week with Republican Gov. Mike Parson. Photos posted by Parson on Facebook show few wore masks. At the time, Schatz said that while senators often wear masks in public, it is “ultimately up to each individual to make that...
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. – Two years after Missouri voters enacted a first-of-its-kind initiative intended to create “partisan fairness” in voting districts, they have changed their minds. Before the measure could be used, voters reversed key parts of it in Tuesday’s election. They opted instead to return to a method that will let commissions composed of Democratic and Republican loyalists redraw state legislative districts after census results are released. The Missouri vote broke a string of nationwide electoral victories for redistricting reform advocates and opened the potential for Missouri to experiment with another nationally unique model — one that could exclude noncitizens from the population totals used in redistricting. Some supporters of the 2018 initiative, known as Clean Missouri, asserted that voters were tricked into undercutting it by the Republican-led Legislature, which placed Amendment 3 on this year's ballot. The amendment passed with just 51% of the vote. “I’m...
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — More than 3 million voters cast ballots in Tuesday's presidential election, marking the first time the state exceeded that threshold. Missouri’s previous high mark was 2.9 million voters in the 2008 presidential election, which was won by Democrat Barack Obama. Since then, Missouri has added more than 100,000 voters to its rolls, for a total of 4.3 million registered voters. About 70% of registered voters cast ballots in Tuesday's election. That fell shy of the 75% threshold that had been forecast by Missouri's local election officials. The voter turnout percentage peaked at 78% in the 1992 election, when there were significantly fewer registered voters. The presidential race between Republican President Donald Trump and Democrat Joe Biden was the top vote-getter on this year's ballot, followed by Republican Gov. Mike Parson's contest against his Democratic challenger, State Auditor Nicole Galloway. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights...
    Missouri Gov. Mike Parson will get his first full term as governor after defeating his Democratic challenger, state Auditor Nicole Galloway. The Associated Press called the race for Parson around 10:45 p.m. EST. Parson, 65, first took the governorship in 2018 after his Republican predecessor, Eric Greitens, resigned amid a sex scandal. Parson had been Missouri's lieutenant governor. Now, as governor elected in his own right, he will retain political control after voters decided he has done well enough to elect him. One term is four years. No one person is allowed to hold the office for more than two terms, according to the state website. Parson faced a strong challenge from Galloway, who weaponized the governor's controversial statements regarding the coronavirus pandemic, which occasionally brought national attention. She also knocked his staunch support for the McCloskeys, a St. Louis couple who were caught on video pointing firearms at protesters...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Mike Parson wins election for governor in Missouri. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Four years after Republicans turned in a dominant performance in Missouri, the Republican governor and a veteran GOP congresswoman are facing strong challenges from Democrats on Tuesday. The governor’s race will be at least partially a referendum on Gov. Mike Parson’s hands-off approach to the coronavirus, which has been surging in Missouri for months. He is facing Democratic state Auditor Nicole Galloway. It’s the first run for governor for both candidates. Parson, a former sheriff who was elected lieutenant governor in 2016, moved into the top job two years ago after former Republican Gov. Eric Greitens resigned in the face of possible impeachment amid multiple scandals. Galloway’s pitch to voters is that Parson mangled his handling of the pandemic and that she would do better, including by requiring people to wear face masks. Parson, who has resisted imposing virus restrictions and...
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Voters on Tuesday will choose to give Republican Gov. Mike Parson a full four years in charge of Missouri or to give the job to Democrat Nicole Galloway, in a race that shaped up as a referendum on Parson's approach to the coronavirus pandemic and the candidates' competing visions of the future of policing in the state. The election, which could be Democrats’ best chance of flipping a governor’s seat this year, marks voters' first chance to weigh in on Parson's leadership of the state. He ascended to the governorship two years ago after his Republican predecessor, Eric Greitens, resigned under a cloud of scandal and with impeachment a possibility. Much of the race between Parson and Galloway, the state auditor, has centered on the pandemic and crime. Galloway has been critical of Parson’s handling of the pandemic. He allowed Missouri...
    By JIM SALTER and GEOFF MULVIHILL, Associated Press ST. LOUIS (AP) — Missouri Gov. Mike Parson steadfastly refused to mandate mask-wearing even as the coronavirus spread across his state this year, telling a group of cattlemen in July, “You don’t need government to tell you to wear a dang mask. If you want to wear a dang mask, wear a mask.” In late September, the Republican governor and his wife both tested positive for the coronavirus, and COVID-19 is now spreading rapidly throughout the state, with rising cases and deaths. Parson, who took office in 2018 after Eric Greitens resigned, said he did not have symptoms and has since returned to campaigning. His Democratic challenger, state Auditor Nicole Galloway, is emphasizing pandemic response and health coverage as key issues in one of the most contested of the 11 races for governor across the U.S. on Nov. 3. Galloway's message has...
    ST. LOUIS – Missouri Gov. Mike Parson steadfastly refused to mandate mask-wearing even as the coronavirus spread across his state this year, telling a group of cattlemen in July, “You don’t need government to tell you to wear a dang mask. If you want to wear a dang mask, wear a mask.” In late September, the Republican governor and his wife both tested positive for the coronavirus, and COVID-19 is now spreading rapidly throughout the state, with rising cases and deaths. Parson, who took office in 2018 after Eric Greitens resigned, said he did not have symptoms and has since returned to campaigning. His Democratic challenger, state Auditor Nicole Galloway, is emphasizing pandemic response and health coverage as key issues in one of the most contested of the 11 races for governor across the U.S. on Nov. 3. Galloway's message has been gaining traction as the virus spread worsens. The...
    The presidential race has sucked up most of the oxygen in politics for months, but it's worth taking one final look at the races for governor across the country. This year there are 11 gubernatorial contests. In nine, an incumbent governor is seeking another term: Delaware, Indiana, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Vermont, Washington and West Virginia. The other two – Montana and Utah – have open seats.[ READ: The 54 Counties That Could Tip the 2020 Presidential Election ]With this assessment, our first since Oct. 13 and our final one of the 2020 election cycle, we're shifting one contest in the Republican direction: The seat being given up by Montana's Democratic Gov. Steve Bullock, who is running in a high-profile U.S. Senate race. We're moving that contest from Toss-up to Lean Republican. The Montana race remains highly competitive, but the state's Republican leanings are proving challenging for the Democratic...
    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — The Democratic candidate for Missouri attorney general made overdue property tax payments this week after being asked about them, prompting a Republican official to accuse him of lying about being qualified to run. Democrat Rich Finneran, a former federal prosecutor challenging Republican Attorney General Eric Schmitt, owed St. Louis County $837 in personal property taxes due at the end of 2019 for two cars, the Springfield News-Leader reported. Finneran told a reporter Tuesday that he'd pay the delinquent taxes as soon as possible, and county records showed he paid both the outstanding bill and one for 2020 on Thursday. Finneran campaign manager Steve Luther said the candidate had been unaware of owing the taxes. Missouri law says candidates face being “disqualified" if they are not current on personal property taxes, state income taxes, municipal taxes, and property taxes on their homes when they file to run....
    Missouri Republican Rep. Ann Wagner is in trouble in what was once considered a safe GOP seat as she seeks a fifth term on Capitol Hill against Democratic state Sen. Jill Schupp. Wagner, 58, was first elected by Missouri's wealthy, suburban 2nd Congressional District in 2012, winning her race to represent the areas south and west of St. Louis by 23 percentage points. Each cycle, though, has become more competitive for the incumbent, including in 2018, when she emerged the victor by fewer than 15,000 votes. But 2020 is her closest contest yet, rated a Republican toss-up by the Cook Political Report. Some internal polls reveal that the former GOP National Committee chairwoman and U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg is tied with Schupp, 65, before their Nov. 3 election. And Schupp raised $2.1 million by the end of July to Wagner's $3.3 million. Wagner has been criticized as a reliable...
    Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Missouri
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Republican Gov. Mike Parson's contested proposal to give the Missouri attorney general the power to intervene in St. Louis homicide cases failed Wednesday when the GOP-led House finished a special session focused on curbing violent crime without taking action on the bill. The bill would have allowed the attorney general, currently Republican Eric Schmitt, to prosecute St. Louis homicides if Gardner’s office didn’t act on those cases in 90 days and if police asked for an intervention. Parson said the goal of the prosecution bill was to help reduce violent crime in St. Louis, but the proposal was widely seen as criticism of the city’s first Black prosecutor, Kim Gardner, who is a Democrat. “You're not going to hit a home run every time in this building,” Parson said. “We're very content with what we got moving. Anything we can do...
    COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Republican Gov. Mike Parson’s contested proposal to give the Missouri attorney general the power to intervene in St. Louis homicide cases failed Wednesday when the GOP-led House finished a special session focused on curbing violent crime without taking action on the bill. The bill would have allowed the attorney general, currently Republican Eric Schmitt, to prosecute St. Louis homicides if Gardner’s office didn’t act on those cases in 90 days and if police asked for an intervention. Parson said the goal of the prosecution bill was to help reduce violent crime in St. Louis, but the proposal was widely seen as criticism of the city’s first Black prosecutor, Kim Gardner, who is a Democrat. “You’re not going to hit a home run every time in this building,” Parson said. “We’re very content with what we got moving. Anything we can do to help law enforcement, to...
    O'FALLON, Mo. -- A white St. Louis couple criminally charged for waving guns during a Black Lives Matter protest outside their home says Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden would invite unchecked lawlessness into American suburbs.Mark and Patty McCloskey on Monday at the Republican National Convention reinforced the theme outlined in President Donald Trump's campaign ads. The Republican is painting his opponent as complicit with rioting and violence that has taken place in some cities in recent months amid racial justice protests, the vast majority of which have been peaceful.Patty McCloskey says, "They want to abolish the suburbs altogether by ending single-family home zoning." She says the actions "would bring crime, lawlessness and low-quality apartments into thriving suburban neighborhoods."She says, "These are the policies that are coming to a neighborhood near you,." She adds, "Your family will not be safe in the radical Democrats' America."EMBED More News Videos Mark and Patricia...
    O'FALLON, Mo. -- A white St. Louis couple criminally charged for waving guns during a Black Lives Matter protest outside their home made their case in their opening night speech of the Republican National Convention Monday."Democrats no longer view the government's job as protecting honest citizens from criminals, but rather protecting criminals from honest citizens," Mark and Patricia McCloskey said in prepared remarks that broke from the optimistic vision for America organizers promised.They added: "Make no mistake: No matter where you live, your family will not be safe in the radical Democrats' America."The McCloskey case drew Trump's attention, especially after Democratic St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner filed felony unlawful use of a weapon charges in July. Trump considered the charges an "egregious abuse of power," his press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said.EMBED More News Videos Mark and Patricia McCloskey, who are personal injury lawyers, were caught on video brandishing guns...
    O'FALLON, Mo. -- A white St. Louis couple criminally charged for waving guns during a Black Lives Matter protest outside their home made their case in their opening night speech of the Republican National Convention Monday."Democrats no longer view the government's job as protecting honest citizens from criminals, but rather protecting criminals from honest citizens," Mark and Patricia McCloskey said in prepared remarks that broke from the optimistic vision for America organizers promised.They added: "Make no mistake: No matter where you live, your family will not be safe in the radical Democrats' America."The McCloskey case drew Trump's attention, especially after Democratic St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner filed felony unlawful use of a weapon charges in July. Trump considered the charges an "egregious abuse of power," his press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, said.EMBED More News Videos Mark and Patricia McCloskey, who are personal injury lawyers, were caught on video brandishing guns...
    O'FALLON, Mo. -- A white St. Louis couple criminally charged for waving guns during a Black Lives Matter protest outside their home will make the case in their opening night speech of the Republican National Convention that they had a "God-given right" to defend themselves and their property.Mark and Patricia McCloskey, lawyers in their 60s, both speak in the recorded message Monday night, their attorney, Al Watkins said. Mark McCloskey told "Fox & Friends" they will emphasize that safety and security are basic tenets of freedom - a theme that fits with the law-and-order focus of Republican President Donald Trump's reelection campaign."Just that we have a God-given right to defend ourselves, and the right of self-defense is one of the most basic civil rights, one of the most basic human rights," McCloskey said.The McCloskey case drew Trump's attention, especially after Democratic St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner filed felony unlawful...
    By JIM SALTER, Associated Press O'FALLON, Mo. (AP) — A white St. Louis couple criminally charged for waving guns during a Black Lives Matter protest outside their home will make the case in their opening night speech of the Republican National Convention that they had a “God-given right” to defend themselves and their property. Mark and Patricia McCloskey, lawyers in their 60s, both speak in the recorded message Monday night, their attorney, Al Watkins said. Mark McCloskey told “Fox & Friends” they will emphasize that safety and security are basic tenets of freedom — a theme that fits with the law-and-order focus of Republican President Donald Trump’s reelection campaign. “Just that we have a God-given right to defend ourselves, and the right of self-defense is one of the most basic civil rights, one of the most basic human rights,” McCloskey said. The McCloskey case drew Trump's attention, especially after Democratic...
    As Democrats turn to celebrities, Republicans turn to causes célèbres. Mark McCloskey and Patricia McCloskey, the St. Louis attorneys who went viral for pointing guns at Black Lives Matter protesters in their neighborhood, will make a virtual appearance during the 2020 Republican National Convention. The McCloskeys, each accused of committing a felony, have received widespread support from Republican elected officials and Second Amendment advocates for their actions on June 28. The case against them was brought by St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly Gardner (D). Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt (R) has promised to fight the “political prosecution” on behalf of the McCloskeys. Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley (R) has also asked the Department of Justice to look into whether Gardner violated the McCloskeys’ civil rights by initiating a prosecution. Missouri Gov. Mike Parson (R) said he would “without a doubt” pardon the McCloskeys. Mark McCloskey made a number of media appearances, including...
    A husband and wife who pointed guns at racial justice protesters in the US will reportedly appear at the Republican Party convention this month. Mark and Patricia McCloskey, who are both lawyers, were filmed brandishing weapons as demonstrators passed their mansion in St Louis, Missouri, in June. They gained national prominence after the clip was widely shared, and were later charged over the incident. The couple said they armed themselves because they felt threatened. On Monday, their lawyer told the New York Times that Mark McCloskey would "definitely be speaking" at the Republican National Convention (RNC). The scaled-down event is due to take place between 24 and 27 August in Charlotte, North Carolina. But Patricia McCloskey is not expected to speak. "She will be at her husband's side," the lawyer, Albert Watkins, said. Five pieces of context to understand the US anti-racism protests Four dates that explain the...
    Missouri voters said yes to expanding Medicaid on Tuesday despite the best efforts of Republicans to block health coverage for more than 200,000 people. Missouri has had an extremely low Medicaid eligibility threshold, with most non-disabled adults excluded from coverage. Even parents are only covered in cases of the most extreme poverty—less than $5,800 in income for a family of four. Advocates for Medicaid expansion, many of whom had been working on the issue for years, celebrated. “Amendment 2 won today,” according to Caitlyn Adams, executive director for Missouri Jobs with Justice Voter Action, “because no matter what we look like, where we live, or how much money we make, most of us want the same things—the ability to keep our families safe and well. Expanding Medicaid is a big step toward this goal.” Missouri’s Republican secretary of state and governor had done their best to sink the effort by getting the...
    Missouri residents approved a ballot measure expanding Medicaid in a blow to Gov. Mike Parson, a Republican, on Tuesday. More than 53% of voters supported expanding Medicaid, compared with roughly 46% who voted no, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported. In this July 7, 2020, file photo, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson speaks during an event at the White House, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File) "We did it!" pro-Medicaid Expansion group Yes On 2 wrote Wednesday on Twitter. "Missouri just voted #YesOn2 to expand Medicaid, and now, because of YOUR vote, over 230,000 hardworking people will have access to life-saving healthcare!" Missouri’s Republican-led Legislature has repeatedly rejected Medicaid expansion proposals over the past decade, prompting supporters to turn to the initiative process. VOTERS IN OKLAHOMA NARROWLY APPROVE MEDICAID EXPANSION Idaho, Maine, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Utah have all expanded Medicaid through ballot questions following inaction by state lawmakers, according to the...
    The U.S. Capitol stands in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Saturday, Aug. 1, 2020.Stefani Reynolds | Bloomberg | Getty Images Voters picked their nominees in several key Senate races and two more House members lost to challengers as five states held their primary elections Tuesday.  Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri and Washington state all voted in an election year upended by the coronavirus pandemic. Three of those states — Arizona, Kansas and Michigan — set the stage for Senate elections this fall that will help to determine whether Democrats can gain a majority in the chamber.  Meanwhile, Missouri became the 38th state to approve expansion of Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for low-income Americans. The move will allow as many as 250,000 people to opt into government health care during the pandemic, according to the Associated Press.  Here are Tuesday's key results, based on race calls from the AP:  Democratic former astronaut...
    Cori Bush, the upset winner of the Democratic primary for Missouri's 1st Congressional District Arizona, Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, and Washington held their primaries on Tuesday. You can find current results at the links for each state; we’ll have a comprehensive rundown in our next Digest. Leading Off ● MO-01: In a major upset, nurse and activist Cori Bush defeated 10-term Rep. Lacy Clay in Tuesday’s Democratic primary for Missouri’s 1st Congressional District. With 150,000 votes in, Bush led the incumbent 49-46. Bush will now be the overwhelming favorite in November in a St. Louis-based seat that backed Hillary Clinton 77-19. The race featured two strikingly different candidates: Clay’s family has represented this district for over 50 years, while Bush only began her political career a few years ago. It started inauspiciously, with a 2016 Senate bid that went nowhere and ended with a punishing 70-13 loss in the Democratic primary...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Mike Parson wins Republican primary election for governor in Missouri. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — The Latest on the Missouri primary election (all times local): 6 a.m. Polls have opened for the Missouri primary. Voters can cast ballots from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. Voters in line when polls close at 7 p.m. can still cast ballots. Missouri voters will decide whether to expand Medicaid health care eligibility to thousands more low-income adults and also will pick the Democratic and Republican candidates for governor, U.S. Congress and the state Legislature. Republican Gov. Mike Parson is expected to win his primary and go on to defend his seat in November. Auditor Nicole Galloway is also expected to win the Democratic primary. Other key races include a primary for St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s seat. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Missouri
    (CNN)The dog days of summer are usually a low-key time for members of Congress to be with their family and constituents back home. But this August 4, some are running for their political lives, challenged by insurgent candidates on the left and right. Kansas, which hasn't sent a Democrat to the Senate in nearly 90 years, has suddenly become the center of the struggle between the two parties for control of the chamber. The Sunflower State also features another Republican primary race, between an indicted congressman and state official, that could affect the Democrats' chances of picking up a House seat in a Trump district.Michigan Rep. Rashida Tlaib, a founding member of the "squad," is being challenged by one of her 2018 rivals, the moderate president of Detroit's city council. In Missouri, Rep. William Lacy Clay, a longtime incumbent, is defending his seat in a race with progressive activist Cori...
    By SUMMER BALLENTINE, Associated Press COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri voters on Tuesday will decide whether to expand Medicaid health care coverage to thousands more low-income adults after years of resistance from Republican lawmakers. The vote on health care, as well as primaries for statewide offices and congressional seats, comes as coronavirus cases are increasing in the state, which could impact voter turnout. Missouri’s Republican-led Legislature repeatedly rejected Medicaid expansion proposals over the past decade, which prompted supporters to turn to the initiative process. Idaho, Maine, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Utah have all expanded Medicaid through ballot questions following inaction by state lawmakers, according to the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Oklahoma became the 37th state to expand eligibility for Medicaid under the federal law last month. Missouri’s Medicaid program currently does not cover most adults without children, and its income eligibility threshold for parents is one of the lowest in the...
    COLUMBIA, Mo. (AP) — Missouri voters on Tuesday will decide whether to expand Medicaid health care coverage to thousands more low-income adults after years of resistance from Republican lawmakers. The vote on health care, as well as primaries for statewide offices and congressional seats, comes as coronavirus cases are increasing in the state, which could impact voter turnout. Missouri’s Republican-led Legislature repeatedly rejected Medicaid expansion proposals over the past decade, which prompted supporters to turn to the initiative process. Idaho, Maine, Nebraska, Oklahoma and Utah have all expanded Medicaid through ballot questions following inaction by state lawmakers, according to the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. Oklahoma became the 37th state to expand eligibility for Medicaid under the federal law last month. Missouri’s Medicaid program currently does not cover most adults without children, and its income eligibility threshold for parents is one of the lowest in the nation at about...
    Supporters of a ballot measure to expand Medicaid to 230,000 Missourians are airing their first TV ad ahead of next month's vote. The spot's narrator says that Amendment 2, as the measure is known, would "fix" the problem of Missouri's federal tax dollars helping to pay for health care in other states by bringing those funds "back to Missouri." The remainder of the ad argues that the amendment would "protect thousands of healthcare jobs," "help keep our rural hospitals open," and "deliver healthcare to more veterans and hardworking Missouri families." xOur first TV ad just went out! Check it out, and then make a plan to vote #YesOn2 at https://t.co/G7fIybrsmx! pic.twitter.com/WuIIuc28OQ— YesOn2: Healthcare for Missouri (@YesOn2MO) July 7, 2020 There hasn't been any public polling on the issue, but efforts to expand Medicaid have performed well at the ballot box. Three red states states—Idaho, Utah, and Nebraska—all voted to expand...
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