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    The North Carolina House is expected Wednesday to approve a COVID-19 relief package that spends $1.7 billion in federal aid. House Bill 196 includes $600 million for COVID-19 testing, tracing and other prevention tasks. It allocates funding to support schools, colleges, universities, farms, fisheries and small businesses, and it bolsters mental health and substance abuse services. The federal funds were provided through the Consolidated Appropriations Act, which was passed by Congress and signed by former President Donald Trump in December. North Carolina received a total of $4 billion in direct aid from the federal measure. The General Assembly passed a bill last month that set aside $2.2 billion of the federal aid for reopening schools, COVID-19 vaccine distribution and rental assistance. Gov. Roy Cooper signed the legislation. Cooper released his proposal last month for spending the federal aid, which called for $287 million for colleges...
    More On: Coronavirus Cuomo health chief deflects nursing home deaths to COVID-19 battle Cuomo aide comes to his defense amid nursing home scandal ‘Green Pass’ in Israel opens music concert to those who are vaccinated Virtual work parties: the good, the bad and the plain peculiar New York Democratic Rep. Adriano Espaillat on Thursday said he’s “not comfortable” with “embarrassing” spending unrelated to the COVID-19 pandemic in President Biden’s $1.9 trillion relief bill, which is expected to pass the House Friday. The candid admission during a CNN interview was circulated by Republicans who have been making the same point this week. Mark Bednar, a senior aide to House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) tweeted the clip, writing, “Democrat Rep admits he’s ‘not comfortable’ with Pelosi’s pet projects.” Espaillat admitted his misgivings when pressed by CNN host Poppy Harlow on $1.5 million for the Seaway International Bridge between Massena, New...
    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer Tuesday privately urged Democrats to remain united in an effort to pass a massive COVID-19 aid spending bill by a mid-March deadline, despite differences over whether the bill should include a minimum wage hike. “He’s begging all of us, despite any differences with any one section of the bill, that we hang together,” Majority Whip Richard Durbin, an Illinois Democrat, said after the party’s weekly caucus luncheon. “This is the signature provision of the Biden administration in terms of dealing with the pandemic. And the economy, and we, need to stick together. That's it.” Senate Democrats aren't sure whether they’ll be able to pass a $15 minimum wage mandate that is included in the massive COVID-19 aid spending bill. The provision faces opposition from within their own party and could be ruled out of order by Senate parliamentarian Elizabeth MacDonough. Schumer and Budget Committee...
    More On: Coronavirus Entire school board resigns after members get caught mocking parents Johns Hopkins expert predicts when COVID-19 pandemic will end This bad work-from-home habit can cause serious damage, experts warn Government memo crushes Cuomo’s defense in nursing home cover-up Democrats formally unveiled their $1.9 trillion coronavirus rescue package in the House — and the big-spending measure was swiftly panned by GOPers as a bloated “liberal wish list.” The 591 page bill unveiled Friday night includes $1,400 direct checks to eligible Americans making less than $75,000 a year, extensions for $400 in federal unemployment benefits and the long sought Democratic priority of a federal minimum wage increase to $15.00. The bill contains billions of dollars for other Democratic priorities including $350 billion to state and local government — of which New York can expect to see at least $50 billion — $130 billion in school funding, $19.1 billion...
    Reuters December 28, 2020 0 Comments Democrats in the U.S. Congress on Monday will try to push through pandemic relief payments of $2,000, in an effort to increase aid for Americans that has put the lawmakers in a rare alignment with President Donald Trump. The Republican president last week threatened to block a $2.3 trillion pandemic aid and spending package if Congress did not boost stimulus payments from $600 to $2,000 and cut other spending. Trump backed down from his demands on Sunday as a possible government shutdown brought on by the fight with lawmakers loomed. But Democratic lawmakers who have a majority in the House of Representatives and have long wanted $2,000 relief checks hope to use the point of agreement with Trump to advance the proposal – or at least put Republicans on record against it – in a vote on Monday. It was unclear why Trump,...
    Trump signed into law $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill. The massive, year-end catchall bill that Donald Trump signed into law combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education, and health care. Highlights of the measure with overall funding amounts and specific amounts for some but not necessarily all initiatives. COVID-19 RELIEF
    With the clock ticking toward a potential U.S. government shutdown, President Donald Trump on Sunday signed a $2.3 trillion spending legislation, which includes $900 billion for coronavirus relief and the remainder for government spending through next September.     The president had called the bill “a disgrace” after it had been passed in the House and Senate, capping months of negotiations in which Trump was little involved. The bill was flown from Washington to his Mar-a-Lago club in Florida to be available if Trump decided to sign it into law.      The stand-off appeared to break when Trump hinted in a tweet late Sunday, “Good news on Covid Relief Bill. Information to follow!”   Without Trump’s signature or passage of a stopgap measure to fund operations, a partial government shutdown would have begun shortly after midnight Monday. Increased unemployment benefits and eviction protections expired early Sunday.     Trump...
    By Tim Reid and Richard Cowan (Reuters) - President Donald Trump will spend Christmas Day at his Palm Beach resort as millions of Americans face the risk of losing jobless benefits on Saturday and a partial government shutdown looms next week, following his threat to not sign a $2.3 trillion coronavirus aid and spending package. Democratic President-elect Joe Biden, whose victory Trump still refuses to acknowledge nearly two months after the Nov. 3 election, is spending the day at his Delaware home and has no public events, according to his staff. Meanwhile, the U.S. Congress, which normally is adjourned the last week of December, will be preparing to return to work. On Monday, following the Christmas weekend, the House of Representatives is scheduled to vote on overriding Trump's veto of a $740 billion bill authorizing the country's defense programs. If the House vote succeeds, the Senate could hold its vote...
    Lawmakers on Christmas Eve blocked each other’s competing bills that attempted to rectify President Trump’s objections to a massive spending and coronavirus aid package. Trump has warned he will not sign legislation that bundles $900 billion in coronavirus aid with the $1.4 trillion 2021 government spending bill. Trump wants lawmakers to make changes to the massive spending package to remove “wasteful” spending and to increase the virus aid stimulus checks from $600 to $2,000 for individuals. Each party attempted quick passage of separate measures that addressed parts of Trump’s criticism of the colossal bill, but since neither passed, lawmakers will have to deal with the impasse on Monday, when the House returns for a rare post-Christmas session. A temporary government funding bill runs out on Monday. The House planned to return that day to vote on a resolution to override Trump’s veto of the 2021 National Defense Authorization...
    Lawmakers on Christmas Eve blocked each other’s competing bills that attempted to rectify President Trump’s objections to a massive spending and coronavirus aid package. Trump has warned he will not sign legislation that bundles $900 billion in coronavirus aid with the $1.4 trillion 2021 government spending bill. Trump wants lawmakers to make changes to the massive spending package to remove “wasteful” spending and to increase the virus aid stimulus checks from $600 to $2,000 for individuals. Each party attempted quick passage of separate measures that addressed parts of Trump’s criticism of the colossal bill, but since neither passed, lawmakers will have to deal with the impasse on Monday, Dec. 28th, when the House returns for a rare post-Christmas session. A temporary government funding bill runs out on the 28th. The House planned to return that day to vote on a resolution to override Trump’s veto of the 2021...
    Jason Chaffetz on Wednesday called on Democrats to 'cut out the pork and all the reckless spending' after President Donald Trump's demand for $2,000 relief checks. The former House Oversight Committee chairman was guest hosting Sean Hannity's show on Fox News when he told viewers: 'Congress has a choice to make. 'Will they deliver needed aid to Americans struggling [in] the pandemic, or will they retreat to the old ways of Washington, where pork-packed projects, foreign nations, and the special interests take priority over the forgotten men and women of the United States of America?'  Trump's demand for additional relief money blindsided all of Washington - members of both parties on Capitol Hill and several of his White House staff alike.  The president’s last-minute objections are setting up a defining showdown with his own Republican Party in his final days in office.  House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy said it...
    President Trump on Tuesday blasted the bipartisan omnibus spending bill passed by Congress that wrapped up COVID relief in it, calling for larger stimulus checks and arguing no one in Congress had read the bill. The face-off is reminiscent of 2018, when Trump threatened to veto an omnibus bill "nobody read." He ultimately ended up not vetoing but promised at the time never to sign such legislation again.  In 2018, he said he signed the legislation for the military and national security. "It's not right and it's very bad for our country," he said. "There are a lot of things that I’m unhappy about in this bill. There are a lot of things that we shouldn’t have had in this bill, but we were, in a sense, forced -- if we want to build our military -- we were forced to have. There are some things that we should have in the bill," Trump...
    Getty Trump slammed aid to foreign governments. In a video viewed more than 11 million times on Twitter, President Donald Trump ticked off a list of aid to foreign governments that he said is contained in the new COVID-19 stimulus relief bill that Congress approved on December 21. Trump alleged the bill provides: $85.5 million for assistance to Cambodia $134 million to Burma $1.3 billion for Egypt and the Egyptian military, “which will go out and buy almost exclusively Russian military equipment.” $25 million for democracy and gender programs in Pakistan $505 million for Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and Panama. A widely circulated post on Facebook also purports that the COVID-19 relief bill contains aid to foreign governments. “Congress found plenty of money for foreign countries, lobbyists and foreign interests while sending the bare minimum to the American people who need it....
    As Congress rushed to pass its year-end spending omnibus legislation and a coronavirus stimulus bill in one fell swoop Monday night, many objected to the process which essentially attached the crucial pandemic aid to a bevy of other priorities totaling $2.3 trillion.  Among the most controversial provisions were related to foreign aid and railed against by people ranging from conservative members of Congress to left-leaning journalists. "It throws billions at foreign aid, including gender programs in Pakistan to the tune of $10 million," Rep. Chip Roy, R-Texas, said in a scathing statement. Intercept co-founder Glenn Greenwald, meanwhile, objected to $500 million that was allocated for joint programs between the U.S. and Israel.  WHY THE HOUSE SPLIT THE CORONAVIRUS AND OMNIBUS PACKAGE INTO TWO VOTES, AND WHAT IT MAY MEAN FOR NEXT CONGRESS "Israel has universal health care while Americans - transferring yet more of your money to that foreign country - do...
    American taxpayers still reeling from coronavirus lockdowns will be shelling out billions to foreign countries if Congress passes a $2.3 trillion spending bill unveiled Monday. The 5,593 page budget-busting bill was posted online Monday afternoon, only hours before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said a vote would be held. For some countries, Christmas came early: $169,739,000 to Vietnam, including $19 million to remediate dioxins (page 1476). Unspecified funds to “continue support for not-for-profit institutions of higher education in Kabul, Afghanistan that are accessible to both women and men in a coeducational environment” (page 1477). $198,323,000 to Bangladesh, including $23.5 million to support Burmese refugees and $23.3 million for “democracy programs” (page 1485). $130,265,000 to Nepal for “development and democracy programs” (page 1485). Pakistan: $15 million for “democracy programs” and $10 million for “gender programs” (page 1486). Sri Lanka: Up to $15 million “for the refurbishing of a high endurance cutter,”...
    By COLLIN BINKLEY, AP Education Writer The year-end spending bill before Congress would restore prisoners' eligibility for federal Pell grants for college, simplify the form used to apply for student aid and erase more than $1 billion in federal debt for historically Black colleges, among an array of other education initiatives tucked into the legislation. An accompanying pandemic relief bill, however, has drawn criticism from higher education advocates who say it does too little for the nation's beleaguered colleges and students. The massive, catchall bill combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion spending bill. Congress struck a deal on the bill Sunday. Under the deal, prisoners would again be allowed to obtain federal Pell grants for low-income students. A 1994 bill blocked prisoners from the program, but momentum has been growing to reverse the decision. The Obama administration chipped away at the prohibition with a 2015 pilot...
    The year-end spending bill before Congress would restore prisoners’ eligibility for federal Pell grants for college, simplify the form used to apply for student aid and erase more than $1 billion in federal debt for historically Black colleges, among an array of other education initiatives tucked into the legislation. An accompanying pandemic relief bill, however, has drawn criticism from higher education advocates who say it does too little for the nation’s beleaguered colleges and students. The massive, catchall bill combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion spending bill. Congress struck a deal on the bill Sunday. Under the deal, prisoners would again be allowed to obtain federal Pell grants for low-income students. A 1994 bill blocked prisoners from the program, but momentum has been growing to reverse the decision. The Obama administration chipped away at the prohibition with a 2015 pilot program allowing prisoners to use Pell...
    House lawmakers passed a one-day government spending bill ahead of a vote on a major coronavirus spending package both chambers plan to approve on Monday. Senate and House leaders announced Sunday evening the two parties struck an accord on a $900 billion virus aid package that includes new stimulus checks, enhanced jobless benefits, small business loans and other aid aimed at helping the nation cope with the impact of pandemic and a recent round of surges and economic lockdowns. Lawmakers plan to bundle the virus aid package with fiscal 2021 spending which expires Sunday at midnight. The House and Senate will pass the one-day government funding measure Sunday night and on Monday. Both chambers will pass the virus aid package as well as full fiscal 2021 spending along with an unrelated water resources authorization measure, all wrapped in one piece of legislation. The bill will also include yet another...
    WASHINGTON - Top Washington negotiators, propelled by a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package, said a Sunday agreement is all but inevitable to deliver long-overdue pandemic aid of almost $1 trillion.  "I am very hopeful that we get this done today," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told Fox News Channel's "Sunday Morning Futures."  The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers that was resolved by the Senate's top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican. Aides to lawmakers in both parties said the compromise sparked a final round of negotiations on a handful of remaining issues.   An aide to a key GOP lawmaker said it would likely require all of Sunday to finalize and draft the final agreement, which is already guaranteed to be the largest spending measure yet, combining COVID-19 relief with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill...
    WASHINGTON - Top Washington negotiators, propelled by a late-night agreement on the last major obstacle to a COVID-19 economic relief package, said a Sunday agreement is all but inevitable to deliver long-overdue pandemic aid of almost $1 trillion.  "I am very hopeful that we get this done today," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., told Fox News Channel's "Sunday Morning Futures."  The breakthrough involved a fight over Federal Reserve emergency powers that was resolved by the Senate's top Democrat and a senior conservative Republican. Aides to lawmakers in both parties said the compromise sparked a final round of negotiations on a handful of remaining issues.   An aide to a key GOP lawmaker said it would likely require all of Sunday to finalize and draft the final agreement, which is already guaranteed to be the largest spending measure yet, combining COVID-19 relief with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill...
    US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi leaves a meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on December 18, 2020.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images Congress voted Friday to prevent a government shutdown for two days, sending a temporary funding measure to President Donald Trump. Federal funding will lapse at 12:01 a.m. ET on Saturday if Washington fails to approve a spending bill. The stopgap measure would keep the government running through Sunday until 12:01 a.m. ET Monday morning while congressional leaders try to finalize a full-year funding and coronavirus relief package. Trump will have hours to sign the bill before government funding expires. Once Trump approves the measure, Congress will once again find itself on a tight deadline. The House will meet again on Sunday at noon ET and will not vote earlier than 1 p.m. The Senate will return at 11 a.m. ET Saturday and will likely...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warned lawmakers that the chamber is likely to remain in session this weekend to vote on a new round of coronavirus aid legislation and a massive 2021 spending bill. Democratic and Republican leaders have yet to finalize a must-pass deal on the coronavirus aid package, which will make it harder to clear the bill by Friday, as lawmakers had hoped. Instead, Congress may be forced to pass another short-term federal spending bill to extend government funding beyond a Friday deadline. “For the information of all senators, we are going to stay right here until we are finished, even if that means working into or through the weekend,” McConnell warned in a floor speech on Thursday morning. Top House and Senate lawmakers are negotiating a coronavirus aid deal worth roughly $908 billion. The package would include a new round of stimulus checks for certain individuals...
    Reuters December 17, 2020 0 Comments After months of feuding and with a weekend deadline fast approaching, U.S. congressional negotiators were wrangling over details of a $900 billion COVID-19 aid bill that leaders have vowed to pass before going home this year. The legislation is expected to include $600 to $700 stimulus checks, extend unemployment benefits, help pay for vaccine distribution and assist small businesses struggling in a crisis that has killed more than 304,000 Americans and thrown millions out of work. Congress passed $3 trillion in economic aid last spring, but lawmakers have argued ever since about how much more may be needed. With rates of COVID-19 infections soaring to new highs, and with the American economy showing signs of weakening, leaders of both parties in the House of Representatives and the Senate this month began to compromise in hopes of passing a bill. “We’re making progress,” House...
    Reuters December 16, 2020 0 Comments U.S. congressional negotiators on Wednesday were “closing in on” a $900 billion COVID-19 aid bill that will include $600 to $700 stimulus checks and extended unemployment benefits, as a Friday deadline loomed, lawmakers and aides said. Top members of the Democratic-controlled House of Representatives and Republican-controlled Senate sounded more positive than they have in months on a fresh response to a crisis that has killed more than 304,000 Americans and thrown millions out of work. Their aides were struggling on Wednesday to draft legislative language as rates of COVID-19 infections are soaring to new highs, even as the United States starts to vaccinate people. The American economy is showing signs of weakening. Negotiators were looking for a way to shift the approach to aiding hard-hit state and local governments, which has been a key Democratic priority but opposed by Republicans, one source familiar...
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday lawmakers won't leave Washington this year until they have agreed on a fresh package of coronavirus relief. McConnell told reporters that he hopes lawmakers can produce a government spending bill with the coronavirus aid attached to it. "We're going to stay here until we get a COVID package ... no matter how long it takes," the Republican senator said. (Reporting by Susan Cornwell; editing by Jonathan Oatis) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: diseases, infectious diseases, vaccines, public health, United States, coronavirus, educationGalleriesNewsCartoons on President Donald TrumpPhotosPhotos: Daily Life, DisruptedPhotosArmenia-Azerbaijan Conflict EscalatesNewsThe Week in Cartoons: Dec. 7-11RecommendedPoliticsBiden’s Team Says Stay Home for InaugurationHealthiest Communities Health News‘Dangerous Moment’ as End of Eviction Ban LoomsBest CountriesPandemic Exposes Financial InequitiesHealthiest Communities Health NewsThe Need to Prioritize Public HealthAmerica 2020McConnell Acknowledges Biden WinCoronavirus Bulletin Stay informed daily on the latest news and advice on...
    (CNN)A bipartisan group of senators is struggling to finalize negotiations over a massive package once viewed as the best bet in Congress to give relief to Americans suffering from the coronavirus pandemic, putting pressure on congressional leaders to take matters into their own hands ahead of a critical deadline next week.The senators, along with a handful of House members, have engaged in negotiations for days as they try to finalize a $908 billion spending package that they hoped would pressure Congress to break a stalemate that has persisted for months.But the group has failed to reached an agreement on a central issue critical for Republican support: Providing protections from lawsuits for businesses, universities and other entities that opened during the pandemic. Republicans in the group say there needs to be an agreement on liability protections in order for them to sign off on a top Democratic priority: $160 billion for...
    The Senate Friday passed a week-long measure to keep the government operating, clearing the measure for President Trump's signature and providing additional time for lawmakers to hash out a deal on another round of coronavirus aid. Lawmakers approved the measure by voice vote. The House passed the measure earlier this week. Partisan differences have so far blocked a measure to fund the government through 2021. The stopgap bill means both the House and Senate will have to return next week to continue negotiations. The two parties are also trying to hammer out a measure that would provide a new round of coronavirus relief aid. Talks have yet to produce a deal based on a $908 billion plan authored by a biparistan group of House and Senate lawmakers. "We're still working on it," Sen. Joe Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, told reporters in the Capitol on Friday. News Congress
    By ANDREW TAYLOR, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers are giving themselves more time to sort through their end-of-session business on government spending and COVID-19 relief, preparing a one-week stopgap spending bill that would prevent a shutdown this weekend. House floor leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said on Twitter that the temporary government funding bill is slated for a vote on Wednesday, when it is sure to easily pass. The development comes as Capitol Hill is struggling to figure out how to deliver long-delayed pandemic relief, including additional help for businesses hard hit by the pandemic, further unemployment benefits, funding to distribute COVID-19 vaccines and funding demanded by Democrats for state and local governments. Disagreements flared Monday over one key provision — a proposed liability shield from COVID-19-related lawsuits for businesses, schools and organizations that reopen. Hoyer had previously told lawmakers that this week would probably be the last of the...
    WASHINGTON – Lawmakers are giving themselves more time to sort through their end-of-session business on government spending and COVID-19 relief, preparing a one-week stopgap spending bill that would prevent a shutdown this weekend. House floor leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md., said on Twitter that the temporary government funding bill is slated for a vote on Wednesday, when it is sure to easily pass. The development comes as Capitol Hill is struggling to figure out how to deliver long-delayed pandemic relief, including additional help for businesses hard hit by the pandemic, further unemployment benefits, funding to distribute COVID-19 vaccines and funding demanded by Democrats for state and local governments. Disagreements flared Monday over one key provision — a proposed liability shield from COVID-19-related lawsuits for businesses, schools and organizations that reopen. Hoyer had previously told lawmakers that this week would probably be the last of the session, but talks are going more...
    Reuters December 7, 2020 0 Comments The U.S. Congress will vote this week on a one-week stopgap funding bill to provide more time for lawmakers to reach a deal on COVID-19 relief and an overarching spending bill to avoid a government shutdown. Lawmakers in the Republican-led Senate and Democratic-run House of Representatives need to enact a government spending measure by Friday, when funding for federal agencies is set to expire. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell hope to attach long-awaited COVID-19 relief to a broad $1.4 trillion spending bill. The pandemic has killed 282,000 people in the United States, thrown millions out of work and crippled businesses. McConnell and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer said separately on Monday that both chambers would vote this week on a measure to allow an additional week of talks. “I am disappointed that we have not yet reached agreement...
    The U.S. Capitol building in Washington, D.C., Nov. 11, 2020.Stefani Reynolds | Bloomberg | Getty Images Congress comes back to Washington this week with two thorny issues to resolve before the end of the year. Lawmakers need to pass a spending bill by Dec. 11 to prevent a government shutdown. Meanwhile, they will have to decide whether to approve another coronavirus relief bill as rampant infections stress hospitals and trip up the U.S. economic recovery. The challenges will test a divided Capitol's capacity to govern after months of gridlock fueled in part by a contentious 2020 election. Congress' ability to pass legislation this month will shape the federal government and private sector's power to reduce the damage caused by the pandemic in the coming months. The GOP-controlled Senate will convene on Monday afternoon following its Thanksgiving break. The Democratic-held House will meet again on Wednesday. Appropriators have reached agreement on...
    White House economics adviser Larry Kudlow said Friday that President Trump met with Chief of Staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and approved a new pandemic aid package. “The president has approved a revised package. He has approved a revised package. He would like to do a deal,” Kudlow said in an interview with Fox Business. Kudlow said Mnuchin expects to be speaking with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this afternoon to discuss the new proposal. President Trump had called off negotiations this week when talks stalled amid Democratic refusal to make meaningful compromises. President Trump said he would support standalone bills that would provide limited and targeted aid, including bills to provide stimulus checks to households and funding for airlines. On Thursday afternoon, however, Pelosi said she would only support aid through a comprehensive bill, reversing her earlier support for a standalone airline bill. CNBC reported shortly after...
    US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) speaks at a press conference at the US Capitol on September 22, 2020 in Washington, DC, as McConnell said in a statement that the Senate would take up President Donald Trumps nominee for the Supreme Court following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.Nicholas Kamm | AFP | Getty Images The Senate passed a bill Wednesday to fund the government into December and prevent a shutdown at the end of the month. The House approved the legislation last week. Once President Donald Trump signs it into law, the measure will ensure government funding does not lapse during a pandemic and just weeks before the 2020 election.  The plan keeps federal agencies running until Dec. 11. Before then, lawmakers aim to hash out spending legislation to keep the government running through Sept. 2021.  Democrats and Republicans reached a deal on a temporary funding bill...
    The House Tuesday passed a stopgap spending bill that will keep the government funded through December 11 after working out a deal with Republicans on agriculture aid and food stamps. The measure now heads to the Senate, where it is expected to pass this week. The year’s funding expires on Sept. 30 and the emergency bill is needed to keep government departments and agencies running “on autopilot” at 2020 funding levels while lawmakers work out a year-long deal. The two parties struck a deal after a battle over farm funding and food stamps. “The last thing the United State of America needs right now, in the midst of a pandemic, is a lapse in government funding,” Rep. Rodney Davis, an Illinois Republican who recovered from a recent bout of coronavirus, said. The partisan dispute over the bill was resolved after Republicans agreed to allow the spending measure to...
    Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) speaks during her weekly news conference at the U.S. Capitol on August 6, 2020 in Washington, DC.Stefani Reynolds | Getty Images House Democrats and the Trump administration reached agreement Tuesday on a spending deal that would fund the government into December and avoid a shutdown before a Sept. 30 deadline, Speaker Nancy Pelosi said. The House aims to pass the legislation Tuesday night.  Pelosi said the proposal would include $8 billion for nutrition assistance for children and families, along with increased accountability for farm aid money. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had criticized a lack of farm assistance funds in a bill House Democrats released Monday.  The bill would fund the government through Dec. 11, avoiding a potentially chaotic shutdown during the coronavirus pandemic and before the Nov. 3 election. Lawmakers have said they want to get past the shutdown threat to focus on...
    House Democrats are aiming for a vote Tuesday evening on legislation to avert a government shutdown after rekindling talks with Republicans and the Trump administration over disputed farm assistance. The House was originally slated to vote Tuesday afternoon on legislation advanced solely by Democrats, but multiple aides said those plans were temporarily put on hold as bipartisan talks resumed over aid for farmers impacted by the coronavirus pandemic as well as nutrition assistance for children in low-income families. Lawmakers are running up against a tight deadline, with just eight days left before current federal funding expires. The government would shut down on Oct. 1 if Congress doesn't pass a spending bill before then. House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerWhite House opposes House energy bill as Democrats promise climate action This week: Supreme Court fight over Ginsburg's seat upends Congress's agenda House Democrats postpone vote on marijuana decriminalization bill MORE (D-Md.)...
    House Democrats may postpone a planned Tuesday vote on a bill to keep the government funded through Dec. 11 as talks resume with Republicans and the Trump administration over disputed farm assistance. Talks are currently ongoing over the aid for farmers impacted by the coronavirus pandemic as well as nutrition assistance for children in low-income families, according to multiple Democratic aides. Depending on how the bipartisan discussions unfold, aides said that the originally planned vote could be postponed. Time is increasingly running short, with only eight days left before current federal funding expires. The government would shut down on Oct. 1 if Congress doesn't pass a spending bill in time. House Democrats introduced legislation on Monday that would extend current government funding through Dec. 11, but it does not include a provision requested by the White House to ensure farm aid payments continue flowing through the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), which...
    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell slammed a government funding resolution drafted by House Democrats on Monday, leaving the United States vulnerable to a government shutdown weeks before the November election. The clock is ticking for the the U.S. Senate and Congress to agree on a new funding package with just nine days before it ends at midnight on September 30. The Senate and House must approve identical versions of the bill for it to be signed by President Trump, but one of his closest allies blasted a drafted resolution from House Democrats as 'shameful.'   House Democrats on Monday revealed a short-term spending bill that would extend funding for through December 11. It would stall the potential shutdown of certain operations for vital government agencies like The Pentagon. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel (pictured) criticized a short-term spending bill presented by House Democrats on Monday as 'shameful' But the draft did not include...
    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi won’t back down on her demand that Republicans agree to at least $2 trillion in the next round of coronavirus aid, a signal that a weekslong impasse will not end soon. The California Democrat questioned at her weekly press conference, “Why should there be a bill that has far less than what the public needs?” Pelosi was expected to talk by phone Thursday afternoon to White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, who told reporters in the Capitol on Saturday that he was trying to meet with her in person, but she was unavailable. The two sides abandoned meeting in person earlier this month after days of closed-door meetings did not yield a compromise. Pelosi has since then refused to meet with Meadows or Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin unless they agree to her demand that the negotiations start at a minimum of $2 billion in...
    House Democrats on Thursday advanced an amendment that would restore millions of dollars in aid to Palestinians cut by the Trump administration two years earlier, as part of a multi-billion dollar spending bill under consideration. House Appropriations Committee Chair Rep. Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyDemocrats sidestep budget deal by seeking 0B in emergency spending New Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries Overnight Defense: House Dems offer M for Army to rename bases | Bill takes aim at money for Trump's border wall | Suspect in custody after shooting at Marine training facility  MORE (D-N.Y.) proposed the amendment that passed by voice vote, calling for $255 million in aid to Palestinians in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The amendment calls for aid to be delivered directly to non-governmental organizations for humanitarian and developmental assistance. Lowey said her amendment seeks to direct U.S. funding “directly to the Palestinian people.” “What we can do...
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