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    GERMAN chancellor Angela Merkel has revealed those who do not take the coronavirus vaccine could be segregated in 'certain areas' The embattled German leader has not ruled out the possibility of areas where non-vaccinated people are banned from entering. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates... 3Angela Merkel has revealed Germany could consider segregated areas for those who have not been vaccinatedCredit: AFP or licensors 3Some Germans fear there could be a two-class society with those who have been vaccinated and those who haven'tCredit: Pacific Coast News The chancellor revealed in an interview with newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung that Germany will consider restricting certain areas or places to people who have been vaccinated. "If we have made a vaccination offer to enough people and some of them do not want to be vaccinated at all, we would have to consider whether openings and access to certain...
    Let's be blunt: America's had an absolutely terrible pandemic. The world's No1 superpower yesterday passed the devastating coronavirus-related death toll of 500,000 people. That's 20 percent of all global deaths, in a country that has 4.25 percent of the world's population. It also means the US has now suffered more COVID victims than the total number of Americans who died on the battlefields of World War I, World War II and the Vietnam War combined. These are all horrific mind-numbing statistics, and I'm in no doubt where much of the blame of this should go: Donald Trump. The recently ousted president handled this crisis catastrophically badly – refusing to take it seriously from the start when it erupted last February, ignoring the science, publicly shaming his top medical experts, and spray-gunning dangerous unproven 'cure' theories. Scroll down for video  As Dr Anthony Fauci, the top US...
    The “COVID-19 Vaccine Janssen” works using an adenovirus as is the case with Astrazeneca, unlike the BioNTech / Pfizer and Moderna vaccines which work with messenger RNA technology. LPharmaceutical firm Janssen-Cilag has applied for provisional marketing authorization for its anti-Covid-19 vaccine, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced on Tuesday. The Agency could issue a recommendation to the European Commission by mid-March if the efficacy and safety data for the vaccine are sufficiently established. If the European Commission validates this recommendation, it will be the fourth anti-Covid-19 vaccine authorized in the EU after those of BioNTech / Pfizer, Moderna and Astrazeneca / Oxford. To speed up the process, the EMA has been examining the development of Janssen’s vaccine candidate for some time in a continuous process, based on data provided by the company. The “COVID-19 Vaccine Janssen” works using an adenovirus as is...
    AstraZeneca said in a company document released Thursday that it could take six months or longer to develop effective vaccines against some of the new coronavirus variants. In a 2020 company review, the drug maker said that it “hopes to reduce the time needed to reach production at scale to between six and nine months, by utilizing existing clinical data and optimizing its established supply chain.” Though AstraZeneca’s first vaccine has shown to be effective against the original novel coronavirus strain and is being distributed throughout the United Kingdom and European Union, recent studies have shown that it is far less effective against a new South African strain that is spreading around the world. Following the new data, South Africa halted the distribution of AstraZeneca’s vaccine within the country, where its native, more contagious strain has become dominant. (RELATED: AstraZeneca Begins Developing Vaccines For Coronavirus Variants) Patients receive the AstraZeneca COVID-19...
    NEW mutant-strain killing Covid jabs will be ready to be rolled out in autumn, the Oxford vaccine boss said today. Professor Andrew Pollard, chief investigator of the Oxford vaccine trial, said: "Work is very quick [on adapting jabs for mutations]. Then there's manufacturing to do, and a small scale study. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 5A woman is given the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab in WadebridgeCredit: Getty Images - Getty "All of that can be completed in a very short period of time, and the autumn is really the timing for having new vaccines available for use." It comes after community spread of three concerning mutations have been detected in the UK. The UK's Kent Covid strain has acquired a mutation similar to the South African variant - which ministers are racing to contain an outbreak of - and could resist jabs, official reports revealed....
    New data from an Oxford University trial offers the first evidence that the COVID-19 vaccine developed by the prestigious school along with AstraZeneca can not only prevent people getting sick with the coronavirus, but help stop its spread in the community. For the first time in a large-scale human trial, all participants in the U.K. study were screened at regular intervals for COVID-19 infection after getting a first shot of the vaccine, rather than just participants who developed suspected symptoms of the disease. The Oxford research, posted online Tuesday as a yet-to-be peer reviewed "pre-print" study by The Lancet, found that up to 12 weeks after getting a first dose of the vaccine, there was a 67% reduction in positive tests among trial participants compared to those given a placebo. A number of vaccines, including Oxford/AstraZeneca's, the Pfizer and Moderna formulas being widely used in the U.S. and others...
    Vials of Covid vaccines – JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP This was first published in The Telegraph’s Beyond Brexit Bulletin. For an essential guide to the decisions facing Britain, post Brexit, sign up to our subscriber-exclusive newsletter here – straight to your inbox every Tuesday and Thursday. Brexit lurks in the background of the EU’s row with AstraZeneca over coronavirus vaccine supplies. It is hard to imagine this controversy could have ever come to pass if Britain had never left the EU. Brexit is not responsible for the European Commission’s attacks on AstraZeneca. But the story neatly illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of Britain quitting the bloc. The UK was still in the Brexit transition period last year when it was invited to join the EU’s joint procurement scheme for vaccines. The European Commission would negotiate on behalf of the bloc, which, by virtue of its size, would ensure cheaper prices. Instead...
    BRITAIN has more Covid vaccine supply than it needs and could share spare jabs with other countries, it's reported. The UK has secured 367 million doses, enough for 5.5 per person, industry insiders believe. ???? Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 8Britain could donate spare vaccine supplies to countries that need them, it is claimedCredit: Getty Images - Getty 8The UK has secured enough doses for 5.5 per person, its reportedCredit: PA:Press Association Around 13 per cent of adults in the UK have already had at least one vaccine injection, with the EU average just two per cent. And with Britain leading Europe's vaccine charge, the government could donate them to other countries lagging behind, it's claimed. A source told The Times: "There is plenty of vaccine. It exceeds what the government wants to do." It comes amid a furious battle with Brussels bigwigs...
    The chief of the pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca, which developed a coronavirus vaccination with Oxford University, has said they have discovered the “winning formula” to improving efficacy, amidst reports that the vaccine will be approved in the next week. Chief Executive of AstraZeneca, Pascal Soriot, claims that his product is as effective as the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine, which was the first in Britain and the Western world to be granted government approval. Speaking to The Sunday Times, Mr Soriot said: “We think we have figured out the winning formula and how to get efficacy that, after two doses, is up there with everybody else.” Sources told the newspaper of record that the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) will approve the AstraZeneca/Oxford product by Thursday. Sources also told the newspaper that it will be effective against the new strain of the virus discovered earlier this month in Britain. Benefits of the Oxford vaccine include...
    A recent analysis of data produced by AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine trials found the pharmaceutical company’s vaccine is effective, but more research needs to be done before it’s green-lit for public distribution, Reuters reported. AstraZeneca’s vaccine, developed with Oxford University, can be up to 90% effective, peer-reviewed data of phase 3 trials published Tuesday in The Lancet shows, according to Reuters. The United Kingdom has already ordered 100 million doses of the AstraZeneca/Oxford vaccine, Sky News reported. BREAKING: A vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca provides protection against severe Covid-19 — but more analysis will be needed to see how well it works in older people https://t.co/ttJAeg6eps pic.twitter.com/txbqUvmBiJ — Bloomberg (@business) December 8, 2020 Scientists and medical experts have been waiting for more comprehensive data from AstraZeneca’s vaccine trials after they criticized the company for not releasing more information last month, according to Reuters. The Lancet study...
    Bill Gates estimates that as many as 6 coronavirus vaccines could be available to the American public by as early as spring. “I expect that we’ll have about six vaccines approved by the first quarter,” Gates said Tuesday while speaking at the virtual Singapore FinTech Festival. The tech billionaire mentioned that vaccine candidates from Novavax, AstraZeneca, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson could be approved within the coming months in addition to the Pfizer vaccine which began its rollout in the United Kingdom on Tuesday. He did not name the sixth vaccine candidate. Pfizer and BioNTech have already sought out emergency approval for use in the U.S. and are set to become authorized by the Food and Drug Administration as early as this week.  “The Western regulators are doing a great job,” Gates said. “They’ve run these phase three trials in an incredibly professional way, looking for any side effects, looking at efficacy.” The Bill &...
    Britain said Sunday it has secured 2 million more doses of a promising coronavirus vaccine as it gears up to launch within days the country’s most ambitious inoculation program in decades. The U.K. has had Europe’s deadliest coronavirus outbreak, with more than 58,000 confirmed virus-related deaths. It now hopes to hit a more positive milestone by becoming one of the first countries in the world to start vaccinating its population against COVID-19. CORONAVIRUS: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW The U.K. government has agreed to buy more than 350 million doses of vaccines from seven different producers, should they prove effective, as it prepares to vaccinate as many of the country’s 67 million people as possible. The Department of Health said Sunday it had increased its order for a vaccine developed by U.S. firm Moderna from 5 million to 7 million doses, enough for 3.5 million people. VideoThe Moderna vaccine is...
    London (CNN)In the days since Oxford University and AstraZeneca unveiled the results of the partnership's Phase 3 Covid-19 vaccine trials, a growing number of questions have emerged. The stated 70% average efficacy was significantly lower than the 94.5% to 95% reported by the other two leading candidates, Moderna and Pfizer.Yet this vaccine could still prove to be more valuable for the world than the other two in the coming months. If the questions over its results are answered and it receives approval, it may lead the way in providing vaccine coverage in poorer countries where it is urgently needed.The UK government took the first step in that approval process on Friday, announcing that it had formally referred the candidate to the UK's medicines regulator for assessment. A researcher in a laboratory at the Jenner Institute in Oxford, England, works on the coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University."[T]he Pfizer...
    A BRIT-developed vaccine could be rolled out in weeks after ministers asked regulators to assess it for emergency approval. Trial data shows the Oxford University developed jab offers up to 90 per cent protection against the virus. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 5AstraZeneca's vaccine could be rolled out in weeks after ministers asked regulators to assess it for emergency approvalCredit: Reuters 5Ninety per cent efficacy was only achieved when people were given a half dose followed by a full dose.Credit: AP:Associated Press No-one given the vaccine ended up seriously ill with Covid, while it also stopped the bug spreading between people. But maker AstraZeneca says it is looking at carrying out further global clinical trials after questions were raised in the US about its results. Ninety per cent efficacy was only achieved when people were given a half dose followed by a...
    Maybe not such a “happy” accident after all. AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine is coming under intense scrutiny after its UK scientists made a major “mistake” during trials — one that could even halt it from getting approved, according to reports. The UK drugmaker and its partner, Oxford University, admitted — after reporting its vaccine tested up to 90 percent effective — that the promising results came after a batch of volunteers were accidentally given half doses. The efficacy of the vaccine was significantly lower at 62 percent for those who received the correctly administered two full doses. Lead researcher Mene Pangalos insisted it was “serendipity,” but the error, which was not reported in the initial findings, has brought the vaccine under intense scrutiny from scientists and industry experts. The half-dose group was just 2,741 volunteers — and all were under 55, raising questions as to whether the relative youth of...
    Maybe not such a “happy” accident after all. AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine is coming under intense scrutiny after its UK scientists made a major “mistake” during trials — one that could even halt it from getting approved, according to reports. The UK drugmaker and its partner, Oxford University, admitted — after reporting its vaccine tested up to 90 percent effective — that the promising results came after a batch of volunteers were accidentally given half doses. The efficacy of the vaccine was significantly lower at 62 percent for those who received the correctly administered two full doses. Lead researcher Mene Pangalos insisted it was “serendipity,” but the error, which was not reported in the initial findings, has brought the vaccine under intense scrutiny from scientists and industry experts. The half-dose group was just 2,741 volunteers — and all were under 55, raising questions as to whether the relative youth of the...
    NEARLY 20 million doses of a Covid jab could be available by the end of the year in a triumph for British science. It could see one in three people vaccinated against the pandemic by the end of January — with life returning to normal by Easter. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 9Nearly 20million doses of a UK-made Covid jab could be available by the end of the year thanks to a breakthrough from Oxford UniversityCredit: PA:Press Association 9 Trial data yesterday showed the Oxford University-developed jab offers up to 90 per cent protection against the virus. It comes after Pfizer and Moderna announced vaccines that showed 95 per cent protection. But the Oxford jab — developed with drugs giant AstraZeneca — is cheaper, and easier to store and distribute worldwide. No one given that vaccine ended up seriously ill with Covid, while...
    LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists testing the efficacy of AstraZeneca's experimental COVID-19 vaccine said they cannot be sure if the virus will mutate in a way that would make it necessary to repeat vaccination every year, but that for now that looks unlikely. "We don't know yet if this virus will be mutating away from the immune response," the Oxford vaccine group's director Andrew Pollard told reporters on a briefing, adding: "There is no evidence of that yet." Asked whether the vaccine - which showed at least 70% efficacy in interim data from phase III trials - would be likely to give longer-term protection, Pollard said: "We've got optimism about immune response lasting at least a year," but that trials needed more time to be able to give any confirmation of durability. (Reporting by Kate Kelland and Kate Holton, Editing by Catherine Evans) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters. Tags: infectious diseases, Canada,...
    Staff at CSL are seen working in the lab on Nov. 8 in Melbourne, Australia. CSL will begin manufacturing AstraZeneca-Oxford University Covid-19 vaccine from Monday.Darrian Traynor | Getty Images News | Getty Images LONDON — The coronavirus vaccine being developed by the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca could still be made available at a similar time to the other leading candidates, according to the head of Oxford's vaccine trial. The comments come shortly after a peer-reviewed analysis of phase two trials, published Thursday, showed the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot triggered a robust immune response in older adults. The findings have raised hopes that it may be able to protect age groups most at risk from Covid-19. Professor Andrew Pollard, director of the Oxford Vaccine Group, said that the researchers were "really delighted" with the findings, adding he was "optimistic" phase three data would be made available before Christmas. Early results from the phase...
    A long-awaited coronavirus vaccine could be available in two months, according to a drugmaker AstraZeneca, which is developing a treatment. The Anglo-Swedish drugmaker is working with the University of Oxford to develop one of the most closely watched COVID-19 vaccines, which is in late stage trials in the U.S., the U.K. and other countries to determine its safety and effectiveness. Once those results are reported, regulators will have to approve the vaccine for widespread use. AstraZeneca said it will analyze data from its vaccine trials in November and December. If the results look promising, it will move quickly to ramp up manufacturing and obtain government approval in the U.S. and elsewhere, Chief Executive Pascal Soriot said Thursday. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "We will be ready to supply hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine around the world by January," Soriot said during an earnings conference call...
    A long-awaited coronavirus vaccine could be available in two months, according to a drugmaker AstraZeneca, which is developing a treatment. The Anglo-Swedish drugmaker is working with the University of Oxford to develop one of the most closely watched COVID-19 vaccines, which is in late stage trials in the U.S., the U.K. and other countries to determine its safety and effectiveness. Once those results are reported, regulators will have to approve the vaccine for widespread use. AstraZeneca said it will analyze data from its vaccine trials in November and December. If the results look promising, it will move quickly to ramp up manufacturing and obtain government approval in the U.S. and elsewhere, Chief Executive Pascal Soriot said Thursday. Get Breaking News Delivered to Your Inbox "We will be ready to supply hundreds of millions of doses of vaccine around the world by January," Soriot said during an earnings conference call...
    The CEO of pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca said Thursday that the coronavirus vaccine that the company is testing could still be ready by the end of the year, despite the fact that the company paused the clinical trials of the medicine after a test subject got sick. As previously reported by The Inquisitr, AstraZeneca is one of multiple drug manufacturers working on getting a vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, the pathogen responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, as soon as possible, despite the fact that the process normally takes years. The Cambridge, England-based manufacturer has been conducting large-scale clinical trials, involving thousands of volunteers, on the so-called “Oxford Vaccine,” developed in conjunction with a team from the British university, that so far appears to be one of the best candidates for a safe and effective immunization. However, this week the manufacturer announced that a test subject had experienced an unspecified adverse reaction to whatever...
    AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine could still be ready this year even though it had to halt a key clinical study after a participant got sick, CEO Pascal Soriot said Thursday. The British pharmaceutical firm should know by the end of 2020 whether the vaccine protects patients from the virus if it’s able to resume the study soon, Soriot said during an online event. “We could still have a vaccine by the end of this year, early next year,” Soriot told reporters during the conference, according to The Wall Street Journal. AstraZeneca said Wednesday that it paused the so-called Phase 3 trial to review the participant’s “unexplained illness.” An independent safety committee will determine whether the research can restart after it learns the person’s diagnosis, which AstraZeneca has yet to confirm, according to Soriot. “It’s very common, actually, and many experts will tell you this,” Soriot said. “The difference with other vaccine...
    Trials of Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine could be allowed to restart just days after a British volunteer was rushed to hospital with suspected swelling in their spinal cord. UK drug giant AstraZeneca, which owns the rights to the vaccine, announced that all studies of the jab had been paused indefinitely while it investigates whether the patient's side-effect is connected to the vaccine. It is understood the female volunteer showed symptoms of transverse myelitis (TM), a rare inflammatory condition that affects the spinal cord. This means no one else will be given the vaccine until the investigation has been completed. However, health industry website Stat reported that a woman was suspected to have TM but the diagnosis was not confirmed, and she was on course to be discharged from hospital as early as last night. Astrazeneca boss Pascal Soriot said the stop on trials was a 'temporary pause' and said that an...
    Pascal Soriot, chief executive officer of AstraZeneca.Simon Dawson | Bloomberg | Getty Images The participant who triggered a global shutdown of AstraZeneca's Phase 3 Covid-19 vaccine trials was a woman in the United Kingdom who experienced neurological symptoms consistent with a rare but serious spinal inflammatory disorder called transverse myelitis, the drug maker's chief executive, Pascal Soriot, said during a private conference call with investors on Wednesday morning. The woman's diagnosis has not been confirmed yet, but she is improving and will likely be discharged from the hospital as early as today, Soriot said. The board tasked with overseeing the data and safety components of the AstraZeneca clinical trials confirmed that the participant was injected with the company's Covid-19 vaccine and not a placebo, Soriot said on the conference call, which was set up by the investment bank J.P. Morgan. Soriot also confirmed that the clinical trial was halted once previously in...
    By Anthony Esposito and Adriana Barrera MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico will need up to 200 million coronavirus vaccine doses, according to a senior government official, and inoculation of its 120 million inhabitants could start as early as April if clinical trials and regulatory approvals for pharmaceutical firm AstraZeneca Plc go as planned. In partnership with the governments of Mexico and Argentina, AstraZeneca initially plans to produce 150 million doses in early 2021 and eventually make at least 400 million doses for distribution throughout Latin America. AstraZeneca is among those working on COVID-19 vaccine candidates now in development around the world. Mexico's government also has said it is considering other options for bringing a vaccine quickly to its population, the second-largest in Latin America. AstraZeneca will be able to produce between 30 and 35 million vaccines per month, Martha Delgado, a Mexican deputy foreign minister, told Reuters in an interview...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City BY RAUL CORTES AND DAINA BETH SOLOMON Production of a COVID-19 vaccine under an agreement between the Mexican and Argentine governments and pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca could begin in the first quarter of 2021, an AstraZeneca executive said on Thursday. Sylvia Varela, head of AstraZeneca Mexico, said at the Mexican president’s daily news conference that Phase III trials were expected to conclude by November or December. The company plans to initially produce 150 million doses for distribution in Latin America, and eventually make at least 400 million doses for the region, she added. “We’ll be prioritizing the vulnerable populations,” she said, noting that the cost, while still not final, was not expected to exceed $4 per dose. Argentina’s president first announced the agreement with Mexico and AstraZeneca, Britain’s second-largest drugmaker, on Wednesday....
    MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Production of a COVID-19 vaccine under an agreement between the Mexican and Argentine governments and pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca could begin in the first quarter of 2021, an AstraZeneca executive said on Thursday. Sylvia Varela, head of AstraZeneca Mexico, said at the Mexican president's daily news conference that Phase III trials were expected to conclude by November or December. (Reporting by Raul Cortes and Daina Beth Solomon; Editing by Dave Graham) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    THE coronavirus vaccine could give immunity for at least 12 months, the chief behind British firm AstraZeneca's trial revealed. Sir Mene Pangalos, running the lab effort alongside Oxford University, said it could even give two years of protection from the killer bug, in a "big step forward". ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 2The company is pushing to get the vaccines approved by OctoberCredit: Getty Images - Getty The head of BioPharmaceuticals Research and Development told BBC Newscast: "Based on precedent, with other studies that the Oxford Group have run, we’re hoping that the immune response will last for at least 12 months but hopefully closer to 24 or longer.” “You get your flu shot every year, hopefully it'll last longer than that but we don't know, but we'd want it to last at least 12 months. "But given how contagious this virus is...
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