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    Sean Hannity has slammed President Biden for 'taking the day off' amid Texas' deadly winter storm. Demanding to know 'where is our commander-in-chief', Hannity pointed out the president called a 'lid' on Thursday at 8am and made no public appearances on Thursday. Biden eventually tweeted at 11.30pm to insist he was working on the situation as he shared a photo of him speaking to Texas Governor Greg Abbott.  Fox News Privacy Policy Fox News host Sean Hannity slammed President Biden for 'taking the day off' amid Texas' deadly winter storm. Biden eventually tweeted at 11.30pm to insist he was working on the situation as he shared a photo of him speaking to Texas Governor Greg Abbott Hannity had earlier asked on his Fox News show: 'Where is our commander-in-chief?  'You know, that new guy? Oh, that's right! This morning, he decided to take a snow day. The...
    By KATHLEEN RONAYNE | The Associated Press The public and private jockeying to be California’s next attorney general is intensifying as Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday he’s “very close” to making a decision on who he will name to the coveted job. U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who represents Newsom’s hometown of San Francisco, has thrown support behind Congressman Adam Schiff, according to a person close to Newsom who says Pelosi and her allies have been calling the governor’s inner political circle to urge he choose the 11-term Burbank-area Democrat. The person is not authorized to discuss the matter and spoke on condition of anonymity. It’s a powerful nod of support for Schiff, who does not have much of a personal relationship with Newsom. Pelosi and Schiff are closely aligned. She tapped him to lead the House’s first impeachment case against then-President Donald Trump. Other candidates lobbying for or under...
    Gregg Popovich receives the COVID-19 vaccine. via NBA/YouTube Gregg Popovich received the COVID-19 vaccine in a PSA made by the NBA. Popovich, 73, called getting the vaccine a "no-brainer," saying it will keep him and his family safe. The NBA has said it won't jump the line for vaccines but has also said it discussed getting its players vaccinated early to encourage public vaccination. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich became one of the first members among NBA coaches and players to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. In a PSA made by the NBA to encourage people to get the vaccine, Popovich received the vaccine, calling it a "no-brainer" to keep him safe. Popovich turns 73 on Thursday and is deemed an "at-risk" individual. "It will keep me safe, keep my family safe and keep other people safe," Popovich said. He...
    That temporary fence around the Minnesota Capitol building is likely to become permanent. A state advisory committee on Capitol security heard a list of proposals last week to beef up security, among them was an idea to replace the chain-link fence that has surrounded the domed building with a permanent enclosure. Other ideas included increased staffing for state troopers and security guards at the building, body cameras for those troopers, metal detectors and an employee to monitor and analyze social media traffic related to the building.  “Suffice it to say that that the fence has been a benefit when we talk about protecting the capitol building itself from people that wish to do harm to that building, whether graffiti, throwing objects, breaking things or climbing on structures,” State Patrol Chief Matt Langer told the Advisory Commission on Capital Area Security.  Langer’s comments follow Gov. Tim Walz informing legislative leaders earlier...
    California Governor Gavin Newsom is facing tough questions after it emerged that the state is relying on a secret mathematical model to determine regional lockdown orders. Since early December, California has used projected regional ICU capacity as the metric used to assign lockdown tiers, issuing stay-at-home orders if capacity falls below 15 percent. But state health officials are now saying their model is too complicated to share with the public. The bizarre situation came to light when the state suddenly lifted lockdown rules in the Greater Sacramento region last week, despite an current ICU capacity of less than 10 percent. The state's COVID-19 data dashboard said on Friday that the 13-county Greater Sacramento region's ICU capacity is currently at 9 percent, but that a four-week projection of future capacity is 'at or above threshold', without explaining why.  Newsom, a Democrat, has long said his coronavirus policy decisions would be driven...
    Of all the disappointments of the five-year term, that of the lack of state reform is the most worrying. “Everything must change so that nothing changes”, said Lampedusa’s account in the Cheetah. The enarchic and administrative king is naked Yet the urgent need for this state reform has never been so glaring: with the health collapse of France during the Covid crisis, its gruesome management by politicians and administrations, the lack of everything (masks , medical devices, gels, vaccine tests) … the enarchic and administrative king is naked. How to tolerate such a level of inefficiency with public spending which in 2020 will beat the world record at 64% of GDP? Compulsory deductions which are in the process of exceeding 50% of the GDP, against 30% at the time of General de Gaulle! a time when not only the French were well looked after and had solid pensions, but...
    New Jersey is giving smokers access to the COVID-19 vaccine before the general public because, its health officials say, smokers are more likely to get gravely ill and quicker.  There are two million smokers in New Jersey. As of Wednesday, they are now eligible to get the vaccine along with people over the age of 65, and people who have underlying health conditions.  Health officials have defended the decision, saying their data proves that people who smoke get sicker more quickly from COVID than those who don't.  It is unclear how they will check whether or not a person is a smoker when they show up to receive the vaccine.  To date, there has not been any widespread study done on how smokers are worse affected by COVID.  New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy last week touring a COVID-19 vaccination site in Rockaway. As of Wednesday, smokers get access to the...
    (CNN)Members of the general public in Kentucky were mistakenly allowed to sign up for Covid-19 vaccine appointments meant for health care workers, according to Louisville-based health system Baptist Health.Baptist Health provided the Kentucky Department of Health with an online vaccine appointment scheduling tool that could be linked to the state's vaccine website for health care workers, Kit Fullenlove Barry, Baptist Health public relations manager, said in a statement to CNN Monday.Feds overpromised and underdelivered on coronavirus vaccines, state health officials sayThe state website linked to a page that outlined that vaccines are available for health care personnel as part of Phase 1a of the vaccine rollout. However, that information that was not included in the scheduling tool. "As a result, many who viewed the site mistakenly thought the vaccines were open to the general public, although we do not know how many people registered who might be ineligible at this...
    The California Department of Public Health is tracking the number of COVID-19 vaccine doses  allocated and administered in cities and counties across the state. As of the week of Dec. 28, 2020 there were approximately 309,575 doses of the Moderna and Pfizer vaccines sent to 17 cities and counties in Northern California. The actual number of doses available may be higher because there was an additional 275,000 doses given to large healthcare providers or state departments to distribute across the state. And there was a batch of 91,650 doses given to long-term care facilities across California separately. Related Articles Coronavirus: California sets another daily case record in possible first sign of ‘surge on top of a surge’ 2021 preview: What’s ahead for Bay Area arts, entertainment Just 1% of Californians immunized amid slow COVID-19 vaccine rollout When will you get your...
    Loading the player... New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is kicking off the new year by proposing a law that would make it a crime to provide coronavirus vaccine shots to those who try to get them before they are scheduled to. READ MORE: Kenosha police, city face $20M claim from Rittenhouse shooting victims According to CNBC, “providers can lose their license if they fraudulently administer vaccines, though the law would add criminal penalties if approved by the state legislature.” “This vaccine can be like gold to some people,” Cuomo said at a press briefing Monday. “If there’s any fraud in the distribution — you’re letting people get ahead of other people, or friends or family, or they’re selling the vaccine — you’ll lose your license, but I do believe it should be criminal, and I’m going to propose a law to that effect.” Apparently, this decision came in response to a New...
    As of last year, there were approximately 30,000 electric vehicles on state roads — a number that likely includes hybrids, according to government officials. To achieve its 2030 emissions goal, about 1 million of the more than 5.5 million projected cars registered within the state by that year will need to be zero-emission vehicles, according to the plan. “Without market intervention, fewer than 500,000 vehicles on the road are projected to be electrified by 2030,” it warns. The state plans to invest in public charging infrastructure over the next decade to make the transition possible.  The state’s Decarbonization Roadmap, including the ban on new gas-powered vehicles, isn’t finalized yet. Massachusetts will consult the public on it throughout January and February before moving forward. However, as The Boston Globe points out, under the 2008 Global Warming Solutions Act, Governor Baker has the authority to pursue many of the policy changes outlined...
    AUSTIN (CBSDFW.COM) — The Texas capitol in Austin will reopen to visitors today. After being closed for months due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the State Preservation Board set January 4 as reopening day. Governor Greg Abbott says health and safety protocols will be in place. Texas State Capitol (credit: Billy Sexton/CBSDFW.COM) The public will only be able to enter though the north door, and masks worn over the nose and mouth will be required at all times while inside. Guests will also be required to social distance and there will be capacity limits. COVID-19 testing will be accessible on site at no cost, but isn’t required. The reopening comes just over a week before the legislature convenes for its regular session. The 87th Texas Legislative Session convenes Jan. 12 Lawmakers are still working on plans and rules to safely conduct business. MORE FROM CBSDFW 15-Year-Old Arrested For Allegedly Beating...
    COVID-19 hospitalizations have surged in New York by almost 80 percent in the past four weeks, as the state battles a second wave of infections.  The shocking news was revealed Sunday, following confirmation that more than 1 million residents have now tested positive to the deadly coronavirus.   That number is likely to be far higher, given that widespread testing was not available when the state was rocked by the first wave of infections in the spring of last year.  New York state was the global epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic during that time, before infection rates began to fall at the start of summer.  However, the state is now entering a deadly new phase, with deaths, new cases and the overall positivity rate increasing along with the number of hospitalizations.   Gov. Cuomo confirmed that, as of Saturday, 7,963 New Yorkers are being treated for COVID-19 in the hospital.  That is...
    A health care provider in New York is being investigated after being accused of 'fraudulently' obtaining COVID-19 vaccines and distributing them to members of the public. In a statement released Saturday, the state Department of Health revealed they had received reports that Parcare Community Health Network based in Orange County had broken with New York's plan to administer the vaccine to frontline healthcare workers, and nursing home residents and staffers first. The statement said the network 'may have fraudulently obtained COVID-19 vaccine, transferred it to facilities in other parts of the state in violation of state guidelines and diverted it to members of the public'. Parcare had posted images to social media of their centers receiving hundreds of doses of the Moderna vaccine and claimed they had recieved authorization from the state despite not being officially listed.   State Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker, pictured, revealed Saturday that Orange County...
     NY Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Wednesday a total shutdown is on the cards in January NY Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Wednesday a total shutdown is on the cards in January if people don't stop holding at-home parties before the vaccine becomes available to the public.   The vaccine is currently being rolled out the state to nursing home staff and residents and healthcare workers.  Then, healthcare systems will give them out across the state to essential, non-health workers - transit staff, grocery store workers etc - along with the most at-risk members of the general public.  Cuomo says that'll happen at the end of January and that it'll be 'totally free' for everyone.  But before then, he is warning a total shutdown is possible because COVID is still on the rise across the state, in some areas at double the rate than in others. In the Finger Lakes,...
    Washington (CNN)"Credible threats of violence" have prompted Michigan authorities to close the state capitol to the public and shutter House and Senate offices, a spokeswoman said, on the day the Electoral College will formally declare Joe Biden the President-elect."The decision was not made because of anticipated protests, but was made based on credible threats of violence," Amber McCann, the deputy chief of staff and spokeswoman for Republican Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey, said in a statement. Track Electoral College votes, state by stateGideon D'Assandro, the communications director for state GOP House Speaker Lee Chatfield, also told CNN Sunday evening that the offices would be closed. He didn't elaborate on the security concern, but said the House and legislative bodies were informed about it by the Michigan State Police, which declined to comment on the matter to CNN.Citing "safety and security concerns in the downtown Lansing area," a notification emailed to...
    (CNN)While health officials agree face masks help prevent the spread of Covid-19, state and local governments have varied widely on implementation of mask rules. Now, President-elect Joe Biden wants to change that.Biden's office has released plans that his administration intends to implement in the beginning of his term, and one is a national mask mandate "by working with governors and mayors."Most states already have some type of mask mandate, but some have no statewide rule -- either leaving it as a recommendation or giving the authority to local officials.Three states recently added face mask mandates: North Dakota, Iowa and Montana. Montana's goes into effect November 20.On November 13, North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum announced a new measure requiring face coverings in indoor businesses and indoor public settings as well as outdoor public settings where physical distancing isn't possible. The order is effective through December 13. Read MoreAnd on November 16,...
    San Jose, Calif., Mayor Sam Liccardo (D) apologized in a statement Tuesday for Thanksgiving arrangements with his family that were “contrary to the rules" established by the state. In a longer statement, Liccardo said that he, his wife and his sister-in-law attended an outdoor dinner at his parents’ house the afternoon of Thanksgiving. He added that family members took precautions to ensure social distancing. “In summary, eight of us representing five households sat around three distanced tables in our own family groups on the back patio, and we wore masks when not eating,” he wrote. “I have a very large family—I am one of five children---and several of our family members who would have joined us for Thanksgiving in the past—including sisters, nephews, nieces and cousins—stayed home out of caution.” However, the mayor acknowledged that under state regulations for California issued in November, private gatherings were restricted to no more...
    By Andy Sullivan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A key battleground state in the 2020 presidential election is expected on Thursday to affirm Democrat Joe Biden's victory over President Donald Trump, which would deal yet another setback to Trump's scattershot efforts to hold on to power. Georgia's top election official, a Republican, has said a labor-intensive hand recount likely will not erode Biden's initial 14,000 vote margin enough to hand Trump a victory in the state. That would leave Trump with a dwindling number of options as he tries to overturn the results of an election in which he drew 5.8 million fewer votes than Biden nationwide. To remain in office, Trump would need to overturn results in at least three large states to flip the results of the state-by-state Electoral College that determines the winner. Biden has captured 306 electoral-college votes to Trump's 232. Trump's campaign has met with little success...
    Mark Herring said he will "do everything in my power" to defend the state's LGBTQ nondiscrimination law. Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring on Tuesday pushed back against a lawsuit that aims to undermine the state's nondiscrimination protections for LGBTQ people. "No one should ever have to fear being discriminated against because of who they love," Herring wrote in a Facebook post. Herring was referring to a lawsuit targeting the Virginia Values Act, which Gov. Ralph Northam signed in April and which protects LGBTQ people from discrimination "on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity in housing, public and private employment, public accommodations, and access to credit."
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the presidential campaign (all times local): 9:40 a.m. With Joe Biden edging closer to unseating him from the White House, President Donald Trump says he wants to put a halt to vote counting. The extraordinary statement by an incumbent president to voice support for ceasing the count of legally cast votes came in a Thursday morning tweet, saying only: “STOP THE COUNT!” Elections are run by individual state, county and local governments. Trump’s public comments have no impact on the tallying of votes across the country. So far, the vote count across the country has been conducted efficiently and without evidence of any misconduct, despite Trump’s public complaints. Trump’s comments come as his campaign has filed legal action in several states to try to stop vote counting, claiming a lack of transparency. Still, Trump’s campaign has held out hope that continued counting in Arizona...
    WASHINGTON – The Latest on the presidential campaign (all times local): 9:40 a.m. With Joe Biden edging closer to unseating him from the White House, President Donald Trump says he wants to put a halt to vote counting. The extraordinary statement by an incumbent president to voice support for ceasing the count of legally cast votes came in a Thursday morning tweet, saying only: “STOP THE COUNT!” Elections are run by individual state, county and local governments. Trump’s public comments have no impact on the tallying of votes across the country. So far, the vote count across the country has been conducted efficiently and without evidence of any misconduct, despite Trump’s public complaints. Trump’s comments come as his campaign has filed legal action in several states to try to stop vote counting, claiming a lack of transparency. Still, Trump’s campaign has held out hope that continued counting in Arizona could...
    BRITS should continue to use the NHS during the second lockdown - despite moving into its highest state of alert, health bosses say. Hospitals are already battling to manage a surge in in coronavirus admissions with numbers only expected to rise in the coming weeks. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 4People should continue to use the NHS if they need care during the second lockdown, health bosses sayCredit: PA:Press Association But people are urged to still come forward if they need care after the first lockdown saw patients avoid getting help to relieve strain on the NHS. Chris Hopson, chief executive of NHS Providers, which represents hospital trusts and foundation trusts in England, told BBC Breakfast: "We can't help you unless you come forward, so help us to help you." Speaking about the alert level moving from three to four - the...
    As public-school systems prove utterly incapable of handling the challenges of the pandemic, New York parents are rushing to put their kids in private and religious schools. But the State Education Department seems bent on destroying those alternatives. That’s right: The SED under interim Commissioner Betty Rosa has renewed its drive to dictate private-school curricula. And if it gets away with that, you can bet more mandates will follow. The pretext here is the real problem of a handful of yeshivas that stand credibly accused of not even trying to teach basic math and English. But state and city education bureaucracies have repeatedly bungled all their attempts to address this (perhaps intentionally, thanks to political pressure). Then came the SED bid to regulate all private-school curricula, which rightly infuriated targets that include some of New York’s top schools. In the latest round, the department’s received more than 140,000 comments opposing...
    By John Avlon, Michael Warren and Brandon Miller | CNN Shortly after joining the White House as President Donald Trump’s pandemic adviser, Dr. Scott Atlas launched a quiet effort that seemed counterintuitive to some of his colleagues — encouraging officials to limit Covid-19 testing mainly to people experiencing symptoms. Atlas, a neuroradiologist, not an infectious disease expert, strongly supported a decision in August to revise federal guidelines to de-emphasize the need to test people without symptoms, according to two sources familiar with the process. He shared his view with state officials, including Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and several others in Florida, according to transcripts of public events and accounts from private meetings in that state. During a joint tour on August 31, Atlas and DeSantis urged public health officials in several Florida cities to focus less on universal testing and more on opening the economy and schools. In private and public...
    Washington (CNN)Shortly after joining the White House as President Donald Trump's pandemic adviser, Dr. Scott Atlas launched a quiet effort that seemed counterintuitive to some of his colleagues -- encouraging officials to limit Covid-19 testing mainly to people experiencing symptoms.Atlas, a neuroradiologist, not an infectious disease expert, strongly supported a decision in August to revise federal guidelines to de-emphasize the need to test people without symptoms, according to two sources familiar with the process. He shared his view with state officials, including Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis and several others in Florida, according to transcripts of public events and accounts from private meetings in that state. During a joint tour on August 31, Atlas and DeSantis urged public health officials in several Florida cities to focus less on universal testing and more on opening the economy and schools. In private and public meetings, according to transcripts and personal accounts, the two spoke in favor of...
    In what’s shaping up to be one of the most expensive and closely watched races for the California legislature this November, two Democrats with impressive government experience and lengthy resumes are battling to represent one of the most racially and economically diverse districts of Silicon Valley. Attorney Ann Ravel and Santa Clara County Supervisor Dave Cortese are vying to replace termed-out state Sen. Jim Beall in District 15, which encompasses nearly 1 million residents in Cupertino, Los Gatos, Campbell and neighborhoods in San Jose from Willow Glen to Almaden to East San Jose. In a crowded seven-person March primary, Cortese, 64, came out on top with 34% of the vote and Ravel, 71, trailed with 22% of the vote. Cortese has outraised Ravel by nearly double over the course of his yearslong campaign — $2.1 million compared to $1.2 million. Special interest groups, also known as PACs, have poured more than...
    District-by-district and school-by-school, some of California’s 6.1 million K-12 students are re-entering classrooms that have been shuttered for months due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Most, however, remain locked out and trying, as best they can, to keep up with schoolwork via computer. It’s no secret that children in relatively affluent homes are faring better. Their parents are more likely to work from home, thus more able to help their kids, and/or are hiring private tutors. However, most of California’s public school students — about 60%, in fact — are from poor families and/or are “English learners.” They already trailed more privileged peers in educational attainment before COVID-19 reared its ugly head and often lack communication resources and support from parents who must leave home to earn their livings. The Public Policy Institute of California, using federal data, concludes in a new report “that distance learning has widened gaps for children of color,...
    FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – One of the nation’s largest COVID-19 antibody surveys is now underway in Texas. The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston is partnering with the Texas Department of State Health Services to launch Texas CARES. The goal is to determine the proportion of people throughout Texas who have COVID-19 antibodies. The survey focuses on several groups: Children 5 to 17 years old; teachers and education professionals; employees within retail, business, or service industries; and patients and staff at community clinics. “This is just a great place to do this type of effort given that one in every 10 children in the country lives in Texas,” said Dr. Sarah Messiah with UTHealth School of Public Health in Dallas. “It’ll give us a nice snapshot across a diverse state as well to see perhaps what’s going on in the nation as a whole too.” If you enroll,...
    SAN ANTONIO – Public transportation is an ongoing issue in San Antonio and as Election Day nears, voters will help decide a future plan for VIA Transit. President and CEO of VIA, Jeff Arndt, joined Leading SA to break down the current state of public transit and what could be next for the company. “We bring in under $200 million a year to support our operation. Dallas brings in $600 million. Houston brings in $758 million on those orders of magnitude,” Arndt said. Arndt said even though VIA covers a huge area, the organization only asked for half of the sales tax as compared to other Texas cities. “We have the spread of things thin, which means we end up with relatively infrequent service, and that makes the service more difficult to use, the trips longer to take. And people with other options are going to opt for those options...
    The focus of Governor Jared Polis's October 16 press conference was a plan for distributing a future COVID-19 vaccine that will be submitted to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention later today. But this information was accompanied by revelations regarding data about the novel coronavirus's current spread through the state, including a new record for daily cases and hospitalizations that continue to soar, with no end in sight. In revealing these figures, Polis encouraged people to cut back on gatherings. "If you have social plans this weekend with some friend to get together at their house or whatever it is, I suggest you avoid them for a few weeks," he said. The key Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment stats cited by Polis: 1,312 new positives today, as well as 352 hospitalizations. Those hospitalizations, he noted, are "the most since late May, and I am very concerned about this trend....
    Longmont will soon allow medical marijuana delivery by approved dispensaries, and they don't even have to be located there. Approved unanimously by the Longmont City Council on October 13, the new ordinance allows medical dispensaries to start delivering within the town starting on October 26. But it may take longer before patients will actually see medication being dropped off at their doors. While marijuana stores don't need to be located within Longmont city limits to qualify for this new program, they must be licensed for delivery by the state Marijuana Enforcement Division as well as the City of Longmont. Although there are several medical dispensaries located nearby in unincorporated Boulder County, there is only one licensed medical dispensary, Twin Peaks, in Longmont. Neither Twin Peaks nor those other Boulder County dispensaries have their MED permits yet.Related Stories Debate Over Future of Denver Marijuana Licensing Continues Colorado Towns Considering New Marijuana Businesses Aurora Slowly Opening Up...
    Colorado marijuana regulators have adopted new waste management rules intended to reduce the industry's growing carbon footprint. According to the state Department of Public Health and Environment, 3,650 tons (7.3 million pounds) of marijuana plant waste was produced by the state's pot industry in 2019, and that number would be increased to 7,300 tons by a requirement that unused plant matter and product be mixed with waste such as sawdust, mature compost, bleach, coffee grounds, sand, glass or shredded paper — as long as the marijuana-to-waste ratio is 50/50. Although the state Marijuana Enforcement Division didn't remove or alter the 50/50 requirement as had been discussed at previous meetings, the MED did open up several paths around it in the department's latest round of extensive rule updates, adding new exemptions for biomass recycling and composting methods. According to CDPHE marijuana environmental impact researcher and small business consultant Kaitlin Urso, the new...
    A nurse gets ready to enter a room to take care of a patient infected with Covid-19 at the intensive care unit of the Lariboisiere Hospital of the AP-HP (Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris) in Paris, on October 14, 2020.LUCAS BARIOULET | AFP | Getty Images European leaders are scrambling to put a cap on surging infections in the region, with governments reimposing sweeping restrictions and shutdowns in an effort to curb the spread of the virus.  The situation has got to a point now where, in the last 24 hours, France has declared a public health state of emergency, the U.K. is approaching a second national lockdown and Germany has introduced a raft of new rules in an effort to lower the infection rate. Europe now has over 7.2 million confirmed cases of the virus, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), and hospitalizations are rising at a...
    It's no longer a matter of debate: According to new data from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, this state has been hit by a third wave of COVID-19. Key indicators of this status include a positivity rate just a whisper under the red line that government officials have cited as a reason for alarm and skyrocketing outpatient visits for people with symptoms of the novel coronavirus, as well as case and hospitalization counts that have climbed at a disturbing pace over the past month. Here are the grim statistics in major categories updated by the CDPHE at 4 p.m. Sunday, October 11, juxtaposed with figures from October 4 and September 13:Related Stories COVID-19: Polis on Why He's Extending Statewide Mask Order King Soopers' Response to Complaints About Poor Mask Use Inmate Claims COVID-19 Mess at Denver Jails 78,461 cases (up 5,385 from October 4 and 17,137 from...
    This week is a real free-for-all, with virtual events bringing the world to you. Take a serious or silly look at the upcoming election, meet artists and learn the latest on COVID-19. Then on Saturday, get out of the house for World Archaeology Day. Here are the ten best free things to do this week. COVID-19 Webinar: Colorado Six Months in Monday, October 12, 8:30 a.m. What has Colorado learned about the coronavirus since March? How has the state's response evolved since that first wave of cases in the spring, and what insights have we gained about communication, testing, tradeoffs and the efficacy of public-health guidance? During this free public webinar presented by the Colorado School of Public Health, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, and the Institute for Science & Policy, Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and Kacey...
    Governor Jared Polis issued a mandatory mask order for Colorado on July 16. That order was set to expire on October 12, but Polis just extended it for another thirty days, citing concerning figures about the spread of COVID-19 in the state. “This is the most worried I’ve been since mid-July,” the governor said at a press conference October 9. "We need to be better at wearing masks — not because I say to do it or because public-health officials say to do it," Polis explained. "It's because you care about your health and your family and your neighbors and your job. That's why we're doing it." Polis concluded with this: "Just wear a damn mask." These days, though, any discussion of masks quickly morphs from science into politics, as evidenced by the comments posted on the Westword Facebook story about Polis's extension of the mask order. Says Eron:...
    CHICAGO (CBS) —She was six years old and died of a drug overdose this summer. As questions linger over how Kerri Rutherford’s parents allowed her to swallow pills, new ones emerge over how many times state workers visited the troubled home. CBS 2’s Chris Tye reports on the newly released timeline and the questions the state just isn’t answering. Kerri Rutherford died in the back bedroom of her family’s home in Montgomery, Illinois, south of Aurora. Neighbors and teachers waived red flags. CBS 2 learned that for five years, the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) made regular visits. In December 2015, credible evidence of abuse or neglect was found here. The family began receiving services from DCFS, services that continued until the day Kerri died. CBS 2 also learned DCFS investigated the household twice in 2017 for investigations later expunged. Four more investigations from 2018 through this...
    During an October 9 press conference about COVID-19, Colorado Governor Jared Polis announced that he will extend the statewide order to wear facial coverings in public places for another thirty days; it was set to expire on Monday, October 12. He contextualized the decision by noting that the state is currently experiencing the most problematic data related to the novel coronavirus since July and August. "We need to be better at wearing masks — not because I say to do it or because public-health officials say to do it," Polis allowed. "It's because you care about your health and your family and your neighbors and your job. That's why we're doing it." At the outset of his remarks, Polis revealed that 834 new cases of the virus were reported on the 9th, with the total being similar to counts in recent days. Many of these infections will inevitably translate into...
    The Colorado Marijuana Enforcement Division has issued a recall of products from AlpinStash, a wholesale recreational marijuana cultivation in Lafayette. According to the October 8 recall, issued in conjunction with the state Department of Public Health and Environment, marijuana grown by AlpinStash was found to have potentially unsafe levels of mold and arsenic, making it Colorado's first marijuana recall ever issued over heavy metals. Heavy metals such as arsenic, nickel, copper, mercury and cadmium can be found found in growing nutrients and fertilizers used to enhance the flavor, yield and potency of marijuana. According to the National Institutes of Health, long-term exposure to heavy metals can lead to liver or kidney damage, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, heart abnormalities, a disrupted nervous system, anemia and more. Recalled products should have a cultivation facility license number on their packaging: 403R-00603. Here are the recalled AlpinStash strains and their harvest dates:Related Stories...
    Better to be a good American than a good employee. Distilled to its most elemental expression, that is the reason why I blew up a 35-year career in broadcast media to add my voice to the alarms sounding about the current state of our Republic. My former employer did the right thing in firing me. They set the rules, standards of conduct and guidelines for content. Break them and you pay. I did and I did. To anyone gleefully saying that I got what I deserved, I agree, so let’s move on...back to our imperiled democracy. Related Stories Marty Coniglio Out at 9News After Controversial Nazi Photo Tweet Marty Coniglio Agrees to Stay Longer at 9News Marty Coniglio on Why He's Leaving 9News At a public event the Saturday after the 2016 election, a colleague asked me what I thought of the result of the presidential race. “Racism and...
    During most of his press conferences since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Governor Jared Polis has shied away from vigorously bashing President Donald Trump, choosing instead to offer subtler criticism of the current administration's response to the virus and apparent lack of a national strategy to combat it. But his virtual session on October 6 was different. This time around, Polis ripped Trump, who has shrugged off having the virus on Twitter and taken part in media events that have disturbed public health experts, accusing him of irresponsibility that could lead to greater problems in Colorado should too many residents follow his example. "It's challenging to watch how the White House is handling this on a personal level," Polis maintained. "Like a lot of things, the President is taking this in a wrong and divisive direction with regard to his counsel and what he's advising people to do." When...
    As the global pandemic enters its ninth month, people are frustrated and desperate. With families unable to cope with food shortages and falling incomes, nations are experiencing mass unrest. Activists have sparked demonstrations against societal injustices, while others have joined the crusades of QAnon conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers. It may get worse before it gets better. There is widespread anger in the United States. The Black Lives Matter movement and the anarchist Antifa fringe have led the largest protests in the U.S. since the 1968 "summer of discontent." Hyper-connected online communities have awakened to national strife, amplified by simmering discontent with dead-end jobs and student loans. Europe is no different: Recently, Alternative for Germany and Generation Identity extremists attacked the Reichstag, and miscellaneous far right protesters demonstrated in London.Assessing Politically Stable CountriesView All 13 SlidesIt's even worse in the developing world. In Brazil, populist President Jair Bolsonaro joined anti-lockdown protesters...
    The State Department decided that Finnish journalist Jessikka Aro would not receive the International Women of Courage (IWOC) award because her negative retweets about President Donald Trump were “not suitable,” were “out of place,” and were likely to cause “blowback” against Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and First Lady Melania Trump on the world stage. Then the Trump administration lied to the public about why it made this decision, the State Department’s Office of Inspector General confirmed in a report on its findings. Senate Democrats asked for and received an Inspector General investigation that ultimately found Aro’s tweets about Trump were a bridge too far for the Trump administration. The investigation was sought after Foreign Policy magazine reported in March 2019, in rather straightforward fashion, that the Trump administration had cancelled Aro. The section on the State Department’s internal considerations on the rescission of the award (the award was ultimately...
    FRESNO, Calif. -- Dr. Joseph Castro was named Wednesday as the new chancellor of the California State University system, becoming the first Mexican-American and native Californian to lead the nation's largest four-year public university system.CSU's Board of Trustees announced the appointment of Castro, who is currently president of CSU Fresno, on the final day of its meeting Wednesday.He will replace Chancellor Timothy White, who has held the post since 2012. White had announced he would retire in June but delayed stepping down to help steer the 23-campus system through the coronavirus pandemic."I am truly grateful for and excited about this unique and wonderful opportunity, and I look forward to working with the talented faculty, staff and presidents of the 23 campuses as well the Board of Trustees and executives and staff at the Chancellor's Office to further increase achievement for our 482,000 students," Castro said in a press release.Before becoming...
    The Georgia Department of Transportation (Georgia DOT) is sending a friendly reminder that signage of any kind that is found in state right of way and not previously authorized is unlawful and will be removed as soon as possible after discovery by Georgia DOT maintenance crews as part of the department’s routine maintenance work. Signs on the state highway system – interstates and state routes – must be approved and permitted to be placed on the right of way. The number of unauthorized political signs typically increases during an election year, but they are not the only problem. Signs that advertise yard sales, real estate or goods and services for sale are often found in the right of way. Unauthorized signs can distract drivers or obstruct their view and also can lead to debris that clogs drainage systems...
    (CBS DETROIT) – Michigan’s Chief Medical Executive Dr. Joneigh Khaldun says names of Michigan schools with coronavirus outbreaks will be released to the public in two weeks. The announcement was made Wednesday during Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s briefing. This comes after the state health department reported five K though 12 schools had outbreaks. Khaldun says the state is currently working with local health departments to gather names of specific schools that have outbreaks associated with them. RELATED LINK: Missed Gov. Whitmer’s Press Conference? Here’s Her Update On The State’s Response To COVID-19 An outbreak is generally defined as two or more cases linked to the same place and time according to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, which says this indicates a shared exposure to the coronavirus that occurred outside of a household. © 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten,...
    Big Basin Redwoods State Park Headquarters & Visitor Center was one of the structures lost to the blaze. Kent Nishimura/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images Visitors will not be permitted in Big Basin Redwoods State Park for at least 12 months, as park officials assess the damage from the CZU Lightning Complex Fire, the San Francisco Chronicle reported on Tuesday. Most redwoods survived the blaze, but the dried out soil poses the danger of flooding as the winter brings more rain. Gov. Gavin Newsom visited the park with other state officials on Tuesday. "If this is not a gut punch, then you're not truly conscious as a human being," he said. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Big Basin Redwoods State Park in California will be closed to visitors for at least a year after the park incurred major damage from the wildfires that blazed through the state in...
    Recently, as Gov. Tim Walz wisely decided to continue the Department of Commerce appeal of the Line 3 pipeline in northern Minnesota, the state’s faith leaders stepped up to sound a cautionary note. In a strongly worded letter to ranking state officials, more than 400 religious and spiritual leaders from around Minnesota called on government leaders to rein in law enforcement responses to the inevitable protests against Enbridge Line 3, should the line be approved and built. Indigenous people as well as their non-Indigenous allies have argued for years that this project violates treaty rights, environmental rules, and common sense. They will resist. The timely missive urges officials to abide by human and civil rights standards as the process moves forward. The letter comes as other environmental groups and tribes — including the Sierra Club, Honor the Earth and others — also filed appeals of the Public Utilities Commission’s approval of...
    NY faces a budget deficit of $ 30 billion in the next two years Unprecedented crisis throughout NY Photo: Andrés Correa Guatarasma / Courtesy Despite a statewide hiring freeze and a $ 30 billion budget shortfall from COVID-19, Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office has been adding expensive and high-profile new employees to the payroll, according to a new report. State Budget Director Robert Mujica wrote to all state agencies and public authorities on April 28 that “Cease all hiring,” except for jobs deemed essential to protect public health and safety. He also said that special hiring exemptions would have to be granted during this time. However, Cuomo’s office has made several new hires and promotions since April, in functions that do not appear to be “essential”, the Albany Times Union newspaper reported Friday. When the New York Post requested comment, budget division spokesman...
            by Lindsey Burke  Normally when a business shuts its doors, it doesn’t still get to charge its customers for a product they can no longer access. It certainly doesn’t get to charge its customers twice for the privilege. Yet, that’s exactly what we’re seeing from some public school districts. They refuse to open their doors for in-person learning—citing safety risks—but they are able to open these same school buildings to charge overworked and tired parents for day care. This is double-dipping into parents’ pocketbooks, and it likely runs afoul of state constitutions. Even though they are not offering in-person instruction, parents (and all taxpayers) are required to pay taxes to pay for district schools. As frustrating as that may be for parents, some districts—including Fairfax County, Virginia; Howard County, Maryland; Gilbert, Arizona; and Durham, North Carolina—have decided to open up classrooms to groups of children,...
    Just as San Jose State students and faculty have returned to classes — mostly virtually — COVID-19 has thrown a wrench in SJSU’s plans to build a stronger relationship with the downtown community surrounding its campus. Because of state guidance on the pandemic, SJSU has been forced to close its campus to the public, meaning you aren’t allowed to even take a morning stroll across the grounds if you don’t have a university ID. School officials say this isn’t something they wanted to do, but the California State University system has interpreted that guidance to limit nonessential visitors to mean campuses are off-limits. An email sent to faculty and staff this week stated: “Until further notice, access to campus property, grounds and facilities of SJSU is restricted to authorized students, faculty and staff only.” And anyone who doesn’t take the hint could be cited for trespassing. Suddenly, bringing a lunch...
    The Iowa Department of Education on Thursday denied a request from Des Moines Public Schools to start the school year fully online, arguing that the state's goal is to allow "parents to choose what's best for their child" — not school districts. What are the details?Last month, Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) ordered schools in the state to begin the new year by offering at least 50% of its classes within the school building. The order permitted school districts to apply for an exemption from the law allowing them to operate in a primarily virtual option, but outlined that such requests would need to be approved by the state. The state's guidelines delineated that districts must have a 2-week rolling average positive test rate of at least 15% in their county before they can transition. In a letter to the district Thursday, Education Department Director Ann Lebo said the...
    By Bill Barrow and Andrew Taylor | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The body of the late Rep. John Lewis has arrived in Washington to lie in state as lawmakers gather to pay tribute to the long-time Georgia lawmaker and icon of the civil rights movement. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi led a delegation Monday to Joint Base Andrews in Maryland to greet Lewis’s flag-draped casket. A motorcade carrying the body stopped at Black Lives Matter Plaza as it winds through Washington on its way to the U.S. Capitol, where he will be the first black lawmaker to lie in state in the Rotunda. Pelosi and others will attend a private ceremony in the Rotunda before Lewis’s body is moved to the steps on the Capitol’s east side for a public viewing, an unusual sequence required because the COVID-19 pandemic has closed the Capitol to the public. Inside the Rotunda...
    Washington (CNN)Congressional lawmakers and the American public will have a chance to pay their respects to the civil rights icon and late congressman, Rep. John Lewis of Georgia, this week as his body lies in state at the US Capitol in Washington, DC.Lewis' body will lie in state in the US Capitol Rotunda where an invitation-only arrival ceremony will take place at 1:30 p.m. ET on Monday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced last week.Following the ceremony in the Capitol Rotunda, a public viewing will take place outdoors as a safety precaution during the coronavirus pandemic.Members of the public will be able to pay tribute to the late Georgia Democrat during select times later in the day on Monday and throughout the day Tuesday as his body lies in state at the top of the East Front Steps of the Capitol. The public will be...
    The late Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., will lie in state in the Capitol Rotunda Monday through Wednesday of next week, Fox News has learned. The casket will arrive Monday and be taken in a procession around the city, with stops at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial near the National Mall. Lewis’s casket will then come up to the Capitol plaza on the East Front and be taken up the steps into the Capitol by an honor guard, Fox News is told. Due to the pandemic, there will be a small ceremony inside. Members will be given time slots to pay their respects. Unlike most ceremonies when someone lies in state, the public will not be permitted into the Capitol due to coronavirus. However, the honor guard will then escort Lewis’s casket to the East Front Portico, where the public will be permitted to walk by to pay respects until nightfall...
    Nearly two months after Minneapolis police killed George Floyd, the Minnesota Legislature approved a bill Tuesday to restrict police use of chokeholds and neck restraints, ban departments from offering “warrior”-style officer training and change a state arbitration process that officers use to contest discipline. State Rep. Carlos MarianiThe measures, passed in the early morning hours following lengthy closed-door negotiations between House Democrats and Senate Republicans, were hailed by supporters as a step toward curbing police killings and other violence that disproportionately affects Black Minnesotans and people of color. “It creates a modern accountability framework of laws that will help to end the type of police brutality that killed George Floyd in May of this year,” Rep. Carlos Mariani, a St. Paul DFLer who chairs the House Public Safety and Criminal Justice Reform Finance and Policy Division, said in a speech during floor debate. Even as lawmakers celebrated new changes to...
    ORLANDO (CBSMiami/NSF) – Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis put out a call Monday for people who have had COVID-19 to donate blood, as the state topped 5,000 deaths of Florida residents due to the pandemic. “One of the treatments that many physicians around the state believe is very effective is the use of convalescent plasma,” DeSantis said Monday while at the Orlando headquarters of OneBlood, a blood-donation agency. “This is a blood that’s donated from somebody who has cleared the COVID-19 disease,” DeSantis continued. “It has the antibodies, and that is then used on a patient who is sick in the hospital. And what they find is, as well as with some of the other treatments, the earlier you do it the more effective you will be.” The governor’s appearance was interrupted by a group of protesters who accused DeSantis of mishandling the pandemic and covering up COVID-19 data. Shouts of...
              More than 500 complaints about mask compliance were made over the weekend on a new hotline and online submission form meant to encourage in Cuyahoga County. A week ago, Governor Mike DeWine mandated face masks in the seven counties, including Cuyahoga, where the Wuhan virus infections have spiked recently. “The surge [in new cases] is catastrophic. According to the state, we are a Red Level 3 and going in the wrong direction towards [level] 4,” said County Executive Armond Budish in a live-streamed briefing last Friday afternoon. “We have to take serious steps to stop the spread. We don’t want to shut down entirely. The economy has already been seriously damaged.” Instead of declining, day-to-day increases in coronavirus cases rose above the state’s 21-day average last week. Ohio saw the largest rise in new cases since the pandemic hit on Friday, with 1,525....
    Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) on Tuesday instructed county officials crack down on bars and restaurants in the state that violate social-distancing requirements. Hogan in a letter to the officials noted “concerning trends” in the state’s coronavirus data, highlighting a positivity rate from coronavirus tests that is now 84 percent higher for residents under 35 than those over 35. Hogan also said that at least a dozen states have re-closed restaurants and bars due to social-distancing violations, and cites his June executive order on reopening such establishments. That order calls for bars and restaurants to only be opened for seated service and, where it applies, to close every other booth and impose a six-person limit on table seating. Today I pressed county leaders to enforce public health requirements in bars and restaurants. We cannot allow a small segment of willful violators to squander our collective efforts and jeopardize our state’s recovery. Read...
    David M. Kennedy July 13, 2020 10:00AM (UTC) This article originally appeared on The Niskanen Center. Let's be clear about what's been happening in the country these last few weeks. Policing is an arm of the state. Police departments and police officers operate under the color of law and as agents of the state, with authority granted by their nation's citizens. That gives their actions special meaning. George Floyd was—literally—killed by his government. Over and over again in America, Black people have been killed, beaten, and otherwise abused by their government through its agents: the police. In the modern era, Rodney King was beaten by his government. Michael Brown was shot and killed by his government. Walter Scott was shot in the back and killed by his government; his government then falsified the shooting scene and lied about what had happened. : This has always been an outrage. But the...
    By Michael Berens and John Shiffman BARTLESVILLE, Oklahoma (Reuters) - District Court Judge Curtis DeLapp was renowned for his hair-trigger temper. Mispronounce his name, come to court a few seconds late, fail to rise as quickly as he’d like – no slight was too small to set him off. For almost a dozen years, DeLapp used his power to terrify people who appeared before him, pressing contempt charges against defense attorneys, prosecutors and even a prospective juror who brought children to court when she couldn’t find daycare, court records show. Another juror was fined $340.70 after she objected to how DeLapp was treating people who appeared before him. “I never want to be a juror or ever go back to court again,” said Carolyn Duffey Love, now 68. “He treated me like a dog.” In 2015, DeLapp grew incensed when he learned someone had dropped sunflower seeds in his courtroom,...
    BACK OF THE YARDS — For years, parents like Consuelo Martinez have lobbied for Back of the Yards to have its own standalone library, securing more than 1,000 signatures in support of their effort. Since Back of the Yards College Prep Academy opened in 2013, students and neighbors have shared a dual-use library on the school’s campus at 2111 W. 47th St. But after a bombshell Tribune report on CPS’ handling of sexual assault allegations in 2018, tighter security on campus made it more difficult for neighbors and students to access it. Now, after years of lobbying public officials, parents’ plan to bring a public library to Back of the Yards is one step closer to reality. In late May, State Rep. Theresa Mah secured $15 million in state funding for capital projects to help fund a new standalone public library in Back of the Yards. Students deserve an...
    Donald Trump is heading to Florida on Friday where he will be briefed on drug smuggling from South America and participate in a fundraiser as the state was forced to reimplement partial lockdowns due to coronavirus surges. The president notably is not spending his day in Florida addressing the massive spike in COVID-19 infections there over the last few weeks as state lawmakers had to halt reopening plans after several day-high new infection rates. Trump will spend his time in southern Florida at the U.S. Southern Command in Doral the day before heading to New Hampshire for his second post-coronavirus rally. The command center is located right next to Trump National Doral golf resort, which is northeast of Miami, but it is not clear if the president will make the less than two mile drive to visit his club for a round of golf. Doral is in Miami-Dade county, which...
    Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti has admitted recent protests and mass demonstrations have led to a spike in coronavirus cases in the city. Garcetti revealed during a press conference on Wednesday that LA County health officials believe some of the new COVID-19 cases may have come from large groups of people gathering at rallies.   'I talked again with [Director of Public Health] Dr Barbara Ferrer about that this morning. She does think some of the spread did come from our protests,' the mayor told reporters.  Mayor Eric Garcetti (pictured at a demonstration on June 2) has admitted recent protests may have contributed to a spike in coronvirus cases in Los Angeles.  Members of Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles gather at a demonstration outside LAUSD headquarters last month 'It's not the act of protesting - that's a great and American thing to do no matter what your opinion is… but...
    By The Associated Press CHICAGO — People traveling to Chicago from 15 states with increasing numbers of confirmed cases of the coronavirus will have to quarantine for two weeks upon arrival or face possible fines, city officials announced Thursday. To comply with the order that takes effect Monday, travelers must stay at a single home or other dwelling for 14 days except to seek medical care or be tested for COVID-19. Mayor Lori Lightfoot said on Twitter that the order is intended to “preserve the gains Chicago had made.” The city has reported 52,569 confirmed cases and 2,611 deaths since the start of the pandemic. Both categories have trended down in recent weeks and the city has allowed many businesses to reopen, including bars and restaurants with limits on customers. The city’s Department of Public Health Commissioner said the specific states listed are based on the rate of new confirmed...
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas governor orders masks to be worn in public across most of the state as confirmed coronavirus cases surge. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    By The Associated Press OKLAHOMA CITY — Coronavirus cases in Tulsa have been rising but officials say it’s too early to directly link the increase to a June 20 campaign rally held there by President Donald Trump. The county has reported more than 1,300 confirmed cases of the virus in the 11 days since the rally drew about 6,200 people to a sports arena. “Frankly (we) probably won’t see until next week just because of the lag from symptoms to testing to reporting,” Bruce Dart, the director of the Tulsa Health Department, said Thursday. The incubation period for the virus is two to 14 days. Dart said previously health officials would be watching closely for six weeks for infections linked to the weekend of the president’s rally. Dart said the increase has so far been traced to smaller gatherings such as at bars, gyms, restaurants, weddings and funerals. The Oklahoma...
    Harking back to the embarrassing days of Gov. Rick “Oops” Perry, my state of Texas is once again saddled with a Republican gubernatorial goober. Greg Abbott is this guy’s name, and he’s another incompetent right-wing ideologue whose botched handling of our state’s COVID-19 crisis makes President Donald Trump look like a master administrator of public health. Unfortunately for you non-Texans, Gov. Abbott’s extreme gooberness is now surging across our borders to afflict people in your state. Before we go there, though, ponder his slapstick performance here, where he’s been swatting futilely at the fast-moving coronavirus. First, as a small-minded, small-government zealot, he obsequiously followed Trump’s lead of do-nothingism, pretending the bad thing would just drift away. As a result, droves of Texans were dying, so he rushed out to express astonishment and concern. Yet, he cravenly refused to offend his corporate and far-right backers by implementing such life-saving measures as...
    GEORGETOWN, Del. (CBS) — Delaware officials are removing a whipping post from public display at the Old Sussex County Courthouse in Georgetown. Officials are removing the whipping post in response to calls from the community and in recognition to the violence and racial discrimination that it displays. The post will be moved to a Division of Historical and Cultural Affairs storage facility with other historical items. “Finally, Delaware is removing its last ‘Red Hannah,’ the whipping post, from the public’s view,” Vice-Chair of the Delaware Heritage Commission Dr. Reba Hollingsworth said. “Such relics of the past should be placed in museums to be preserved and protected for those who want to remember the cruel, inhuman, barbarous acts perpetrated on our citizens.” HAC Director Tim Slavin says it is appropriate for items like this to be “preserved in the state’s collections, so that future generations may view it and attempt to...
    The Supreme Court on Thursday ruled to allow states to provide tax credits for individuals donating money to faith-based educational institutions. The case, Espinoza v. Montana Department of Revenue, sought to decide whether or not the Montana state government violated the religion clauses or the equal protection clause of the Constitution by prohibiting funding for religious schools, while allowing it for education in general. It was decided in a 5-4 vote, with the liberal wing and the conservative wing of the court voting together. "The application of the no-aid provision discriminated against religious schools and the families whose children attend or hope to attend them in violation of the Free Exercise Clause of the Federal Constitution," Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the court's majority opinion. The case arose after three mothers were barred by state law from using their children's scholarship funds won from the state for tuition at...
    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice is done talking about why he pushed out a top health official during the coronavirus pandemic. The Republican governor deflected multiple questions Monday about the forced resignation of former public health commissioner Cathy Slemp as he continued to doubt the accuracy of the state’s virus caseload. Justice has vented about a possible overstating of the state’s active caseload, floating the idea that the tally could be exaggerated by around 300 cases, while providing few details. He has placed the blame on Slemp, who has decades of public health experience, and suggested she was responsible for the discrepancy before having her removed from her post last week. (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    The City of Guyton has planned two special-called council meetings for this week to adopt the city budget for Fiscal Year 2021, but the timeline for adoption is not in compliance with state law. The City announced late Monday that two teleconference meetings would be held on July 1st and July 2nd for the purposes of introducing and adopting the budget for the upcoming fiscal year. See the agenda announcements here: OCGA 36-81-5(f) reads that “At least one week prior to the meeting of the governing authority at which adoption of the budget ordinance or resolution will be considered, the governing authority shall conduct a public hearing, at which time any persons wishing to be heard on the budget may appear.” The use of the word “shall” indicates that the hearing must take place at least one week ahead of the adoption. View the code section. Neither agendas make...
    The California legislature voted last week to strike anti-discrimination language from the State Constitution. In a 30-10 vote, the legislature passed the Assembly Constitutional Amendment No. 5 (ACA 5), which removes the words “The state shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin,” from California’s constitution, which were put in place in 1996 with Proposition 209. Proposition 209 effectively repealed the state’s Affirmative Action policies, which allowed public institutions such as schools and universities to give preferential treatment to underrepresented groups even if they were less than qualified. As Harvard University has shown, such policies lead to discrimination against Asian Americans especially. The California proposal, which will be given to the people of the Golden State as a new resolution to vote on later this year, aims to bring back Affirmative Action to increase...
    California voters will be given the opportunity to repeal the California Civil Rights Initiative, also known as Proposition 209, that amended the state Constitution to prohibit discrimination or preferential treatment of people based on race or sex. Proposition 209 states: "The State shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting."The California legislature has now voted to strike these words from our state constitution: “The state shall not d… https://t.co/rskjLegxIt — Steve Miller (@Steve Miller)1593031561.0On Wednesday, the California Senate voted 30-10 in favor of putting the constitutional amendment that reinstates affirmative action up for a vote on the November ballot. The California Senate surpassed the required two-thirds majority. The California State Assembly voted 60-14 to pass Assembly Constitutional Amendment No. 5 on June...
    Business groups, organizations and citizens are coming out in favor of a resolution that would declare racism a public health crisis. Dozens of parties have submitted testimony in favor of Senate Concurrent Resolution 14. On Wednesday, the state Senate Health, Human Services and Medicaid Committee held a second hearing on the measure. As drafted, the resolution would, in part, define terms concerning racism and health equity, promote community dialogue and look at vendors and grant recipients “with a racial equity lens,” state Sen. Hearcel F. Craig, D-Columbus, said in sponsor testimony. The resolution would create a working group to make recommendations on additional actions. “Our resolution wants to reverberate the disparities that are inextricably linked in health care, Ohio’s prisons, the digital divide within education and health care services, economic opportunities, our education system, more likely to be uninsured, and access to affordable and adequate housing,”...
    By Adam Beam | Associated Press SACRAMENTO — California’s 1996 ban on affirmative action policies will be tested at ballot box in November as voters will decide whether governments and public colleges and universities can consider race in their hiring and admissions decisions — all against the backdrop of a presidential election and cultural upheaval over racial injustice. California has banned affirmative action since 1996, when 55% of voters approved a constitutional amendment that made it illegal to give preferential treatment based on race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin. Wednesday, the state Senate voted 30-10 to repeal that amendment, although voters must approve in November before it can become law. The 1996 amendment came at a time when Republicans ruled the state and was just two years removed from a separate voter-approved amendment — eventually overturned by the courts — that would have banned immigrants living in...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California’s 1996 ban on affirmative action policies will be tested at ballot box in November as voters will decide whether governments and public colleges and universities can consider race in their hiring and admissions decisions — all against the backdrop of a presidential election and cultural upheaval over racial injustice. California has banned affirmative action since 1996, when 55% of voters approved a constitutional amendment that made it illegal to give preferential treatment based on race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin. Wednesday, the state Senate voted 30-10 to repeal that amendment, although voters must approve in November before it can become law. The 1996 amendment came at a time when Republicans ruled the state and was just two years removed from a separate voter-approved amendment — eventually overturned by the courts — that would have banned immigrants living in the country illegally form using...
    BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraqi lawmakers Wednesday passed a crucial bill allowing the country to finance a widening fiscal deficit amid an unprecedented economic crisis spurred by falling oil prices and the pandemic. Of 329 members of parliament, 168 voted in favor of a law enabling domestic and foreign borrowing by the government, a key legal step for Iraq to access funds and pay state salaries as revenues take a hit with plummeting oil prices. Iraq depends on oil exports to fund the lion’s share of it’s state expenditures, including a bloated public wage bill. But month-to-month earnings have been half of what the government had projected to fund the 2020 budget as oil prices hover between $20-$30. The bill’s passage was necessary to enable the government to request loans both internally and through international monetary agencies because the 2020 budget was not passed due to political deadlock. ...
    In the Pioneer Press, Josh Verges writes: “St. Paul Public Schools no longer will pay the city of St. Paul to post police officers in seven of its high schools. The school board voted 5-1 on Tuesday to stop contract negotiations with the city and develop a new safety plan. Board member Chauntyll Allen said the move was a long time coming. ‘Our focus needs to be on student achievement,’ she said, ‘and in order for all of our students to achieve, they need to be free from trauma.’” For MPR, Tim Pugmire reports: “Three Republican state senators from outside the Twin Cities said Tuesday that they want a federal investigation of the Minneapolis Police Department in the aftermath of the George Floyd killing. Sens. Bill Ingebrigtsen, R-Alexandria, Scott Newman, R-Hutchinson, and Dave Senjem, R-Rochester, are asking U.S. Attorney General William Barr to investigate whether there are patterns of excessive...
    (CNN)Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee announced Tuesday that a new statewide mandate requiring residents to wear face masks will go into effect later this week in response to a new surge of coronavirus cases. The rule, which will go into place Friday, will require masks in any indoor public space, as well as outdoors if social distancing can't be maintained. Any facial covering that fits over the nose and mouth will be permitted. "I think of these face coverings, in some sense, as a statement," Inslee said during a news conference announcing the rule. "It's a statement that when you wear it, it means you care about people, because it means you want to reduce the risk that you are going to infect another person."The step makes Washington just the latest state to require people to wear masks when out in public. Washington is among the 25 US states that,...
    SACRAMENTO (CBS / AP) — California Gov. Gavin Newsom and the Democratic state Legislature have agreed to a state spending plan that avoids billions of dollars in permanent cuts to public schools and health care programs but imposes pay cuts to state workers and other programs to cover an estimated $54.3 billion budget deficit brought on by the coronavirus pandemic. The agreement announced Monday does not include Newsom’s proposed permanent cuts to public schools and health care programs, which would have made fewer low-income older adults eligible for government funded health insurance and eliminated programs aimed at keeping people out of nursing homes. Instead, the state will delay about $12 billion in payments to public schools to future budget years. This gives school districts the authority to go ahead and spend the money — either by borrowing or pulling from their reserves — and the state will pay them back...
    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The racial reckoning sweeping the country after the killing of George Floyd in police custody has generated momentum at state capitols for widespread reforms addressing a range of inequities. Lawmakers have floated proposals to address affirmative action, racial disparities in school funding and health care, criminal justice reforms and even study reparations for slavery. The efforts go beyond policing reforms to focus on systemic racism that has stubbornly pervaded public life for decades. They are prompting “very real conversations I didn’t think the country has ever really had because none of them are comfortable,” said Sydney Kamlager, a member of the Legislative Black Caucus in the California State Assembly. “If you’re just talking about police and you’re not looking at the rest of the spectrum, then you’re really not focused on change,” she said. Success has been mixed. While advocates in California have celebrated a string...
    Florida restaurants are under no obligation to let the public know when they have been exposed to employees with COVID-19, despite record numbers of new infections sweeping the state, sparking fears of a second wave.  The Sunshine State, which is continuing to plow ahead with its reopening despite a surge in new cases, does not require restaurants to inform customers of a coronavirus outbreak among staff because it is not classed as a food-related outbreak.    While the Florida Department of Health tracks outbreaks of illnesses such as hepatitis A and norovirus in restaurants and orders owners to contact customers when they occur, it does not track cases of coronavirus linked to restaurants or require the cases to be made public.   Customers of infected restaurant workers are also not classed as their close contacts under the state's contact tracing efforts.   The state does not even require workers to wear masks when...
    New York state’s Democrat-led legislature on Tuesday voted to repeal a decades-old law that had previously guaranteed police misconduct records were shielded from the public record. Lawmakers in the Empire state have drawn on the momentum caused by the death of George Floyd, who died May 25 while in the custody of Minneapolis police, and subsequent protests to act on a package of police accountability bills. Gov. Andrew Cuomo had already said Monday that he intends to sign the new legislation that will make police disciplinary records subject to the Freedom of Information Law, or FOIL, requests, which are usually made by media – but can be made by any American. The governor noted that records are already available for other government employees, such as teachers and toll takers. PHILADELPHIA POLICE INSPECTOR CHEERED BY FELLOW OFFICERS AS HE TURNS HIMSELF IN ON CHARGES OF ASSAULTING PROTESTER  “Their records will be...
    The U.S. Navy announced Tuesday that it is working on an order to ban the display of the Confederate flag, less than a week after the Marine Corps issued its directive to do so.   "The Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Mike Gilday, has directed his staff to begin crafting an order that would prohibit the Confederate battle flag from all public spaces and work areas aboard Navy installations, ships, aircraft and submarines," spokesman Commander Nate Christensen said in a statement. "The order is meant to ensure unit cohesion, preserve good order and discipline, and uphold the Navy's core values of honor, courage and commitment." The United States Marine Corps issued its order Friday, directing commanders to "identify and remove the display of the Confederate battle flag or its depiction within workplaces, common-access areas and public areas on their installations."  Trending News Trump suggests 75-year-old man shoved to the ground by police...
    On a Monday evening in mid-May, West St. Paul Mayor David Napier announced he had reached out to administrators and found that senior housing facilities in the city had largely kept coronavirus at bay. All except for one, where a third of the residents were infected. “Everyone is doing amazingly well. … They have instituted some protocol, they started early, and it has held off the virus within their buildings,” said Napier, addressing the West St. Paul City Council on May 11. “The only one that is really suffering right now is Southview Acres. Out of 180 residents, they have 60 residents that have COVID.” While Southview Acres had done widespread testing of residents by May 11, Napier said, it had yet to do the same for staff, and it was short dozens of workers. That left open the possibility, if not the likelihood, that staff inadvertently passed the virus...
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