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    CHICAGO (WLS) -- Seniors can begin making appointments for a vaccine at the United Center beginning Thursday.The sign-up for appointments will begin at 8:30 a.m. for seniors. After the signup period for seniors, anyone eligible for a vaccine as part of the Phase 1B+ group can begin scheduling appointments at 4 p.m. on March 7.To register for an appointment, visit www.zocdoc.com/vaccine or call (312) 746-4835 from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday.The United Center will open for a limited number of appointments on March 9 before a full opening on March 10.RELATED: Chicago COVID vaccine map shows how many residents vaccinated by zip codeMore than 100,000 appointments will be made available."From the beginning, we have prioritized ensuring our seniors and vulnerable populations can receive the COVID-19 vaccine as quickly and equitably as possible, and I'm thrilled the United Center vaccine...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — As Minnesota has ramped up its pace in administering COVID-19 vaccines — with nearly 1 million receiving at least one shot — health officials reported Tuesday 443 new cases of the virus and four more deaths. The latest update from the Minnesota Department of Health shows the cumulative COVID-19 case count reached 485,655 since the first case was reported in the state nearly a year ago. The state’s death toll is at 6,490. As of Sunday, 1,383,609 doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been administered in Minnesota, mostly of the Pfizer vaccine. The state’s vaccine rollout dashboard shows that 16% of the population (908,590 people) have gotten one shot while 8.5% (or 472,789 people) have received the full series. RELATED: Next In Line For Vaccine Will Be Minnesotans With Certain Underlying Conditions, Food Processing Workers Last week, Gov. Tim Walz said the vaccine rollout will expand once 70%...
    Here’s a common complaint I hear from seniors all the time: Interest rates are so low that it’s impossible to earn enough cash to supplement Social Security. “Certificates of deposit don’t earn anything,” writes MarketWatch reader Camille: “Until the mid-2000s, you could easily earn 4% on a certificate of deposit (CD). Today, your money does not earn anything, which penalizes small savers and seniors.” She’s right. Based on rates as I write this, if you put $500 into a one-year CD, you’d get back about $502.76 in 12 months. Wow! Two whole dollars and 76 cents! Probably enough for a loaf of bread or a gallon of gas, but not much else. Low interest rates are a double-edged sword. If you’re borrowing money, it’s obviously good, but if you’re trying to make a few bucks, no. And this isn’t likely to change in any significant way, given the...
    DANVERS (CBS) – Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker said the decision to allow caregivers to receive their COVID vaccine when they bring someone 75 or older to a site is expected to help get more shots administered in the senior community. The state will post 74,000 appointments online Thursday for mass vaccination sites and pharmacies at locations across Massachusetts. Another 30,000 additional appointments will be posted by the end of the week, pushing the total to more than 100,000. RELATED: Mass COVID Vaccination Site Opens At DoubleTree Hotel In Danvers Starting Friday, friends or family who are making appointments for residents older than 75 can make one for themselves as well. “We hope this change will encourage more 75 and older residents to get their vaccines at mass vaccination sites, which have the most availability,” Baker said. RELATED: Natick, Dartmouth Get Mass Vaccination Sites; Caregivers For Elderly Now Eligible For Shot...
    A vaccine shortage has forced Kaiser Permanente to cancel more than 5,000 appointments in Santa Clara County for seniors who had been set to receive COVID-19 inoculations. In what Kaiser spokesman Marc Brown called “a very unfortunate development,” the hospital failed to receive the vaccines it anticipated when people had booked appointments for late January and early February. Brown said staff had scheduled people for the vaccine based on previous deliveries and “guidance” from the state and county. “We understand the frustration this causes, and we are continuing to do all we can to increase the supply of vaccines, working in partnership with county, state and federal governments,” Brown said in an email in response to questions from The Times. When additional vaccines are obtained, Kaiser will reschedule the appointments, prioritizing those 75 years and older, Brown said. Kaiser also will attempt to reschedule those 65 to 74...
    Two sisters from New York have teamed up to help senior citizens in their community get vaccinated. Ava and Lily Weinstein started a service to help seniors register online and make appointments to get the coronavirus vaccine. The two teenagers were inspired to launch their business after their own grandparents had trouble navigating the system to register for the vaccines. "We were helping out our grandparents and it was very hard and difficult for them…many people don’t have kids or grandchildren to help them…We want to get out of this pandemic as soon as we can…we wondered how other people are supposed to do this," Ava Weinstein told "Fox and Friends Weekend" on Saturday. VideoLily Weinstein said she and her sister started to reach out to people in the community by creating and handing out fliers in front of their grandparents’ apartment building. "It’s the best feeling in...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — Thousands of seniors in Minnesota will find out Wednesday if they’ve been selected in this week’s COVID-19 vaccine lottery. The Minnesota Department of Health says that 226,244 seniors pre-registered for this week’s random lottery, which will only allow about 8,000 people to be vaccinated in the coming days at community sites across the state. The drawing happened at 7 a.m., with appointment notices soon to follow. The lottery is part of the state’s pilot program to speed up the vaccine rollout, getting doses to Minnesotans ages 65 and older, educators and child care workers. This is the second week of the program. The vast majority of the seniors who pre-registered during the 24-hour window this week won’t be chosen in Wednesday morning’s lottery. However, their information will automatically be entered into next week’s drawing. As such, there’s no need to register again for those...
    In the Star Tribune, Glenn Howatt writes: “At least 206,000 Minnesota seniors signed up for the state’s COVID-19 vaccine lottery Tuesday, although it could take several weeks before most of them get shots. There are only 8,000 doses set aside for those 65 and older this week at the state’s nine community vaccination clinics. On Monday, state officials announced a vaccine lottery after the online appointment system last week was quickly overwhelmed by those hoping to snag a slot. As a result, more people were able to place their names in the hat, but now they will have to wait until they are randomly selected for an appointment….” For the Pioneer Press, Frederick Melo writes: “It’s official — St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter is running for re-election. Carter, a fourth-generation St. Paul resident, former city council member and son of a St. Paul police officer, won a four-year term in November...
    SANTA ANA (CBSLA) — The Orange County Health Care Agency Friday reported 892 newly confirmed COVID-19 cases and one death, bringing countywide totals to 218,741 cases and 2,547 deaths. Senior residents of Laguna Woods Village began receiving the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine Friday. (CBSLA) And officials reported there were 1,896 COVID-19 patients hospitalized, 516 of whom were being treated in intensive care units. The numbers all pointed to good news in the county’s fight against the pandemic, with daily case numbers, hospitalizations and positivity rates all on the decline. “It’s a continuation of the trends we’ve seen,” Orange County CEO Frank Kim said. “What this tells me is that all of the indicators are consistent. The testing rate is still high, so these aren’t false numbers. Hospitalizations are down, the ICUs are trending down and the case positivity is coming down.” On Jan. 10, the county’s test positivity...
    KEY LARGO(CBSMIAMI)—- Governor Ron DeSantis says he hopes Florida will receive bigger batches of COVID-19 vaccines because of stepped-up efforts by the Biden Administration. Speaking at the Murray Nelson Government Center in Key Largo, DeSantis told CBS4’s Peter D’Oench that the state had received 266,000 doses of the vaccine this week and expects to receive the same amount next week. He said he had pushed for more doses before Donald Trump left office and is lobbying for more vaccine right now. “If you look at places like Hard Rock Stadium, they do 1,000 a day. We could do 2,000 a day if we had more vaccine. Get us more vaccine. We will use it well and a lot of seniors will be happy about that. We are going to keep putting seniors first. It was the right strategy. Other places are copying Florida and we need to keep our pedal...
    Nearly 50,000 people in Florida who received their first coronavirus vaccine dose are overdue for their second one. The two immunizations approved for emergency use authorization in the U.S. - Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna - each require a booster shot three or four weeks apart.  According to Florida's Department of Health, about 1.03 million people have been given at least one shot and more than 93,000 have returned for their second jab.  However, a total of 45,056 have missed their shot - a figure that has risen 10 percent over the last three days, health department data shows.  Some health experts say seniors are delaying going to their second appointment because they fear serious side effects such as fever, headache and chills. There is currently no national database tracking people who are overdue for their second shot and Florida is the first state to announce this issue. Of the 1.03...
    Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis said his state has administered the coronavirus vaccine to over 400,000 seniors, a best in the nation number that he expects to grow significantly in the next week. “Florida has vaccinated more than 400,000 seniors – more than any other state in the nation that’s reporting updates on this critical effort,” DeSantis said on Twitter. “We anticipate this number to grow, as Florida has reported more vaccinations this week than the previous 3 weeks combined.” DeSantis attached a video to the tweet in which he lauded the state’s performance in distributing the vaccine and promised even more progress in the coming weeks. “Even with the delayed reporting, we’re reporting almost 350,000 seniors that have received a coronavirus vaccine shot,” DeSantis said in the video. “There is no other state that is even close to us in terms of going for seniors. The vast majority of our...
    The chief executive officer of AARP said Sunday there should be more “clarity” and streamlined process for COVID-19 vaccine administration to senior citizens outside of nursing homes. In an interview on CBS News’ “Face the Nation,” Jo Ann Jenkins, the CEO of the American Association of Retired Persons, said “were not moving fast enough.” “There could be some simple clarity and transparency about what is to be expected, the time frame that individuals all across this country should be thinking about,” she urged. “Clearly, we need to keep up the protections of wearing masks and washing our hands and doing all of those things. We shouldnt let our guard down. But there needs to be further clarity about and expectations set about when these vaccines are going to be administered widely.” Jenkins said AARP has information on its own website, but here’s far greater need for wider information. “Were listing...
    Ciao Paolo: Last farewell for Italys 1982 World Cup hero Rossi The Short Haircut That Always Looks Good on Round Faces 3 Reasons Retirement Will Cost More Than You Think Many people assume that once they retire, their living costs will go down. And while that's true to some degree, your expenses may not drop to the extent you expect them to. In fact, here are three reasons why retirement may cost you more than you imagined. © Provided by The Motley Fool 3 Reasons Retirement Will Cost More Than You Think 1. Medicare leaves lots of coverage gaps Medicare provides coverage to millions of seniors but doesn't cover everything. Original Medicare won't pay for dental care, vision exams, or hearing aids -- services seniors commonly need year after year. But these gaps aside, Medicare itself also isn't free. Part B, which covers outpatient care, charges a monthly premium...
    New federal applications for college aid this year have dropped 17% from 2019 — sparking fears that COVID-19 concerns could drive high school seniors to postpone college or skip it altogether. The decline, according to an analysis of Department of Education data, builds on a 13% drop in freshman college enrollments this fall, as colleges switched to pandemic-prompted remote learning — and threatens economic harm to the American secondary education system that could linger for years. Only 24% of students eligible to submit submissions the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or Fafsa, for the first time — that is, next year’s college freshmen — have done so, The Wall Street Journal reported Saturday. Last year at this time, 29% of high school seniors had submitted the paperwork that opens federal, state, and other grants and loans to college students. The decline is even more severe at schools that...
    There has been a lot of discussion lately about how the electorate has evolved from Donald Trump’s narrow victory in 2016 to his likely loss in 2020: Senior citizens have swung back in the Democratic direction, or Latinos are more likely to vote for Trump, for example. Some of that pundit chat has just been taken as an article of faith, though, originating with snippets from focus groups or person-on-the-street interviews, or extrapolated from looking at which states are moving in what direction and who lives in those states. But there’s actually an illuminating and rigorous way to do that kind of number-crunching in an apples-to-apples fashion, by comparing the crosstabs from the same good pollster from four years ago versus today. And if you do that with Pew Research’s most recent national poll, it turns out that much of the conventional wisdom is in fact borne out: Trump’s Latino vote...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Citymeals on Wheels is kicking into high gear to make sure senior citizens isolated during the coronavirus pandemic don’t go hungry. As CBS2’s Natalie Duddridge reported Thursday, the organization is focusing its efforts on packing emergency boxes. A 25,000 square-foot warehouse in Hunts Point In the Bronx is stacked up to the rafters with food, a full year’s supply. But Citymeals has been going through it faster than it ever has and that means it need more help and donations, too. “We have brown rice. We have apple sauce, green beans,” worker Ottis Lewis said. Lewis packs emergency food boxes that he’ll deliver to isolated seniors. “It’s really needed. A lot of people are going through it right now,” Lewis said. FLASHBACK: Citymeals On Wheels Overcoming Obstacles As It Navigates Pandemic To Feed New Yorkers Since the pandemic began, Citymeals has handed out double a year’s...
    Social Security recipients will get a cost-of-living increase of 1.3% in 2021, trustees for the gargantuan federal program said Tuesday. For the 64 million Americans who get Social Security, this would lift the average monthly benefit—which is $1,503 this year—to $1,522. Disabled workers and their dependents will get the sane 1.3% increase, raising their average monthly benefit to $1,274. 80% of older Americans can't afford to retire - COVID-19 isn't helping What’s interesting is that while news of the 1.3% cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) was released by the Social Security Administration (SSA), another federal agency—the Labor Department—released its own data Tuesday showing that inflation rose a bit more than that—1.4%—for the 12-month period ended in August. What this means is that the COLA seniors are getting will trail the prevailing inflation rate by one-tenth of 1%. This might not sound like much, but Mary Johnson, Social Security and Medicare...
    SAN ANTONIO – Many of those in line outside the Bexar County Elections Office dropping off their mail-in ballots have been seniors, many of which are mobility impaired. Bexar County Commissioner Justin Rodriguez, who represents Precinct Two, said he had wanted to give those voters more options. “We’re in a global pandemic, and we need to innovate,” Rodriguez said. “But, I couldn’t get everything done that we wanted to.” He said for instance, having several drop-off locations instead of one at the Bexar County Elections Office would have been helpful. “I think there was some disagreement on whether that was practical to get set up,” Rodriguez said. Since then, Governor Greg Abbott mandated counties with election offices with branch locations now can only have one. Unlike Harris County that has an elected county clerk who handles elections, “We have an independent elections administrator, a separate office.” Rodriguez said he also...
    A senior signing up for Medicare.Justin Sullivan | Getty Images Open enrollment season for Medicare enrollees can sometimes be overwhelming because of the wide variety of choices. The average senior will have 47 different health plans to choose from for 2021, according to the Trump administration, up 20% from last year.  In most years, the majority of seniors turn to independent brokers and insurance agents for help trying to figure out which plan will work best for them.  "In our focus groups, people said it's kind of nice to have an agent who can walk you through the options and steer you toward a certain plan," said Tricia Neuman, executive director of the Kaiser Family Foundation program on Medicare policy. But, she adds, "it's much harder this year just because people are mostly home." With Covid-19 cases rising across the country, seniors are reluctant to seek help in person this...
    Man United concedes stoppage-time equalizer, scores 100th-minute winner against Brighton (video) Amazing photos of nocturnal animals More Than Half of Americans Plan to Make This Positive Retirement Move Due to the Pandemic The coronavirus pandemic has put tens of millions of Americans out of work, strained people's finances, and even among those whose situations haven't changed, many are more fearful about the future. As a result, investing strategies have been altered, and retirement plans are evolving to accommodate these crazy times. © Provided by The Motley Fool More Than Half of Americans Plan to Make This Positive Retirement Move Due to the Pandemic Among those changes in plans, one shift in particular that's being considered by a majority of us is actually a positive one: According to Voya Financial, fully 54% of Americans now plan to work during retirement in some capacity. Load Error To be fair, Voya...
    Population aging is a powerful force. By 2030 the population above age 60 will have grown so much that other generations like millennials and Gen-Z will be outnumbered by them in Europe, China, Japan and the United States. Each day, 12,000 Americans celebrate their 60th birthday; in China, 54,000; and in the world, about 210,000, according to the United Nations Population Division. The pandemic will only accelerate this trend given the predictable decline in fertility — which tends to occur whenever unemployment is high — and the shifting demographics of cases and deaths, which are trending younger as time goes by. The 60+ crowd will become very important economically for three reasons. First, they own more than half of the net worth around the world, a proportion that reaches 80 percent in the United States, according to a study by the Federal Reserve. Second, the same study concluded that the...
    One New Jersey man is going above and beyond for his community during the pandemic. Greg Dailey, 50, who has been delivering newspapers to East Windsor residents for 25 years, has updated his business to include groceries – and it has grown into an entire network of devoted volunteers. To date, the man has made more than 900 deliveries to those who need help. CLICK HERE FOR COMPLETE CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE Dailey said back in March he received a call from an 88-year-old client who asked if he could deliver the paper closer to her front door. The man agreed, but the request made him think. “My thought process was that if she’s struggling to get the newspaper from the sidewalk, how is she getting anything else done?” he told Insider. Dailey called the woman while he was out shopping for groceries and offered to bring them to her doorstep. CLICK HERE...
    28 High School Seniors Nominated in 2019 Accepted into Naval Academy, Air Force Academy, West Point, Merchant Marine Academy U.S. Senator Kelly Loeffler (R-Ga.) recently announced that 28 high school graduates from across Georgia who were nominated last fall by her predecessor have been accepted into U.S. military service academies for fall 2020. The 28 students are among the several dozen students nominated by Georgia congressional offices who have been accepted. Members of Congress are tasked with nominating students to attend our nation’s military academies annually. Those nominees who are accepted into the academies are awarded full four-year scholarships that include tuition, books, room and board, and medical and dental care. As U.S. Senator Johnny Isakson’s successor, Loeffler inherited his slate of 2019 nominees. The 28 students were selected out of a pool of 300 applicants and they will attend the U.S. Naval Academy, the U.S. Military Academy at West...
    CHICAGO -- A group of high school students are bringing generations together by reaching out to spread joy to older people isolated by the pandemic.Nice people keeping each other company. That's the idea behind "Lifting Hearts With the Arts," high school students connecting with lonely seniors, virtually."Our volunteers sing to residents, play music to them or just have a conversation every week," said Maya Joshi, Founder.Joshi is a rising sophomore at Walter Payton College Prep. She started the organization after seeing how the pandemic affected her grandparents."Their anniversary was coming up and my family and I couldn't go visit them and so I just called them every day and we started doing more video calls with me and my sister," she said. "I thought, why not spread that same joy to other seniors and others in more isolated settings?"The high school students virtually connect every week with residents of assisted...
    Most people enjoy a nice irony. Let me share one that is not so nice. COVID-19 testing is available, at no cost, for all who want it, just a few hundred yards from the assisted living facility where I live with many other senior souls. But neither the governor nor our county authorities have mandated testing for our staff, so we live, still after all of these weeks, with the maddening ambiguity of not knowing if one or more of the nice people who serve us are asymptomatic and carrying the virus. Related Articles Letter: Since when does theft warrant a death sentence? Letter: America must rectify atrocities done to Native Americans too Letter: Each voice is powerful enough to create change Letter: COVID-19 shows animals merit more care, concern Letter: Campus police a big help in keeping outsiders out Earlier, when testing capacity was limited, our lack of testing...
    LOS ANGELES -- A non-profit has expanded to help more seniors stay home during the COVID-19 pandemic by delivering free groceries and prescriptions directly to them. AllTogether LA, formerly known as Santa Monica Community Helpers, has merged with other volunteer groups to help reach more seniors not only across Santa Monica, Venice, Marina Del Rey, Mar Vista, Brentwood, and Culver City but all of Los Angeles County, CA."I was overwhelmed with calls from Santa Monica Helpers. You know, I was really only on for a week and then this huge community building effort happened." said Lorena Camarena, founder of AllTogether LA."We have the infrastructure to take on as many volunteers as we need. We have the infrastructure to adapt every city, every town, every neighborhood in Los Angeles," said Mitch Olivieri, Director of Community Health and Volunteering with AllTogether LA.Camarena first got the idea of delivering household goods to senior...
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