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over Trump’s case:

    By RYAN J. FOLEY, Associated Press IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — A Republican lawmaker and a man later charged with participating in the Jan. 6 Capitol riot were among thousands of people who chastised Iowa’s attorney general for refusing to seek to overturn Donald Trump’s election loss, records show. Droves of Trump supporters who wrongly believed the election was stolen due to fraud called Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller a coward, stupid, blind, lazy, pathetic, and worse in angry emails to his office. Several vowed to defeat the Democrat if he runs for reelection in 2022. Others wrongly believed he was a Republican and called him a traitor. More than 2,500 emails to Miller, obtained by The Associated Press under the open records law, illustrate how authorities at all levels of government came under intense pressure from Trump’s biggest supporters to subvert the election results. “YOU indeed do have your...
    President Biden will defer to his Justice Department on whether former President Donald Trump should be criminally prosecuted over the Jan. 6 sacking of the Capitol by his supporters. The Biden administration would have "an independent Justice Department" to determine whether to launch a Trump-focused investigation and possibly charge him, according to White House press secretary Jen Psaki. "I am not going to speculate on criminal prosecution from the White House podium," she told reporters during a Tuesday briefing. The question over Trump's criminal and civil legal exposure follows his second Senate impeachment trial acquittal last weekend — this one focused on whether he incited the angry rioters who clashed with police, forced their way into the legislative hall, and ransacked offices as they threatened then-Vice President Mike Pence, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and other lawmakers. Democratic Mississippi Rep. Bennie Thompson sued Trump, his attorney Rudy Giuliani, and two right-wing...
    By Eric Tucker | Associated Press WASHINGTON — The Democratic chairman of the House Homeland Security committee accused Donald Trump in a federal lawsuit on Tuesday of inciting the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol and of conspiring with his lawyer and extremist groups to try to prevent Congress from certifying the results of the presidential election he lost to Joe Biden. The lawsuit from Mississippi’s Rep. Bennie Thompson is part of an expected wave of litigation over the Jan. 6 riot and is believed to be the first filed by a member of Congress. It seeks unspecified punitive and compensatory damages. The case also names as defendants the Republican former president’s personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani and groups including the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers, extremist organizations that had members charged by the Justice Department with taking part in the siege. A Trump adviser, Jason Miller, said in...
    Analysis by Maeve Reston and Stephen Collinson | CNN Donald Trump’s defense lawyers face a daunting mission Friday in refuting a devastating impeachment case that the former President is a dangerous tyrant who turned his mob on his fellow Americans. But after they huddled Thursday with three of Trump’s top supporters — Sens. Ted Cruz, Lindsey Graham and Mike Lee — who are supposed to be serving as impartial jurors — it’s clear their task will be aided by Republican senators who care as much about political damage control as clearing Trump’s name. No matter how persuasive the Democrats’ case was over the past week, the raw political math remains on Trump’s side. There is still no indication 17 Republican senators are willing to join Democrats to convict the former President for inciting the deadly insurrection on January 6. That potential outcome for Trump could be hard for some Republican...
    (CNN)Donald Trump's defense lawyers face a daunting mission Friday in refuting a devastating impeachment case that the former President is a dangerous tyrant who turned his mob on his fellow Americans.But after they huddled Thursday with three of Trump's top supporters -- Sens. Ted Cruz, Lindsey Graham and Mike Lee -- who are supposed to be serving as impartial jurors -- it's clear their task will be aided by Republican senators who care as much about political damage control as clearing Trump's name.No matter how persuasive the Democrats' case was over the past week, the raw political math remains on Trump's side. There is still no indication 17 Republican senators are willing to join Democrats to convict the former President for inciting the deadly insurrection on January 6.That potential outcome for Trump could be hard for some Republican senators to explain to their constituents after three days in which Democratic...
    DONALD Trump has reportedly blasted the "terrible" impeachment trial prosecutors over Capitol riot videos as Republicans have slammed the "offensive" case. The former president has been watching the Senate trial from his Mar-A-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, according to reports. 8The former president has been watching the Senate trial from his Mar-A-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, according to reportsCredit: Getty Images - Getty 8Capitol rioters are pictured during the January 6 chaosCredit: Reuters 8Trump supporters were seen scaling the Capitol wallsCredit: AP:Associated Press 8'I think most Republicans found the presentation by the House Managers offensive and absurd,' Graham tweeted on WednesdayCredit: The Mega Agency The 74-year-old Republican was unimpressed when Impeachment managers played never-before-seen harrowing videos of the US Capitol siege on January 6, two sources with knowledge of the matter told the Daily Beast. The footage played during trial included a video of the Capitol mob smashing...
    The House impeachment managers will begin their opening arguments on the merits of the impeachment of former President Donald Trump when the chamber convenes at noon on Wednesday, following a 56-44 Senate vote to move ahead with the trial Tuesday.  Meanwhile, speculation is running rampant about which Republicans may vote to convict Trump. The attention has mainly been on a group of moderate senators, but also includes Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. Bloomberg reported Tuesday that McConnell hasn't decided how he'll vote on the final conviction question and has told other Republicans that their vote is a personal decision.  It's almost certain that 17 Republicans won't vote to convict Trump -- the number necessary for Democrats to reach the 67-vote supermajority threshold -- but the House impeachment managers are hopeful they can get more Republicans on board to deliver a stronger rebuke to the former president.  They made some progress in that...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening arguments will begin in Donald Trump’s impeachment trial after an emotional first day ended with the Senate voting to hear the case for convicting the former president of inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol even though he is no longer in office. On Wednesday, House Democrats prosecuting the case and the former president’s attorneys will lay out their opposing arguments before the senators, who are serving as jurors. The defense lost the vote seeking to halt the trial on constitutional grounds, 56-44, leaving Trump fuming over his lawyers’ performance and allies questioning the defense strategy. Some called for yet another shakeup to his legal team. House prosecutors on Tuesday wrenched senators and the nation back to the deadly attack on Congress, showing a graphic video of the Jan. 6 mob violence that stunned the the world as hundreds of rioters ransacked the building to try...
    By LISA MASCARO, ERIC TUCKER, MARY CLARE JALONICK and JILL COLVIN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Opening arguments will begin in Donald Trump's impeachment trial after an emotional first day ended with the Senate voting to hear the case for convicting the former president of inciting the riot at the U.S. Capitol even though he is no longer in office. On Wednesday, House Democrats prosecuting the case and the former president’s attorneys will lay out their opposing arguments before the senators, who are serving as jurors. The defense lost the vote seeking to halt the trial on constitutional grounds, 56-44, leaving Trump fuming over his lawyers' performance and allies questioning the defense strategy. Some called for yet another shakeup to his legal team. House prosecutors on Tuesday wrenched senators and the nation back to the deadly attack on Congress, showing a graphic video of the Jan. 6 mob violence that...
    Democrats’ case to convict former President Trump in next week’s Senate impeachment trial is poised to center on one question: If his conduct on and before the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection doesn’t warrant a lifetime ban from office, then what does? In a pretrial brief released Tuesday morning, the House Democratic impeachment managers—the nine lawmakers, led by Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), tasked with prosecuting the case against Trump—offered the first official sketch of their plans to affirm what they call a “betrayal of historic proportions.” “If provoking an insurrectionary riot against a Joint Session of Congress after losing an election is not an impeachable offense,” they write, “it is hard to imagine what would be.” Much of the brief is animated by Republican arguments that the impeachment process is too rushed, that trying a former president might be unconstitutional, or that the country’s leaders should instead focus on the future...
    President Biden's Thursday executive order on health care is set to unravel a Trump-era legal fight over Medicaid. "There's nothing new that we're doing here, other than restoring the Affordable Care Act and restoring the Medicaid to the way it was before Trump became president," Biden said before he signed the order, charging Trump with making the two "more inaccessible, more expensive, and more difficult for people to qualify." The order, which the Biden administration touted as an effort to "reverse attacks" on President Obama's signature achievement, instructs the Health and Human Services to open a special coronavirus-era enrollment period for people to sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act. But it also compels other federal agencies to re-examine Trump-era polices regarding both the ACA and Medicaid, with the end goal of it being easier for more people to enroll. The directive, along with an order reinstating...
    ​The US Supreme Court dismissed lawsuits that accused former President Trump of illegally profiting from his four years in the White House as “moot” on Monday. ​​”The judgment is vacated, and the case is remanded to the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit with instructions to dismiss the case as moot​,” the court wrote in an order released Monday. ​ The attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia sued over whether Trump benefited financially from the Trump International Hotel in Washington, DC, while the Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington sued over the Trump International Hotel in Manhattan.  Maryland and DC accused Trump of profiting from his hotel whenever foreign dignitaries of people seeking to curry favor with his administration stayed at the property.  The business came at a detriment to other hotels and restaurants in the area.  The decision by the court was expected...
    The Department of Justice (DOJ) said Friday that it will not be pressing charges against a former temporary elections worker in Pennsylvania who threw out nine military ballots in the Keystone State before November’s presidential election. While Republicans had seized on the case in Luzerne County as an example of what they said was widespread voter fraud that cost President TrumpDonald TrumpEx-Trump lawyer Cohen to pen forward for impeachment book Murkowski says it would be 'appropriate' to bar Trump from holding office again Man known as 'QAnon Shaman' asks Trump for pardon after storming Capitol MORE a second term, prosecutors said they found insufficient evidence to determine any criminal intent contributed to the worker discarding the ballots. “After a thorough investigation conducted by the FBI and prosecutors from my office, we have determined that there is insufficient evidence to prove criminal intent on the part of the person who discarded the...
    Wall Street Journal editor-at-large Gerry Baker said there was a "very strong case" Tuesday for President Trump to resign from office with a week to go in his term, while hesitating to endorse the idea outright. Trump is facing the sharpest political backlash of his presidency in its concluding days after a mob of his fervent supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol in a deadly melee last week. Several conservative outlets and commentators have called for his impeachment, removal and disqualification from holding future office, while Baker's Wall Street Journal editorial board called on him to resign last week for his sake and the country's. "There's a week to go," Baker said on "America's Newsroom." "I'm not sure. The Wall Street Journal editorial page, where I work, has argued that very strongly, and I think there's a very strong case to be made for that. I think there are questions, then, about what happens after...
    Drew Angerer/Getty Images President Donald Trump has previously admitted to ordering a slowdown in coronavirus testing so that case numbers would appear to be less than what they actually were. Now, new reporting shows that he put much of the blame on one person from his inner circle. According to The New York Times, Trump, in August, berated his son-in-law Jared Kushner over high Covid-19 case stats, and ordered him to slow testing. “You’re killing me! This whole thing is! We’ve got all the damn cases,” Trump shouted at Kushner. “I want to do what Mexico does. They don’t give you a test till you get to the emergency room and you’re vomiting.” Weeks later, Trump recognized that the coronavirus would result in his electoral downfall. While preparing for a debate with President-elect Joe Biden, Trump put the blame for his then-pending defeat squarely on Kushner. “I’m going to lose,”...
    Former Trump 2016 campaign adviser George Papadopoulos celebrated the pardon President Trump granted to him while noting that he may not be done with his accusers. Papadopoulos served a 14-day prison sentence after pleading guilty to providing false statements to investigators about the timing of his meeting a professor with supposed ties to Russia and a female Russian national. Papadopoulos has since claimed he was set up and said he appreciates the treatment he received from the president. PAPADOPOULOS APPLAUDS FLYNN PARDON, HOPES FORTHCOMING 'FACTS' WILL LEAD TO SIMILAR ORDER FOR HIMSELF "I'm absolutely ecstatic," Papadopoulos told FOX Business Network's Maria Bartiromo Wednesday morning. "It’s a tremendous moment for myself and my family, and it came on the cusp of Christmas so it made it even more special for me." Papadopoulos now claims he did not lie about his meeting with the professor, now known to be Joseph Mifsud, rather he "misremembered" when he...
    Loading the player... Despite the Supreme Court dismissing Trump’s attempts to overturn the results of the election in four battleground states, President Donald Trump says that his fight is “not over.” According to The Washington Post, Trump appeared in a Fox News interview with host Brian Kilmeade on Saturday morning where he continued to promote his claims of election fraud and spoke about his intention to continue challenging the electoral college vote. “No, it’s not over. We keep going and we’re going to continue to go forward. We have numerous local cases,” Trump said. Read More: Trucks with first COVID-19 vaccine in US get ready to roll He continued to insist it was “a rigged election” while referencing Joe Biden’s victory in Georgia. “This wasn’t like a close election,” Trump said. “You look at Georgia. We won Georgia big. We won Pennsylvania big. We won Wisconsin...
    “Saturday Night Live” sounded off on the Supreme Court’s decision to decline to hear a Texas case seeking to overturn the election results that was backed by Donald Trump.  During the highly popular sketch show’s “Weekend Update” segment, hosts Colin Jost and Michael Che mocked the president’s ongoing efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election.  “Guys, I gotta be honest, I’m beginning to think Donald Trump didn’t win this election,” Jost joked during the segment before discussing the Supreme Court decision.  The court denied a Texas effort Friday that would have essentially nullified the presidential election in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Georgia and Wisconsin, all states where Joe Biden won a narrow victory over the incumbent Republican candidate. The decision comes days after the court refused to hear a different request from the GOP to stop the certification of Pennsylvania’s election results.  'SNL' COLD OPEN SHOWS FAUCI, BIRX EXPLAINING...
    President Trump vowed that he and his campaign “are going to continue to go forward” with their legal challenges against November’s election results, despite the Electoral College getting set to cast their votes on Monday. Trump told “Fox & Friends” in an interview that aired Sunday morning that even though the Supreme Court rejected a case brought by Texas against several swing states over their elections, he still has other challenges in play. TRUMP TELLS 'FOX & FRIENDS' HE'S 'SO DISAPPOINTED' IN SUPREME COURT FOR TURNING ASIDE TEXAS ELECTION SUIT “No, it's not over. We keep going and we're going to continue to go forward. We have numerous local cases,” Trump said, claiming that he won Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Georgia, while noting that he has an ongoing case in Wisconsin. When asked about Monday’s Electoral College vote, which is when the country officially elects the president, Trump recognized that he...
    The fight for Donald Trump’s second term in office isn’t over yet, Rudy Giuliani said on Friday. After the Supreme Court ruled against a bid from the state of Texas that could have overturned the results of the election, the former New York City mayor and Trump’s personal lawyer indicated that their bid to challenge the results of the election will still press forward. Hours after the ruling that Texas did not have the right to challenge how other states could run their elections — which, if successful, would have allowed the states to throw out results and select electors who might pick Trump as president — Giuliani found a silver lining in the ruling. In an interview on Newsmax, he pointed out that the ruling did not discuss the merits of the case, instead rejecting it on the grounds that the state did not have the right to...
    Mediaite founder and ABC chief legal analyst Dan Abrams discussed the complaint filed by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on his Sirius XM show Wednesday, calling the lawsuit an “absurd” attempt to overturn the election and not a case with any hope of being taken up by the Supreme Court. As Law & Crime covered earlier, the Texas suit seeks to invalidate the election results in the swing states of Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan, and Wisconsin. The case has been heavily criticized by a long list of legal experts for both the extreme remedy it is seeking and for several outlandish claims, like the assertion that President-elect Joe Biden’s chances of overcoming President Donald Trump’s early lead in those four states as “less than one in a quadrillion.” University of Texas law professor Steve Vladeck noted that lawsuits between the states were within the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, but they...
    Rarely does one witness one state’s Attorney General go after another state’s Attorney General on cable news, but these are not normal times. Attorneys General’s intrastate fighting now appears to be a thing, a thing worthy of viewing on a website dedicated to covering the intersection of media and politics. Michigan AG Dana Nessel appeared on CNN’s Newsroom to address a recent lawsuit filed by Texas AG Ken Paxton, which ostensibly alleges that elections that took place in four other swing states should be disallowed. Yup, that really did happen, even though there is no reliable evidence of the sort of systematic voter fraud or constitutional violation that would allow such a massive disenfranchisement of millions of Americans’ votes. The lawsuit’s real reason is that it is likely the only possible way that the Trump campaign can get any election case before a Supreme Court, which features three justices appointed under...
    Reuters December 8, 2020 0 Comments Neil Young on Monday ended his lawsuit against U.S. President Donald Trump’s campaign for playing of two of his songs at campaign rallies without permission. Young had sued the campaign in August for copyright infringement over its alleged unlicensed playing of “Rockin’ in the Free World” and “Devil’s Sidewalk” numerous times at rallies and political events. His lawyers said at the time that while voters could support the candidate of their choice, the now 75-year-old Young did not want his music “used as a ‘theme song’ for a divisive, un-American campaign of ignorance and hate.” Young’s lawsuit in Manhattan federal court was dismissed with prejudice, meaning it cannot be brought again. It was not immediately clear if the case had been settled. Lawyers for Young and the Trump campaign did not immediately respond to separate requests for comment. It is common for musicians...
    By Jonathan Stempel NEW YORK (Reuters) - Neil Young on Monday ended his lawsuit against U.S. President Donald Trump's campaign for playing of two of his songs at campaign rallies without permission. Young had sued the campaign in August for copyright infringement over its alleged unlicensed playing of "Rockin' in the Free World" and "Devil's Sidewalk" numerous times at rallies and political events. His lawyers said at the time that while voters could support the candidate of their choice, the now 75-year-old Young did not want his music "used as a 'theme song' for a divisive, un-American campaign of ignorance and hate." Young's lawsuit in Manhattan federal court was dismissed with prejudice, meaning it cannot be brought again. It was not immediately clear if the case had been settled. Lawyers for Young and the Trump campaign did not immediately respond to separate requests for comment. It is common for musicians...
    President Donald Trump said Monday that he is fighting his increasingly desperate effort to remain in office by finding a way to overturn the vote in battleground states on behalf of his supporters – not for his own benefit.  Trump has maintained a drumbeat of unsupported claims of large-scale fraud through the Thanksgiving weekend and into Monday, despite a devastating Appeals  court ruling against him in Pennsylvania and a Wisconsin recount that resulted in a boost for President-elect Joe Biden despite Trump paying for the count.  'I'm not fighting for me, I'm fighting for the 74,000,000 million people (not including the many Trump ballots that were 'tossed'), a record for a sitting President, who voted for me!' Trump tweeted. The president tweeted that he was fighting for the 74 million people who voted for him, not for himself, even as he continues to claim he won the election  In...
    Fox News’ Geraldo Rivera got combative on The Five Friday as he argued that President Donald Trump needs to “recognize the reality” that the election is over and he lost. Rivera, a Trump ally who recently spoke with the president, said he understands where the president is coming from because he “was absolutely assaulted from the second he took office” and the Democrats “did everything they could to undermine him,” bringing up the Russia saga in particular. “I understand how angry he has about the way he was treated. I understand why that may translate into now I’m not going to give up when they did so many bad things to me,” Rivera went on to add. “But I love the guy, and I just want him to recognize the reality that this is over.” Jeanine Pirro immediately teed off on him and asked, “Are you kidding me?” When...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is putting off upcoming arguments about whether Congress should have access to secret grand jury testimony from special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives had asked the court to put off arguments scheduled for Dec. 2, and the court on Friday agreed, removing the case from its calendar. Douglas Letter, the top lawyer for the House had told the court in a written filing that the House Judiciary Committee that takes office in January “will have to determine whether it wishes to continue pursuing the application for the grand-jury materials that gave rise to this case.” Letter noted that President Donald Trump’s defeat in his bid for reelection could affect the committee’s decision. The material initially was sought in the summer of 2019 as part of the committee’s investigation of possible misconduct by Trump, including whether he obstructed Mueller’s investigation....
    By MARK SHERMAN, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives is asking the Supreme Court to put off upcoming arguments about whether Congress should have access to secret grand jury testimony from special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. The House Judiciary Committee that takes office in January “will have to determine whether it wishes to continue pursuing the application for the grand-jury materials that gave rise to this case,” Douglas Letter, the top lawyer for the House said in a written filing Tuesday. Letter noted that President Donald Trump's defeat in his bid for reelection could affect the committee's decision. The case is scheduled to be argued on Dec. 2. The material initially was sought in the summer of 2019 as part of the committee's investigation of possible misconduct by Trump, including whether he obstructed Mueller's investigation. Mueller’s 448-page report, issued in April 2019, “stopped short” of...
    WASHINGTON – The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives is asking the Supreme Court to put off upcoming arguments about whether Congress should have access to secret grand jury testimony from special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. The House Judiciary Committee that takes office in January “will have to determine whether it wishes to continue pursuing the application for the grand-jury materials that gave rise to this case,” Douglas Letter, the top lawyer for the House said in a written filing Tuesday. Letter noted that President Donald Trump's defeat in his bid for reelection could affect the committee's decision. The case is scheduled to be argued on Dec. 2. The material initially was sought in the summer of 2019 as part of the committee's investigation of possible misconduct by Trump, including whether he obstructed Mueller's investigation. Mueller’s 448-page report, issued in April 2019, “stopped short” of reaching conclusions about Trump’s conduct to...
    President Donald Trump and his allies continue to push unfounded claims of voter fraud, but CNN legal analyst Elie Honig wasn’t having it, telling Ana Cabrera, “it’s over, it is over…they simply do not have reliable evidence of widespread voter fraud.” “How realistic is it that President Trump can succeed on a strategy of challenging state election results in court?” asked Cabrera, referring to a question submitted by a viewer. “Here is my free, unsolicited advice for President Trump,” replied Honig, a former U.S. Assistant Attorney for the Southern District of New York. “It’s over. It is over. This legal strategy has almost no chance of changing the outcome of the election…they simply do not have reliable evidence of widespread voter fraud.” Honig continued, noting that courts across the country were dismissing the Trump campaign’s lawsuits “almost as quickly as they’re filed.” “Here’s the practical problem: margins matter,” he explained. “If Joe Biden holds on to Arizona or Georgia, then he doesn’t even need Pennsylvania in order to stay...
    President Trump’s "provocative" comments could dissuade the Supreme Court from taking on his case, former federal prosecutor Andrew McCarthy told “America’s Newsroom” on Thursday as the Trump campaign has been filing lawsuits over election results in battleground states. “Turning up the heat politically does not help persuade the judges” and likely “does help the judges who don't want to take the case,” McCarthy added, noting that the Supreme Court does not have to take all cases and is “in charge of its own docket.” McCarthy penned an op-ed in the National Review titled, “Trump’s Wee-Hours Rant Was a Legal Blunder, Too.” “The political part of the election is at an end,” McCarthy wrote in the piece. “The president can do no more at this point to persuade voters. “If we are headed into a litigation phase, he should leave public statements to his very capable lawyers,” he continued. “This is not a situation...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump camp says it’s suing to stop Pa. vote count over lack of ‘transparency,’ seeks to intervene in Supreme Court case. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    If President Trump wins the 2020 presidential election, the media’s “unrelenting negative coverage” of the commander in chief will be to blame, constitutional law expert Jonathan Turley said on Wednesday. “Months ago, I wrote that if Donald Trump prevails in this election, the people most responsible would be the media,” Turley told “Fox & Friends.” “We had this just unrelenting level of negative coverage from the media. I think the rebuttal was that a lot of voters were turned off by it. They certainly turned off the news,” Turley said. NO CLEAR WINNER IN PRESIDENTIAL RACE AS VOTE COUNTING CONTINUES, ELECTION HANGS IN BALANCE Americans woke up Wednesday morning not sure who their next president will be, as slow returns in key swing states delayed results and made it impossible to call the race for either President Trump or Joe Biden. With the outcome still up in the air, both candidates claimed they had a path to victory -- with Biden...
    More than 7 million people have already voted in the state of Texas ahead of next week's general election, a figure that accounts for nearly 43 percent of all registered voters in the state.  Over 7.1 million people have voted early in Texas, CNN reported. In 2016 59 percent of all registered voters in the Lone Star State voted in all of 2016. Early voting began in Texas on Oct. 13, with record turnout reported in major cities like Austin and Dallas.  President TrumpDonald John TrumpObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Trump makes his case in North Carolina, Ohio and Wisconsin Pence's chief of staff tests positive for COVID-19 MORE won Texas in 2016, as has every Republican presidential nominee for several decades, but Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenObama slams Trump in Miami: 'Florida Man wouldn't even do this stuff' Trump makes his case in North Carolina,...
    President Donald Trump rape accuser E. Jean Carroll and her lawyers arrive for her hearing at federal court during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic in the New York, October 21, 2020.Carlo Allegri | Reuters A Manhattan federal court hearing for a case that hinges on the allegation that President Donald Trump raped a writer more than two decades ago ended abruptly Wednesday, after a government lawyer was barred from the courthouse due to New York's coronavirus rules. Lawyers for the Department of Justice had planned to make oral arguments in person before Judge Lewis Kaplan to support their position that the DOJ should be allowed to intervene in E. Jean Carroll's defamation lawsuit against Trump. But one of those lawyers was denied entry to the courthouse in lower Manhattan earlier in the day because he had traveled there from his home in Virginia. Virginia is among a group of states...
    Supreme Court to review Trump’s ‘Remain in Mexico’ policy WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear the Trump administration’s appeal of a lower court ruling that it improperly diverted money to build portions of the border wall with Mexico. The high court has previously allowed construction to continue, even after a federal appeals court ruled in June that the administration had illegally sidestepped Congress in transferring the Defense Department funds. The case will not be argued before the winter and it’s unclear how the outcome of the presidential election would affect the case, if Democrat Joe Biden wins the White House. It’s also not clear whether the administration has spent all of the $2.5 billion it moved to the wall project. Dissenting from a July order that allowed construction to continue, Justice Stephen Breyer wrote that the court’s action “I fear, may operate, in effect,...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear the Trump administration's appeal of a lower court ruling that it improperly diverted money to build portions of the border wall with Mexico. The high court has previously allowed construction to continue, even after a federal appeals court ruled in June that the administration had illegally sidestepped Congress in transferring the Defense Department funds. The case will not be argued before the winter and it's unclear how the outcome of the presidential election would affect the case, if Democrat Joe Biden wins the White House. It's also not clear whether the administration has spent all of the $2.5 billion it moved to the wall project. Dissenting from a July order that allowed construction to continue, Justice Stephen Breyer wrote that the court's action “I fear, may operate, in effect, as a final judgment.” The case has its origins in the...
    Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., continued Democrats' claims that the real reason why Republicans are rushing to confirm Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court is so that she can be on the bench for an upcoming ObamaCare case, but he had a particularly colorful way of putting it. The case, California v. Texas, centers on whether the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate is still constitutional now that there is no tax attached to it and whether the act itself can survive without it. The Trump administration is siding with states who believe that ObamaCare should be stricken down in its entirety. BARRETT, PRESSED BY DEMOCRATS ON FUTURE OF OBAMACARE IN HEARING, MAKES 'JENGA GAME' COMPARISON "There is a political agenda here. Whether you are privy to it, part of it notwithstanding, it has to do with the Affordable Care Act," Durbin said. "Nov. 10 is the absolute date they have to...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court won't revive a lawsuit by Democratic members of Congress who argued that President Donald Trump has been violating the Foreign Emoluments Clause of the Constitution, which bans foreign payments to a sitting US president.The court, without comment, on Tuesday let stand a lower court opinion that dismissed the lawsuit.Democrats argued that Trump violated the clause by maintaining ownership of his companies while they conduct business with foreign governments without seeking congressional consent.But a federal appeals court said in February that the members of Congress didn't have the legal right to bring the case because they do not constitute a majority in the House or Senate. The Trump administration asked the justices to stay out."Petitioners do not constitute a majority of either chamber of Congress and thus are, as the court of appeals emphasized, powerless to approve or deny the President's acceptance of foreign emoluments," government lawyers told...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is increasingly at odds with Attorney General William Barr over the status of the Justice Department’s investigation into the origin of the Russia probe, with the president increasingly critical about a lack of arrests and Barr frustrated by Trump’s public pronouncements about the case, according to people familiar with the matter. Trump and his allies had high hopes for the investigation led by Connecticut U.S. Attorney John Durham, betting it would expose what they see as wrongdoing when the FBI opened a case into whether the Trump campaign was coordinating with Russia to sway the 2016 election. Trump has also pushed to tie prominent Obama administration officials to that effort as part of his campaign against Joe Biden, who was serving as vice president at the time. But a year and a half into the investigation, and with less than one month...
    By MICHAEL BALSAMO, ZEKE MILLER and ERIC TUCKER, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is increasingly at odds with Attorney General William Barr over the status of the Justice Department's investigation into the origin of the Russia probe, with the president increasingly critical about a lack of arrests and Barr frustrated by Trump's public pronouncements about the case, according to people familiar with the matter. Trump and his allies had high hopes for the investigation led by Connecticut U.S. Attorney John Durham, betting it would expose what they see as wrongdoing when the FBI opened a case into whether the Trump campaign was coordinating with Russia to sway the 2016 election. Trump has also pushed to tie prominent Obama administration officials to that effort as part of his campaign against Joe Biden, who was serving as vice president at the time. But a year and a half into...
    In a fiery exchange during Tuesday's hearing, former national security adviser Michael Flynn's attorney Sidney Powell claimed that U.S. District Court Judge Emmet Sullivan had displayed "abject bias" in the case and should recuse himself. Powell's remarks came during oral arguments before Sullivan over whether the judge should grant a request to dismiss Flynn's criminal case. Sullivan responded to Powell by saying that she was free to submit an argument in writing and should have done so months ago. Powell also admitted on Tuesday that she has spoken to President Trump about Flynn's criminal case, but that she requested that Trump not grant him a pardon. FBI OFFICIAL ON MUELLER TEAM SAID FLYNN PROSECUTION HAD 'GET TRUMP' ATTITUDE, COLLUSION PROBE WAS 'NOT THERE' "Have you had discussions with the president about this case?" Sullivan asked Powell. Powell at first tried to invoke executive privilege, but upon being reminded that she is not...
    A Manhattan judge has tossed out a defamation lawsuit against Fox News brought by the former Playboy model who took a $150,000 payoff to squelch her story of an affair with a pre-presidency Donald Trump. Karen McDougal had alleged in the suit filed late last year that Fox host Tucker Carlson slandered her by calling the payout "a classic case of extortion." U.S. District Court Judge Mary Kay Vyskocil ruled on Thursday that McDougal failed to prove that Carlson was accusing her of an actual crime in a way that would back up a defamation claim. The judge said that lawyers for Fox "persuasively" argued that "any reasonable viewer 'arrive[s] with an appropriate amount of skepticism' about the statements" Carlson makes, according to a new court filing. The judge called the on-air remarks "rhetorical hyperbole and opinion commentary intended to frame a political debate, and as such, are not actionable...
    New text messages released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Wednesday evening suggest that FBI agents involved in investigating Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign bought professional liability insurance for fear of being exposed and sued. The text messages, reported by The Federalist and included in court filings by Sidney Powell, were part of a new batch of documents released as exculpatory evidence in the prosecution of former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn. The evidence was released after a review of the case by U.S. Attorney Jeffrey Jensen, ordered by Attorney General William Barr. In one text, an agent speculated that they would be “screwed” when a new attorney general began asking questions about the investigation, possibly after leaks to the New York Times or other media outlets.One text, dated Jan. 10, 2017, read: “we all went and purchased professional liability insurance.” Other texts discussed the rules for reimbursement of that insurance....
    By TOM HAYS NEW YORK (AP) — A Manhattan judge has tossed out a defamation lawsuit against Fox News brought by the former Playboy model who took a $150,000 payoff to squelch her story of an affair with a pre-presidency Donald Trump. Karen McDougal had alleged in the suit filed late last year that Fox host Tucker Carlson slandered her by calling the payout “a classic case of extortion.” U.S. District Court Judge Mary Kay Vyskocil ruled on Thursday that McDougal failed to prove that Carlson was accusing her of an actual crime in a way that would back up a defamation claim. The judge called the on-air remarks “rhetorical hyperbole and opinion commentary intended to frame a political debate, and as such, are not actionable as defamation,” the judge said in a written ruling. Messages were left on Thursday with lawyers on both sides of the legal fight seeking...
    NEW YORK (AP) — A Manhattan judge has tossed out a defamation lawsuit against Fox News brought by the former Playboy model who took a $150,000 payoff to squelch her story of an affair with a pre-presidency Donald Trump. Karen McDougal had alleged in the suit filed late last year that Fox host Tucker Carlson slandered her by calling the payout “a classic case of extortion.” U.S. District Court Judge Mary Kay Vyskocil ruled on Thursday that McDougal failed to prove that Carlson was accusing her of an actual crime in a way that would back up a defamation claim. The judge called the on-air remarks “rhetorical hyperbole and opinion commentary intended to frame a political debate, and as such, are not actionable as defamation,” the judge said in a written ruling. Messages were left on Thursday with lawyers on both sides of the legal fight seeking comment. McDougal has...
    PRESIDENT Donald Trump abruptly left his press briefing moments earlier to take "an emergency call," but did not specify what the call was about as he left the room. When a reporter asked him about the Breonna Taylor case, he commented and said "I thought it was really brilliant." He then went on to praise Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron, whom he believes "is doing a fantastic job. I think he's a star." Trump then repeated a quote Cameron said earlier that day, saying "justice is not easy" and "mob justice is not justice." "I think it's a very positive thing it'll all work out," he continued. 1Trump abruptly left his briefing for an "emergency call"Credit: AP:Associated Press More to follow... For the latest news on this story keep checking back at Sun Online. Thesun.co.uk is your go to destination for the best celebrity news, football news, real-life stories, jaw-dropping pictures...
    The United States and Iran will face off at the UN’s top court on Monday in the latest round of a battle over sanctions on Tehran reimposed by President Donald Trump. Tehran dragged Washington to the International Court of Justice (ICJ) in The Hague in 2018 after Trump pulled the US out of a landmark international nuclear deal with Iran. They will argue over the coming week about whether the court, set up after World War II to deal with disputes between UN member states, actually has jurisdiction in the case. Iran says the sanctions brought back by the Trump administration breach the 1955 “Treaty of Amity” between the two countries, signed long before the 1979 Iranian revolution severed ties. Tehran won an early victory in October 2018 when the ICJ ordered sanctions on humanitarian goods to be eased as an emergency measure while the overall lawsuit is dealt with....
    Attorney General Bill Barr on Wednesday defended his decision to use a mechanism that allows Justice Department lawyers to defend President Donald Trump from a defamation lawsuit – instead of a private legal team – following outrage at the unusual move from a lawyer for the defendant, E. Jean Carroll, who has accused Trump of raping her decades ago. [ READ: DOJ Asks to Defend Trump in Rape Accuser's Defamation Suit ]"This was a normal application of the law. The law is clear. It is done frequently," Barr said Wednesday morning. "And the little tempest that's going on is largely because of the bizarre political environment in which we live." Because Trump was accused of committing defamation while he was serving as president, the case should be shifted from state to federal courts and the U.S. government can substitute as the defending party, Barr said at a press conference in Chicago...
    Donald Trump could soon have the United States Department of Justice defending him against a defamation suit filed against him by E. Jean Carroll if a motion filed on Tuesday is accepted by the judge overseeing the case. Dan Berman of CNN wrote that if Trump does get a defense team that is funded by the taxpayers, it would likely be unprecedented. Caroll has accused Trump of committing sexual assault on her and the administration is claiming that while that alleged assault happened when he was a private citizen, the comments he made that led to the lawsuit happened while he was in office. When Trump was asked about the claims that he sexually assaulted the woman in the dressing room of the Bergdorf Goodman’s he said the allegations were totally false. He also claimed he’d never met her in his life. The potential change in attorneys for Trump isn’t...
    The Department of Justice could file antitrust charges against Google in the coming weeks after Attorney General Bill Barr set a deadline to wrap up work on the case by the end of September.  Career lawyers said they needed more time to build a strong case against one of the world's most wealthy companies but their requests were shot down by Justice Department officials, according to the New York Times.  Some of the 40-odd lawyers working on the investigation into Google's parent company Alphabet have voiced concern that the case is being pushed through before November so that it will be regarded as a win for the Trump administration.   The Times reports that some lawyers said they would not sign the complaint if it was filed before a full investigation could be completed, while others left the case over the summer.  Attorney General Bill Barr set an end of September...
    The first night of Republican National Convention Monday kicked off with a video montage narrated by actor Jon Voight as patriotic and pro-Donald Trump images and clips showed on screen. The first speaker, Charlie Kirk, who founded conservative student organization Turning Point USA, kicked off the night warning Americans that 'everything we love' is at stake in November. 'Speaking to you in my personal capacity tonight as a 26-year-old, I have a chance to view the state of our country as someone who sees the angst of young people and the challenges facing new parents forming families,' Kirk said from a podium at the Andrew W Mellon Auditorium in Washington D.C. 'I am here tonight to tell you – to warn you – that this election is a decision between preserving America as we know it, and eliminating everything that we love,' he urged. In an attempt to expand speaking...
    A judge in California ordered President Trump to pay the legal fees involved with a lawsuit brought by porn star Stormy Daniels, who claims to have had an affair with the longtime businessman in 2006. California Superior Court Judge Robert Broadbelt III determined on Monday that Daniels, who filed the lawsuit in 2018 under her real name, Stephanie Clifford, was the "prevailing party" under state law in a case where she sought to be released from a nondisclosure agreement arranged by then-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen just before the 2016 election. Daniels's lawyers made the decision public on Friday. Daniels's lawsuit, part of an effort to be released from the agreement, was dismissed, and her claims were deemed moot after Trump's attorneys agreed not to enforce the NDA or sue for violations, thus rendering the agreement unenforceable. The latest decision was a response to Daniels's demands that she be reimbursed...
    Attorneys also argued that many messaging app users were well aware of the potential for surveillance, including from the US. It was up to them to decide whether or not to use an app, not the government. The plaintiffs in the case hope to get a preliminary injunction that would block the order while the lawsuit is in progress. The lawsuit isn’t guaranteed to work. The White House and others have insisted that Chinese-made social apps like WeChat and TikTok are national security threats over concerns the Chinese government might force them to hand over sensitive user data. That belief could play heavily into the government’s case. There’s no publicly available evidence these data raids are happening, however, and the claimed constitutional violations would be significant if true. For that matter, a temporary injunction would be helpful by itself — it would buy time that would allow for a stronger...
    Former Trump 2016 campaign adviser Carter Page told “Hannity” Tuesday that he’s "grateful" to the Senate Intelligence Committee after it found that the FBI gave “unjustified credence” to the now-discredited Steele dossier. “I'm grateful to the Senate [Intelligence Committee] and everything they've done to help reestablish the rule of law in our country,” Page told host Sean Hannity. SALLY YATES, TOP DOJ OFFICIAL FIRED BY TRUMP, TELLS DNC PRESIDENT HAS 'TRAMPLED THE RULE OF LAW' During the Russia investigation, the FBI relied heavily on the file compiled by former British spy Christopher Steele to obtain a surveillance warrant to spy on Page. Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz has since found that the FBI systematically violated rules designed to protect Americans from unauthorized surveillance. VideoIn Page's case, an ex-FBI lawyer, Kevin Clinesmith, even falsified an email from the CIA to make Page's Russian contacts seem nefarious, when Page in fact had been an informant to...
    WASHINGTON - A U.S. appeals court on Thursday agreed to rehear arguments over whether the judge assigned to the criminal case against Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump's former national security adviser, must grant a request to dismiss it. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit said it would hold an oral argument in the politically charged criminal case on Aug. 11. In a 2-1 decision on June 24, a three-judge panel of the same court ruled in favor of Flynn and the Trump administration and said U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan in Washington had to grant the Justice Department's motion to clear Flynn, who twice pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI. Sullivan asked the full court to reconsider the three-judge panel's ruling, saying the Justice Department's dropping of the Flynn case was unprecedented and had to be carefully scrutinized.
    The attorney for a couple who brandished firearms at protesters on their property filed a motion to dismiss charges brought by the St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office. Attorney Joel Schwartz, who is representing Mark and Patricia McCloskey, accused St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner on Wednesday of a partisan campaign against the husband and wife after it was revealed that she sent campaign emails stating that the couple had "pointed guns at peaceful citizens." "Here, a reasonable person with access to all the facts would find that there was at least the appearance of impropriety, in that Ms. Gardner's decision may have been affected by her personal, political, financial, and professional interests, and that her neutrality, judgement, and ability to administer the law in an objective manner may have been compromised," the filing stated. Schwartz's filing included exhibits of Gardner's reelection emails, which told her supporters that they "might...
    Kavanaugh has tried unsuccessfully to avert politically sensitive decisions, CNN says Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh urged the court to avoid ruling on at least two cases, saying that it should avoid politically sensitive issues, according to a new report. Kavanaugh sent a series of private memos this spring advocating avoiding decisions in major disputes over abortion and Democratic subpoenas for President Donald Trump's financial records, multiple sources told CNN. In the end, the court did hear both cases. One of the cases involved restrictions on abortion clinics in Louisiana, which the court ruled on and struck down in a 5-4 split, with Chief Justice John Roberts siding with the liberals.  The other involved attempts by Democrats in Congress to subpoena President Donald Trump's tax returns, an effort that the court rejected 7-2. Kavanaugh (rear, first from right) is seen with the other justices. The revelation suggests that he hopes...
    Iranians from a variety of political, economic and cultural backgrounds — lawyers, teachers, footballers, artists, students, activists — joined together in an unprecedented Twitter storm, sharing the hashtag #DoNotExecute to protest the judiciary upholding the death sentences of three men arrested after last year’s nationwide protests. Five days after the campaign, Iran’s Supreme Court agreed with the retrial request of the men’s attorneys, who had gotten access to their clients’ case after the hashtag went viral. “The request for retrial was accepted by the Supreme Court,” Babak Paknia, one of the lawyers, wrote on his Twitter account Sunday, Saeed Tamjidi, 28, Mohammad Rajabi, 26, and Amirhossein Moradi, 26, were apprehended after the November uprising following a spike in fuel prices. Hundreds were killed and thousands were injured in the crackdown on the unrest. “The unjust death sentence for November protesters is to create an atmosphere of fear and horror. But...
    Matt NovakJust now•Filed to:coronaviruscoronaviruscovid-19donald trumppresident trumptexasfloridafrancenew zealandgermanyaustraliaSaveA restaurant on Ocean Drive in Miami Beach, Florida serves customers who apparently have no idea there’s a pandemic going on (July 14, 2020).Photo: Chandan Khanna (Getty Images) The U.S. recorded 77,255 new cases of coronavirus on Thursday, setting a depressing new world record. The U.S. has the worst outbreak on the planet right now, but it’s probably more accurate to say this new record was broken last week. Why? The largest private testing lab in the country is currently averaging more than seven days to get test results completed. That means many of those new cases reported on Thursday are people who got tested over a week ago and are just getting their diagnosis now. As Gizmodo reported on Tuesday, Quest Diagnostics is struggling with the volume of coronavirus tests that it’s expected to complete each day. Quest is currently doing about 125,000...
    President Donald Trump listens to a question during a joint news conference with Finland's President Sauli Niinisto in East Room of the White House in Washington, October 2, 2019.Leah Millis | Reuters WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump was furious over the Supreme Court's rulings Thursday morning, after justices handed down a split decision over whether he can shield his tax records from investigators. Trump also complained that he was the victim of "political prosecution," although he is not, in fact, being prosecuted in either case.  The decisions handed a win to the Manhattan district attorney but rejected parallel efforts by Democrats in the House of Representatives.  Following the rulings, Trump attorney Jay Sekulow sought to reframe both cases as victories. "We are pleased that in the decisions issued today, the Supreme Court has temporarily blocked both Congress and New York prosecutors from obtaining the President's financial records," Sekulow...
    The Supreme Court dealt a stunning blow to Donald Trump Thursday by ruling that his private accounting firm must hand over tax return information that and prosecutors had demanded. The court ruled 7-2 that Trump is not immune from subpoenas, in an opinion that tested both the power of local prosecutors and Congress to obtain information. The opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts; the two who dissented were Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito.  The court handed Trump the defeat in a politically-consequential case on the last day of its term, wrapping up a session where Trump scored wins and some notable losses. The ruling has immediate implications for Trump, who must face the voters in just four months – and now must prepare to contend with explosive reports about his sprawling business empire, multiple bankruptcies, and whatever else may emerge from the materials. The case are Trump v....
    The Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that the Little Sisters of the Poor are exempt from an Obama-era mandate to provide contraception in their health care plans. The case, Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania, marked the Catholic religious order’s second time before the Supreme Court, after nearly 10 years of legal dispute. It arose when the New Jersey and Pennsylvania state governments sued the Trump administration for exempting the Little Sisters from the contraception mandate. The exemption, issued in the form of a 2017 executive order from President Trump, stated that the Little Sisters are protected from “undue interference from the federal government.” Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar recommitted to that position the following year with guidelines exempting religious non-profits from contraception requirements outlined in the 2010 Affordable Care Act. When the case was argued in early May, Pennsylvania Chief Deputy Attorney General Michael...
    Kentucky AG Daniel Cameron is getting slammed on social media after photos surfaced of his recent engagement party — with critics including Beyonce’s mother questioning how he’s been spending his time while the cops involved in Breonna Taylor’s death stay free. “Instead of charging the killers of #BreonnaTaylor ….. Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron had an engagement party this weekend,” said a tweet reposted by Beyonce’s mom, Tina Lawson, wrote on Instagram on Tuesday. The tweet included photos of Cameron and his fiancee at their engagement party. “I was shocked to learn that the attorney general for Kentucky is a 34 year old black man. A republican,” Lawson wrote next to the posting. “When Breonna’s Mother Tamika asked to speak with him, he had someone else call her. !
    George Nader, a central witness in former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s investigation and a former informal foreign policy adviser to the White House, was sentenced to 10 years in prison over his conviction on child sex charges. Judge Leonie Brinkema handed down the decade-long sentence Friday after Nader pleaded guilty in January to two charges relating to sexual exploitation of children.  Nader, former high-profile adviser to top U.S. and Middle Eastern officials, had admitted to possessing child pornography that showed sexual abuse of minors and bringing an underage boy to the U.S. for sex. The crimes were committed prior to the 2016 race, during which he worked with President TrumpDonald John TrumpMiami-Dade to close beaches for July Fourth weekend...
    By Andrew Chung (Reuters) - The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday enhanced the ability of President Donald Trump's administration to quickly deport illegal immigrants, including asylum seekers, without judicial review, handing him a victory in a case concerning one of his signature issues in an election year. The justices ruled 7-2 in favor of the administration in its appeal of a lower court ruling that a Sri Lankan farmer named Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam had a right to have a judge review the government's handling of his bid for asylum. The justices found that limiting judicial scrutiny of his rapid deportation case, known as expedited removal, did not violate key safeguards of individual liberty in the U.S. Constitution. (Reporting by Andrew Chung in New York; Editing by Will Dunham) Copyright 2020 Thomson Reuters.
    The US Supreme Court is seen in Washington, DC.Saul Loeb | AFP | Getty Images The Supreme Court sided 7-2 with President Donald Trump on Thursday in a case over a federal law that substantially limits the role that courts can play in reviewing deportation decisions in certain cases under a streamlined process known as "expedited removal."  The opinion was authored by Justice Samuel Alito, and joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh. Justices Stephen Breyer and Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote separate opinions concurring with the judgment. Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan dissented.  The law was challenged by Vijayakumar Thuraissigiam, a Sri Lankan asylum seeker who belongs to the Tamil ethnic minority group. Thuraissigiam said he had been "abducted and brutally beaten by a gang of men" before he fled.  Two asylum officers and an immigration judge rejected Thuraissigiam's claims, and...
    Attorney General William Barr at the White House on June 16.Stefani Reynolds/CNP via ZUMA Wire For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.A Justice Department lawyer who prosecuted Roger Stone says that he and other career prosecutors “were told that we could be fired,” if they resisted political pressure to lower their recommended sentence for the longtime adviser to President Donald Trump. Aaron Zelinsky, a lead prosecutor on the Stone case, shared new details Wednesday on efforts by his superiors to convince him and his colleagues to give Stone “a break” after the self-styled dirty trickster was convicted in November for perjury, obstruction of Congress, and witness tampering. “What I heard repeatedly was that Stone was being treated differently from any other defendant because of his relationship to the president,” Zelinsky testified. Stone is not just Trump’s friend. He was convicted of lying to...
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