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spreading election misinformation:

    TikTok is offering a new glimpse into just how much misinformation is on its platform. Between July and December of last year, the app removed hundreds of thousands of videos for breaking its rules around misinformation about the 2020 presidential election and the coronavirus pandemic. Details of the takedowns were released as part of the company’s latest transparency report. Unsurprisingly, election misinformation was the most prevalent. The company removed 347,225 videos for sharing election misinformation or manipulated media, according to the report. An additional 441,000 clips were removed from the app’s recommendations because the content was “unsubstantiated.” (Like Facebook, TikTok works with third-party fact checking organizations; the company also warns users when videos contain “unverified” claims.”) During the same period, TikTok took down 51,505 videos for sharing misinformation about COVID-19. In its report, TikTok notes that 87 percent of these clips were removed within 24 hours of being posted,...
    Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., speaks during a rally in the Capitol Building to call on the Senate to vote on House Democrats' prescription drugs and health care package on Wednesday, May 15, 2019.Tom Williams | CQ-Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images Lawmakers are looking beyond the social media companies when it comes to cracking down on misinformation. Reps. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif., and Jerry McNerney, D-Calif., sent letters to top executives at AT&T, Verizon, Roku, Amazon, Apple, Comcast, Charter, Dish, Cox, Altice, Google parent Alphabet, and Disney-owned Hulu on Monday, urging them to address misinformation on their services. They linked disinformation and conspiracy theories to the radicalization of people who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 as lawmakers moved to affirm President Joe Biden's victory. "Misinformation on TV has led to our current polluted information environment that radicalizes individuals to commit seditious acts and rejects public health best practices, among...
    Loading the player... A new study has found that misinformation regarding election fraud has dropped 73 percent after several social media sites, including Twitter, permanently suspended President Donald Trump’s account. The research firm Zignal Labs made this determination by reviewing the number of mentions across social media platforms discussing election fraud after Trump lost his primary means of spreading baseless theories about his defeat to Joe Biden. The previous 2.5 million mentions dropped to nearly 688,000 in the week after Trump was banned from Twitter, according to The Washington Post. Misinformation dropped dramatically the week after Twitter banned Trump https://t.co/3zn6pJH6Q1 — The Washington Post (@washingtonpost) January 16, 2021 Months before the Nov. 3 election and afterward, Trump and his allies pushed election disinformation, but Zignal found it dropped swiftly on Twitter and other platforms in the days following the Twitter ban that began on Jan. 8. Read More: Obama says...
    YouTube policy communications lead Farshad Shadloo said the site removed “several” videos from the channels after BuzzFeed got in touch. Shadloo also defended the company’s record, saying YouTube had pulled “thousands” of election misinformation videos. The internet video giant has further clamped down on bogus election claims in the wake of the Capitol incursion, vowing to immediately give channels strikes (and thus temporary or even permanent bans) if they post new misinformation videos. However, the discovery suggests YouTube had at least some holes in its process. A major channel network kept spreading false claims for two months — that’s a lot of potential damage, especially from operators keeping their true origins a secret. While it can be difficult to completely thwart disinformation, it’s clear there’s room to improve.
    Evan Vucci/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.It’s the weekend, which means President Donald Trump spent a couple of hours this morning tweeting lies about his election loss. In recent months, Twitter has attempted to stop the flow of misinformation coming from the president’s account by flagging such tweets as “disputed.” On Saturday, Twitter took it a step further by severely restricting the ways users could engage with three of Trump’s tweets that had been labeled lies. When users tried to like or retweet the messages, they were instead alerted: “We try to prevent a Tweet like this that otherwise breaks the Twitter rules from reaching more people, so we’ve disable most of the ways to engage with it.” Retweeting with a comment attached was still enabled. never seen Twitter do...
    More than a month after the U.S. presidential election, YouTube says it will start removing newly uploaded material that claims widespread voter fraud or errors changed the outcome. The Google-owned video service said Wednesday that this is in line with how it has dealt with past elections. That’s because Tuesday was the “safe harbor” deadline for the election and YouTube said enough states have certified their results to determine Joe Biden as the winner. But this election was different from past elections and YouTube has been widely criticized for not doing more to prevent misinformation from spreading on its platform. Unlike Twitter and Facebook, which put measures in place — with some success —- YouTube has until Wednesday stood by its decision to allow baseless claims about election fraud to stay up. There is no evidence of widespread fraud in the 2020 election. Election officials confirmed there...
    YouTube has suspended the pro-Trump One America News Network from posting new videos for a week and has had its old content demonetized after uploading a video containing misinformation about the coronavirus, YouTube spokesperson Ivy Choi confirmed to The Hill on Tuesday. The week-long suspension is the result of a “strike” issued for saying that there is a guaranteed cure for COVID-19, a claim that runs afoul of YouTube’s coronavirus specific policy. The demonetization came as a result of “repeated violations of our COVID-19 misinformation policy and other channel monetization policies,” Choi said. Axios first reported on the suspension and demonetization. “Early on in this pandemic, we’ve worked to prevent the spread of harmful misinformation associated with COVID-19 on YouTube,” she added. YouTube did not immediately respond to questions about how many strikes OANN had previously accrued. The channel has been criticized for spreading myriad lies about the pandemic and the election. ...
    Getty President Donald Trump tweeted a video interview featuring the former administrator of 8chan and 8kun spreading a baseless conspiracy theory about voter fraud. The segment from the pro-Trump network One America News Network falsely alleged that a voting-software company Dominion impacted the election.  Ron Watkins, the former administrator of his father's message boards, is apparently assisting in the spread of misinformation among right-wing politicians.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. President Donald Trump tweeted an interview with the former administrator of 8chan and 8kun, the fringe message boards that have hosted the QAnon conspiracy theory's leader, Q. In the segment, Ron Watkins was used as an expert, but spread a baseless conspiracy theory about voter fraud.  The video was a segment from One America News Network (OAN), a right-wing, pro-Trump news network, with host Chanel Rion interviewing Watkins. The segment advanced a voter fraud conspiracy theory...
    Facebook took down a handful of pages tied to Steve Bannon because they were spreading misinformation about the election. Overall, the social media platform took down seven pages that had accrued more than 2.4 million followers and pushed the "Stop the steal" motto, which promotes unverified claims of mass voter fraud that allegedly helped Democratic nominee Joe Biden, according to the Washington Post. The pages were flagged by the liberal group Avaaz on Friday. “We’ve removed several clusters of activity for using inauthentic behavior tactics to artificially boost how many people saw their content,” said Facebook spokesman Andy Stone. “That includes a Group that was originally named ‘Stop the Steal’ which later became ‘Gay Communists for Socialism’ and misled people about its purpose using deceptive tactics.” Some of the pages taken down include those belonging to Brian Kolfage, Conservative Values, We Build the Wall Inc., Citizens of the American Republic,...
    Facebook is still trying to get a handle on people and groups spreading election misinformation via “Stop the Steal” messaging. The company took down a handful of prominent Facebook pages and at least one group promoting “Stop the Steal,” for inauthentic behavior, according to The Washington Post. The social network’s actions impacted seven pages, which had more than 2 million followers, and were reportedly linked to Donald Trump’s former advisor Steve Bannon. The pages used “inauthentic behavior tactics,” to amplify their posts, Facebook told The Washington Post . The company also took down a group that had been named “Stop the Steal,” but was later renamed to “Gay Communists for Socialism.” 
    Facebook has announced plans to crack down on groups that spread what it considers misinformation on its platform, introducing new “probationary periods” for groups that regularly violate rules. Mashable reports that tech giant Facebook has announced plans to prevent the spread of what it considers misinformation within the groups on its platform. Facebook will now put certain Facebook Groups in “probation” periods of 60 days. During this timeframe, all posts in the groups must be manually approved by a group administrator or moderator in an attempt to have them take responsibility for the content posted in the groups. If Facebook finds that many of a group’s posts violate its community standards policies, the group could face a probationary period. All groups on the platform will be subject to these new rules, whether they are public or private. If the groups continue to violate Facebook policies during the probationary period, the...
    (CBS DETROIT) – The FBI is now investigating reports of possible voter suppression. Federal authorities say the agency is looking to allegations of robocalls and texts urging voters to quote “stay safe and stay home” on Election Day. The suspicious calls were reported in multiple states including Michigan. Attorney General Dana Nessel says called out the calls yesterday as voter suppression. MORE FROM CBS DETROIT: 2020 Election Results: Biden Wins Michigan, Sen. Gary Peters Wins Reelection MORE FROM CBS DETROIT: Election Officials Project Detroit Voter Turnout Highest In More Than 20 Years MORE FROM CBS DETROIT: Henry Ford Health System: More Than 33,000 Patients Tested Negative For Covid-19 In Last 30 Days, 2,180 Tested Positive © 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Related
    North Carolina's Buncombe County is warning residents about illegal robocalls being used to spread misinformation about voting in the state on Election Day.  "DO NOT LISTEN to these robocall voicemails!," the county said in a Twitter post Tuesday. "Today is your last chance to vote. If you are in line by 7:30 pm, you will get to vote." More than 15,000 Buncombe County residents voted at precincts Tuesday as of 4 p.m. CLICK HERE TO SEE FOX NEWS’ LIVE PROBABILITY DIALS North Carolina isn't the only state seeing an influx of robocalls. According to the Washington Post, voters were barraged with an estimated 10 million spam calls recently, as part of a larger effort, especially in battleground states, to discourage voters from turning out on Election Day. The calls play a short, recorded message telling them to “stay safe and stay home.” On Tuesday, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nassel tweetdd a similar warning: "Getting reports of multiple robocalls...
    Officials in Nebraska and Michigan are warning voters to ignore calls telling them not to go to the polls Tuesday and spreading other misinformation. Both Michigan and Nebraska's 2nd Congressional District are expected to be key battlegrounds that will help decide the election. Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel said Tuesday that her office had received reports of robocalls to residents in Flint urging them to stay home Tuesday because of long lines at the polls and to instead vote Wednesday. [ READ: Trump, Biden Offer Final, Frenzied Pitches to Voters ]"Obviously this is FALSE and an effort to suppress the vote. No long lines and today is the last day to vote. Don't believe the lies! Have your voice heard!" Nessel said in a tweet. Michigan offices on Monday also cautioned local voters about false text messages alleging that there are "ballot sensor issues." Nessel called the messages a...
    Election misinformation is designed to mislead voters, keep them away from the polls, and undermine overall faith in the voting process, Axios reports. According to the outlet, there are ways to help voters steer clear of any misinformation and avoid accidentally spreading it to others.   Axios reports that voters should always check the source that information is coming from and read it before they spread it via Twitter or other social media outlets. Director of the Alliance for Securing Democracy Laura Rosenberger told the outlet that voters should identify credible sources and be cautious about reports of fraud, hacks, or interference until they are verified by a legitimate source. She recommends utilizing Snopes, which has been debunking internet myths for years, to check its list of election misinformation. "First: Remember that many of the rumors spreading on Election Day are likely to be things weve covered before — gaffes, mischaracterizations, cheap fakes,...
    Savannah Rychcik September 29, 2020 0 Comments Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden’s campaign is demanding Facebook remove posts authored by President Donald Trump and his son Eric Trump over allegedly spreading misinformation about the voting process. Biden’s campaign manager, Jennifer O’Malley Dillon, penned a letter to Facebook accusing the company of failing to act on its “responsibility to protect our democracy” by “clearing up confusion about how this election will work” and by “fight[ing] misinformation” about how to participate in the election. O’Malley Dillon argued instead of seeing “progress” they have seen “regression.” She called Facebook “the nation’s foremost propagator of disinformation about the voting process.” O’Malley Dillion cited a video posted by Donald Trump Jr. claiming those who oppose the president “plan to add millions of fraudulent ballots that can cancel your vote and overturn the election.” He encouraged viewers to “join an army for...
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