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    Kipp Jones, The Western Journal February 23, 2021 0 Comments The chief of the Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma is demanding that Jeep drop the name of the tribe from its popular Cherokee line of sports utility vehicles. In a statement to Car and Driver, Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr. said Jeep should “honor” the Cherokee people by learning about the tribe’s history and should no longer use the name of the Tahlequah, Oklahoma-based tribe and its people on its vehicles. “I’m sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car,” Hoskin, a Democrat who won a contentious 2019 tribal election, told the outlet. “The best way to honor us is to learn about our sovereign government, our role in this country, our history, culture, and language and have meaningful dialogue...
    The Cherokee Nation is calling on automaker Jeep to stop naming two of its best-selling sports utility vehicles after the Native American tribe, as other U.S. corporations and professional sports teams reconsider branding that could be considered racially or culturally inappropriate.  The Oklahoma-based tribe, one of the largest in the U.S., told Jeep parent company Stellantis during a Zoom call last month that it does not condone Jeep's use of the "Cherokee" name in its branding, a spokesperson for the Cherokee Nation told CBS News in a statement Tuesday. Two of Jeep's most popular and well-known vehicle models are called the Jeep Grand Cherokee and the Jeep Cherokee.  Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chuck Hoskin Jr. called on Jeep to ditch his tribe's name from all of its cars after Car and Driver magazine asked if he approved of the name. "I think we're in a day and age in this...
    The Cherokee Nation asked Jeep to stop using its name on a car model. “I’m sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car," Chuck Hoskin Jr., principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, told Car and Driver. "The best way to honor us is to learn about our sovereign government, our role in this country, our history, culture, and language, and have meaningful dialogue with federally recognized tribes on cultural appropriateness." Jeep has been building cars called the Grand Cherokee for 45 years and is ready to release a 2022 model. "I think we're in a day and age in this country where it’s time for both corporations and team sports to retire the use of Native American names, images, and mascots from their products, team jerseys, and sports in general,"...
    The principal chief of the Cherokee Nation has asked Jeep to stop using the tribe's name on its SUVs.The Jeep Grand Cherokee is the brand's best-selling model, while the Jeep Cherokee is its third best-selling. Jeep recently unveiled a redesigned version of the Grand Cherokee, and the company has sold SUVs under the Cherokee brand name for about 45 years."I think we're in a day and age in this country where it's time for both corporations and team sports to retire the use of Native American names, images and mascots from their products, team jerseys and sports in general. I'm sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car," Chuck Hoskin, Jr., principal chief of the Cherokee Nation said in a written statement.He had initially sent the statement to Car and Driver, which...
    Cherokee has asked Native American carmaker Jeep to change the name of its popular 4×4 Cherokee. The famous Jeep 4X4 Cherokee may have had to change its name in its 50s because the leader of the Native American tribe who named it believes the time has come for businesses and sports teams in the United States to stop using their name. Chuck Hoskin Jr., head of the Cherokee tribe, told the group he did not tolerate the use of “Cherokee” by their business, “a spokesman for the tribe confirmed to AFP on Monday. Call of the Cherokee Chief He told Stellandis Group, the parent company of Jeep, about the merger between the French groups PSA and the Italian-American Fiat Chrysler via video conference on January 29. Contacting AFP, the automaker did not respond Monday afternoon. “In this country, I think the time has come for companies and sports teams to...
    TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) — It is time for Jeep to stop using the Cherokee Nation's name on its Cherokee and Grand Cherokee SUVs, the chief of the Oklahoma-based tribe said. Chief Chuck Hoskin, Jr. said in a statement first reported by Car & Driver magazine that he believes corporations and sports teams should stop using Native American names, images and mascots as nicknames or on their products. “I’m sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car," Hoskin said. Kristin Starnes, a spokeswoman for Jeep’s parent company, Stellantis, said in a statement that the vehicle name was carefully selected “and nurtured over the years to honor and celebrate Native American people for their nobility, prowess and pride." She didn't say whether the company was considering renaming the vehicles and didn't immediately reply to...
    2019 Jeep Cherokee TrailhawkSource: Fiat Chrysler The principal chief of the Cherokee Nation wants Jeep to stop using the tribe's name on its SUVs, saying it "does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car." Jeep started using the Cherokee name more than 45 years ago, including on the brand's top-selling Grand Cherokee SUV. It also offers a smaller SUV called the Cherokee, which was its third best-selling vehicle last year in the U.S. "I think we're in a day and age in this country where it's time for both corporations and team sports to retire the use of Native American names, images and mascots from their products, team jerseys and sports in general," Chuck Hoskin Jr., principal chief of the Cherokee Nation, said in a statement. "I'm sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by...
    (CNN)The principal chief of the Cherokee Nation has asked Jeep to stop using the tribe's name on its SUVs.The Jeep Grand Cherokee is the brand's best-selling model, while the Jeep Cherokee is its third best-selling. Jeep recently unveiled a redesigned version of the Grand Cherokee, and the company has sold SUVs under the Cherokee brand name for about 45 years. The Cherokee have been known by that name since before Europeans came in contact with them. The 2021 Jeep Grand Cherokee."I think we're in a day and age in this country where it's time for both corporations and team sports to retire the use of Native American names, images and mascots from their products, team jerseys and sports in general. I'm sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car," Chuck Hoskin, Jr.,...
    ALAMEDA (CBS SF) — On Tuesday, the city of Alameda officially renamed Jackson Park, a tribute to slave-owning and Native American-oppressing U.S. President Andrew Jackson, and changed it to Chochenyo Park, referring to the language spoken by the island’s original inhabitants, the Ohlone tribe. The City Council voted 4-1 Tuesday, with Councilman Tony Daysog dissenting. Alameda stripped the park of its name in July after a two-year process that began with a petition signed by more than 1,000 Alameda residents asking for the removal. The movement picked up steam in 2020 with the national outrage surrounding the killing of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and others by law enforcement around the country. Alameda’s Recreation and Park Commission approved the change and appointed a committee of residents to find a new name. Chochenyo was selected over four other finalists, including Ohlone Park, Justice Park, Peace Park, and Mabel Tatum Park. Tatum was...
    In July 1929, as concrete was being poured on what was then called the Manor to Point Reyes Road, Point Reyes Emporium owner Bill Scilacci felt the road’s name left much to be desired. In a letter to the editor to the San Rafael Independent that month, Scilacci made the first known suggestion to name the road after 16th-century English explorer Sir Francis Drake, according to local historian Dewey Livingston. The name had widespread recognition and a local connection, and could provide a much-needed boost for commerce and residential expansion in West Marin and beyond, Scilacci argued. “See if we cannot get an expression from your subscribers as to the relative merit of giving this new highway a name that the county will be proud of hundreds of years hence,” Scilacci wrote. While Scilacci’s name suggestion was officially adopted about four years later across all jurisdictions, pride over it has...
    (CNN)As America confronts racism more directly, sports teams with Native American names, mascots or logos are facing pressure to change away from ethnic stereotypes and caricatures.Native American leaders have long criticized sports teams for relying on racist caricatures, stereotypes or, in the case of the NFL's Washington Redskins, an ethnic slur."If the leagues want to offer more than empty words in service of their profits, if they really want to live by the values they claim to have, they must ban Native mascots, team names, insensitive gestures and the subsequent racist behavior of fans," wrote Crystal Echo Hawk, founder and executive director of the native-led nonprofit organization IllumiNative.The Washington Redskins and the Cleveland Indians have already pledged to reexamine their names, but they are not the only teams facing similar issues. Here's a look at the sports teams who may decide to make changes soon.Washington RedskinsRead MoreThe NFL's Washington Redskins...
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