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    A car crash that seriously injured Tiger Woods Tuesday marked the latest chapter in 15-time major winner's turbulent life following his meteoric rise to worldwide fame, spectacular fall from grace and epic 2019 comeback.  The golf superstar, 45, had to be cut free by fire crews after his vehicle it rolled over and suffered 'major damage'. He is now undergoing surgery.  Shocking images of Wood's smashed up car following the accident in Los Angeles provided a stark flashback to his 2009 crash when he hit a fire hydrant outside his Orlando, Florida home.  That came after he was chased out of his house by then wife Elin Nordegren over his numerous affairs and eventually led to admissions of infidelity and drug use.   He was arrested for a DUI with five different kinds of drugs in his system in 2017 leading to Woods taking an 'indefinite break' from golf before his stunning comeback...
    PROFESSOR Carl Hart is an academic who specializes in neuroscience and psychology. He caused a stir after admitting he casually uses heroin to maintain his "work-life balance." 4Carl HartCredit: Columbia University Who is Professor Carl Hart? Carl Hart, is a Professor of Psychology at Columbia University. Hart is known for his research in drug abuse and drug addiction. He was the first tenured African American professor of sciences at Columbia University. The 54-year-old got his bachelors from the University of Maryland before he earned his PhD from the University of Wyoming. He grew up in an impoverished Miami neighborhood, engaging in petty crime and drug sales. Based on his upbringing, he came to believe drugs were the reason for poverty and crime in most neighborhoods. 4Hart is a professor at ColumbiaCredit: Getty Images - Getty He is particularly interested in what social and psychological factors influence self-administration of drugs. Is he married...
    A PSYCHOLOGY professor says he enjoys snorting heroin by the fireplace to relax and insists it is as rational as his alcohol use. Carl Hart, the Ziff Professor of Psychology at Columbia University, has a fondness for heroin not only as a study subject but also as a substance for personal use. 6Carl Hart hopes that talking about his drug use will help lead to the decriminalization of illegal drugsCredit: Columbia University 6The psychology professor says snorting heroin helps him maintain a work-life balanceCredit: Getty Images - Getty The father-of-three, 54, insists he does not have a drug-use problem, but says heroin helps him maintain a work-life balance. The professor has detailed his drug use in his new book - Drug Use for Grown-ups: Chasing Liberty in the Land of Fear - in which he says snorting heroin makes him feel "refreshed" and "prepared to face another day". He writes:...
    A Columbia University professor of psychology and neuroscience says he snorts heroin and takes other drugs to feel 'refreshed' and 'prepared to face another day.' Carl Hart, 54, studies the effects of recreational psychoactive drugs on humans and is the chair of the prestigious university's psych department, according to the New York Post. Hart, who is on a sabbatical until July, details his drug use in his new book 'Drug Use for Grown-ups: Chasing Liberty in the Land of Fear.' In his book, he says he has particular attachment to heroin scholastically and as a substance for personal use. 'There aren't many things in life that I enjoy more than a few lines by the fireplace at the end of the day,' he writes. Carl Hart, left, studies the effects of recreational psychoactive drugs on humans Carl Hart, left, has admitted to using heroin in a new book titled 'Drug Use...
    A bill was introduced in California Thursday that would decriminalize the personal use of psychedelic drugs like psilocybin mushrooms, MDMA, LSD, ketamine, DMT, mescaline and ibogaine for all Californians over the age of 21.  It comes on the heels of Oregon’s blockbuster drug decriminalization bill, which just went into effect earlier this month and aims to replace incarceration with a $100 fine and addiction counseling.  Multiples cities have also decriminalized psychedelic drugs recently, including Oakland, Santa Cruz, Washington, DC, Ann Arbor and Denver.  Under the bill introduced Thursday by California State Senator Scott Weiner, a Democrat who represents parts of San Francisco and parts of San Mateo County, possession of psychedelic drugs by people under 21 and possession on school grounds would still be illegal. Previous convictions for possession of these drugs would be expunged under the legislation.  Wiener’s bill would also create a commission tasked with regulating the legal and therapeutic use of these drugs.  There has been a...
    Carl Hart is a psychology professor at Columbia University. Courtesy of Carl Hart Professor Carl Hart has studied psychoactive drugs for more than three decades. His new book lays out why he thinks all drugs should be legal. Other experts stress limiting supply and putting more limits on big drug companies could help. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Carl Hart says he first tried heroin six or seven years ago. At the time, he was already a tenured professor at Columbia University, and "well over 40," according to his new book, "Drug Use for Grown Ups." After doing that "short, thin line" with a friend he felt "a dreamy light sedation, free of stress."  Then, the two chatted, laughed, "called it an evening and went home."  Hart, a psychology professor and neuroscience expert, had already worked (legally) with drugs including marijuana, cocaine, and heroin for more...
    Regularly using marijuana has long-term harmful effects regardless of how old the person was when they began smoking, a new study suggests Researchers looked at people who began smoking or vaping cannabis routinely in high school or in their early 20s in comparison with non-users. They found that, by age 35, pot users who began at any age were more likely at least three times more likely to be high-risk alcohol drinkers, at least seven times more likely to smoke cigarettes daily and 20 times more likely to use other drugs. The team, from the University of Queensland, in Australia, said the findings should be used to send a clear message to the public about the risks of regular cannabis use . Researchers from the University of Queensland, in Australia, compared people who began regularly using marijuana as teenager and as adults to non-users (file image) People who began...
    Brain implants controlled by a mobile phone and recharged wirelessly via Bluetooth could help cure addiction, Parkinson's and depression. The device, roughly the length of a US penny, controls brain function for long periods without the need for regular invasive procedures to change the batteries. LEDs built into the device are the size of a grain of salt and use light to manipulate neurons in the brain.  Tests in rats found it suppresses drug addiction and researchers hope it could also be used in humans to treat neurological conditions.   Scroll down for video  The device, roughly the length of a US penny, controls brain function for long periods without the need for regular invasive procedures to change the batteries A smartphone connects to the implant wirelessly and builds on the success of previous models which were mounted to the head.     'This powerful device eliminates the need for additional painful...
    This article was medically reviewed by Mayra Mendez, Ph.D., LMFT, a licensed psychotherapist and program coordinator for intellectual and developmental disabilities and mental health services at Providence Saint John's Child and Family Development Center in Santa Monica, California.  Medically Reviewed Reviewed By Check Mark Icon A check mark. It indicates that the relevant content has been reviewed and verified by an expert Our stories are reviewed by medical professionals to ensure you get the most accurate and useful information about your health and wellness. For more information, visit our medical review board. If someone you love has a drug abuse disorder, its important to listen to them without judgement. STOCK4B-RF/Getty Images You should never tell someone with drug addiction that it is their fault or you're embarrassed to be associated with them.  You should also never ignore someone with drug addiction or give them an ultimatum as this can...
    Teens who smoke weed at least once a week for six months can lose up to two IQ points as they get older and find it harder to problem solve, a new study revealed.  The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) studied 808 teens who used cannabis at least weekly for at least six months and 5,308 who did not use the drug.  They discovered that regular dope smokers suffer a decline of two IQ points over time compared to those who did not use cannabis during their teen years. Further analysis showed that verbal IQ, linked to understanding concepts, abstract reasoning and memory, declines by three points among those who get high.  'Loss of IQ points early in life could have significant effects on performance in school and college and later employment prospects,' said senior author Mary Cannon.  The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) studied...
    THE UNDERTAKER admitted he used steroids during his legendary wrestling career because he ‘had to be jacked’. The 55-year-old WWE great revealed there was a stigma to be huge during his three-decade career. 2The Undertaker revealed he used steroids during his careerCredit: Reuters Real name Mark Calaway – the 6ft 10in star went on to reveal the WWE’s strict drug policy for present-day wrestlers. Speaking on The Joe Rogan Experience podcast, he said: “There was a time where everyone had to be big, jacked, right. “Especially the 6ft 8in guys, the big guys – there was a stigma, you’ve got to be 300 pounds. “It’s in our head – nobody gives a s**t. They’re interested in the characters and what you do on TV. But in our heads, “f**k, I’ve gotta be 330 pounds.” The Undertaker added: “Now, we’re tested for everything. They test for steroids – they have for...
    SECRET videos that reveal more about Armie Hammer’s wild sex life have emerged as he appears to show off “woman in lingerie on all fours” on his bed and “brags about drug use”. Leaked from his private Instagram account, one of the clips show the actor taking a drag from a vape box, writing: “When you realize they don’t test for DMT on drug tests.” 18Videos from Armie Hammer's secret Instagram account have been leaked showing him with a semi-naked woman and taking a drugs testCredit: Instagram Hammer, 34, has been racking up the headlines recently due to his alleged “twisted” bedroom fantasies, which were revealed in a series of NSFW messages by anonymous Instagram user, House of Effie. Since the screenshots of Armie’s private DMs detailing a fetish for “cannibalism” and “drinking blood” emerged, a number of women have come forward to claim the texts are real.  Now a...
    Recreational narcotics users have ditched ‘party drugs’ like cocaine, ecstasy, and LSD in favor of marijuana as the pandemic shut down nightclubs while forcing people to isolate at home, a new study has found. Researchers at New York University’s Langone Health Center surveyed 128 adults in New York City to see how this past spring’s lockdown affected the local party scene. Their findings were published in the December edition of the journal Substance Use & Misuse. According to the study, 78.6 per cent of those surveyed reported using less cocaine; 71.1 per cent said they cut down on their use of ecstasy (also known as MDMA); and 68 per cent said they were consuming less LSD. The study also found that of those who still use cocaine, 66.7 per cent reported using less of it while just 29 per cent of marijuana users said they were consuming less of the...
    Friends of the late Deadliest Catch star Nick McGlashan say they fear he may relapsed back into alcohol and drug abuse over the holiday season, after he was found dead in a Tennessee Holiday Inn room over the weekend.  McGlashan, a seventh-generation fisherman and crabber who appeared on the Discovery Channel reality series for seven years, passed away on Sunday in Nashville. The 33-year-old was found unresponsive by a friend in a room at the Holiday Inn on West End Avenue at 12:30pm. He was pronounced dead at the scene by first responders shortly after. Friends of the reality TV star told The Sun McGlashan had been in high spirits in the days leading up to his death. However they say they fear the father-of-two, who for years had struggled with drug and alcohol abuse before getting clean in 2017, may have recently relapsed. 'There is a lot of drama...
    Dear Amy: My husband of 20 years smokes pot every day, and I hate it. I’ve always hated the idea of smoking anything, cigarettes or pot. Columnist Amy Dickinson (Bill Hogan/Chicago Tribune)  Lately (because of the pandemic) his pot use has ramped up and now the house smells like weed. I’ve told him that I don’t like being surrounded by the smell of marijuana inside our house. He says I’m hung up on the stigma of it. Maybe so, but he’s always known I am not OK with this. For a long time, he hid his pot use from me and was not doing it at home, but now he works from home because of the pandemic, and so I’m bombarded with it. We have children, and I don’t want them to be OK with the idea of daily drug use. Am I overreacting and being judgmental? I don’t think...
    SOUTHERN Charm’s Thomas Ravenel made a hurtful claim in a family court filing that his son Saint, 5, was previously diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome due to Kathryn Dennis' “drug and alcohol consumption” while pregnant.  The shocking allegation was made by Thomas, 58, in his ongoing custody battle with ex-girlfriend Kathryn, 29, over their children Kensington, 6, and Saint, 5.  12Thomas Ravenel claimed in court papers that his son Saint, 5, with ex Kathryn Dennis was formerly diagnosed with FAS Credit: Instagram In public South Carolina court records exclusively obtained by The Sun, Thomas claimed Saint was “formerly diagnosed with FAS due to Kathryn’s excessive drug and alcohol consumption while he was in utero.” Thomas claimed their son took “speech and occupational therapy for years to help combat his delays, but he is still falling behind at school.” In an effort to help Saint catch up to his peers, his teacher created...
    Wendy Williams was ‘excited’ as she introduced the world’s first-look of her Lifetime biopic that documents her past drug abuse and relationship struggles. The film, titled Wendy Williams: The Movie, stars actress Ciera Payton, 34, as the outspoken talk show host throughout several different phases of her life - both the good and the bad.  14Wendy Williams was 'excited' to introduce the first-look at her new film Credit: Twitter 14Wendy Williams: The Movie stars actress Ciera Payton Credit: Twitter 14The biopic takes a look at Wendy's past marriage to Kevin Hunter Sr. Credit: Twitter Wendy, 56, told viewers on her show on Thursday the film’s premiere will “be an evening event. It’s going to be a documentary for two hours then the movie for two hours. “I haven’t seen anything including what you’re  about to see. These are all actors, by the way, I’m not in this. Now, let’s watch!”...
    Lorne Michaels was none too pleased with the late John Belushi’s drug-induced charades on “Saturday Night Live.” The “SNL” creator said as much in an upcoming documentary titled “Belushi” and recalled the funnyman often being in debilitated states ahead of performances. “He’d been out with [Rolling Stones rocker] Ronnie Wood and he was a mess,” Michaels said in the piece of a Belushi’s state right before a show airing on Feb. 24, 1979. “He was coughing, he looked terrible and the doctor says, ‘John can’t go on,’ and I was somewhere between rage and very little sympathy.” Michaels said he weighed his options of throwing Jake Blues, who was one-half of the Blues Brothers, on stage that night. BOOK CLAIMS TO SHED LIGHT ON JOHN BELUSHI'S FINAL DRUG-FUELED HOURS “So I said, ‘What happens if he does it?’ [The doctor] says, ‘Well, he could die?’ And I said, ‘What are the...
    A Florida high school dean has been fired after he tested positive for marijuana, even though it had been prescribed to him by a doctor to treat post-traumatic stress disorder he incurred in the Marines. Belleview High School Dean Mike Hickman was fired by the Marion County School Board in a unanimous 5-0 vote Wednesday. The board said that while medical marijuana is legal in Florida, the drug is illegal under federal law, its use violates district policy and he failed to notify his supervisor he was using it. The central Florida district offered to suspend Hickman, 51, if he agreed not to use medical marijuana in the future, but the 10-year employee refused. After an administrative judge upheld a previous superintendent's recommendation that he be fired, the board acted. Mark Levitt, an attorney who represents current Superintendent Diane Gullett, told the board Gullett agrees with her predecessor's decision and...
    Social media users have blasted 'crazy' Oregon voters for deciding to decriminalize personal possession of all drugs, including heroin and methamphetamine.  The proposal, known formally as Oregon Ballot Measure 110, passed handily on Tuesday, with 58.8 percent support.  Under the new measures, instead of going to trial and facing possible jail time, a person found with the hard drugs in their possession will have the option of paying a $100 fine or attending new 'addiction recovery centers'. While the proposal has been praised by drug reform activists, many on social media expressed shock that Oregonians had voted to pass the measure with such broad support.  'I'm so p***ed that Oregon passed 110. You really just decriminalized heroin. The drug that KILLED my cousin. He only shot up a 'personal use' amount and now he's gone,' one railed on Twitter.   Oregon has become the first state in the United State to decriminalize...
    Oregon became the first state to decriminalize hard drugs like heroin, cocaine and meth in a 59-41% vote as of early Wednesday morning, according to the Associated Press.  The "Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act" will transition Oregon's drug policy from a punitive, criminal approach to "a humane, cost-effective, health approach." "People suffering from addiction are more effectively treated with health care services than with criminal punishments," the bill reads. "A health care approach includes a health assessment to figure out the needs of people who are suffering from addiction, and it includes connecting them to the services they need." MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION SUPPORTERS TOUT ECONOMIC BENEFITS IN NEW VOTER PITCH Instead of treating drug users as criminals, Oregon will now offer them addiction services funded by marijuana tax revenue, which is more than $100 million a year in the state.  Only small amounts of drugs are decriminalized, such as less than 1 gram of...
    Oregon could become the first U.S. state to decriminalize possessing hard drugs like heroin, cocaine and LSD in a ballot measure during Tuesday’s election. If voters pass Measure 110, users found in low-level possession of the substances would have the option of paying $100 fines or attending new, free addiction recovery centers instead of being arrested and facing jail time, The Associated Press reported. The recovery centers would be funded by tax revenue from retail marijuana sales in the state, which was the country’s first to decriminalize marijuana possession. Yes on 110, the organization sponsoring the ballot measure, stresses that the act does not legalize any drugs. “No change is made in the criminal code for delivery, manufacture, and other commercial drug offenses. These offenses will remain a crime,” according to the website. “No change is made for other crimes that may be associated with drug use, such as driving...
    A Friday piece from New York Magazine cites a former White House official who claimed that Donald Trump is currently “hopped up” on steroids and performance enhancers following his stay at Walter Reed Medical Center for coronavirus. “They aren’t even considering what happens when he’s feeling worse than he’s feeling now, when he’s hopped up full of steroids and other performance enhancers,” they said. “He’s on the sort of drugs you’d see with a Tour de France rider in the mid-’90s!” The official added that Trump is on “more drugs than a Belgian racing pigeon.” As The Inquisitr reported, Trump previously accused Joe Biden big of using performance-enchancing drugs and suggested that he would make the former vice president take a drug test before the then-forthcoming first presidential debate. The head of state also indicated that he would sign an executive order that disqualified his Democratic opponent from running in...
    (CNN)Sam Burgess has stepped down from his coaching role with the South Sydney Rabbitohs following what the club calls "very concerning" allegations against the team's former star player.The newspaper The Australian published an investigation into Burgess on Friday, alleging the 31-year-old had engaged in drug use, domestic violence and incidents of sexual harassment. The report also says South Sydney covered up the alleged incidents to protect Burgess.Burgess' lawyer Mark O'Brien did not immediately respond to CNN's request for comment, but in a statement to The Australian said: "The allegations are false and constitute an indefensible defamation against my client."It is apparent sources of the false allegations are those currently in dispute with my client over various issues."South Sydney issued a statement noting that "the allegations in today's The Australian newspaper are very concerning and the club is treating them with the utmost seriousness. Read MoreBurgess attempts to break a tackle...
    Editor’s note: We endeavor to bring you the top voices on current events representing a range of perspectives. Below is a column arguing that price controls have never worked and will not succeed in lowering drug costs in the long term. You can find a counterpoint here, where Nan Hayworth, an ophthalmologist and former Congresswoman for New York’s 19th congressional district, argues that price controls on prescription drugs will be beneficial to the American people and will ensure that Americans will never pay more for drugs than people in other developed countries. Price controls distort markets, create shortages and exacerbate the problem they are intended to solve. This has been true for thousands of years. In their 1978 book, Forty Centuries of Wage and Price Controls, authors Robert Scheuttinger and Eamonn Butler reviewed the damage caused by price controls, from the Babylonian Code of Hammurabi, to President Nixon’s Economic Stabilization...
    Mattea Kramer September 27, 2020 2:17AM (UTC) This piece originally appeared on TomDispatch. In our new era of nearly unparalleled upheaval, as a pandemic ravages the bodies of some and the minds of nearly everyone, as the associated economic damage disposes of the livelihoods of many, and as even the promise of democracy fades, the people whose lives were already on a razor's edge — who were vulnerable and isolated before the advent of Covid-19 — are in far greater danger than ever before. Against this backdrop, many of us are scanning the news for any sign of hope, any small flicker of light whose gleam could indicate that everything, somehow, is going to be okay. In fact, there is just such a flicker coming from those who have been through the worst of it and have made it out the other side. : I spoke with Rafael Rodriguez of Holyoke, Massachusetts, on a sweltering Thursday...
    (CNN)Less than a year ago the US Navy said it didn't want its Marines and Sailors using hemp or cannabidiol (CBD) products. Now they've expanded its ban to include topical products like lotions and shampoos.The Navy says the new rules were made to "protect sailors from potential tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure that could negatively impact mission readiness and disqualify a Sailor from continued service.""It is impossible for consumers to determine how much THC a product actually contains in the current environment where label claims are not trustworthy," the Navy said in an online statement.Department of Defense officials say "it's not reasonable or practical" for them to test every hemp product to figure out which products could prompt a positive urinalysis result, according to the statement.Hemp, CBD and marijuana: What's legal in the US?Read MoreCBD is the chemical found in hemp and marijuana plants, and even though CBD is derived from marijuana,...
    Two recent studies support the effectiveness of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for COVID-19 that can reduce the chance of hospitalization or death, refuting narratives in the media that the drug is dangerous and being pushed by President Donald Trump for political reasons. Hydroxychloroquine is a relatively cheap and readily available drug that has been used for decades to treat malaria. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, doctors around the world have vouched for positive results seen in patients who take it.What do the studies say?A study out of Italy found that HCQ reduces by 30% the risk of death for COVID-19 patients who are hospitalized. The result comes from an observational study of more than 3,400 COVID-19 patients in 33 Italian hospitals. "We observed that patients treated with hydroxychloroquine had a 30% lower in-hospital mortality rate compared to those not receiving this treatment," said Augusto Di Castelnuovo, epidemiologist at the Neuromed...
    Millionaire philanthropist and film financier Steve Bing sought help for addiction and depression multiple times before he killed himself earlier this year, his last girlfriend has said.   Mary Bozkurt, who dated Bing during 2019, has made a series of revelations about the late producer's state of mind in the months before he jumped from the 27th floor of his Los Angeles apartment building.   Bozkurt told Page Six that Bing loved his son Damian, 18, who he initially denied paternity of, and that he 'hated' his drug use.   'Steve was mad at God for so much tragedy that goes on. His death was not about partying or the ugly side of a Hollywood lifestyle as many articles suggested,' she told Page Six.   'Steve was in a lot of pain and the drugs were a destructive means of escape for him.' 'He hated everything about drug use, and he made several efforts...
    The founder of the Guardian Angel's has vowed to have 60 members of their organisation patrolling part of Manhattan amid growing safety concerns. Curtis Sliwa, 66, led a Guardian Angels safety patrol of around eight members through Manhattan's Upper West Side yesterday. The group met local people and examined the condition of the area after reports of public urination, cat-calling and drug use, the New York Post reports. Curtis Sliwa, 66, (pictured wearing red) led a Guardian Angels safety patrol of around eight members through Manhattan's Upper West Side yesterday The city recently moved around 300 people from packed shelters into The Lucerne, Hotel Belleclaire and the Belnord. However, since the group, including at least six homeless pedophiles, were moved into the hotels by the city brazen drug-dealing and public masturbation have been reported by residents. Describing the scene inside the Hotel Belleclaire told to him by a security...
    Cannabis is bad for the heart and may trigger heart attacks and strokes, doctors have warned.  The American Heart Association (AHA), who reviewed the available evidence, now recommend avoiding cannabis to protect the heart. In a scientific statement, it said smoking cannabis has some of the same harms as tobacco, which is known to be a leading cause of death worldwide. Research has shown the recreational drug may have health benefits — but smoking cannabis has been linked with a slew of damaging heart problems. Chemicals inside the drug can cause heart rhythm abnormalities within an hour of smoking, studies show.  The toxins can alter blood pressure, heart rate and trigger inflammation, all of which are underlying culprits of heart disease and strokes.    The AHA warning applied to people who use the drug recreationally, as well as and for medicinal purposes.    Cannabis is bad for the heart and may trigger...
    A Michigan lawmaker and rising star in the Democratic Party who is running for Congress in one of the nation’s most contested seats discussed drug use and sex in a now-deleted blog where he also published derogatory comments about women and creepy remarks about children in underwear. State Rep. Jon Hoadley (D-Kalamazoo) is seeking the Democratic nomination in Michigan’s 6th Congressional District and was last week endorsed by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee — the official campaign arm of the Democrats in the House of Representatives. An up-and-comer in the party, Hoadley has also been endorsed by vice presidential hopeful Sen. Kamala Harris, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer and firebrand “Squad” member Rep. Rashida Tlaib. But before he was elected to state politics in 2014, the ambitious Democrat ran a LiveJournal blog where he discussed learning about crystal meth, described his sexual partners as “victims” and published a conversation which included...
    Two giants of social media, Facebook and Twitter, have yanked a video of a press conference in Washington, D.C., that was reposted by President Trump. The viral video, viewed more than 14 million times on Facebook alone, features doctors and medical personnel from a group America’s Frontline Doctors, who share their opinions on coronavirus and the response to the pandemic. Andy Stone, a spokesman for Facebook, said the video was removed “for sharing false information about cures and treatments for COVID-19.” Yes, we removed it for sharing false information about cures and treatments for COVID-19. — Andy Stone (@andymstone) July 28, 2020 A spokesperson for Twitter told Business Insider, “Tweets with the video are in violation of our COVID-19 misinformation policy. We are taking action in line with our policy.” In the video, about a dozen doctors standing in front of the Supreme Court building in Washington praise the...
    Trisha Paytas said Jeffree Star reached out to her to apologize, but she wasn't willing to accept it. Screenshot/@trishapaytas, @jeffreestar YouTuber Trisha Paytas said beauty mogul Jeffree Star privately reached out to apologize for insulting her weight, skin, and past drug use on the pair's 2020 Valentine's Day weekend trip to Las Vegas. Previously, a former friend of Star's named Tab David made a since-deleted YouTube video about overhearing Star make fun of Paytas behind her back during the trip.  Paytas later confirmed that David was referring to her and that the Vegas trip left her "in tears." Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Beauty mogul Jeffree Star still has yet to re-emerge in the public eye following explosive drama involving him and fellow YouTuber and business partner Shane Dawson, but according to YouTuber Trisha Paytas, he's been "working on himself" behind-the-scenes. During a July 15 vlog,...
    Trisha Paytas appeared to confirm parts of Tab David's damning but since-deleted video about Jeffree Star. Screenshot Instagram/@trishapaytas, @jeffreestar Trisha Paytas is opening up about her 2020 Valentine's Day weekend trip to Las Vegas with Jeffree Star, claiming now that the beauty mogul left her "in tears." In a video and in tweets, Paytas is now confirming rumors that Star attacked her weight, skin, and drug use behind her back during the trip — rumors she previously denied. The rumors were started by Tab David, a former friend of Star's who uploaded and then deleted a scathing testimony about Star's behavior toward "a friend" and others on the Las Vegas trip. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. On Valentine's Day 2020, Jeffree Star and Trisha Paytas took a private jet to Las Vegas, where the two documented their luxury getaway on social media. Online, the two YouTubers...
    In late February, I traveled to Nebraska Medical Center for "Tucker Carlson Tonight" and met with several impressive physicians and nurses in charge of the National Quarantine Unit there. They were taking care of the first COVID-19 cluster, more than a dozen passengers from the Diamond Princess cruise ship. They taught me about the severity of the illness and how highly contagious it is and I knew then that we were facing a formidable foe. One of my final interviews was with a bearded researcher, an unassuming yet clearly brilliant scientist, Dr. Andre Kalil. He was a principal investigator into the National Institutes of Health-sponsored multicenter trial on an antiviral drug, Remdesivir, which had been studied against Ebola and found not to be effective. DR. NICOLE SAPHIER: CORRECT CORONAVIRUS MISTAKES – AS FIRST WAVE CONTINUES, WE CAN LEARN FROM THESE LESSONS But from a purely biochemical perspective, there was more reason...
    A 51-year-old man died after being arrested for carrying drugs during a traffic stop Saturday outside the New Jersey State Police barracks in Totowa, authorities said. The man's death didn't involve use of force by the arresting trooper or any responding troopers, state Attorney General Gurbir S. Grewal emphasized. "The man suffered an undetermined medical emergency shortly after being arrested at approximately 11:30 a.m., and being placed in the back of a police vehicle," Grewal said. "The trooper, as well as other responding troopers and paramedics, administered medical aid and the man was transported to St. Joseph’s Regional Medical Center in Paterson, where he was pronounced dead at approximately 1:05 p.m.," the attorney general said. "The identity of the decedent is not being released at this time," he added. Grewal said his office was investigating, as it always does whenever a civilian dies in law enforcement custody in New Jersey. CHECK...
    ANTIOCH (CBS SF) — A suspected shoplifter at an Antioch Lucky supermarket who died after a violent confrontation with a store worker had “underlying issues of drug use” which contributed to his death, according to police. The suspect was identified as 34-year-old Michael Hamilton of Antioch. Hamilton was confronted by an unidentified 56-year-old Lucky employee on Wednesday night after allegedly trying to steal meat from the butcher area of the store. A struggle followed which ended with Hamilton dying at the scene and the worker being taken to the hospital with head and neck injuries. Witnesses described Hamilton being restrained by the worker with either a headlock or a chokehold but police did not confirm those accounts. On Thursday, Antioch police said in a press release that an autopsy revealed no trauma to Hamilton’s neck, indicating there was use of a chokehold, carotid or any other pressure applied to his...
    Illicit drug use shot up 30% worldwide over the past decade and is expected to rise further this year as more people cope with the coronavirus pandemic by turning to substances, according to a new United Nations report. A United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime study released Thursday found illegal drug use spiked from 2009 to 2018 with 269 million users globally, or 5% of the population. “In the long run, the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 crisis has the potential to lead to a lasting transformation of the drug markets,” the report reads. “The economic difficulties caused by the COVID-19 crisis may affect people who are already in a position of socioeconomic disadvantage harder than others. This could lead to an increase in the number of people resorting to illicit activities linked to drugs in order to make a living (production, transport, etc.) and/ or...
    MILEY Cyrus has revealed she is six months sober after years of hard-partying and drug use. The Party In The USA singer underwent vocal chord surgery in November and has revealed that she at first went sober to focus on her recovery. 6 Miley has been sober for six monthsCredit: Splash News However, she shared that she began looking at her family's past and thinking about her own future, and revealed that she loves "waking up 100%, 100% of the time." Miley said: "I’ve been sober sober for the past six months. At the beginning, it was just about this vocal surgery. "But I had been thinking a lot about my mother. My mom was adopted, and I inherited some of the feelings she had, the abandonment feelings and wanting to prove that you’re wanted and valuable. "My dad’s parents divorced when he was three, so my dad raised himself."...
    After a series of shootings that resulted in one fatality, organizers of the Capitol Hill Organized/Occupied Protest (CHOP) — formerly the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone (CHAZ) — say they are taking measures to improve security inside their six-block nation, instituting proposed “safe zones” for drug use and suggesting that CHOP empty at night to prevent violence. After days of insisting that CHOP was a peaceful, party-like zone for those who want to have an ongoing protest against racism and police brutality, a group of CHOP organizers known as “Voices of CHOP” say they are prepared to take measures to control increasing violence and hope the full contingent of CHOP residents agree. Voices of CHOP, “a group of BIPOC and white volunteers and activists,” released their proposal for a safe CHOP on Twitter late Sunday. Please read and share: Open letter to the leaders, organizers, and #CHOP community. Physical copies will...
    Several U.S. hospitals in states with fresh surges of COVID-19 cases have started treating their sickest patients with dexamethasone rather than await confirmation of preliminary results of a study by British researchers, who said the inexpensive steroid saves lives. The move illustrates how the pandemic is changing the way hospitals work, at least regarding COVID-19 patients. Traditionally, doctors wait for detailed data to be published in a peer-reviewed journal – or for guidelines from medical societies – before embracing a new treatment, so they can better gauge the risks against the drug’s benefits. The urgency of the coronavirus pandemic and lack of other treatments have altered those calculations. Dexamethasone is the first drug shown to lower the risk of death in severely ill COVID-19 patients in what researchers running the trial hailed as a “major breakthrough.” The Oxford University researchers said in a news release that dexamethasone reduced death...
    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday revoked its emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19, but quickly came under fire from President Donald Trump, who said only U.S. agencies have failed to grasp its benefit in fighting the coronavirus. Based on new evidence, the FDA said it was no longer reasonable to believe that hydroxychloroquine and the related drug chloroquine may be effective in treating the illness caused by the novel coronavirus. The FDA also warned that the drugs have been shown in lab studies to interfere with Gilead Sciences Inc’s antiviral drug remdesivir – the only medicine so far to show a benefit against COVID-19 in formal clinical trials. The move comes after several studies of the decades-old malaria pills suggested they were not effective either as a treatment for or to prevent COVID-19. British scientists earlier this month halted a large trial after deciding that...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The Food and Drug Administration is revoking the emergency use of hydroxychloroquine to treat the novel coronavirus, the agency announced Monday.RELATED: FDA revokes emergency use of malaria drugs to treat coronavirusIn ABC7 News' live interactive newscast at 3 p.m., UCSF Infectious Disease Specialist Dr. Peter Chin-Hong joined ABC7 News Anchor Liz Kreutz to explain what the drug was and why it was revoked.Doctor Chin-Hong said the malaria drug is not an antiviral drug, which is probably not likely to work."We've never had a virus is treated by something that's not an anti-virus drug," Chin-Hong said. "For example, if you're taking Tamiflu, it's an antiviral drug that actually targets the lifecycle of the virus with influenza. When you're taking an HIV drug, those are all anti-HIV drugs that target very specifically, something about HIV ability to propagate itself."Chin-Hong said him, along with many in the medical field...
    Emergency use of the anti-malaria drug hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for coronavirus has been withdrawn by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA said that new evidence from clinical trials meant that it was no longer reasonable to believe that the drug would produce an antiviral effect. President Donald Trump later defended promoting the use of hydroxychloroquine as a treatment of Covid-19. In March, the FDA granted the emergency use of the drug for some serious cases. But on Monday, the agency said clinical studies had suggested that hydroxychloroquine was ineffective in treating the deadly virus and failed to prevent infection among those exposed to it. Hydroxychloroquine 'does not save lives'Responding to the FDA's decision, Mr Trump said that he had previously taken the drug preventatively with no side effects. "I took it and I felt good about taking it," he told reporters on Monday, adding: "I...
    By MATTHEW PERRONE WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators on Monday revoked emergency authorization for malaria drugs promoted by President Donald Trump for treating COVID-19 amid growing evidence they don’t work and could cause serious side effects. The Food and Drug Administration said the drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are unlikely to be effective in treating the coronavirus. Citing reports of heart complications, the FDA said the drugs’ unproven benefits “do not outweigh the known and potential risks.” The decades-old drugs, also prescribed for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can cause heart rhythm problems, severely low blood pressure and muscle or nerve damage. The agency reported Monday that it had received nearly 390 reports of complications with the drugs, including more than 100 involving serious heart problems. Such reports represent an incomplete snapshot of complications with the drugs because many side effects go unreported. FDA’s move means that shipments of the drugs obtained...
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is rescinding its Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine as a treatment for coronavirus. President Donald Trump has touted hydroxychloroquine as a potential treatment for the coronavirus. FDA Chief Scientist Denise Hinton wrote in a letter on Monday, “We now believe that the suggested dosing regimens for [chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine] as detailed in the Fact Sheets are unlikely to produce an antiviral effect.” Hinton said, “Recent data from a large randomized controlled trial showed no evidence of benefit for mortality or other outcomes such as hospital length of stay or need for mechanical ventilation of [hydrozycholoroquine] treatment in hospitalized patients with COVID19.” “FDA has concluded that, based on this new information and other information discussed in the attached memorandum, it is no longer reasonable to believe that oral formulations of HCQ and CQ may be effective in treating COVID-19,” Hinton added. Additionally,...
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has revoked its emergency use authorization for hydroxychloroquine, the unproven coronavirus treatment Donald Trump repeatedly boosted and even (said he) took himself. That emergency use authorization came under pressure from Trump, with whistleblower Dr. Rick Bright saying he was removed from his job for pushing back. Trump owns the promotion of this risky treatment at official levels. Now, the FDA says it has concluded that “it is no longer reasonable to believe that oral formulations of HCQ and CQ may be effective in treating COVID-19, nor is it reasonable to believe that the known and potential benefits of these products outweigh their known and potential risks.” The benefits of the drugs as COVID-19 treatments were extremely dubious at the outset, but Trump continued pushing them for weeks, even as study after study undercut the initial claims of their effectiveness, with significant safety concerns as well. “Recent data from a large randomized controlled trial...
    WASHINGTON - U.S. regulators on Monday revoked emergency authorization for malaria drugs promoted by President Donald Trump for treating COVID-19 amid growing evidence they don't work and could cause deadly side effects. The Food and Drug Administration said the drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are unlikely to be effective in treating the coronavirus. Citing reports of heart complications, the FDA said the drugs' unproven benefits "do not outweigh the known and potential risks." The decades-old drugs, also prescribed for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can cause heart rhythm problems, severely low blood pressure and muscle or nerve damage. The move means that shipments of the drugs obtained by the federal government will no longer be distributed to state and local health authorities for use against the coronavirus. The drugs are still available for alternate uses, so U.S. doctors could still prescribe them for COVID-19 — a practice known as off-label prescribing....
    The Food and Drug Administration on Monday yanked its emergency use authorization for Hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the coronavirus, citing a lack of evidence it worked and that the risks outweighed any potential benefits. The agency said the drug, along with a similar version called Chloroquine, which is normally prescribed to treat malaria and some forms of severe arthritis, was “unlikely to be effective in treating COVID-19 for the authorized uses in the EUA,” according to a statement, CNBC reported. “Additionally, in light of ongoing serious cardiac adverse events and other serious side effects, the known and potential benefits of CQ and HCQ no longer outweigh the known and potential risks for the authorized use,” the FDA said. The FDA authorized the emergency use of the drugs in March, and President Trump has frequently touted the drug — which he said he himself took as a preventive measure with...
    The Food and Drug Administration has ended its emergency use authorization for hydroxycholorquine and chloroquine, the drugs the president touted in the fight against coronavirus. Mr. Trump took a 14-day regimen of hydroxycholorquine himself.  Based on the FDA's continued review of the available scientific evidence, the FDA determined the drug is "unlikely to be effective in treating COVID-19 for the authorized uses," the FDA said. The administration added that "in light of ongoing serious cardiac adverse events and other serious side effects, the known benefits "no longer outweigh the known and potential risks." The White House has not yet responded to a request for comment on ending the emergency authorization for the drug. Coronavirus: The Race To Respond FDA ends emergency use authorization for hydroxycholorquine Renters face eviction despite coronavirus moratoriums China warns "very high" risk of new Beijing COVID cluster spreading A second stimulus check? Here's how much you...
    WASHINGTON — U.S. regulators on Monday revoked emergency authorization for malaria drugs promoted by President Donald Trump for treating COVID-19 amid growing evidence they don’t work and could cause deadly side effects. The Food and Drug Administration said the drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are unlikely to be effective in treating the coronavirus. Citing reports of heart complications, the FDA said the drugs’ unproven benefits “do not outweigh the known and potential risks.” The decades-old drugs, also prescribed for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can cause heart rhythm problems, severely low blood pressure and muscle or nerve damage. TOP STORIES Not kidding around: Cuomo threatens to reinstate coronavirus shutdowns Abraham Lincoln monument torched in Chicago: An absolute disgraceful act Coronavirus hype biggest political hoax in history The move means that shipments of the drugs obtained by the federal government will no longer be distributed to state and local health authorities for...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. regulators on Monday revoked emergency authorization for malaria drugs promoted by President Donald Trump for treating COVID-19 amid growing evidence they don’t work and could cause deadly side effects. The Food and Drug Administration said the drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are unlikely to be effective in treating the coronavirus. Citing reports of heart complications, the FDA said the drugs’ unproven benefits “do not outweigh the known and potential risks.” The decades-old drugs, also prescribed for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can cause heart rhythm problems, severely low blood pressure and muscle or nerve damage.ADVERTISEMENT The move means that shipments of the drugs obtained by the federal government will no longer be distributed to state and local health authorities for use against the coronavirus. The drugs are still available for alternate uses, so U.S. doctors could still prescribe them for COVID-19 — a...
    WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is revoking its emergency authorization for malaria drugs promoted by President Donald Trump for treating COVID-19 amid growing evidence they don't work and could cause deadly side effects.The agency said Monday that the drugs hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are unlikely to be effective in treating the coronavirus. Citing reports of heart complications, the FDA said the drugs pose a greater risk to patients than any potential benefits.The decades-old drugs, also prescribed for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, can cause heart rhythm problems, severely low blood pressure and muscle or nerve damage.The move means that shipments of the drugs obtained by the federal government will no longer be distributed to state and local health authorities. The drugs are still available for alternate uses, so U.S. doctors could still prescribe them for COVID-19 - a practice known as off-label prescribing.On Thursday, a National Institutes of Health...
    Singapore’s Health Sciences Authority [HSA] on Wednesday granted conditional approval for Gilead Sciences Singapore’s experimental drug Veklury (remdesivir) to treat COVID-19 infections, according to an official statement. Remdesivir, an antiviral medication, did not prove successful in treating Ebola patients but improved coronavirus patients’ recovery time by 31 percent in a trial led by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease. In the U.S. study, patients who qualified for the drug had to be on mechanical ventilation or supplemental oxygen. The approval will allow infectious disease specialists to administer the drug to adult COVID-19 patients who have oxygen saturation less than 94 percent, or require supplemental oxygen or breathing support, like from a mechanical ventilator. CLICK HERE FOR FULL CORONAVIRUS COVERAGE The HSA consulted with its Medicines Advisory Committee to grant the conditional approval. To further optimize use of the drug, the HSA is working with the Ministry of Health and other...
    Two black former employees at a New Jersey car warranty company claim they endured constant racism in a workplace that allowed drug-abuse and the defrauding of customers, new court papers say. Kendrick Hester, 41, and James Waters, 47, both started at Motor Vehicles Assurance in Toms River as sales associates last October and were forced out by the Spring after complaining about working conditions, according to an Ocean County Superior Court lawsuit. White employees repeatedly and causally threw out the N-word — even applying it to black professional athletes Colin Kaepernick and LeBron James, the court papers from last week claim. One of Hester’s coworkers once told him, “Oh, there goes Sidney Poitier, the most well-spoken black man,” the court papers allege. Other white employees performed mocking renditions of black stereotypes and would walk around work “‘rapping’ offensive racial epithets on an almost daily basis” and make fun of black...
    As most of the nation hunkered down amid the coronavirus pandemic, visits to doctor offices and outpatient clinics plunged. That’s helping cause major swings in prescription drug use. Express Scripts, a top prescription benefit manager with over 100 million customers, saw big jumps in people getting three-month refills via mail delivery, as people with chronic health problems stocked up early in the crisis. Refills jumped 18% between mid-March and mid-April. Then prescription orders started dropping, partly from all the patients who’d just stocked up. Other people lost jobs and health insurance, or avoided medical facilities for fear of catching the virus. TOP STORIES Richmond police chief says rioters blocked firefighters from burning home with child inside Democrats know their time grows short Lincoln Memorial, WWII Memorial defaced by vandals in rioting For some types of drugs, orders are bouncing back, and one category has spiked sharply. The Associated...
    The authors of two major medical studies on coronavirus patients— including one that raised global concerns about the use of the hydroxychloroquine — retracted their papers on Thursday. The journals that published the studies said the authors were unable to get full access to the database behind their work to verify the raw data. The Lancet retracted an influential paper published in May that claimed to analyze data from nearly 96,000 coronavirus patients in six continents. The study found those who took hydroxychloroquine showed increased heart rhythm problems and had a higher mortality rate than those who didn't take it. The New England Journal of Medicine then retracted a study from the same authors, also published in May, that said it analyzed 8,910 COVID-19 patients. That study suggested that widely-used blood pressure medicines did not raise the risk of death for COVID-19 patients.  The Lancet study influenced governments in several nations to ban...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House medical team kept a close eye on President Donald Trump’s heart rhythms, including at least one electrocardiogram, to watch for potential side effects when he took a two-week course of a malaria drug to try to prevent the coronavirus, his doctor reported Wednesday. “The President completed the regimen safely and without side effects,” Dr. Sean Conley wrote in a report on Trump’s latest physical and his treatment with hydroxychloroquine. Overall, Conley said, Trump showed little change in basic health measurements from 16 months ago. On the negative side, he gained a pound. But on the plus side, his cholesterol level continued to fall. “The data indicates the President remains healthy,” Conley concluded. Trump recently took a two-week course of hydroxychloroquine after two White House staffers tested positive for COVID-19. Conley said it was done in consultation with “appropriate care team members and close...
    Senator Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) speaks during a campaign rally at the Altria Theatre on February 29, 2020 in Richmond, Virginia. Klobuchar on May 20 introduced legislation to the Senate that would provide Americans who are unemployed as a result of the coronavirus pandemic with a $4,000 tax credit. Zach Gibson/Getty Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar is among the many critics of President Donald Trump who have openly mocked his decision to take controversial anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine as a preventive measure against COVID-19. But what Klobuchar hasn't widely discussed is that her husband also took the drug when he had the disease. "They say that hydroxychloroquine can lead to hallucinations," Klobuchar posted on Twitter May 20, in response to a seemingly random tweet from the president about the Democratic primary several weeks after it had already ended with former Vice President Joe Biden as the presumptive nominee. They say that hydroxychloroquine...
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