Wednesday, Feb 24, 2021 - 21:24:48
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electricity price:

    AUSTIN, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – The Public Utility Commission of Texas said Wednesday, Feb. 24, it has opened an investigation into the business practices of retail electric providers whose plans with pricing indexed to the electricity wholesale rate “are reported to have inflicted unusually high bills on their Texas customers in the aftermath of last week’s winter storm grid event.” “While the architecture of these indexed plans are theoretically allowable under state law and Commission rules, an influx of complaints into our Customer Protection Division has caused concerns that questionable business practices might be exacerbating the situation,” said Thomas Gleeson, PUC Executive Director. “As the Legislature commences its exploration of the factors that combined with this natural disaster to cause outages across the state, we are responding to the economic impacts on individual Texans by investigating issues related to those consumer complaints including possible violations of the PUC’s rules on disclosures.”...
    ARLINGTON, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – In the middle of record low temperatures, Ty Williams of Arlington received a home electric bill so high he couldn’t believe it – $11,527.89. “And that’s just for half of February,” said Williams. “It just blows my mind. I really did think it was a mistake. There is no way that this is happening.” Based on Williams’ electricity usage, had he been on a fixed rate plan ($0.11 per kWh), his bill would have been $334.70. Other customers of the electric company Griddy also reported astronomical bills. “They (Griddy) took $300 from my account on the 13th and then took another $300 on the 15th,” said Kristin Schlinker of Arlington, who, like most Griddy customers, is on a pay as you go plan. “I just about had a heart attack. It was crazy!” Griddy is a wholesale electric retail provider. For a monthly fee of $9.99,...
    The New York Times His Lights Stayed on During Texas’ Storm. Now He Owes $16,752. SAN ANTONIO — As millions of Texans shivered in dark, cold homes over the past week while a winter storm devastated the state’s power grid and froze natural gas production, those who could still summon lights with the flick of a switch felt lucky. Now, many of them are paying a severe price for it. “My savings is gone,” said Scott Willoughby, a 63-year-old Army veteran who lives on Social Security payments in a Dallas suburb. He said he had nearly emptied his savings account so that he would be able to pay the $16,752 electric bill charged to his credit card — 70 times what he usually pays for all of his utilities combined. “There’s nothing I can do about it, but it’s broken me.” Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New...
    The New York Times His Lights Stayed on During Texas’ Storm. Now He Owes $16,752. SAN ANTONIO — As millions of Texans shivered in dark, cold homes over the past week while a winter storm devastated the state’s power grid and froze natural gas production, those who could still summon lights with the flick of a switch felt lucky. Now, many of them are paying a severe price for it. “My savings is gone,” said Scott Willoughby, a 63-year-old Army veteran who lives on Social Security payments in a Dallas suburb. He said he had nearly emptied his savings account so that he would be able to pay the $16,752 electric bill charged to his credit card — 70 times what he usually pays for all of his utilities combined. “There’s nothing I can do about it, but it’s broken me.” Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New...
    The New York Times His Lights Stayed on During Texas’ Storm. Now He Owes $16,752. SAN ANTONIO — As millions of Texans shivered in dark, cold homes over the past week while a winter storm devastated the state’s power grid and froze natural gas production, those who could still summon lights with the flick of a switch felt lucky. Now, many of them are paying a severe price for it. “My savings is gone,” said Scott Willoughby, a 63-year-old Army veteran who lives on Social Security payments in a Dallas suburb. He said he had nearly emptied his savings account so that he would be able to pay the $16,752 electric bill charged to his credit card — 70 times what he usually pays for all of his utilities combined. “There’s nothing I can do about it, but it’s broken me.” Sign up for The Morning newsletter from the New...
    New York (CNN Business)Dallas resident DeAndre Upshaw said it was "very shocking" when he opened his latest electricity bill."While I'm trying to get gas and groceries and make sure that my pipes don't explode, the last thing I'm thinking about is a $7,000 bill from my utility company," Upshaw told CNN's Fredricka Whitfield via Skype Saturday.As Texas struggles to recover from a deep freeze that has killed dozens, some customers in Texas like Upshaw are facing unprecedented price hikes in their energy bills as a result of the recent snow storm. Texas officials say they are investigating.Texas' utility regulator, Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUCT), said Saturday that it is investigating "the factors that combined with the devastating winter weather to disrupt the flow of power to millions of Texas homes." It's also giving customers a way to use an emergency provider in the event their current provider is not...
    Talk about adding insult to injury. After a deadly winter storm left millions in Texas without power this week -- along with shortages of food and clean water -- some Texans are now seeing exorbitant electricity bills. The tabs run as high as $17,000, according to reports. That's how much Ty Williams, a resident of Arlington, told FOX 4 of Dallas-Fort Worth his family was being asked to pay -- despite trying to conserve electricity during the storm. "How in the world can anyone pay that? I mean you go from a couple hundred dollars a month," he told WFAA-TV in Dallas. "There’s absolutely no way‚ it makes no sense."  Williams is a customer of Griddy, a wholesale electricity provider in the state. TEXAS POWER GRID STABILIZES, AS HOUSTON OPENS WATER DISTRIBUTION SITE TO 'OVERWHELMING DEMAND'  Griddy urged its customers to switch this week as wholesale prices skyrocketed during the storm, but Williams said...
    Movistar Fusión changed everything in 2012, when for the first time, the operator launched the first package that combined fiber and mobile. Since then, trend for convergent offers has become widespread, and now they also include television, connected home services, or alarms among others. The commitment to energy is another of the services for the home that is being included by several telecommunications brands, especially the MoreMobile Group, which this week strengthened its bet with the purchase of Lucera, electricity marketer from renewable sources. The bet on electricity comes from afar You have to go back to 2015 to see the first foray of a telephone operator in electricity services. At that time PepeEnergy was born, with the claim to offer energy at cost price. That is, the same price that the marketer pays to the distributor plus a small monthly fee. This fee was initially only 1 euro for...
    Barely a month remains until the first anniversary of the declaration of the state of alarm on March 14, with which Spain and its citizens were aware that they had to face a global pandemic, many of them without knowing exactly its meaning. and what it would entail. Thus, the expansion of Covid-19 has brought hand an unprecedented global economic crisis, causing the closure of thousands of businesses and a significant increase in unemployment rates. How could it be otherwise, the pandemic has also caused changes in the price of products that are commonly consumed. Although logic could invite one to think that prices have decreased – as has happened with average wages – this has not been the case. According to data from the Consumer Price Index (CPI), published by the National Institute of Statistics (INE), the interannual rate has risen one point, reaching 0.5%, which means its...
    Tesla just gave bitcoin a big boost that’s likely to result in more greenhouse gas emissions from the energy-hungry cryptocurrency. After Tesla purchased $1.5 billion in bitcoin and announced that it will accept bitcoin as payment in the future, the price of bitcoin reached an all-time high. The price of bitcoin reached an all-time high “It’s hard to imagine, frankly a more credible endorsement than one coming from folks like Elon [Musk] who are inventing the future,” says Garrick Hileman, head of research at crypto asset company blockchain.com and visiting fellow at the London School of Economics. When prices are high, bitcoin “mining” — creating new coins by verifying transactions — ramps up. But even though that mining happens virtually, it results in greenhouse gas emissions that fuel a climate crisis in the real world. That’s at odds with Tesla’s mission to “accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy.” With...
    The Conversation Spain Snow and cold heat up Spain’s electricity market Andrey_Popov / ShutterstockIn Sesame Street, children were explained that 3 + 3 + 3 is greater than 5 + 1 + 1, since 3 + 3 + 3 = 9 and 5 + 1 + 1 = 7. However, from what is seen and heard these days in the media and on social networks, it seems that many believe that the answer is 5 + 1 + 1 since 5 is the highest number. The problem I am referring to is not exactly this but a similar one, that of calculating the electricity tariff. In the first days of January 2021, the average price of electricity in Spain was substantially higher than in the same period in 2020, but that does not mean that it will be like this at the end of the year. In fact, the vast...
    The price of electricity has skyrocketed in Spain in recent weeks, coinciding with the biggest cold wave recorded in recent years. To get an idea, on January 8, the price per megawatt / hour stood at 114.89 euros, rising about 30% compared to last year and almost tripling the price that had been usual a few months earlier. But what has caused this rise in the heat of the cold wave? Between discussions about the reduction or redistribution of taxes, and even nationalizations of energy companies that have occurred in recent days in the political sphere, from the point of view purely of the generation and importation of energy, there is a much clearer explanation. “Several conditions have been added, some more predictable, and others extraordinary, that have caused this rise,” explains Antonio Delgado Rigal, doctor in Artificial Intelligence and CEO of Aleasoft, a company that is dedicated to...
    The Organization of Consumers and Users (OCU) has warned that hiring a flat rate for electricity given the rise in the price of electricity in the last week is “a serious mistake.” In a statement, the association states that these flat rates have a high cost, which is 30% more than the best rates with a fixed price and up to 46% more than the regulated rate (PVPC). In addition, it underlines that these electricity rates are not really flat, since they always have consumption limits “difficult for the user to know”. Likewise, OCU considers that today the flat rate policy “in no way invites to promote energy efficiency”, but rather It is “an invitation to uncontrolled consumption.” For this reason, it recommends hiring traditional rates, either indexed such as the regulated rate (PVPC) or betting on a rate with a good fixed price, since it can save up...
    The Conversation Spain Snow and cold heat up Spain’s electricity market Andrey_Popov / ShutterstockIn Sesame Street, children were explained that 3 + 3 + 3 is greater than 5 + 1 + 1, since 3 + 3 + 3 = 9 and 5 + 1 + 1 = 7. However, from what is seen and heard these days in the media and on social networks, it seems that many believe that the answer is 5 + 1 + 1 since 5 is the highest number. The problem I am referring to is not exactly this but a similar one, that of calculating the electricity tariff. In the first days of January 2021, the average price of electricity in Spain was substantially higher than in the same period in 2020, but that does not mean that it will be like this at the end of the year. In fact, the vast...
    The Conversation Spain Snow and cold heat up Spain’s electricity market Andrey_Popov / ShutterstockIn Sesame Street, children were explained that 3 + 3 + 3 is greater than 5 + 1 + 1, since 3 + 3 + 3 = 9 and 5 + 1 + 1 = 7. However, from what is seen and heard these days in the media and on social networks, it seems that many believe that the answer is 5 + 1 + 1 since 5 is the highest number. The problem I am referring to is not exactly this but a similar one, that of calculating the electricity tariff. In the first days of January 2021, the average price of electricity in Spain was substantially higher than in the same period in 2020, but that does not mean that it will be like this at the end of the year. In fact, the vast...
    The price of electricity continues to rise in the heat of the cold wave. This Tuesday the cost of electricity again marked a new peak, and for Wednesday it is expected that those prices will be exceeded and 89.94 euros per megawatt hour will be reached, the second highest price of the month, only behind the one charged last Friday. And all this while the thermometers record downward records, reaching 20 degrees below zero in places like Teruel. The increase in prices – which affects consumers who have contracted the Voluntary Price for the Small Consumer (PVPC) – is not the consequence of a direct decision of the Government nor of a large increase in the cost of generation, but the operation of the electricity market. But this increase threatens to create a new clash between PSOE and United We Can, given that the purple ones are pressing to accelerate...
    The following article is sponsored by StopSocializedMedicine.org and authored by Sven R Larson, Ph.D. Regardless of who is sworn in as president on January 20, some things will not change. We know, for example, that government will try to extend its control over our health care system. The latest idea is price regulations on pharmaceuticals. This is an issue where Trump and Biden are very much in agreement. On September 13, President Trump issued an Executive Order to align U.S. prescription drug prices with those of other countries. American consumers should not pay more than they do in what the Executive Order described as “most favored nations.” Joe Biden, in turn, wants to “create an independent commission to oversee and regulate” prescription-drug prices. In other words, there is not much more than a mail-in ballot’s distance between Trump and Biden on this issue. On the face of it, price control rings of compassion and...
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