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    More On: home decor Bed Bath & Beyond offers 25% off for their storage and organization sale How to refresh your surroundings without spending a dime Designer fireplaces are the hot new pandemic amenity Brothers figure out how to keep Christmas bulbs in place They were “Sex and the City,” now they’re “Leave it to Beaver.” Before the pandemic, Spencer Pariser, 33, a real estate industry executive, and his fiancée Jessica Galvin, 30, who works in asset management, were never home. “We were the people who were at restaurants for every meal and never sat at our table to eat,” said Pariser. But a few weeks into lockdown, the couple, who own a loft on Lafayette Street in Nolita, had completely changed their tune. “Next thing you know Jessica is experimenting with recipes, and we’re having all our dinners at home,” said Pariser. “If we had to eat at...
    Airlines canceled most New York City-area flights scheduled for Monday ahead of a strong winter storm that's expected to bring high winds and heavy snow to the region. Local officials also urged people to stay off roads. Flight schedules were already drastically lower than the norm because of the Covid-19 pandemic and a host of travel restrictions. Three-quarters of the departures scheduled from John F. Kennedy International Airport, or 151 flights, have been canceled as have 86%, or 102 flights from LaGuardia Airport, according to FlightAware, a flight-tracking site. Nearly 70% of the departures from United Airlines hub Newark Liberty International Airport were also canceled. A snowstorm canceled about a quarter of departures from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport on Sunday. Airlines stopped charging ticket-change fees last year in an effort to boost bookings in the pandemic but several major carriers said they won't charge fare differences for travelers affected by...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — We are looking at a potentially major Nor’easter starting late Sunday and lingering through early Tuesday. Expect changes — even a subtle track shift could make a big difference with this storm. LINK: Check The Latest Forecast Here is an updated look at a timeline of the storm: 6 p.m. Sunday – 6 a.m. Monday: Snow starts to fill in southern New Jersey up through Monmouth County. Snow showers are possible in New York City by sunset, but the steadiest snowfall holds off until later in the evening. 6 a .m. – 6 p.m. Monday: The brunt of the storm blossoms north and in NYC, and however far the storm pushes north will get heavier snow. Winds will be gusting 40-45 mph in NYC to 50+ mph along the coasts. Coastal issues could arise. Snow could fall at heavy rates of 1″ to 2″ per hour at...
    More On: public schools De Blasio is trying to kill gifted-and-talented education NYC to reboot Gifted and Talented program for schools this fall: officials Los Angeles students required to get COVID-19 vaccine before returning to school Worried sick: Staff concerned after NYC botches teacher COVID testing With Mayor de Blasio keeping all middle and high schools closed for now, most New York City students are learning from home . . . or at least they’re supposed to be. But the Department of Education has been struggling with rising levels of “online truancy.” According to Monday’s DOE attendance record, 134 schools had no contact with at least a quarter of their online learners. Another 69 schools simply provided no data on remote attendance. And it’s actually worse than that: Standards for “attendance” vary; some schools will mark even a student who fails to e-attend class as “present” if the kid...
    NEW York City’s “most expensive apartment” worth a hefty $40million with five bathrooms overlooking Central Park is currently up for grabs.  Spanning three floors atop the exclusive white-glove building Hampshire House, the ‘iconic’ penthouse is based on Billionaires’ Row, Central Park South. 9The 'most expensive apartment' in New York is now up for grabsCredit: SPAN Architecture and Viewpoint.co.il 9The penthouse apartment spans three floors at Hampshire HouseCredit: SPAN Architecture and Viewpoint.co.il 9The spacious pad even has five and a half bathroomsCredit: SPAN Architecture and Viewpoint.co.il 9Hampshire House's 1930s building is an iconic part of New YorkCredit: SPAN Architecture and Viewpoint.co.il 9The apartment has sweeping views over Central ParkCredit: SPAN Architecture and Viewpoint.co.il Billed as a “once in a lifetime investment” the highly coveted pad is set to be auctioned next month with the upmarket Concierge Auctions.  And with stunning views stretching across Central Park, the elegant apartment is sure to...
    More On: editorial The left’s silly assault on Joe Biden’s Defense pick Gen. Lloyd Austin Gov. Cuomo’s anti-science, job-killing, utterly senseless NYC indoor dining shutdown Sen. Mike Lee is wrong to think Latino, women’s museums will ‘divide us’ Hunter ripe for special counsel and other commentary In the wake of Police Commissioner Dermot Shea’s remarks last week on the drastic jump in shootings across the city, we asked the NYPD for information to flesh out what we’re calling “the revolving door” — gun perps who’ve been apprehended, but then released thanks to ill-conceived criminal-justice reforms. That info certainly shows a real problem. As of last week, the NYPD had arrested 3,765 individuals on gun charges in 2020; just 450 are in city or state custody — that is, in jail or prison. That means 88 percent of those at least caught with an illegal gun are now back on...
    More On: dining Why won’t New York’s leaders share the data on restaurants and COVID-19? Another restaurant shutdown will kill a lot of dreams — including for ‘second chancers’ CA chef refuses to close restaurants, calls Gov. Newsom an ‘a—hole’ ‘Twerking’ rant restaurant owner has a message for his critics Fur-lined seats, beautifully lit glass cabins, miniature electric fireplaces… The Big Apple’s outdoor dining scene will be a winter wonderland this year, thanks to creative restaurant owners who have been forced to adapt to the ever-changing coronavirus restrictions imposed by Gov. Andrew Cuomo.  To help illustrate the amazing work being done by restaurateurs, The Post is asking its readers to take snapshots of the most imaginative set-ups they have seen and email them to outdoordining@nypost.com. The best of the bunch will be chosen by our food critic Steve Cuozzo. Over the summer, restaurants were in full bloom with their breezy...
    TikTok users are sharing the craziest things they've ever witnessed a rich person say or do, from throwing out unused kitchen appliances to not realizing that a quarter of a million dollars was stolen from them. User @missbeifong started off the trend, asking others: 'What's the most insane actual rich person behavior that you've experienced?' After she recalled a rich mom say that she would throw out mattresses whenever her kids threw up on them, other TikTok users chimed in with their own mind-boggling stories. Popular: TikTok user @missbeifong started off the trend, asking others: 'What's the most insane actual rich person behavior that you've experienced?' BuzzFeed rounded up some of the best responses from TikTokers who couldn't belief how the one per cent live. User @thatpilotguy0 said that when he worked at a flight school, one man who wanted to learn to fly a plane was particularly memorable. The man walked...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — A new way to raise revenue for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority that can also help small businesses stay afloat and help the environment is being considered. As CBS2’s political reporter Marcia Kramer explained Tuesday, this is literally thinking outside the box — a bill to slap a surcharge on every Internet purchase  — every box — delivered in New York City to bail out the MTA. “My bill is a $3 surcharge on all non-essential online deliveries. So that’s anywhere from if you’re buying a book, cosmetics, a TV, a sweater — anything that’s non-essential. Essential items would be medicine, food, diapers,” said Assemblyman Robert Carroll (D-Park Slope). Take Our Poll And since an average of 1.8 million packages are delivered daily to apartments and homes in the city, we’re talking mucho dinero for the deficit-plagued transit agency: Billions of dollars. More: MTA Outlines Layoffs, Massive Service Cuts...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo took a brief moment to share a laugh with special guest Dr. Anthony Fauci during Monday's COVID briefing.At the end of the press briefing, Cuomo said he is having trouble figuring out what to send Fauci for Christmas and asked what food he misses most from NYC."You know governor, whenever I need some comfort food and I dream back on my days in the Bensonhurst section of Brooklyn, what comes to my mind are two things: a nice Nathan's hot dog and a really steaming pastrami sandwich," Fauci said.RELATED | Dr. Anthony Fauci warns January could be very difficult monthCuomo laughed at his response and asked about cannoli or meatballs."I don't want to overdo it, I don't want to overstay my welcome, but I'll take them all," Fauci said.As the two continued to laugh, Cuomo promised it was done and...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — Coronavirus vaccines are on the way, potentially rolling out to New Yorkers in less than two weeks time. Health care workers and the frailest of Americans will get priority. But then who? New York state is set to receive 170,000 doses of the COVID-19 vaccine by Dec. 15. According to officials, the city could get 480,000 doses by early January. MORE: City Council Meets With Pfizer Reps, Hospital Officials And Patient Advocates To Discuss COVID Vaccine Plan But after frontline workers and long-term care residents, there is a debate about who should come next. Brooklyn Councilman Robert Cornegy Jr. told CBS2’s Nick Caloway on Saturday Black and brown communities where the virus has hit the hardest should get priority. “We’re saying we saw what the pandemic did to our communities, how it ravaged our NYCHA developments, how it ravaged minority communities. We have a responsibility to go...
    More On: Coronavirus in NY How NYC restaurateurs press ahead despite COVID-19 restrictions Southern District of New York suspends in-person proceedings due to COVID-19 Defiant NYC bar in COVID-19 hotspot closes for TV spot as people bang on door for drinks Is NYC’s Department of Education trying to sabotage Catholic schools? New York City’s top doctor Tuesday warned that those vulnerable to COVID-19, as well as their household members and caregivers, should stay in when possible — and wear masks “at all times.” “Effective immediately, the City’s Health Commissioner is advising older adults and people with underlying health conditions who are at an increased risk of severe COVID-related illness to limit activities outside the home, except leaving home to travel to work or school, or for essential purposes including medical care, grocery shopping or pharmacy necessities,” the de Blasio administration said in a statement. “The advisory also applies to...
    The bulk of city schools that serve kids up to fifth grade should eventually be able to open on a full-time basis, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday. “Most schools — of the ones that we’ve announced, let’s be very clear, elementary K-5; PreK, 3-K centers, District 75 special ed — most will be able to get to five-day over time, some as early as Monday, December 7th,” Hizzoner said at his daily briefing. “Some will take more time.” De Blasio unveiled the city’s plans to revive the nation’s largest school system on Dec. 7 after shuttering buildings prior to Thanksgiving. Currently, a total of 335,000 kids are enrolled in the Department of Education’s blended learning format that has kids alternate between remote and classroom instruction. Of those, about 190,000 students are in the grade ranges that could return to school full-time. De Blasio said Monday the city would...
    New York has 20 of the 100 priciest ZIP codes in the nation, but for the first time the city doesn’t have a single one in the Top 10. Tribeca’s 10007 ZIP code dropped from fifth to 11th, which was Gotham’s highest-ranked nabe in PropertyShark’s annual survey of median home sale prices. Tribeca’s 10013 came in at No. 13, five lower than last year’s grade. The only other New York ZIP code to break the top 20 was Brooklyn’s 11231, which covers part of Carroll Gardens. The biggest price dip was 38% in the Garment District’s 10018, which dropped from 26th to 84th. NYU real estate economist Tim Savage chalked the midtown plummet up to the scatter-shot mix of old and new buildings: “It’s just a less attractive neighborhood.” The Hamptons soared however. Sagaponack, where Drew Barrymore and Jimmy Fallon have estates, ranks No. 2, the same as last year,...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- The Centers for Disease Control has determined that most coronavirus infections are spread by people who don't display symptoms.Those findings were published Friday on the agency's website.According to the CDC, 24 percent of spread is from asymptomatic people compared to 41 percent that comes from people experiencing COVID-19 symptoms.The remaining third are from those who are believed to be pre-symptomatic.What to know about coronavirus:Where to get tested in New York, New Jersey and ConnecticutCoronavirus by zip code - New York CityHow coronavirus changed the New York regionDo you have coronavirus symptoms?NYC COVID-19 positivity rate trackerHere are more of today's headlines:Donald Trump Jr. tests positive for COVID-19A spokesperson for Donald Trump Jr. announced he has tested positive for COVID: "Don tested positive at the start of the week and has been quarantining out at his cabin since the result. He's been completely asymptomatic so far and is...
    This story was originally published by Chalkbeat, a nonprofit news organization covering public education. Sign up for their newsletters here. The success of this school year was always going to depend on remote learning. Even before rising coronavirus infections threatened once again to force all teaching and learning back online, the vast majority of students were learning virtually on most days.
    A plan to take New York City classrooms to the streets hit a road block. City officials turned down 63% of public school requests to close a street and move instruction outdoors. A total of 233 public schools applied to use an adjacent street for al fresco instruction, but only 86 — or 37% — got a green light from the Department of Transportation, statistics from the agency show. The agency approved a greater percentage of private school requests — 46% of the 124 submitted. The DOT approved 10 public schools in the Bronx; 39 Brooklyn; 22 in Manhattan; 13 in Queens; and two on Staten Island. Mayor de Blasio and schools Chancellor Richard Carranza announced in August that schools could seek to use outdoor space, including streets and parks, as a way of making instruction safer during the coronavirus outbre ak. “We want to give schools the option...
    The first Sunday of November means only one thing for New Yorkers: marathon day, with its tinfoil-strewn streets, cheering fans in all five boroughs and a palpable energy as exhausted but proud finishers flood the city. This year the NYC Marathon turns 50, but instead of some 50,000 participants hitting the hard pavement of our city, the New York Road Runners, which organizes the 26.2-mile run, expects about 25,000 participants in what will be called the Virtual TCS New York City Marathon, taking place from Oct. 17 until Nov. 1. It’s still a far cry from the 127 runners who kicked the event off in Central Park on a hot day in September 1970 — just one of whom was a woman, and 55 of whom finished the race. “You can imagine when it was such a small group of people, we all essentially knew each other — if not...
    More than three-quarters of FDNY employees who retired last year qualified for annual pensions exceeding $100,000 — with many awarded extra because of disabilities related to 9/11, a new study and data reveal. Forty of the 491 retirees landed gold-plated pensions of more than $200,000 a year, according to the study by the Empire Center for Public Policy. The largest pension went to retired Assistant Chief James C. Hodgens, who once headed the Fire Academy and was eligible to collect $282,476 a year. He qualified for a disability pension, which enables uniformed officers to retire with pension payouts of at least 75 percent of their final salary instead of usual 50 percent. Such disability pensions made up 60 percent of all of the department’s retirement costs last year, according to a Post review of the FDNY’s annual pension report. An FDNY spokesman said many responders are still retiring with disability...
    Former Secret Service agent Dan Bongino said Sunday that a rash of crimes in New York City amounted to “the most predictable public safety crisis in human history.” Bongino, who also previously served with the New York Police Department, told “Fox & Friends” host Pete Hegseth that the increase in crime was the logical result of policies that put criminals back out on the streets rather than behind bars. (RELATED: ‘A Bunch Of Savages’: Dan Bongino Rips Into Protesters Who Hope Wounded Deputies Will Die) WATCH: Hegseth broached the topic, saying that dozens of criminals had been arrested multiple times in recent months and asking, “How are you supposed to defeat crime when they just get let out of jail?” Bongino responded by saying it was time for the kind of assessment one might expect from Thomas Sowell: “With points like this the data is so obvious the only...
    Having New York City in your backyard has its perks -- but it certainly comes with a price.  Residential rental website Zumper has ranked a handful of North Jersey cities as some of the most expensive in the NYC-Metro area. The "Zumper New York City Metro Area Report" analyzed active listings -- particularly a one-bedroom units -- in September 2020 across 24 cities to find the ones that are most expensive, and the ones with the fastest growing rental rates. The findings might not shock you. The top 10 most expensive places to rent in an around New York City include Fort Lee, Englewood, Hoboken, Jersey City and Secaucus. The least and most expensive rentals in the New York City Metro area.ZumperNew York City, where a one-bedroom apartment averages $2,600 a month, is by far the most expensive place to rent. Prices in Fort Lee climbed 5.1 percent, making it the...
    Three people were killed and two more injured in four incidents across the city Monday and Tuesday, according to the NYPD. Most recently, a 23-year-old man was blasted in the stomach during a party on East 116th Street near Lexington Avenue around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday, cops said. A gunman showed up at the party and opened fire, striking the victim, according to police. It’s unclear whether he was the intended target. He was taken to NYC Health + Hospitals / Harlem with non-life-threatening injuries. Five shell casings were recovered on scene, according to police sources. Hours earlier, two men, ages 24 and 26, were found shot to the chest outside an apartment complex at 700 Herkimer St. in Bedford-Stuyvesant around 9:30 p.m. Monday, authorities said. They were declared dead at Interfaith Medical Center. One gun and four shell casings were found at the scene, police sources said. No further details...
    Three people were killed and two more injured in four incidents across the city Monday and Tuesday, according to the NYPD. Most recently, a 23-year-old man was blasted in the stomach during a party on East 116th Street near Lexington Avenue around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday, cops said. A gunman showed up at the party and opened fire, striking the victim, according to police. It’s unclear whether he was the intended target. He was taken to NYC Health + Hospitals / Harlem with non-life-threatening injuries. Five shell casings were recovered on scene, according to police sources. Hours earlier, two men, ages 24 and 26, were found shot to the chest outside an apartment complex at 700 Herkimer St. in Bedford-Stuyvesant around 9:30 p.m. Monday, authorities said. They were declared dead at Interfaith Medical Center. One gun and four shell casings were found at the scene, police sources said. No further details...
    The teenaged kids of some of the biggest names in New York’s media elite—Chris Cuomo, George Stephanopoulos, and others—have teamed up to start an online publication bridging the traditional style of their parents’ generation and the Gen-Z focus on fighting racism and inequality at all levels of society. In July, amid the coronavirus pandemic, Lily Wolfson and Ryan Pelosky, two New York City high-school students, decided they wanted to launch an online newspaper for teens. They emailed a network of friends they knew through school, extracurricular activities, and social occasions, and enlisted a few dozen peers from across the city to help launch The Iris, a New York-based digital newspaper. The resulting website is a student newspaper on steroids. The Iris has glossy sheen and a fairly sleek design, and is packed with opinion articles, reported local and national news pieces, interviews, features, and even a crossword puzzle.
    Monday’s return to New York City schools wasn’t the one anyone planned for. For most, it wasn’t a return at all. Only pre-kindergarten and some special education students were scheduled to end a six-month absence from school buildings after a last-minute decision to postpone, for the second time, plans to be among the first big districts to resume in-person instruction after the coronavirus forced students and staff home. Mayor Bill de Blasio greeted pre-K students at a school in Queens and praised the “air of energy and spirit” among teachers and pupils. “To see those children so engaged, so happy to be there, it was truly inspiring,” de Blasio said.
    By CAROLYN THOMPSON and JENNIFER PELTZ NEW YORK (AP) — Monday’s return to New York City schools won’t be the return anyone planned for. For most, it won’t be a return at all. Only pre-kindergarten and some special education students are scheduled to end a six-month absence from school buildings after a last-minute decision to postpone, for the second time, plans to be among the first big districts to resume in-person instruction after the coronavirus forced students and staff home. Schoolchildren in kindergarten through 12th grade are still starting the new school year Monday, but fully remotely, the same way students in Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston and many of New York's other urban districts have. After a fidgety spring of online pre-K, Jessica D’Amato’s 5-year-old son has been so excited about going back to in-person school that he keeps asking: “When am I going to kindergarten?” First the answer was...
    New York City’s ambitious attempt to be among the first big cities to bring students back into classrooms closed by the coronavirus suffered another setback Thursday, as the mayor announced he was again delaying the start of in-person instruction for most students due to a shortage of staff and supplies. De Blasio announced a new timeline that will keep most elementary school students out of their physical classrooms until Sept. 29. Middle and high school students will learn remotely through Oct. 1. “We are doing this to make sure all of the standards we set can be achieved,” de Blasio said.
    NEW YORK (AP) — New York City has again delayed the start of in-person learning for most of the more than 1 million students in its public school system. Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Thursday that most elementary school students would do remote-only learning until Sept. 29. Middle and high schools would stay remote through Oct. 1. The delay came just days before students across the nation's largest school district were set to resume in-person instruction Monday. Now, only pre-kindergarten students and some other special education students will be going back into physical classrooms next week. De Blasio and union leaders said the city needed more time to prepare for students to return to school buildings. “We are doing this to make sure all of the standards we set can be achieved,” de Blasio said. Labor leaders, who had sounded alarms in recent days that the schools just weren't ready...
    An already chaotic start to the school year took another twist hours before classes began Wednesday when the city Department of Education announced that kids signed up for blended learning aren’t guaranteed real-time virtual learning. After previously assuring parents that all of the city’s 1.1 million public school students would receive at least some live online instruction when the academic year began, the DOE backed off that promise late Tuesday in an internal guidance memo. Now, the 58 percent of kids whose parents signed up for a blended learning schedule — alternating in-person classes with online courses — won’t be guaranteed that those virtual sessions take place in real time. That is, they may find themselves watching pre-recorded videos of lessons in which the teacher isn’t actually online at the time, depriving them of a chance to ask for help during class if they don’t understand the material. Only the...
    An already chaotic start to the school year took another twist hours before classes began Wednesday when the city Department of Education announced that kids signed up for blended learning aren’t guaranteed real-time virtual learning. After previously assuring parents that all of the city’s 1.1 million public school students would receive at least some live online instruction when the academic year began, the DOE backed off that promise late Tuesday in an internal guidance memo. Now, the 58 percent of kids whose parents signed up for a blended learning schedule — alternating in-person classes with online courses — won’t be guaranteed that those virtual sessions take place in real time. That is, they may find themselves watching pre-recorded videos of lessons in which the teacher isn’t actually online at the time, depriving them of a chance to ask for help during class if they don’t understand the material. Only the...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City New York City is second only to Los Angeles for cities in the United States where surface transportation is impacting the health of its residents and the American Lung Association is prescribing a full transition to electric vehicles by 2050. In a new report titled “The Road to Clean Air,” the AMA claims the despite having the largest public transportation system in the nation, New York City is not far behind other more car-dependent cities in conditions affecting the lungs such as asthma. AMA President Harold Wimmer says prioritizing this mid-century goal could prevent up to 6,300 premature deaths, 93,000 asthma attacks and 416,000 lost workdays every year based on emissions projections in 2050. “Everyone deserves to breathe clean, healthy air where they live, work and play. The transition to electric...
    Smoke billowed out of tenement-building windows on East 101st Street. An up-stretched fire ladder reached the sixth floor. On the asphalt basketball court below, four kids, oblivious to it all, competed in a feverish game of two-on-two. That moment, frozen in a photo, conveys a lot about East Harlem in the 1970s: Buildings blazed and streetball raged. Firemen put out blaze at a building on 101st Street at First Avenue burned in 1975 while youths play basketball.Paul Hosefros/The New York Times Day to day on the asphalt, there were no refs, criminals lurked in the shadows (often providing grease for shorts and sneakers) and creative showboating was de rigueur. The setting served as a breeding ground for world-class NBA stars. They included Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (then known as Lew Alcindor), Julius “Dr. J” Erving and Metta World Peace (then known as Ron Artest). Former Knicks great Walt “Clyde” Frazier, who grew...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- Speed limits are being reduced by five miles per hour on nine of the most dangerous streets across New York City, officials announced Tuesday, as part of the city's ongoing Vision Zero efforts to reduce pedestrian deaths.The reason, officials say, is a spike in the number of fatalities involving cars and motorcycles, already more than all of last year.Department of Transportation Commissioner Polly Torttenberg says it appears drivers have gotten used to driving faster on open roads during the coronavirus pandemic, when traffic has been reduced due to the lockdown."We know the reasons," she said. "It's not complicated. We see it in the crash reports. It's speeding."Related: Hit and run driver injures bicyclist in Jamaica, QueensThe following areas will have speed limits reduced from 30 mph to 25:--Parts of Riverside Drive in Manhattan--Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn--Northern Boulevard in Queens--Bruckner Boulevard in the Bronx--Shore Parkway Service...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The coronavirus pandemic didn’t stop one of music’s biggest nights from happening. MTV’s Video Music Awards took place in a unique way, all across New York City on Sunday night, CBS2’s Cory James reported. It was a show like never before. But before getting to the music, host Keke Palmer paid tribute to Chadwick Boseman, days after the 43-year-old Black Panther star passed away from cancer. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Tri-State Coronavirus Travel Advisory Quarantine List Resources, Hotlines, Unemployment & Covering Bills Remote Learning Tools For Parents Teaching At Home CBS2’s Dr. Max Answers Your Health Questions What To Do If Someone Isn’t Social Distancing Or Wearing A Mask? Expert: Parents Be Mindful Of Children’s Stress After Months Of Isolation Chopper 2 Over Empty NYC Streets, Landmarks Complete Coronavirus Coverage MTV, dealing with challenges during the pandemic, put on the annual show with both pre-taped performances and...
    TRENTON, N.J. (CBSNewYork/AP) — The majority of New Jersey’s school districts are planning a hybrid start to the academic year, Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday. Of the state’s more than 700 public districts and private schools, 436 proposed to start the year with a mix of in-person and remote education, Murphy said. CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC Tri-State Coronavirus Travel Advisory Quarantine List Resources, Hotlines, Unemployment & Covering Bills Remote Learning Tools For Parents Teaching At Home CBS2’s Dr. Max Answers Your Health Questions What To Do If Someone Isn’t Social Distancing Or Wearing A Mask? Expert: Parents Be Mindful Of Children’s Stress After Months Of Isolation Chopper 2 Over Empty NYC Streets, Landmarks Complete Coronavirus Coverage The governor said 180 districts are seeking to start entirely remotely, while 59 are planning in-person starts. Fewer than a dozen schools will pursue a mix of all of those approaches, Murphy said. The...
    Health experts in New York City are urging residents to get tested for COVID-19 at least once a month as schools and business are set to reopen, drawing the criticism of doctors who insist the suggestion is 'unrealistic' with results already backed up by two weeks. Since June, city officials have encouraged New Yorkers to get tested, whether they’re exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19 or not. That idea was taken a step further by Dr. Jay Varma, Mayor Bill de Blasio's Senior Adviser for Public Health, on Monday, who said coronavirus tests should be repeated every month. ‘The rule of thumb that I follow myself, and encourage others to do, is to make sure you’re tested at least once every month,’ Varma said in a press briefing with the mayor. ‘In an ideal world, we would have readily available tests that people could even just get in their homes, but we’re...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – Tri-State power companies are making progress, but more than 100,000 were still without power Sunday morning – five days after Tropical Storm Isaias hit New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. Con Edison said it is optimistic most customers in New York City will have power restored Sunday; most in Westchester could have their lights back on Monday. Power Outages Click on the links below for information from utilities in your area. New York: Con Edison NYSEG National Grid PSEG Long Island Orange & Rockland New Jersey: PSE&G New Jersey Jersey Central Power & Light Atlantic City Electric Orange & Rockland Connecticut: Eversource United Illuminating New York City’s effort to clear downed trees and debris is also taking time. CBS2’s Christina Fan reported Sunday the city is prioritizing “life-threatening” situations, like clearing trees that toppled onto homes. Fear was written all...
    Tropical Storm Isaias’ appearance in New York may have been brief — but it was the worst storm to wallop the area since Hurricane Sandy, Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday. The powerful storm, which packed damaging wind gusts as high as 70 mph, left one man dead in Queens and a woman injured in Brooklyn, uprooted trees across the five boroughs and knocked out power to 130,000 New Yorkers. De Blasio called Isaias “very brief but very intense.” “This is turning out to be one of the most serious weather events since Hurricane Sandy,” Hizzoner said at his daily press briefing, referring to the deadly 2012 superstorm that caused historic flooding in the Big Apple. At one point, 911 was slammed with more than 100 calls per minute, he added. Mayor Bill de BlasioJames Messerschmidt “The system held even though there were real delays,” he said. Con Edison is...
    NEW YORK CITY (WABC) -- So many of us are getting inundated with political emails on social media and in our inboxes as we get close to the presidential election in November, but some of that material is actually coming from scammers.We also have a warning about a dangerous new spam that uses the fear of exposure to COVID-19 to con you, as "contact tracing" is the latest buzzword that hackers are using to make you open your wallet."Scammers follow the news, and they're aware of contact tracing is starting to happen in various states," said Patrick Webre, chief of the FCC's Consumer and Government Affairs Bureau. "And they can use this to prey on us, get personal information, financial information, to use against us."Webre is warning about phony calls, one of which starts by saying, "Dear citizen, this is the U.S. Department of Health, and this call is regarding...
    A very small percentage of office workers have returned to their desks in Manhattan despite New York City reopening from months of coronavirus-related closures. The Wall Street Journal cited data from landlords and other official sources that indicate fewer than 10% of workers are back in the office. That means most people are opting to stay at home and work as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, or businesses are opting to keep their offices shuttered and see how things play out. One landlord said that just 8% of people who work at buildings in downtown Manhattan have returned to work, while another said that 9% have returned in several midtown buildings. New York City was slammed with coronavirus cases and deaths in the early months of the pandemic, but the Big Apple eventually got things under control. According to WorldoMeter, California now leads the nation in terms of the number of...
    During the summer of the coronavirus, when all restaurant meals are consumed outside, the new flex is flower-power dining. Making the best of a bad situation, this season’s hot spots are wooing Big Apple foodies with explosions of stems and blossoms. Scarpetta, an Italian mainstay famous for its spaghetti with tomato and basil, launches an al fresco takeover of 29th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues on Aug. 1 (orange trees and a floral awning are promised). Meanwhile, just opened for outdoor supping amidst an explosion of blue blossoms is the Italian seafood and pasta mecca Marea, helmed by celebrated chef Michael White. The folks behind the look — designer Alsun Keogh and florist Carlos Franqui — see lush exteriors as the new equivalent of mood lighting and luxe wallpaper. “Everybody loves flowers,” Franqui told The Post, explaining that the uber arrangement he created for Marea aims to transport diners...
    During the summer of the coronavirus, when all restaurant meals are consumed outside, the new flex is flower-power dining. Making the best of a bad situation, this season’s hot spots are wooing Big Apple foodies with explosions of stems and blossoms. Scarpetta, an Italian mainstay famous for its spaghetti with tomato and basil, launches an al fresco takeover of 29th Street between Fifth and Madison Avenues on Aug. 1 (orange trees and a floral awning are promised). Meanwhile, just opened for outdoor supping amidst an explosion of blue blossoms is the Italian seafood and pasta mecca Marea, helmed by celebrated chef Michael White. The folks behind the look — designer Alsun Keogh and florist Carlos Franqui — see lush exteriors as the new equivalent of mood lighting and luxe wallpaper. “Everybody loves flowers,” Franqui told The Post, explaining that the uber arrangement he created for Marea aims to transport diners...
    NEW Yorkers’ most ridiculous texts have been exposed in stealthy pics taken by a street photographer. Jeff Mermelstein has been shooting the streets of the Big Apple for more than 30 years. 8Jeff Mermelstein has been taking pictures of people's text messagesCredit: Images from ‘#nyc’ by Jeff Mermelstein. Courtesy the artist and MACK 8Images of the bizarre messages are being collated into a bookCredit: Images from ‘#nyc’ by Jeff Mermelstein. Courtesy the artist and MACK But the snapper recently turned his lens to the phone conversations of those passing through them, the New York Post reports. Jeff said he’s compiled the pics, which he’s been taking since 2017, into book titled “#nyc”. He revealed he started the project after taking a picture of one woman’s phone and being fascinated by what he saw. He said: “After looking at my picture I saw what was on the screen – it was...
    The Brooklyn Borough President has called for the return of the controversial NYPD anti-crime unit just a month after it was shut down due to anti-cop protests as shootings in the Big Apple continue to spike.  Eric Adams, one of NYC's most influential black politicians, claims that the plainclothes unit, whose job it was to get guns off the street, may need reform but should not have been completely eliminated.  The former cop, who is running for mayor in 2021, said that the absence of the unit led 'bad guys' to believe they can do 'whatever you want'.   He made the comments after another violent weekend in New York City and a spate of shootings which resulted in the death of a one-year-old child.   Brooklyn Borough President, one of NYC's most influential black politicians, claims that the NYPD anti-crime unit should never have been disbanded  as he spoke about recent...
    A much-touted effort by New York City officials to prevent a “second wave” of COVID-19 outbreaks has gotten off to a “worrisome start” in part because a majority of people the city has contacted have failed to fully cooperate with the effort. The development follows the city’s widely reported decision to block contact tracers from asking people if they had participated in the Black Lives Matter protests or riots. The New York Times first reported on the “worrisome” start to the city’s contract tracing program ahead of the city’s new reopening phase Monday, which includes the return of outdoor dining and in-store shopping, as well as many office workers. “The city has hired 3,000 disease detectives and case monitors, who are supposed to identify anyone who has come into contact with the hundreds of people who are still testing positive for the virus in the city every day,” the Times’ Sharon...
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