Saturday, Feb 27, 2021 - 03:56:33
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the country’s prison:

    An Iranian man wearing a protective face mask waves an Iran flag. Morteza Nikoubazl/NurPhoto via Getty Images Mohammad Mosaed is an Iranian reporter who has twice been arrested by the government. He fled Iran in January, following a prison summons for a five year sentence for "spreading propaganda."   The Committee to Protect Journalists awarded him its 2020 International Press Freedom Award. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Mohammad Mosaed, an Iranian freelance journalist who has twice been arrested by the government for his investigative reporting and criticism of Iranian officials, was detained by Turkish border officials earlier this year after fleeing Iran following a prison summons.  In January, Mosaed fled the country after he was summoned to begin a nearly five-year prison sentence. He told the Committee to Protect Journalists that he was detained by police at the Turkish border and feared he would be deported back...
    At least 62 inmates died on Tuesday in a series of riots that occurred in three prisons in as many cities in Ecuador, according to the country’s head of Prisons, Edmundo Moncayo, who attributed the riots to quarrels between at least two criminal gangs vying for control from jails. Moncayo, director of the Service of Attention to Persons Deprived of Liberty (SNAI), detailed that 33 prisoners had been confirmed dead in the jail of the city of Basin, another 21 in that of Guayaquil and 8 in that of Cotopaxi, as well as an undetermined number of wounded, since the verifications in the penitentiary centers were still continuing. At a press conference at the Presidential Palace in Quito, Moncayo indicated that the dispute is probably due to the vacuum that was generated between the gangs inside the prisons after the death last December of a prisoner who was released and...
    The General Secretariat of Penitentiary Institutions, dependent on the Ministry of the Interior, has approved this Friday the transfer of another four ETA prisoners, including those convicted of killing the former socialist minister Ernest Lluch and the former head of the Andoáin Local Police Joseba Pagazaurtundua. There is also another convicted of terrorism, in this case for the kidnappings of the industrialist José María Aldaya and the lawyer Cosme Delclaux. Among those transferred from prison is Fernando García Jodrá, sentenced in 2002 to 33 years in prison for the murder of Ernest Lluch Martín, among other attacks. After being progressed to the second grade, he will leave the Huelva penitentiary for León. He entered prison on August 28, 2001 and is serving a sentence for the crimes of attacks, homicides, falsification of documents, damage and damage. As reported by Penitentiary Institutions, the legal accumulation of their sentences has not been...
    Princess Diana with Prince Harry and Prince Charles outside Highgrove House. Tim Graham Photo Library via Getty Images Princess Diana reportedly compared Highgrove House to returning to prison. According to biographer Andrew Morton, the princess "loathed her country home." One reason was its close proximity to Camilla Parker-Bowles. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Princess Diana compared Highgrove House — the country home she shared with Prince Charles — to prison, according to her royal biography.  The Prince of Wales purchased the residence, near Tetbury, Gloucestershire, in 1980. Charles and Diana spent a lot of time there during the early years of their marriage in the 1980s.  Read more: Kristen Stewart transforms into Princess Diana in new photos from 'Spencer' movie The residence was close to where Camilla Parker-Bowles lived at the time. "But Charles' friends were not the only reason why she loathed her country home,"...
    A 30-year-old Iraqi migrant with Swedish citizenship has been deported from Denmark for the 17th time after coming to the country consistently for drug deals. The 30-year-old Iraqi man was arrested earlier this week and police have demanded that not only he be deported from the country but that he should be banned from Denmark for life. The arrest and deportation is the 17th time the Iraqi has been ordered to leave the country. He told officers that he comes back time and time again because illegal drugs are easier to purchase in Denmark compared to Sweden where he is a citizen, Ekstra Bladet reports. According to the newspaper, the man had been arrested last year in October and had presented a fake Italian drivng licence to police as his identification. In one instance the man came to Denmark the same day he had been released from a Swedish prison,...
    ^ Keep Westword Free Support Us I Support Local Community Journalism Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free. Support Us FCI Englewood, a federal prison in Jefferson County that's the site of one of the worst COVID outbreaks in Colorado, will experience another kind of outbreak on December 31, when activists plan to hold a "New Year's Eve Noise Demo" outside the facility. An outbreak of sound. "You can anticipate abolitionist, anti-prison and leftist chanting," explains Mary Reeves, an organizer affiliated with Denver Communists. "You can participate with noisemakers of any kind. There will probably be confetti. The typical things you would expect at a New Year's Eve party. But this is not a party, because there's nothing really to celebrate in a country like this."Related Stories FCI Englewood Has Become a COVID-19 Hot Spot How Soon-to-Be-Freed Rod...
    Jonathan Pollard, who spent 30 years in U.S. prison for spying for Israel, arrived in Israel early Wednesday with his wife, triumphantly kissing the ground as he exited the aircraft in the culmination of a decades-long affair that had long strained relations between the two close allies. Pollard was welcomed at Israel's international airport by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who presented him and his wife Esther with Israeli ID cards granting them citizenship. 'Welcome back. How good you've come home,' Netanyahu said, according to a statement issued by his office.  He said they could start new lives in Israel, 'in freedom and happiness.'  'We are ecstatic to be home at last,' said Pollard. Jonathan Pollard and his wife Esther fell to their knees, with Netanyahu watching on Pollard, 66, was released from US custody in November 2015 after 30 years in prison Netanyahu handed them Israeli ID...
    (CNN)An Australian man dubbed "the Claremont killer" has been sentenced to at least 40 years in jail for murdering two young women, bringing an end to one of the country's most notorious cold cases. Jane Rimmer, Ciara Glennon and Sarah Spiers all went missing from a popular nightlife area in the Western Australia city of Perth in the 1990s. For nearly 25 years, their unsolved deaths continued to loom large in the minds of residents.In September this year, following a seven-month judge-only trial, Bradley Robert Edwards, 52, was found guilty of murdering childcare worker Rimmer, 23, in 1996 and lawyer Glennon, 27, in 1997.He was found not guilty of murdering Spiers, 18, a secretary whose body has never been found, as there was insufficient evidence.On Wednesday, Edwards was sentenced to a minimum of 40 years in prison before he will be eligible to apply for parole, the Supreme Court of...
    A human rights law was successfully used to block the deportation of a Turkish drug lord from the United Kingdom despite previously being ruled by British judges to be a “danger to the community”. The 52-year-old Turk — referred to only as ‘CD’ as he was also granted anonymity — has been described as a “very major player” in the heroin-smuggling racket in Britain, yet he will not face deportation. CD was released from prison in January after only serving two-thirds of his 18-year sentence. Rather than being deported from the country, his lawyers successfully argued that his removal from the country would breach his human rights due to the dangers he would face should he return to his native Turkey. According to documents seen by the Mail on Sunday, the drug dealer initially entered the UK as an illegal immigrant in 1995 and was refused asylum, but was granted...
    An Australian academic's Israeli boyfriend was the real reason she was detained by Iranian intelligence officers as she tried to leave the country on baseless spy claims.  Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert was released in a reported prisoner swap deal early on Thursday morning after spending two years in some of Iran's most notorious jails.  Multiple diplomatic and senior government sources have confirmed that Dr Moore-Gilbert was stopped at Tehran airport in 2018 after authorities discovered she was in a relationship with an Israeli citizen, according to The Age.  Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert (pictured) was released in a reported prisoner swap deal early on Thursday morning after spending two years in some of Iran's most notorious jails  Dr Moore-Gilbert (pictured) being transported to a waiting plane to leave Iran after her release on Thursday morning  The University of Melbourne lecturer was freed after more than six months of high level negotiations...
    If there’s been a day in his adult life that Donald Trump didn’t break the law, it was because he forgot or was too busy watching porn. To him, the law is something for other people to follow and for him to pervert and subvert with delays and motions and countersuits and people who’ll lie to cover up his lies. In a just world, he belonged in a prison cell decades ago. There’s nothing I’d love more than to see the whole family get sent up the river. Ivanka included. True, we do not live in a country that has made it a habit of sending pretty, rich blond women to prison, but if ever an exception might be made, it’s here. So it’s a pretty serious bummer to see Joe Biden’s aides leaking out through NBC News that he wants to move on and “move the country forward.” I...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — A new report shows that more jail and prison staff and inmates in Texas have been infected and killed by COVID-19 than those of any other state’s criminal justice system. According to the report by the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, at least 231 inmates and staff members have died of COVID-19 in Texas prisons and jails. The study also found that Texas inmates and staff tested positive for the coronavirus virus that causes COVID-19 at a 490% higher rate than the state’s general population. Also, nine Texas inmates approved for parole died in prison before their release. Federal prison facilities and Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities were excluded from the analysis, the LBJ School said in a statement. “COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on prisons and jails across the country, and especially in Texas,” said Michele Deitch,...
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