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    An Iranian man wearing a protective face mask waves an Iran flag. Morteza Nikoubazl/NurPhoto via Getty Images Mohammad Mosaed is an Iranian reporter who has twice been arrested by the government. He fled Iran in January, following a prison summons for a five year sentence for "spreading propaganda."   The Committee to Protect Journalists awarded him its 2020 International Press Freedom Award. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Mohammad Mosaed, an Iranian freelance journalist who has twice been arrested by the government for his investigative reporting and criticism of Iranian officials, was detained by Turkish border officials earlier this year after fleeing Iran following a prison summons.  In January, Mosaed fled the country after he was summoned to begin a nearly five-year prison sentence. He told the Committee to Protect Journalists that he was detained by police at the Turkish border and feared he would be deported back...
    SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — A Bosnian court sentenced on Thursday a Bosnian Muslim man to six years in prison on charges that he fought for the Islamic State group in Syria. Jasmin Keserovic, who has spent nearly seven years in Syria, was also charged with inciting others to take part in terrorist activities. Judges said that by publicly calling on Muslims to kill Christian soldiers and civilians alike, the defendant “demonstrated specific ruthlessness.” Hudges rejected defense claims that Keserovic was in Syria for charity work to help the local population amid the war. He was part of a group of seven Bosnian men flown back to Bosnia from Syria on a U.S. Air Force flight in December 2019 along with 18 women and children. In 2014, Bosnia became the first country in Europe to introduce prison terms for its citizens who fought abroad. Fighters who have since returned to the...
    SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — A Bosnian court sentenced on Thursday a Bosnian Muslim man to six years in prison on charges that he fought for the Islamic State group in Syria. Jasmin Keserovic, who has spent nearly seven years in Syria, was also charged with inciting others to take part in terrorist activities. Judges said that by publicly calling on Muslims to kill Christian soldiers and civilians alike, the defendant “demonstrated specific ruthlessness.” Hudges rejected defense claims that Keserovic was in Syria for charity work to help the local population amid the war. He was part of a group of seven Bosnian men flown back to Bosnia from Syria on a U.S. Air Force flight in December 2019 along with 18 women and children. In 2014, Bosnia became the first country in Europe to introduce prison terms for its citizens who fought abroad. Fighters who have since returned to the...
    At least 62 inmates died on Tuesday in a series of riots that occurred in three prisons in as many cities in Ecuador, according to the country’s head of Prisons, Edmundo Moncayo, who attributed the riots to quarrels between at least two criminal gangs vying for control from jails. Moncayo, director of the Service of Attention to Persons Deprived of Liberty (SNAI), detailed that 33 prisoners had been confirmed dead in the jail of the city of Basin, another 21 in that of Guayaquil and 8 in that of Cotopaxi, as well as an undetermined number of wounded, since the verifications in the penitentiary centers were still continuing. At a press conference at the Presidential Palace in Quito, Moncayo indicated that the dispute is probably due to the vacuum that was generated between the gangs inside the prisons after the death last December of a prisoner who was released and...
    QUITO, Ecuador (AP) — Sixty-two inmates have died in riots at prisons in three cities in Ecuador as a result of fights between rival gangs and an escape attempt, authorities said Tuesday. Prisons Director Edmundo Moncayo said in a news conference that 800 police offices have been helping to regain control of the facilities. Hundreds of officers from tactical units had been deployed since the clashes broke out late Monday. Moncayo said that two groups were trying to gain “criminal leadership within the detention centers” and that the clashes were precipitated by a search for weapons carried out Monday by police officers. Moncayo said 33 died at the prison in Cuenca in southern Ecuador, 21 in the Pacific coast city of Guayaquil and eight in the central city of Latacunga. Moncayo said that close to 70% of the country’s prison population lives in the centers where the unrest occurred. Minister...
    QUITO, Ecuador (AP) — Sixty-two inmates have died in riots at prisons in three cities in Ecuador as a result of fights between rival gangs and an escape attempt, authorities said Tuesday. Prisons Director Edmundo Moncayo said in a news conference that 800 police offices have been helping to regain control of the facilities. Hundreds of officers from tactical units had been deployed since the clashes broke out late Monday. Moncayo said that two groups were trying to gain “criminal leadership within the detention centers” and that the clashes were precipitated by a search for weapons carried out Monday by police officers. Moncayo said 33 died at the prison in Cuenca in southern Ecuador, 21 in the Pacific coast city of Guayaquil and eight in the central city of Latacunga. Moncayo said that close to 70% of the country’s prison population lives in the centers where the unrest occurred....
    The General Secretariat of Penitentiary Institutions, dependent on the Ministry of the Interior, has approved this Friday the transfer of another four ETA prisoners, including those convicted of killing the former socialist minister Ernest Lluch and the former head of the Andoáin Local Police Joseba Pagazaurtundua. There is also another convicted of terrorism, in this case for the kidnappings of the industrialist José María Aldaya and the lawyer Cosme Delclaux. Among those transferred from prison is Fernando García Jodrá, sentenced in 2002 to 33 years in prison for the murder of Ernest Lluch Martín, among other attacks. After being progressed to the second grade, he will leave the Huelva penitentiary for León. He entered prison on August 28, 2001 and is serving a sentence for the crimes of attacks, homicides, falsification of documents, damage and damage. As reported by Penitentiary Institutions, the legal accumulation of their sentences has not been...
    MADRID (AP) — Police in Spain say 14 people were arrested in violent street protests in several cities following the arrest of Spanish rap artist Pablo Hasél, who had barricaded himself at a university with dozens of supporters to avoid prison and defend his fight for free speech. Emergency services said Wednesday that 33 people were treated for injuries in the disturbances. In the northeastern city of Barcelona, thousands of protestors set trash cans on fire and threw rocks at the police. Several stores and a bank were damaged amid chaotic scenes on one of the city’s main streets. Spanish National Television cited city authorities as estimating the damages at 70,000 euros ($84,000). Smaller demonstrations took place in other Spanish cities. Further protests are planned Wednesday. A 24-hour standoff between police and Hasél ended early Tuesday when anti-riot officers arrested him in northeastern Lleida University. He was taken to prison...
    British Health Secretary Matt Hancock today announced « severe fines » for people who flout new border rules designed to stop the spread of the disease. Coronavirus in the country, including a fine of 10,000 pounds (about $ 13,776.05) and sentences of 10 years in prison. Starting Monday, people arriving in the UK will need to be tested for COVID on the second and eighth days of their quarantine, Hancock told British lawmakers. Those coming from « red list countries » will have to pay 1,750 pounds (about $ 2,411.81) for hotel quarantine, transportation and testing, he said. People who try to evade hotel quarantine rules could face up to 10 years in jail, he said, adding that the fines will be used to ensure people comply. England is currently under the third national lockdown since the outbreak of the pandemic in...
    Billionaire Michael Rubin has gifted Super Bowl tickets to two families impacted by the criminal justice system in Florida, Page Six has learned. We’re told the Philadelphia 76ers partner is giving the tickets to people who have been negatively affected by the “state’s broken probation and parole policies,” a source said, including a man named Michael Orlando and a woman named Ysabelle Mobelle. Insiders told us Orlando was sent to county jail for three months for “leaving the country without permission” in what was considered a violation of his probation, although he was allegedly told by his probation officer verbally that he could leave the country for a business retreat. His father died while he was in prison. We’re told Mobelle, 29, was sentenced to prison while pregnant after testing positive for marijuana, although she allegedly used it to treat her chronic anxiety. Her 5-year-old son was placed in...
    Russian dissident Alexei Navalny has been sentenced three and a half years of prison time for violating his parole, according to the Associated Press. Navalny, 44, one of Putin's most vocal critics, was jailed in Moscow after returning to his country on Jan. 17. He spent months in Germany, recovering after being poisoned with a Soviet-era nerve agent. He was immediately arrested upon his return and put in jail, having been accused of failing to meet his parole terms under a 2014 suspended sentence for embezzlement. On Tuesday, the judge returned a verdict that will imprison him for two and a half years. The reduction from the original sentence was due to spending a year under house arrest. Navalny's poisoning and subsequent arrest upon his return to Russia sparked international condemnation and has created a riff within the country. Tens of thousands of protesters gathered throughout the country demanding Navalny's...
    Russian dissident Alexei Navalny appeared in court on Tuesday, where he could be sentenced to years in prison. Navalny, one of Russian President Vladimir Putin's most vocal critics, has been jailed in Moscow since returning to his country on Jan. 17, after spending months in Germany recovering from being poisoned with a Soviet-era nerve agent. Upon arrival, the 44-year-old was immediately arrested and put in jail, having been accused of failing to meet his parole terms under a 2014 suspended sentence for embezzlement. Russian authorities are looking to turn his suspended sentence into a 3 1/2 year prison sentence. In Tuesday's court hearing, Navalny asked the court how he should have better fulfilled his probationary obligations given he was in a coma. "Can you explain to me how else I was supposed to fulfill the terms of my probation and notify where I am?" Navalny asked. "Coma?" he said...
    Princess Diana with Prince Harry and Prince Charles outside Highgrove House. Tim Graham Photo Library via Getty Images Princess Diana reportedly compared Highgrove House to returning to prison. According to biographer Andrew Morton, the princess "loathed her country home." One reason was its close proximity to Camilla Parker-Bowles. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Princess Diana compared Highgrove House — the country home she shared with Prince Charles — to prison, according to her royal biography.  The Prince of Wales purchased the residence, near Tetbury, Gloucestershire, in 1980. Charles and Diana spent a lot of time there during the early years of their marriage in the 1980s.  Read more: Kristen Stewart transforms into Princess Diana in new photos from 'Spencer' movie The residence was close to where Camilla Parker-Bowles lived at the time. "But Charles' friends were not the only reason why she loathed her country home,"...
    Tehran, Iran — An Iranian-American has been sentenced to prison on spying charges, Iran's judiciary reported Tuesday, the latest dual national held in the country amid tensions with the West. Iran's judiciary did not name the man sentenced but said he had been free on bail and re-arrested while trying to flee the country.  Iranian media said a businessman named Emad Sharghi was arrested while trying to leave the country through a western border. Iranian media said Sharghi is a dual U.S.-Iranian national, and that his wife's passport was also confiscated to prevent her leaving the country.   Former hostage of Iran wants Biden to prioritize prisoner release It was the first arrest of an American or a U.S. dual national announced by Iran since President Joe Biden was sworn in earlier this month, and it may complicate Mr. Biden's efforts to bring Iran back into compliance with the nuclear...
    TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — An Iranian-American has been sentenced to prison on spying charges, Iran’s judiciary reported Tuesday, the latest dual national held in the country amid tensions with the West. Iran’s judiciary did not name the man sentenced, but said he had been free on bail and re-arrested while trying to flee the country. Many prisoners in Iran have been out on bail amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic in the country. Judiciary spokesman Gholamhossein Esmaili said the man had been convicted on espionage charges and of providing military information to foreign countries. Esmaili did not elaborate. It wasn’t immediately clear where the man faced trial. However, previous cases involving those with Western ties accused of espionage have been heard in Iran’s Revolutionary Courts, often sentenced to as much as 10 years in prison. Families of those detained in Iran have criticized Tehran over such trials, saying...
    Jared Kushner and Mir Ben-Sabbath (right) in Rabat. D.R. Written by Nabil D. – The head of the Moroccan Laboratory for the Struggle against Nature has warned his fellow citizens against the Israeli plan to sever Morocco. This is a basic plan to cover up the real aims of the Tel Aviv regime in the neighboring country and the entire Maghreb region. “Naturalization with the Zionist institution has reached all spheres, such as politics, economics, the arts, and sports,” recalled Ahmed Ohman, who was sentenced to a month in prison for opposing the establishment of diplomatic relations. Between Morocco and Israel, Donald Trump and his son-in-law Jared Kushner. “On the whole, Moroccans need to understand that there is no area that is not protected by Zionist invasion,” the activist explained. “The best example is that the assets of waqfs and religious affairs are managed in the country’s capital, Rafat and...
    EFE videos Vietnam increases repression on the eve of the congress that will mark its future Ho Chi Minh (Vietnam), Jan 22 (EFE) .- Vietnam has increased the pressure on dissidents with arrests, prison sentences and other forms of harassment, as the XIII Congress of the Communist Party approaches, which since Monday will mark the course of the country for the next five years. In the Congress, which will take place from January 25 to February 2, some 1,600 party delegates from all over the country will elect the 200 members of the central committee, which in turn will designate twenty members of the Politburo, the highest body leader and in charge of appointing the general secretary of the party, the position that holds the greatest power in the country. “In recent months, the communist regime in Vietnam has stepped up its heavy hand against local dissent by arresting activists,...
    A 30-year-old Iraqi migrant with Swedish citizenship has been deported from Denmark for the 17th time after coming to the country consistently for drug deals. The 30-year-old Iraqi man was arrested earlier this week and police have demanded that not only he be deported from the country but that he should be banned from Denmark for life. The arrest and deportation is the 17th time the Iraqi has been ordered to leave the country. He told officers that he comes back time and time again because illegal drugs are easier to purchase in Denmark compared to Sweden where he is a citizen, Ekstra Bladet reports. According to the newspaper, the man had been arrested last year in October and had presented a fake Italian drivng licence to police as his identification. In one instance the man came to Denmark the same day he had been released from a Swedish prison,...
    Seoul, South Korea (CNN)South Korea's highest court has upheld former President Park Geun-hye's 20-year prison sentence for her 2018 bribery conviction, ending a corruption scandal that has gripped the country for years.Park was initially sentenced to 24 years in prison after she was found guilty on multiple counts of abuse of power, bribery and coercion. Those charges related to a massive influence-peddling case that prompted widespread protests, implicated some of the country's most powerful figures and saw her removed from office in 2017.Ousted South Korean president Park Geun-hye stands trial over corruption scandalPark's 2018 sentence was reduced to 20 years last July following a retrial. Prosecutors appealed that sentence and requested a heavier penalty, but on Thursday, South Korea's Supreme Court upheld Park's 20-year jail term, according to a news release from the court.The Supreme Court is South Korea's highest court, meaning that Thursday's decision is expected to be the...
    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — A convicted firebrand cleric who inspired the Bali bombers and other violent extremists walked free from an Indonesian prison Friday after completing his sentence for funding the training of Islamic militants. Police said they would continue to monitor the activities of Abu Bakar Bashir, who is now 82 and ailing, and his son said Bashir for now would be avoiding activities outside his family due to the coronavirus pandemic. Bashir was imprisoned in 2011 for his links to a militant training camp in the religiously conservative Aceh province. He was convicted of funding the military-style camp to train Islamic militants and sentenced to 15 years in jail. Bashir has accumulated 55 months of sentence reductions, which are often granted to prisoners on major holidays, such as Independence Day, religious holiday exemptions and illness, said Rika Aprianti, the spokesperson for the corrections department at the Justice Ministry....
    Algerian authorities sentenced a man to three years in prison on Monday for his satirical social media posts mocking Algeria’s government and state religion, Islam, Agence France-Presse (AFP) reported on Monday. Authorities accused Walid Kechida, 25, of insulting Algerian President Abdelmadjid Tebboune and “offending the precepts” of Islam with internet memes and other online posts, according to Kaci Tansaout, a member of Algeria’s National Committee for the Liberation of Detainees (CNLD), a prisoners’ rights group. “Walid Kechida is sadly sentenced to three years in prison with a fine,” Tansaout said. “The public prosecutor in Algeria’s northeastern Setif province had called for a five-year sentence, and Kechida has already spent eight months in detention awaiting trial,” according to AFP. Kechida is a supporter of Algeria’s anti-government protest movement, known as the Hirak. Algerian authorities have arrested and prosecuted several Hirak supporters in recent months as part of an overall effort to quell the protest...
    The U.S. continues its run at the top of the list as the country with the most COVID-19 infections, the disease caused by the coronavirus.   Early Sunday, the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center reported the U.S. has 20.4 million of the world’s 84.3 million COVID infections.  India, the country with the second-largest number of cases has about half as many cases as the U.S. with 10.3 million.  Public health officials warn, however, that India’s caseload may be undercounted.  The U.S. has recorded more than 350,000 deaths related to the coronavirus. Funeral homes across the country are finding it difficult to keep up with the demand for their services.    A surge of cases in the coming weeks is expected, following the holiday season, public health officials say.  The CDC Data Tracker says more than 13 million coronavirus vaccines have been distributed in the U.S. but only 4.2 million people...
    ^ Keep Westword Free Support Us I Support Local Community Journalism Support the independent voice of Denver and help keep the future of Westword free. Support Us FCI Englewood, a federal prison in Jefferson County that's the site of one of the worst COVID outbreaks in Colorado, will experience another kind of outbreak on December 31, when activists plan to hold a "New Year's Eve Noise Demo" outside the facility. An outbreak of sound. "You can anticipate abolitionist, anti-prison and leftist chanting," explains Mary Reeves, an organizer affiliated with Denver Communists. "You can participate with noisemakers of any kind. There will probably be confetti. The typical things you would expect at a New Year's Eve party. But this is not a party, because there's nothing really to celebrate in a country like this."Related Stories FCI Englewood Has Become a COVID-19 Hot Spot How Soon-to-Be-Freed Rod...
    Jonathan Pollard, who spent 30 years in U.S. prison for spying for Israel, arrived in Israel early Wednesday with his wife, triumphantly kissing the ground as he exited the aircraft in the culmination of a decades-long affair that had long strained relations between the two close allies. Pollard was welcomed at Israel's international airport by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who presented him and his wife Esther with Israeli ID cards granting them citizenship. 'Welcome back. How good you've come home,' Netanyahu said, according to a statement issued by his office.  He said they could start new lives in Israel, 'in freedom and happiness.'  'We are ecstatic to be home at last,' said Pollard. Jonathan Pollard and his wife Esther fell to their knees, with Netanyahu watching on Pollard, 66, was released from US custody in November 2015 after 30 years in prison Netanyahu handed them Israeli ID...
    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israeli media say Jonathan Pollard, who served 30 years in U.S. prison for spying for Israel, has arrived in country. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    (CNN)An Australian man dubbed "the Claremont killer" has been sentenced to at least 40 years in jail for murdering two young women, bringing an end to one of the country's most notorious cold cases. Jane Rimmer, Ciara Glennon and Sarah Spiers all went missing from a popular nightlife area in the Western Australia city of Perth in the 1990s. For nearly 25 years, their unsolved deaths continued to loom large in the minds of residents.In September this year, following a seven-month judge-only trial, Bradley Robert Edwards, 52, was found guilty of murdering childcare worker Rimmer, 23, in 1996 and lawyer Glennon, 27, in 1997.He was found not guilty of murdering Spiers, 18, a secretary whose body has never been found, as there was insufficient evidence.On Wednesday, Edwards was sentenced to a minimum of 40 years in prison before he will be eligible to apply for parole, the Supreme Court of...
    Filmmaker and left-wing activist Michael Moore has claimed in his weekly podcast that there is “non-stop killing of our black and brown citizens in this country.” He also called President Donald Trump the “worst president ever.” In the latest episode of “Rumble,” Moore addressed the Black Lives Matter protests of the past several months as he conversed with fired CNN contributor Marc Lamont Hill. “We’ve had a year [with] the absolute worst president ever, and it happened this year with a once in a century pandemic,” Moore said. “It happened this year and with an uprising over the non-stop killing of our black and brown citizens in this country, and that people finally said, ‘That’s enough.’ … It’s been a powerful and it’s been a revolting year.” Listen below: Moore’s claim that there is “non-stop killing” of “black and brown citizens” isn’t supported by the evidence. A Harvard University...
    A human rights law was successfully used to block the deportation of a Turkish drug lord from the United Kingdom despite previously being ruled by British judges to be a “danger to the community”. The 52-year-old Turk — referred to only as ‘CD’ as he was also granted anonymity — has been described as a “very major player” in the heroin-smuggling racket in Britain, yet he will not face deportation. CD was released from prison in January after only serving two-thirds of his 18-year sentence. Rather than being deported from the country, his lawyers successfully argued that his removal from the country would breach his human rights due to the dangers he would face should he return to his native Turkey. According to documents seen by the Mail on Sunday, the drug dealer initially entered the UK as an illegal immigrant in 1995 and was refused asylum, but was granted...
    At least 11 people have died and dozens were left wounded following a prison riot in Sri Lanka this weekend prompted by fears that authorities were doing nothing to contain the Chinese coronavirus. Violence broke out on Sunday when guards opened fire to contain unrest at the Mahara prison near Colombo. Prisoners demanded release after hundreds of inmates tested positive for the coronavirus and were not moved to isolation. The Police Criminal Investigation Department announced that it launched a probe into Sunday’s clashes. Justice Minister Ali Sabry said on Monday that he will appoint a five-member committee to investigate the matter. Human rights groups have expressed concerns that the majority of the deaths were the result of lethal force by authorities, accused of ignoring inmates’ concerns about lack of testing and adequate isolation facilities. “We can’t say it for certain but most of the deaths and injuries appear to...
    Colombo, Sri LankaAt least eight prisoners were killed and more than 50 injured in clashes with guards at a Sri Lankan prison, officials said on Monday, as authorities tried to quell a protest over rising corornavirus infections in the country's crowded jails.Sri Lanka has witnessed an upsurge in coronavirus cases in the past month and over-congested prisons across the country have reported thousands of fresh infections.Inmates have staged protests in recent weeks demanding an increase in coronavirus testing and new isolation facilities for infected prisoners.The latest clash at Mahara prison situated on the outskirts of the capital Colombo started on Sunday when some inmates protested against prisoners infected by the Covid-19 virus being transferred from other facilities to Mahara.Prison inmates are twice as likely to die of Covid-19 than those on the outside, new report finds"We can't say it for certain but most of the deaths and injuries appear to...
    COLOMBO (Reuters) - At least eight prisoners were killed and more than 50 injured in clashes with guards at a Sri Lankan prison, officials said on Monday, as authorities tried to quell a protest over rising corornavirus infections in the country's crowded jails. Sri Lanka has witnessed an upsurge in coronavirus cases in the past month and over-congested prisons across the country have reported thousands of fresh infections. Inmates have staged protests in recent weeks demanding an increase in coronavirus testing and new isolation facilities for infected prisoners. The latest clash at Mahara prison situated on the outskirts of the capital Colombo started on Sunday when some inmates protested against prisoners infected by the Covid-19 virus being transferred from other facilities to Mahara. "We can't say it for certain but most of the deaths and injuries appear to be due to gunshots," said Ajith Rohana, a senior police official tracking the...
    (CNN)A Florida man who has spent 31 years in prison for a nonviolent marijuana crime could soon be a free man.Richard DeLisi has been incarcerated since 1989 when, at the age of 40, he was convicted on charges of racketeering, trafficking in cannabis and conspiracy after agreeing to help smuggle more than 100 pounds of marijuana from Colombia into Florida. He received a 90-year prison sentence.His case has received legal support from the Last Prisoner Project, a nonprofit that advocates for ending prison sentences for cannabis offenses. With 31 years in prison, DeLisi is the country's longest-serving nonviolent cannabis prisoner, according to the group. 5 facts behind Americas high incarceration rateDeLisi, now 71, could be released from South Bay Correctional Facility as early as December 4, though the exact release day still depends on several factors, according to the Florida Department of Corrections press secretary Kayla McLaughlin."It feels amazingly wonderful...
    An Australian academic's Israeli boyfriend was the real reason she was detained by Iranian intelligence officers as she tried to leave the country on baseless spy claims.  Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert was released in a reported prisoner swap deal early on Thursday morning after spending two years in some of Iran's most notorious jails.  Multiple diplomatic and senior government sources have confirmed that Dr Moore-Gilbert was stopped at Tehran airport in 2018 after authorities discovered she was in a relationship with an Israeli citizen, according to The Age.  Dr Kylie Moore-Gilbert (pictured) was released in a reported prisoner swap deal early on Thursday morning after spending two years in some of Iran's most notorious jails  Dr Moore-Gilbert (pictured) being transported to a waiting plane to leave Iran after her release on Thursday morning  The University of Melbourne lecturer was freed after more than six months of high level negotiations...
    (CNN)Hundreds of people were sentenced to life in prison in Turkey on Thursday in trial linked to a 2016 coup attempt. A total of 475 defendants were tried in the high-profile case that focused on the events in the Akinci Air Base in Ankara, which the prosecutor argued was the main command center for the coup plot. Most of the defendants received at least one life sentence. Nineteen were sentenced to 79 counts of life in prison without parole after being convicted of charges of attempting to overthrow the constitutional order, assassinate the President and murder, according to the state news agency Anadolu. Turkeys combative foreign policy could soon reach a dead endSeventy people were acquitted, the state news agency said. "The Turkish judiciary continues to hold the traitors to account," Turkish Justice Minister Abdulhamit Gul said on Twitter after the court announced the verdicts. Read More"No one should doubt...
    Iran British-Australian educator Kylie Moore-Gilbert was reportedly released on Wednesday during a prisoner exchange for three Iranians. Moore-Gilbert, 33, one of the country’s highest-ranking Western prisoners, was jailed for more than two years on espionage charges. In a statement, he praised the Iranian people and thanked those who worked for his release. British-Australian academic jails ‘notorious’ in Iran’s notorious desert prison, says Australia British-Australian educator Kylie Moore-Gilbert is seen on November 25, 2020 in Tehran, Iran. (Via Iranian State Television AP) “I have nothing but respect, love and admiration for Iran’s great nation and its loving, generous and courageous people,” Moore-Gilbert told The Guardian. “Despite my injustices, I am leaving your country. “I came to Iran as a friend and with friendly intentions. I left Iran with those feelings. It is not the same yet, but strengthened,” he continued. Moore-Gilbert, a lecturer at the University of Melbourne on Middle...
    If there’s been a day in his adult life that Donald Trump didn’t break the law, it was because he forgot or was too busy watching porn. To him, the law is something for other people to follow and for him to pervert and subvert with delays and motions and countersuits and people who’ll lie to cover up his lies. In a just world, he belonged in a prison cell decades ago. There’s nothing I’d love more than to see the whole family get sent up the river. Ivanka included. True, we do not live in a country that has made it a habit of sending pretty, rich blond women to prison, but if ever an exception might be made, it’s here. So it’s a pretty serious bummer to see Joe Biden’s aides leaking out through NBC News that he wants to move on and “move the country forward.” I...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — A new report shows that more jail and prison staff and inmates in Texas have been infected and killed by COVID-19 than those of any other state’s criminal justice system. According to the report by the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas, at least 231 inmates and staff members have died of COVID-19 in Texas prisons and jails. The study also found that Texas inmates and staff tested positive for the coronavirus virus that causes COVID-19 at a 490% higher rate than the state’s general population. Also, nine Texas inmates approved for parole died in prison before their release. Federal prison facilities and Immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities were excluded from the analysis, the LBJ School said in a statement. “COVID-19 has had a devastating impact on prisons and jails across the country, and especially in Texas,” said Michele Deitch,...
    BRATISLAVA, Slovakia (AP) — The leader of a far-right party with seats in the Slovak parliament was convicted of illegal use of neo-Nazi symbols and sentenced to four years and four months in prison on Monday. Marian Kotleba, head of the People’s Party Our Slovakia, was standing trial after he presented three poor families with checks for 1,488 euros in 2017. The number 1,488 has a symbolic meaning for neo-Nazis and white supremacists. The verdict isn't final. Kotleba pleaded not guilty and can appeal the verdict issued by the Specialized Criminal Court in Pezinok. The country’s Supreme Court would decide on his appeal. The extreme far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia, whose members use Nazi salutes and want Slovakia out of the European Union and NATO, was the fourth-most popular party in the country in February’s parliamentary elections with 8% support. It has 17 seats in the 150-seat the Slovak Parliament...
    BRATISLAVA – The leader of a far-right party with seats in the Slovak parliament was convicted of illegal use of neo-Nazi symbols and sentenced to four years and four months in prison on Monday. Marian Kotleba, head of the People’s Party Our Slovakia, was standing trial after he presented three poor families with checks for 1,488 euros in 2017. The number 1,488 has a symbolic meaning for neo-Nazis and white supremacists. The verdict isn't final. Kotleba pleaded not guilty and can appeal the verdict issued by the Specialized Criminal Court in Pezinok. The country’s Supreme Court would decide on his appeal. The extreme far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia, whose members use Nazi salutes and want Slovakia out of the European Union and NATO, was the fourth-most popular party in the country in February’s parliamentary elections with 8% support. It has 17 seats in the 150-seat the Slovak Parliament and...
    BRATISLAVA, Slovakia (AP) — The leader of a far-right party with seats in the Slovak parliament was convicted of illegal use of neo-Nazi symbols and sentenced to four years and four months in prison on Monday. Marian Kotleba, head of the People’s Party Our Slovakia, was standing trial after he presented three poor families with checks for 1,488 euros in 2017. The number 1,488 has a symbolic meaning for neo-Nazis and white supremacists. The verdict isn’t final. Kotleba pleaded not guilty and can appeal the verdict issued by the Specialized Criminal Court in Pezinok. The country’s Supreme Court would decide on his appeal. The extreme far-right People’s Party Our Slovakia, whose members use Nazi salutes and want Slovakia out of the European Union and NATO, was the fourth-most popular party in the country in February’s parliamentary elections with 8% support. It has 17 seats in the 150-seat the Slovak...
    KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Belarus’ authoritarian president on Saturday visited a prison to talk to opposition activists, who have been jailed for challenging his re-election that was widely seen as manipulated and triggered two months of protests. President Alexander Lukashenko spent more than four hours talking to his jailed political foes at the Minsk prison that belongs to Belarus’ State Security Committee, which still goes under its Soviet-era name, KGB. Lukashenko’s office said that “the goal of the president was to hear everyone’s opinion.” Among 11 jailed activists who attended the meeting were several members of the opposition’s Coordination Council and Viktor Babariko, the former head of a major Russia-owned bank. Babariko aspired to challenge Lukashenko but was barred from the race and remained in jail since his arrest in May on charges he dismissed as political. Lukashenko’s landslide re-election in the Aug. 9 vote was widely seen as manipulated...
    KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Belarus' authoritarian president on Saturday visited a prison to talk to opposition activists, who have been jailed for challenging his re-election that was widely seen as manipulated and triggered two months of protests. President Alexander Lukashenko spent more than four hours talking to his jailed political foes at the Minsk prison that belongs to Belarus' State Security Committee, which still goes under its Soviet-era name, KGB. Lukashenko's office said that “the goal of the president was to hear everyone's opinion." Among 11 jailed activists who attended the meeting were several members of the opposition's Coordination Council and Viktor Babariko, the former head of a major Russia-owned bank. Babariko aspired to challenge Lukashenko but was barred from the race and remained in jail since his arrest in May on charges he dismissed as political. Lukashenko's landslide re-election in the Aug. 9 vote was widely seen as manipulated...
    KYIV – Belarus' authoritarian president on Saturday visited a prison to talk to opposition activists, who have been jailed for challenging his re-election that was widely seen as manipulated and triggered two months of protests. President Alexander Lukashenko spent more than four hours talking to his jailed political foes at the Minsk prison that belongs to Belarus' State Security Committee, which still goes under its Soviet-era name, KGB. Lukashenko's office said that “the goal of the president was to hear everyone's opinion." Among 11 jailed activists who attended the meeting were several members of the opposition's Coordination Council and Viktor Babariko, the former head of a major Russia-owned bank. Babariko aspired to challenge Lukashenko but was barred from the race and remained in jail since his arrest in May on charges he dismissed as political. Lukashenko's landslide re-election in the Aug. 9 vote was widely seen as manipulated amid...
    Allies of Nicaragua strongman Daniel Ortega have proposed a law making it a crime to spread fake news on social media punishable by up to four years in prison, according to a report. A bill introduced Monday in the National Assembly would allow sentences of two to four years for “the publication or dissemination of false (or) distorted information, likely to spread anxiety, anguish or fear,” Agence France-Presse reports. It’s the second controversial bill in a week to be introduced in the National Assembly, which is under the control of President Ortega’s Sandanista supporters. That bill would require any person who receives funding from abroad to register with the Ministry of the Interior as a “foreign agent” subject to close monitoring and restrictions on their civic and political rights, AFP reported. Those who would have to register include NGOs and foreign correspondents. The bill has caused an international outcry,...
    By Erikas Mwisi Kambale BENI, Democratic Republic of Congo (Reuters) - Fifty-two inmates at a prison in the northeastern Congo city of Bunia have starved to death this year because of insufficient government funding, the United Nations and local authorities said. The Democratic Republic of Congo's jails are among the world's most overcrowded, according to the U.N., with inmates living in squalid conditions on meager rations. The Bunia prison operates at nearly 500% of capacity, U.N. figures show. "This situation is really worrying," said Bunia mayor Ferdinand Fimbo, blaming sporadic government support for malnutrition in the prison. President Felix Tshisekdei told his cabinet this month he would personally ensure prisons across the country did not run out of food or medicine. But the head of the Bunia prison, Camille Zonzi, was quoted in a report by the U.N. peacekeeping force in Congo as saying that the government had still only...
    BANGKOK (AP) — Health officials in Thailand say a prison inmate has tested positive for the coronavirus in the country’s first confirmed locally transmitted case in 100 days. They say the inmate is a 37-year-old man who was arrested for drug abuse who was arrested in Aug. 26 and tested positive on Wednesday when brought to the health center of a prison in Bangkok. A day earlier, the prime minister had congratulated the nation for having achieved 100 days without any confirmed local cases of the coronavirus. Thailand has sustained relatively light health damage from the pandemic, even though in January it was the first country outside China to confirm a case. But its economy has been devastated by the absence of foreign tourists, who are banned from entry, and by a drop in exports. Copyright © 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast,...
    RONALDINHO has been pictured arriving at a Paraguayan court, where he could finally be allowed to return to Brazil. The football legend has been under house-arrest in Asuncion since April after serving 32 days in prison. 5Brazilian legend Ronaldinho was pictured arriving at court todayCredit: Reuters 5The Brazilian legend is hoping to be allowed to return to his homelandCredit: Reuters 5He insisted on attending the trial in personCredit: AFP or licensors And now five months on from flying into Paraguay for charity work, Ronaldinho and his brother could finally be allowed to leave. A judge will today decide whether to let the 40-year-old leave the country after paying a £152,000 fine for the use of allegedly faked travel documents. And Ronaldinho has insisted on being able to attend the trial in person. So, masked up as has become custom since the beginning of the Brazilian's ordeal, he arrived at the...
    New Jersey prisoners who are within a year of completing their state prison sentences would be eligible to be released up to eight months early if a proposed bill becomes law. The New York Times reports that New Jersey lawmakers seemed close to backing the proposal on Thursday. The bill would free more than 3,000 prisoners amid the coronavirus pandemic if it is signed into law.  The American Civil Liberties Union told the newspaper it believes the proposal is the first legislative initiative of its kind in the country. Prisoners eligible for the early release would receive credit for time served during the pandemic. If approved, the law would not allow for the release of most sex offenders, but would apply to inmates sentenced for other violent crimes, including murder, according to the newspaper.  “There are people who were sentenced to long prison terms, but they weren’t sentenced to die...
    CAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian court sentenced several young women to two years in prison Monday for posting “indecent” dance videos on TikTok in a fraught case that critics describe as a further crackdown on self-expression in the conservative society. The women were also fined 300,000 Egyptian pounds (nearly $19,000) each for “violating the values and principles of the Egyptian family,” inciting debauchery and promoting human trafficking, according to a statement from the public prosecutor. Their lawyers vowed to appeal the ruling. The prosecution statement named just two of the defendants — 20-year-old student Haneen Hossam and 22-year-old Mawada Eladhm — and said the other three helped run their social media accounts.  Both women recently vaulted to TikTok fame, amassing millions of followers for their video snippets set to catchy Egyptian club-pop tracks. In their respective 15-second clips, the women wearing makeup pose in cars, dance in kitchens and joke...
    CAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian court sentenced several young women to two years in prison Monday for posting “indecent” dance videos on TikTok in a fraught case that critics describe as a further crackdown on self-expression in the conservative society. The women were also fined 300,000 Egyptian pounds (nearly $19,000) each for “violating the values and principles of the Egyptian family,” inciting debauchery and promoting human trafficking, according to a statement from the public prosecutor. Their lawyers vowed to appeal the ruling. The prosecution statement named just two of the defendants — 20-year-old student Haneen Hossam and 22-year-old Mawada Eladhm — and said the other three helped run their social media accounts. Both women recently vaulted to TikTok fame, amassing millions of followers for their video snippets set to catchy Egyptian club-pop tracks. In their respective 15-second clips, the women wearing makeup pose in cars, dance in kitchens and joke...
    CAIRO (AP) — An Egyptian court sentenced several young women to two years in prison Monday for posting “indecent” dance videos on TikTok in a fraught case that critics describe as a further crackdown on self-expression in the conservative society. The women were also fined 300,000 Egyptian pounds (nearly $19,000) each for “violating the values and principles of the Egyptian family,” inciting debauchery and promoting human trafficking, according to a statement from the public prosecutor. Their lawyers vowed to appeal the ruling. The prosecution statement named just two of the defendants — 20-year-old student Haneen Hossam and 22-year-old Mawada Eladhm — and said the other three helped run their social media accounts. Both women recently vaulted to TikTok fame, amassing millions of followers for their video snippets set to catchy Egyptian club-pop tracks. In their respective 15-second clips, the women wearing makeup pose in cars, dance in kitchens and joke...
    Bradley Cortright July 13, 2020 0 Comments Amid criticism of President Donald Trump’s decision to commute former campaign aide Roger Stone’s prison sentence, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany is defending the move.  “The Roger Stone clemency was a very important moment for justice in this country,” McEnany said during a press briefing on Monday. “You had a completely bogus Russian witch hunt that found nothing, and in order to justify the waste of taxpayer dollars, you had Robert Mueller charging people with process crimes.” She continued to allege that there are “two standards of justice,” with one that favors the opponents of the president and a different standard for supporters of Trump.  “The last time I checked, they didn’t have 29 FBI agents wearing tactical gear showing up at their house in a predawn raid wielding M-4 rifles and sweeping across the lawn, as with Roger Stone … Instead, [Andrew] McCabe and [James] Clapper...
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