Thursday, Feb 25, 2021 - 06:00:36
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    SINGAPORE (Reuters) - Facebook on Thursday said it had banned the Myanmar military from using its Facebook and Instagram platforms with immediate effect, as pro-democracy demonstrators continued to stage rallies to protest the military seizing power. "Events since the February 1 coup, including deadly violence, have precipitated a need for this ban," Facebook said in a blog post. "We believe the risks of allowing the Tatmadaw (Myanmar army) on Facebook and Instagram are too great." The army seized power this month after alleging fraud in a Nov. 8 election swept by Aung San Suu Kyi’s National League for Democracy (NLD), detaining her and much of the party leadership. At least three protesters and one policeman have been killed in violence at rallies. The U.S tech giant said it would also ban all "Tadmadaw-linked commercial entities" from advertising on its platforms. (Reporting by Fanny Potkin; Editing by Ed Davies) Copyright 2021...
    When Turkey launched its Afrin offensive in early 2018 to dislodge Kurdish minorities from Northern Syria, the country ordered Facebook to block the page of a prominent militia group in the area known as the People’s Protection Units or YPG. Forced to make a decision, the company prioritized staying online over objecting to censorship, new internal emails obtained by show. Since then, the social media giant has blocked users in Turkey from accessing the YPG’s Facebook page. Facebook complied with the order even though, like the US government, it does not consider the group a terrorist organization. “… We are in favor of geo-blocking YPG content if the prospects of a full-service blockage are great,” the team that accessed the situation wrote to Joel Kaplan, the company’s vice-president of global public policy. “Geo-blocking the YPG is not without risk — activists outside of Turkey will likely notice our actions,...
    Sheryl Sandberg and other top Facebook execs silenced a Kurdish group at the request of the Turkish government in a bid to protect its business in 2018, according to a new report. According to ProPublica, Turkey, which was launching a bloody military offensive against Kurdish minorities in neighboring Syria, demanded that Facebook block posts from the People’s Protection Units, a mostly Kurdish militia group that the Turkish government had targeted. If Facebook didn’t give in to Turkey’s demands, it faced losing tens of millions of users in the country. On the flip side, silencing the group, known as YPG, would add to the perception that Facebook too often bends to the wishes of authoritarian governments and that it values its business over all else. In a series of newly disclosed emails from the company’s leadership, ProPublica revealed that there was no hand-wringing over the ethical dilemma....
    More On: facebook Australian lawmakers push ahead with news law after Facebook concessions Facebook backs down on bullying in a win for journalism Facebook watchdogs beg Canadian town: Stop erecting sexy snowmen! Facebook agrees to lift Australian news ban after reaching deal on media law Sheryl Sandberg and other top Facebook execs silenced a Kurdish group at the request of the Turkish government in a bid to protect its business in 2018, according to a new report. According to ProPublica, Turkey, which was launching a bloody military offensive against Kurdish minorities in neighboring Syria, demanded that Facebook block posts from the People’s Protection Units, a mostly Kurdish militia group that the Turkish government had targeted. If Facebook didn’t give in to Turkey’s demands, it faced losing tens of millions of users in the country. On the flip side, silencing the group, known as YPG, would add to...
    A RENTER was left scratching their head at a very “unusual” gadget they found on the wall of their new home - but can you guess what it is? The person took to the internet to help identify the object, and it actually has a very useful purpose in the home. 3A renter was left baffled after seeing this gadget on the wall of their new flatCredit: Facebook It turns out that the long, white device screwed onto the wall is actually a broom and mop holder.  There are four slots, each with a round bulb-shaped fixture, for you to store your broom handles so they don’t topple over onto the floor.  One woman explained: “It holds your broom. Slot the handle into each gap.” Another added: “You push them in the slot and it locks them in.” 3The person took to the internet to help identify the object, and...
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s government announced on Tuesday that Facebook has agreed to lift its ban on Australians sharing news after a deal was struck on legislation that would make digital giants pay for journalism. Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Facebook confirmed in statements that they had reached agreement on amendments to proposed legislation that would make the social network and Google pay for news that they feature. Facebook blocked Australian users from accessing and sharing news after the House of Representatives passed the draft law late Wednesday last week. The Senate will debate amended legislation on Tuesday. “The government has been advised by Facebook that it intends to restore Australian news pages in the coming days,” Frydenberg and Communications Minister Paul Fletcher said in a statement. Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Associated Press, legislation, business, journalism,...
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s government announced on Tuesday that Facebook has agreed to lift its ban on Australians sharing news after a deal was struck on legislation that would make digital giants pay for journalism. Treasurer Josh Frydenberg and Facebook confirmed in statements that they had reached agreement on amendments to proposed legislation that would make the social network and Google pay for news that they feature. Facebook blocked Australian users from accessing and sharing news after the House of Representatives passed the draft law late Wednesday last week. The Senate will debate amended legislation on Tuesday. “The government has been advised by Facebook that it intends to restore Australian news pages in the coming days,” Frydenberg and Communications Minister Paul Fletcher said in a statement. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Facebook will restore Australian news pages this week after reaching a deal with the government over its world-first law regulating big tech. The social media platform was condemned by politicians around the world after it blocked 25 million Australians from viewing and sharing news articles on Thursday. The 'arrogant and disgraceful' move - which also banned charity, health authority and emergency service pages - came after Australia's ground-breaking news media bargaining code passed the lower house of Parliament on Wednesday night. But following talks with Facebook bosses, the government has made some last-minute changes to the law which have appeased the tech giant and brought it back to the negotiating table.   'We're pleased that we've been able to reach an agreement with the Australian government and appreciate the constructive discussions we've had,' said William Easton, Managing Director, Facebook Australia and New Zealand. Facebook has advised the government it will restore...
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s government says Facebook had agreed to lift its news ban after reaching a deal on legisaltion. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    Just a few days after blocking Australian publishers and residents from sharing news content, Facebook has reversed the policy. Initially, Facebook claimed “We will now prioritize investments to other countries, as part of our plans to invest in new licensing news programs and experiences.” In an update posted today, the company said: After further discussions, we are satisfied that the Australian government has agreed to a number of changes and guarantees that address our core concerns about allowing commercial deals that recognize the value our platform provides to publishers relative to the value we receive from them. As a result of these changes, we can now work to further our investment in public interest journalism and restore news on Facebook for Australians in the coming days. Developing…
    Google will end its most recent ban on election-related ads on February 24th. In an email , the company told advertisers it will start accepting all political ads on Wednesday, including those that reference specific elected officials, candidates, political parties or ballot measures. Citing its sensitive events policy, Google temporarily blocked such ads after polls closed at the end of the presidential election in November. It lifted the ban on only to reinstate it a month later on following the US Capitol attack on January 6th. The company enacted the policy to slow the spread of misinformation. “We regularly pause ads over unpredictable, ‘sensitive’ events when ads can be used to exploit the event or amplify misleading information,” a spokesperson for the company told News Brig at the time. The company told it will “continue to rigorously enforce our ads policies, which strictly prohibit demonstrably false information that could significantly...
    WhatsApp has detailed what will happen to users who don’t accept its new privacy policy in an FAQ on its website. Starting May 15th, its functionality will become more limited, and users will no longer be able to send or read messages from the app. They’ll still be able to receive calls and notifications, but this will only be possible for a “short time.” Speaking to TechCrunch, the company confirmed this period will last a few weeks. The new privacy policy has been controversial among some users, who worry that it allows WhatsApp to share their private messages with its parent company Facebook. However, messages between individuals on WhatsApp are end-to-end encrypted, so only their recipients can see their contents. What the new privacy policy relates to is messages sent to businesses, which may be stored on Facebook servers and whose data may be used for advertising. WhatsApp has shared...
    February 19, 2021 | 4:21 pm WhatsApp changed the way it changes the way it makes its terms and conditions known to its users. This after the exodus of users of the messaging service after it announced an update to its privacy policy. The Facebook-owned app said they made an update on the plans to ask users to review and agree to the updated terms and privacy policy. After encountering a great deal of misinformation, we announced last month that we would allow more time for this update, while we work to clear up any confusion. WhatsApp said in a statement Since January, they created a way to communicate points about the update of their policy directly on WhatsApp through the Status function, so that more than 2 billion users could know the information directly in the application. The messaging app said changes to...
    Editorial: Gaming / Facebook / Twitter / YouTube / Instagram / News / Discord / Forums The world of streaming is very competitive and breaking through this sector dominated by YouTube and Twitch is not easy; Proof of this was what happened with Mixer, Microsoft’s attempt to enter the sector that ended up disappearing and its effort transferred to Facebook to strengthen its own platform. Precisely, Facebook Gaming has gone step by step, but firmly, upwards and recently a significant increase in its audience levels was revealed. A recent report by Stream Hatchet revealed the numbers that Facebook Gaming has registered in terms of audience and that account for its rise in the video game streaming sector. According to the information, the escalation of Facebook Gaming began as a result of the pandemic in 2020 and registered a growth of 108% taking as a reference the period from January 2020...
    Since 2018, the American social media giant, Facebook has been facing a class action accusing it of knowingly inflating its audience. Facebook ignored the problem According to legal documents, unveiled on Wednesday February 17, companies accuse Facebook to have consciously inflated its number of users to generate more advertising revenue. They said the social media giant knew the estimates weren’t reliable, but preferred to ignore the issue, notes Le Figaro. So as not to lose income The complainants clarified that this measure overestimated the potential audience for advertising campaigns, but in order not to lose revenue, the platform’s executives did not seek to correct the situation, notes France Info. “Facebook knew that its ‘Potential reach’ was inflated and misleading. (…) Facebook knew that the problem was largely caused by fake accounts and duplicates“, they accused.According to documents viewed by the French press, another employee wondered how...
    London (CNN Business)Facebook's decision to block people from sharing news in Australia has been rebuked by lawmakers around the world, raising the specter of a much wider showdown between the world's biggest social media platform and the governments and news organizations fighting to check its power.Elected officials and media publishers in the United Kingdom, Canada, Germany and the United States slammed Facebook's actions on Thursday, suggesting they were anti-competitive and underscored the need for a regulatory crackdown."It is one of the most idiotic but also deeply disturbing corporate moves of our lifetimes," Julian Knight, the lawmaker who chairs the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee in Britain's parliament, told broadcaster Sky News. How Facebook managed to unfriend Australia while Google came out on topIn a statement shared with CNN Business, Knight said that UK lawmakers will use pending legislation aimed at regulating social media companies to ensure platforms such as...
    By ROD McGUIRK, Associated Press CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s prime minister on Friday urged Facebook to lift its blockade of Australian users and return to the negotiating table with news publishing businesses, warning that other countries would follow his government’s example in making digital giants pay for journalism. Prime Minister Scott Morrison described Facebook’s move Thursday to prevent Australians accessing and sharing news as a threat. The blockade has escalated a fight with the government over whether powerful tech companies should have to pay news organizations for content. “The idea of shutting down the sorts of sites they did yesterday, as some sort of threat — well, I know how Australians react to that and I thought that was not a good move on their part,” Morrison told reporters. “They should move quickly past that, come back to the table and we’ll sort it out,” he added. There was...
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s prime minister on Friday urged Facebook to lift its blockade of Australian users and return to the negotiating table with news publishing businesses, warning that other countries would follow his government’s example in making digital giants pay for journalism. Prime Minister Scott Morrison described Facebook’s move Thursday to prevent Australians accessing and sharing news as a threat. The blockade has escalated a fight with the government over whether powerful tech companies should have to pay news organizations for content. “The idea of shutting down the sorts of sites they did yesterday, as some sort of threat — well, I know how Australians react to that and I thought that was not a good move on their part,” Morrison told reporters. “They should move quickly past that, come back to the table and we’ll sort it out,” he added. There was public outrage at how the...
    Australia has been plunged into a state of shock after Facebook ambushed the country with its unjustified ban on news - but it's far from the first time the so-called social network has made headlines for all the wrong reasons.  The social media juggernaut, helmed by CEO Mark Zuckerberg, on Thursday banned Aussies from reading and sharing local news in response to a world-first law to make tech companies pay media outlets for the content they use. When Australians went to reliable Facebook news accounts they were ominously met with a message saying 'no posts' were available - and even non-news pages providing desperately needed services were banned. Prime Minister Scott Morrison has condemned the 'arrogant and disappointing' move while refusing to bow to intimidation from the tech giant.  A former Facebook CEO even encouraged Australians to delete the app in protest at the 'irresponsible' and 'reckless' new policy. Daily...
    Facebook’s senior executives knew that it was overestimating the number of users its advertisers could reach, according to an amended lawsuit reported by the Financial Times. A product manager told senior executives in 2018 that Facebook’s potential reach audience figures were “deeply wrong,” and proposed changing the metrics to make it more accurate. However, senior executives allegedly rebuffed the changes, saying that the impact on revenue would be “significant,” according to the filing.  woah, I have the unsealed docs here. this is the Facebook census / fake accounts case DCN filed to get unsealed for public interest. Judge recently ruled in our favor. So I guess here come the docs. And the apparent cover-up was once again worse than imagined. Sandberg. https://t.co/q4OT5Wl4D4 pic.twitter.com/DPEPa0YwYq — Jason Kint (@jason_kint) February 18, 2021 Sections of a filing that were previously redacted show internal communication between the product manager and executives in charge of...
    Facebook announced Thursday it has blocked Australians from viewing and sharing news on the platform because of proposed laws in the country to make digital giants pay for journalism. Australian publishers can continue to publish news content on Facebook, but links and posts can't be viewed or shared by Australian audiences, the U.S.-based company said in a statement. Australian users cannot share Australian or international news. International users outside Australia also cannot share Australian news. "The proposed law fundamentally misunderstands the relationship between our platform and publishers who use it to share news content," Facebook regional managing director William Easton said. "It has left us facing a stark choice: attempt to comply with a law that ignores the realities of this relationship, or stop allowing news content on our services in Australia. With a heavy heart, we are choosing the latter," Easton added. The announcement comes a day after...
    Facebook’s version of Cameo has yet to officially launch, but Facebook is already hosting live-streamed “meet and greet” events with influencers as it tests the service. A website for Super, an upcoming Facebook service that will let users pay to interact with influencers in live streams, (as spotted by social media consultant ) and has streamed several events with influencers since late last year. Facebook hasn’t said when Super might launch, but a spokesperson confirmed the company is testing the service with “small events.” Bloomberg reported that Facebook’s New Product Experimentation team was working on the feature, which it compared to Cameo, the app that allows people to pay celebrities to record short, personalized videos. Unlike Cameo, Super seems to be geared more toward live streams. Its website is currently promoting a handful of upcoming “meet and greet” events with YouTube personalities, like Andru Edwards . It notes that...
    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Facebook says it’s blocking Australians from accessing news due to proposed laws to make tech giants pay for journalism. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    If there was an award for ‘world's best camouflage’ this snake would have definitely won it. You may not have been able to spot the seven-foot python at first glance but a sharp-eyed possum has done so. 5Can you spot the seven-foot python?Credit: Snake Catchers Brisbane and Gold Coast / Facebook The photos show the carpet python perfectly hidden under the rail, looking ready to pounce while the terrified possum is curled up in a corner on the roof of a family's porch. Snake Catchers Brisbane & Gold Coast posted the ‘game of spot the snake’ on their Facebook page after being called out to a home in Sherwood, Queensland. Some users were quick to spot the deadly snake while others could only see the possum. Snake catcher Jaedon Lunt said the snake was probably eyeing up the possum for its next meal. 5The snake was perfectly hidden under the...
    Interaction through devices such as a smartwatch is today such a normal fact, to which we have to be vigilant, since they determine the success that brands find in this phenomenon. There are more and more bets in the market, which help us understand the value of a very well executed product, as Facebook has learned to do. The social media market is one of great value, especially because it determines the capacity of a platform the weight of Facebook. The technology market does not stop demonstrating the capacity with which its brands have in the market and to this extent it is that benchmarks have been established, which help us to understand the value in the market, to be able to increasingly integrate the consumer , just like Facebook is doing. As part of this integration there is an intrinsic value in the series of developments that have been...
    Facebook could re-implement one of the strategies that works best for it, but this time with a device. After Facebook’s plans to create an app that copies Clubhouse were known in the past days, now Zuckerberg’s company could be involved in launching its own Apple Watch. Facebook prepares its own smartwatch Although relations between Facebook and Apple are going through their most tense, those in Mountain View recognize that Apple’s smartwatch is the best inspiration for making a smartwatch. The information shared since has revealed details about the development of an Apple Watch competitor with a focus on health and messaging. The possible launch of a smart watch by the social media giant could happen in 2022. Know more: Zuckerberg v. Apple: orders staff to “inflict pain” on apple company Facebook would release a smartwatch in 2022 The report cites anonymous Facebook sources involved in the...
    Facebook goes against the Apple Watch. The strong rumor arises of the new secret project of Mark Zuckerberg and his social network: a smart watch. We know that the Facebook nuts have all the money in the world. And despite the privacy scandals or the serious threats to censor the platform in some countries, everything indicates that the company has many active projects. The curious thing is the case of the most recent report on this matter. Since now everything indicates that Mark Zuckerberg would not be limited only to the field of social networks. On the contrary, it would be evaluating a new way to collect data to be in close contact with its users: using a smartwatch. Facebook goes against the Apple Watch Since The Information the details of a new report emerged directly from alleged anonymous informants inside Facebook. Those who say that within the company...
    Facebook has detailed how it’s handling the political situation Myanmar in a new post, where it has revealed that it’s limiting the distribution of all content posted by the country’s military. According to the social network, the “Tatmadaw,” the official name of the armed forces of Myanmar, is using the platform “to spread misinformation. As such, it’s enforcing company policy on repeat offenders of misinformation, which will affect the Tatmadaw Information Team’s Facebook Page, Tatmadaw spokesperson Brigadier-General Zaw Min Tun’s Facebook account, among other military-owned accounts. In addition, the company has suspended Myanmar government agencies’ ability to ask Facebook for content removal through channels reserved for authorities. It’s also proactively removing hate speech and reducing distribution of content that explicitly praises or supports the coup. The website is deleting misinformation that there was widespread fraud or foreign interference in Myanmar’s November elections, as well, along with content that calls...
    Facebook they are not shy about integrating formats that work into their services. And the famous “Stories” of Snapchat or Reels similar to TikTok are the best example of this. Now, Mark Zuckerberg’s company would be in the early stages of development of an app similar to the incipient social network, ClubHouse. Facebook wants its own ClubHouse ClubHouse is a social network where what really matters is the voice, talk and communicate. According to a report shared by The New York Times, Facebook has been interested in this format for a while. And perhaps, Mark Zuckerberg’s first-hand test, in one of the Clubhouse “rooms” to talk about the future of augmented reality, a few days ago, was what he needed to start his own application. Know more: What is Clubhouse, the new audio social network Facebook creates a social network like Clubhouse According to The New...
    FACEBOOK is secretly creating an "audio" social media service like Clubhouse, a new report claims. It's a bid to take on the viral app that already counts Elon Musk among its biggest fans. 3Facebook is quietly working on its own Clubhouse rivalCredit: Facebook Clubhouse is a live audio app whose members join on an invite-only basis. It's a bit like radio, podcasts and Reddit all rolled into one. People will host various "conversations" in virtual rooms where other users can join and listen in. Now a New York Times report claims that Facebook is working on a similar live audio product. 3Clubhouse is a fast-growing live audio appCredit: Unsplash Facebook hasn't denied the report, and said that it's always experimenting on new products. "We've been connecting people through audio and video technologies for many years," said a Facebook spokesperson. "And [we] are always exploring new ways to improve that experience...
    Copycat Facebook strikes again - in just a week of CEO Mark Zuckerberg making an appearance on the Clubhouse app, the firm is reportedly building its own version. Clubhouse is an audio-chat social media platform that is available by invite-only, but has climbed the popularity ladder in just a few months. People familiar with matter told The New York Times that Facebook executives have ordered employees to create audio chat rooms, which is known internally as ‘Fireside.’ Zuckerberg appeared in ‘The Good Time Show’ Sunday to discuss the future of virtually and augmented reality, but listeners of the discussion speculated that it was a reconnaissance mission for his own company. Facebook is reportedly building its own version of the new social app Clubhouse. Clubhouse is an audio-chat platform that is available by invite-only, but has climbed the popularity ladder in just a few months DailyMail.com has reached out to...
    Following reports that Facebook may be hopping on the newsletter bandwagon, it appears the social network is working on its own version of one of the hottest apps around, Clubhouse. The audio-chat iOS app (which is currently invite-only) blew up last week when Elon Musk stopped by for a conversation. Mark Zuckerberg recently popped in to chat as well, so the Facebook CEO obviously has some interest in Clubhouse. Zuckerberg might not stick around on the app, though, especially if Facebook creates a Clubhouse competitor. According to The New York Times , Facebook leaders have asked developers to build the company’s own audio chat service, which is said to be in the early stages of development.  Facebook, of course, has rarely spotted a tech trend it didn’t quickly latch onto. It has a long history of (ahem) borrowing ideas from competitors, often to great success. Instagram Stories emerged...
    Facebook will start scaling back all political content in its News Feed for some users, including posts from people's family and friends, as part of a trial to test ways the social media giant can rank posts on its platform.  The company said on Wednesday it would temporarily reduce the political content for some users in Canada, Brazil and Indonesia this week and in the United States within the coming weeks.  In a blog post, Facebook said the point of the trial was to explore a 'variety of ways to rank political content in people's feeds' before deciding what approach to use in the future.  The tests will extend to all political content, including posts from family and friends. It is not just limited to political news posted by media outlets or posts from political figures.  It was not immediately clear how Facebook planned to classify political content as part...
    (CNN Business)Facebook will start reducing the amount of political content users see while scrolling their primary feeds.The social media platform will "temporarily reduce the distribution of political content in News Feed for a small percentage of people" in Brazil, Indonesia and Canada this week, it said in a blog post on Wednesday. The changes will be applied to a limited number of US users in the coming weeks. "During these initial tests we'll explore a variety of ways to rank political content in people's feeds using different signals, and then decide on the approaches we'll use going forward," Aastha Gupta, product management director at Facebook, wrote in the blog post. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg hinted at the changes during the company's earnings call last week. "One of the top pieces of feedback that we're hearing from our community right now is that people don't want politics and fighting to take...
    Rep. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY), who serves as the chair of the House Oversight Committee, wrote a letter to Parler COO Jeffrey Wernickon Monday demanding that the social media platform reveal its investors and creditors. “In the weeks leading up to the assault on the Capitol on January 6, Parler users actively took to the platform to call for violence and even ‘civil war,'” began Maloney in her letter. “A recent analysis by USA Today shows a strong connection between President Trump’s speech at the January 6 rally and a significant uptick in calls for violence on Parler,” she added. “Immediately after President Trump exhorted his supporters to ‘show strength’ during his speech, the term ‘civil war’ surged into one of the top five most frequently used terms on Parler. One user wrote, ‘Be men fight back and f— them up. Civil war is upon us.'” Maloney went on to mention that “since...
    Yahoo News PHOTOS | Vienna’s cafeterias turn into student libraries as they remain closed due to the pandemic Bars and restaurants in Austria have been closed since November 3 as one of the restriction measures imposed by the Government and the country’s health authorities to try to stop the coronavirus pandemic and there is no date of reopening. Faced with this situation, in the capital, Vienna, some cafeterias have opened their doors as student libraries, such as the Café Museum, one of the most famous and oldest in Vienna. This place opened its doors in 1899 and has historically been a meeting point for artists and writers. Now their tables are filled with high school and college students doing their jobs or preparing for exams. The cafeteria cannot serve you food or drink due to restrictions, but it provides you with a bottle of water, a few small snacks and...
    (CNN Business)After years of struggling to crack down on vaccine misinformation, Facebook is once again revising its policies to get tougher.On Monday, the company announced several ways it plans to better combat vaccine misinformation, including making it harder to find accounts through searches on Facebook-owned Instagram that discourage people from getting vaccinated. The announcement comes a day after CNN Business reported that Instagram continued to prominently feature anti-vaxxer accounts in its search results, while Facebook groups railing against vaccines remained easy to find. The findings raised concerns among public health experts, given the United States is in the midst of its largest vaccine rollout ever to address the coronavirus pandemic.Facebook (FB) said Monday that it's "expanding" its efforts to remove false claims on its namesake platform and Instagram about the coronavirus, Covid-19 vaccines and vaccines in general during the pandemic. The company also announced it will start showing links in...
    Facebook's Chief Product Officer Christopher Cox.David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty Images Last June, Facebook was being rocked from the inside and out.  Protests were erupting across the U.S. after Minneapolis police were caught on camera killing George Floyd, an unarmed Black man. At Facebook, employees were demanding more from their leaders.  In particular, they were upset with how the company handled a post by President Donald Trump about protests that said, "when the looting starts, the shooting starts." Facebook had decided to leave the post up, even though many employees were arguing that the president had violated the company's policies on inciting violence.  Facebook executive Chris Cox had just returned to the company on June 11 after an abrupt departure in March 2019. One of Facebook's earliest employees, the chief product officer was widely considered one of its moral and emotional leaders, with a natural charisma that stands...
    The data war has escalated really fast following some measures that Apple has applied recently. Facebook’s business seems to have been seriously threatened by seeing how Apple tries to offer much more control to users about the way they share their information on the network. But his speech doesn’t seem particularly convincing. Some Facebook apps along with various other productivity apps. Mark Zuckerberg’s company tries to convince users that these measures that Apple has implemented, among which notices about tracking in apps and websites are included, and the new privacy labels, are really bad. But along the way, it seems they are using arguments that few connect with. Among the groups that do not connect with them, there is Harvard University, specifically Harvard Business Review, one of its publications. Specifically, it talks about how Facebook would have been choosing specific data that would favor only them, keeping other relevant ones...
    The war for data has escalated really fast following some measures that Apple has applied recently. Facebook’s business seems to have been seriously threatened by seeing how Apple tries to offer much more control to users about the way they share their information on the network. But his speech doesn’t seem particularly convincing. Some Facebook apps along with various other productivity apps. Mark Zuckerberg’s company tries to convince users that these measures that Apple has implemented, among which notices about tracking in apps and websites are included, and the new privacy labels, are really bad. But along the way, it seems they are using arguments that few connect with. Among the groups that do not connect with them, there is Harvard University, specifically Harvard Business Review, one of its publications. Specifically, it talks about how Facebook would have been choosing specific data that would favor only them, keeping other relevant...
    (CNN)On Wednesday night, House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy announced that the GOP would not remove freshmen Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia from her committee assignments, despite the views that she has espoused, which don't even begin to approach rational thought or, for that matter, fit anywhere along the wide spectrum of acceptable political discourse. (The Democratic-led House is however expected to vote Thursday on removing Greene from her assignments.) McCarthy claims Greene renounced her previous abhorrent views and conspiracy theories while apologizing behind closed doors to her colleagues. Scott Jennings Meh. Call me when she goes on Sean Hannity or Tucker Carlson to renounce those lies and apologize. What is said in a private room means nothing. The people who need to hear from her are the folks continuing to aggressively believe in and push the sort of garbage that she has peddled. She must make clear that...
    Prime Minister Scott Morrison speaks during a press conference in the Prime Ministers courtyard on December 11, 2020 in Canberra, Australia.Sam Mooy | Getty Images News | Getty Images SINGAPORE — Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Thursday he had a "constructive meeting" with Google chief Sundar Pichai after the tech giant threatened to pull its search engine from the country over a potential new law. Essentially, Australia wants internet giants Facebook and Google, a subsidiary of Alphabet, to pay for news. The government introduced a media bill in parliament in December. If passed, the new media bargaining code would require the digital platforms to pay local media outlets and publishers to link their content in news feeds or search results. If the parties cannot reach an agreement, a government-appointed panel will decide on the price. "I thought it was a constructive meeting," Morrison told reporters Thursday, according to the...
    Facebook-owned messaging app WhatsApp has started posting Status messages to users about its “commitment to your privacy.” The in-app messages were appearing for members of The News Brig staff in the US and UK on Saturday, and some users reported the Status messages — WhatsApp’s version of Snapchat Stories or Twitter Fleets—have been appearing in India for a while now. “There’s been a lot of misinformation and confusion around our recent update and we want to help everyone understand the facts behind how WhatsApp protects people’s privacy and security,” a WhatsApp spokesperson said in an email to The News Brig. “Going forward, we’re going to provide updates to people in the Status tab so people hear from WhatsApp directly. Our first update reaffirms that WhatsApp cannot see your personal messages, and neither can Facebook, because they are protected by end-to-end encryption.” The messages read “One thing that isn’t new is...
    Gambling addiction experts see familiar aspects in Robinhood app Latinos dying daily from Covid-19 increase 1,000% in Los Angeles county We Didn’t Always Know How Facebook Would Use Its Power The U.S. government almost never jumps at its first chance to confront an emerging monopoly. But regulators have a long history of getting it right the second time. Standard Oil controlled America’s petroleum market for years before the Justice Department sued the company under the Sherman Antitrust Act; the federal government helped enshrine AT&T’s telephone monopoly for decades before deciding to break up “Ma Bell.” But now that federal and state enforcers are turning their attention to the power of large tech companies, lawyers for Facebook are insisting that the government already missed its only opportunity. © Getty / The Atlantic In lawsuits filed late last year, the Federal Trade Commission and 48 state attorneys general zeroed in on...
    Facebook's supreme court said in its first rulings Thursday that the tech giant was wrong to remove four of the five pieces of content it had reviewed.  The left-leaning Oversight Board said the social network was wrong to take down post for violating rules on hate speech and harmful COVID-19 misinformation.  It overturned decisions to remove a post with photos of a deceased child that included commentary on China's treatment of Uighur Muslims. The board also overturned a decision to remove an alleged quote from Nazi propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels. Facebook had removed that for violating its policy on 'dangerous individuals and organizations.' It also said the removal of a post in a group claiming certain drugs could cure COVID-19, which criticized the French government's response to the pandemic was wrong.  And it ruled that Instagram photos showing female nipples that the user in Brazil said aimed to raise awareness of...
    Report: Eagles, Jets to interview 49ers assistant Michael Clay for special teams job The best cheap snow blowers you can buy Apple says its big privacy change is coming in early spring as conflict with Facebook heats up The next beta version of its iPhone and iPad operating systems will force app developers to ask permission to access the phone's unique identifier, Apple confirmed to CNBC Wednesday. The company said it will roll out in "early spring." Companies that depend on online advertising are afraid that the change will reduce the effectiveness of targeted ads, and Facebook has been a particularly vocal critic. Apple CEO Tim Cook is set to speak Thursday about data privacy at the Computers, Privacy and Data Protection conference in Brussels. © Provided by CNBC A monorail train displaying Google signage moves past a billboard advertising Apple iPhone security during the 2019 Consumer...
    A monorail train displaying Google signage moves past a billboard advertising Apple iPhone security during the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019.Bloomberg | Bloomberg | Getty Images The long-awaited privacy update to Apple's iPhone and iPad operating systems that could dramatically hurt mobile advertising is coming in "early spring," Apple told CNBC on Wednesday. To target mobile ads and measure how effective they are, app developers and other industry players currently often use Apple's (IDFA), or a string of letters and numbers that's different on every Apple device. But once this update rolls out, app makers will be forced to ask permission to access a user's IDFA through a prompt. A significant portion of users are expected to say no, reducing the effectiveness of targeted ads. Apple first announced the change last summer, giving advertisers and app makers ample time to...
    Last year, Facebook finally banned Holocaust denial content, after tacitly allowing it to fester on its site for years. And today on International Holocaust Remembrance Day, the company touted efforts to connect people to “credible information about the Holocaust.” However, the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) said that Facebook is failing to enforce its own policies, leaving hateful content up after its reported, as seen by CNET. It gave the site a D along with Reddit, Steam and Discord, for how it handles Holocaust denial posts. The ADL created report cards for most major social media sites, based on criteria like whether social media sites had policies against Holocaust denial and the ease of finding such content. The ADL weighted enforcement the highest, so it reported Holocaust denial content in January to test how Facebook and the other sites responded.. Twitch received the highest grade, a B, while...
    Jerusalem (CNN)Facebook has deleted a post by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and suspended a chatbot linked to his account for violating the company's privacy policy.Visitors to the Prime Minister's Facebook page, who clicked on a link about the coronavirus, received an automatic message, purporting to come from Netanyahu."If you have friends or family members aged 60 or over who have not yet been vaccinated, you can write a response here with their name and phone number, and I may call to convince them!" the message read. Vaccination rates highlight stark differences between Israelis and Palestinians -- amid row over responsibilityTaking action and removing the items, Facebook said, via a spokesperson, that "under our privacy policy we do not allow content that shares or asks for people's medical information." The spokesperson added that Facebook had "removed the offending post and temporarily suspended the Messenger bot, which shared this content,...
    The data will be available through the Facebook Open Research and Transparency (FORT) tool, which the company created “to enable academic researchers to study the impact of Facebook’s products on elections [with] measures to protect people’s privacy and keep the platform secure.” Researchers need to apply for FORT access to get their hands on the data. Facebook is also moving 2020 Election Spend Tracker data from its Ad Library to the elections page on February 1st. Anyone can download that information to find out how much presidential, Senate and House candidates spent on Facebook ads. Data on aggregate advertising spending for all pages will still be available through the Ad Library. In October, Facebook demanded that New York University shut down a political ad research project. Thousands of volunteers signed up for an NTU Ad Observatory project to use a browser extension that vacuumed up data about political ads Facebook...
    Google is threatening to pull its search engine from an entire country — Australia — if a proposed law goes into effect that would force Google to pay news publishers for their content. “If this version of the Code were to become law it would give us no real choice but to stop making Google Search available in Australia,” Google Australia and New Zealand VP Meg Silva told Australia’s Senate Economics Legislation Committee today. “We have had to conclude after looking at the legislation in detail we do not see a way, with the financial and operational risks, that we could continue to offer a service in Australia,” she added, according to The Sydney Morning Herald. The company, which has been lobbying against Australia’s plan for months, claims the country is trying to make it pay to show links and snippets to news stories in Google Search, not just...
    Google has threatened to remove Google Search in Australia if a proposed new law requiring it to pay news organisations for content is passed.  The tech giants face $10 million fines if they don't follow the rules of the proposed code, designed to ensure they pay for news. Treasurer Josh Frydenberg introduced the underpinning bill to parliament in December, praising the 'world-leading' code. Representatives from Google will appear at the hearing on Friday, to argue the bill is unworkable. One of its main concerns is that it would have to pay all registered news businesses for having results through the platform's search engine. Google doesn't want this and is instead offering to have its 'news showcase' feature included, which allows users to read some stories that are otherwise behind paywalls. The government says it would prefer Facebook and Google to negotiate commercial deals with news media companies. But if such talks...
    Facebook is passing the buck by allowing its 'supreme court' oversight board to decide whether Donald Trump should be permanently banned from the social media platform in what will be a major test for the recently formed panel. Trump had his Facebook and Instagram accounts suspended in the wake of the deadly January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol at the hands of MAGA mob rioters.  The social media giant said on Thursday that it stands by its decision to suspend Trump's accounts but will defer to the quasi-independent oversight board, which is known informally as the Facebook 'supreme court', to determine if it should be upheld permanently.    The board was created last year to rule on thorny content issues, such as when posts constitute hate speech, or - in this case - if the major decision to ban a world leader was the right one.  Its ruling on Trump,...
    Facebook says it has referred its suspension of former President Donald Trump’s posting privileges to its Oversight Board, which will rule on whether the decision was justified or not. "We think our decision to suspend former President Trump was right, but we don’t think we should make these calls on our own," Facebook said in an announcement on Thursday. "Given the significance, we referred this decision to the Oversight Board. During review, Mr. Trump’s access will remain suspended," Facebook added. Facebook also said the board's decision will be "binding" and can’t be overruled by CEO Mark Zuckerberg or anyone else at Facebook. Trump was banned from his Facebook and Instagram accounts indefinitely on Jan. 7. The former president has also been banned by other social media giants like Twitter and YouTube after the violent Capitol attack on Jan. 6. Facebook’s Oversight Board says it will accept the Trump case....
    3 National Guard members dead after helicopter crash on training mission in upstate New York The state of the US Covid outbreak as Biden gets to work Facebook is referring Trump ban to its Supreme Court which cannot be overruled by Zuckerberg or execs Facebook on Thursday announced that it will refer its decision to indefinitely suspend the account of former President Donald Trump to its newly instituted Oversight Board. The independent body will review the decision to suspend Trump and make a binding decision on whether the account will be reinstated. The board will have up to 90 days to make its decision, but the board's members have committed to move as quickly on this case as possible, a spokesman for the board told CNBC. © Provided by CNBC President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media before boarding Marine One on the...
    Facebook vice president Nick Clegg says the company is referring its decision to indefinitely suspend former President Trump from its platform to its newly-established oversight board for a complete review. The president’s Facebook account was suspended indefinitely on January 7th after he incited his followers to attack the US Capitol on January 6th. Six people died in the ensuing riots. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said at the time that “the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service… are simply too great.” “We believe our decision was necessary and right,” Clegg said in a statement. “Given its significance, we think it is important for the board to review it and reach an independent judgment on whether it should be upheld.” The oversight board, established last year, is intended to provide an appeals process for Facebook’s content moderation decisions. The oversight board took its first six cases...
    President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021.Al Drago | Bloomberg | Getty Images Facebook on Thursday announced that it will refer its decision to indefinitely suspend the account of former President Donald Trump to its newly instituted Oversight Board. The independent body will review the decision to suspend Trump and make a binding decision on whether the account will be reinstated. Until a decision is made, Trump's account will remain suspended, the company said in a blog post. The board will begin accepting public comments on the case next week, it said in a tweet. The board will have up to 90 days to make its decision, but the board's members have committed to move as quickly as possible, a spokesman for the board told CNBC. A...
    A CHINESE restaurant owner has caused a stir for his “extremely honest” descriptions of its food. Feigang Fei admits that one of the dishes being served up at Aunt Dai’s in Montreal, Canada is “not that good”. 6Feigang Fei holding his restaurant's menuCredit: Facebook 6He confesses to this dish's shortcomingsCredit: Twitter The restaurant has been open for seven years but has gone viral after a Twitter user Kim Belair posted a few of Fei’s descriptions from the menu. The Orange Beef on the menu us “not THAT good” compared to the restaurant’s General Tao Chicken, he says. He also admits he’s “not a huge fan” Sweet and Spicy pork strips because it’s different to version he ate at university in China. Fei tells customers he “did NOT have a chance to try” the Satay beef when he wrote the description though the Cumin Beef is “very tasty”. Of one dish,...
    New York : WhatsApp has decided to postpone the entry into force of the changes in its Conditions and Privacy policy until May, which were initially to become effective on February 8, and has reiterated the protection of conversations with end-to-end encryption that prevents the company from accessing its content. At the beginning of January, WhatsApp users began to see a message warning of changes in the service about the data that WhatsApp collects from users and their treatment, as well as relating to the way in which business they can use Facebook’s hosted services to store and manage their chats. In the same message that warned that in order to continue using the messaging service, users had to accept the changes. The company then told Europa Press that the new policies do not imply material changes in the processing of data for users, and that WhatsApp still does...
    New York : WhatsApp has decided to postpone the entry into force of the changes in its Conditions and Privacy policy until May, which were initially to become effective on February 8, and has reiterated the protection of conversations with end-to-end encryption that prevents the company from accessing its content. At the beginning of January, WhatsApp users began to see a message warning of changes in the service about the data that WhatsApp collects from users and their treatment, as well as relating to the way in which business they can use Facebook’s hosted services to store and manage their chats. In the same message that warned that in order to continue using the messaging service, users had to accept the changes. The company then told Europa Press that the new policies do not imply material changes in the processing of data for users, and that WhatsApp still does...
    Jordan Anderson gets engaged to Larry McReynolds daughter Jennifer Lopez Clapped Back at a Fan Who Thinks She’s Had “Tons” of Botox Google defends its partnership with Facebook, denies states claim of anticompetitive advantage Google on Sunday disputed claims from a group of attorneys general, led by Texas' Ken Paxton, that its ad-buying arrangement with Facebook was anticompetitive. In a blog post, Google's director of economic policy Adam Cohen called the lawsuit from 10 Republican-led states "misleading." The statement followed a New York Times article earlier on Sunday that described more details of the alleged arrangement, citing an unredacted draft of the complaint. © Provided by CNBC Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai gestures during a session at the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, on January 22, 2020. Google on Sunday disputed claims from a group of attorneys general, led by Texas' Ken Paxton,...
    Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai gestures during a session at the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, on January 22, 2020.(Photo by Fabrice COFFRINI / AFP) (Photo by FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP via Getty Images) Google on Sunday disputed claims from a group of attorneys general, led by Texas' Ken Paxton, that its ad-buying arrangement with Facebook was anticompetitive. In a blog post, Google's director of economic policy Adam Cohen called the lawsuit from 10 Republican-led states "misleading." The statement is Google's most extensive response yet to the lawsuit, which is also the only one to name Facebook as a "co-conspirator." The company faces two other complaints from a bipartisan group of attorneys general and from the Justice Department. The statement followed a New York Times article earlier on Sunday that described more details of the alleged arrangement, citing an unredacted draft of the complaint. The Wall Street Journal previously...
    Just a few days ago WhatsApp announced new measures, which basically were reduced to the company was going to start sharing usage data with Facebook. It was also a mandatory change, if you did not agree to share your data with Facebook, your WhatsApp account would be deleted. The new privacy policies went into effect in February This generated a great controversy, probably partly due to the fact that WhatsApp has not explained this process well. Many even think that Facebook was going to be able to read the messages sent by WhatsApp. Now WhatsApp has announced that it will delay this controversial and confusing change in its privacy policy. Many people expressed that there is a lot of confusion regarding our recent update. Due to the spread of so much misinformation that it raises concern, we want to help people learn the facts and understand our principles. ...
    The last few days have been quite hectic in the world of instant messaging due to the new privacy policy approved by WhatsApp, and mandatory acceptance in many parts of the world (Europe excluded), in which it was indicated that they would still be shared more user usage data with Facebook, its parent company. The movement of the largest courier service on the planet did not take long to cause an earthquake. Many users of the platform have begun to seek shelter in other services such as Signal or Telegram, and apparently there have been so many movements that WhatsApp itself has decided to suspend the entry into force of the new policy for just over three months. Now It will not apply from February 8 but from May 15. Three more months to be able to report properly WhatsApp indicates in an official statement that it has detected a...
    The WhatsApp platform announced that it will delay the implementation of its new privacy policies, which would be applicable from February 8. The reason for this decision was due to the response it had from users, who consider that a clear explanation is required about the data that is collected and under what mechanisms does this information get to Facebook Inc., the parent company that groups WhatsApp, Facebook and Instagram, among others. Precisely, one of the most significant reactions from WhatsApp users was that they began to look for other messaging options, such as Signal, which in recent days achieved more than 100,000 downloads. WhatsApp will not implement its new policies in February. Photo: Pixabay This Friday, the company pointed out that it is about confusion and misinformation about the content of its new policies, and indicated that it will seek to make the public understand why these...
    Facebook claims to have designed software capable of predicting if a coronavirus patient's health will deteriorate or will need oxygen just by scanning their chest X-rays. Working with New York University (NYU), the social media firm says the system can calculate such developments four days. Together they have built three machine-learning models to assist doctors better prepare as cases around the world continue to rise. One model is designed to predict deterioration using a single chest X-ray, another does the same but through a series of X-rays and the third uses an X-ray to determine if and how much supplemental oxygen a patient may need. Scroll down for video  Facebook and NYU built three machine-learning models to assist doctors better prepare as cases around the world continue to rise. One model is designed to predict deterioration using a single chest X-ray, another does the same but through a series...
    These are not good times for Facebook when it comes to WhatsApp, and at least for the moment it seems that their data transfer plans will have to wait. And is that the new policies in this regard have generated a fire that still persists, and that it has forced those responsible for the social network to delay the implementation of the same three months, which now will not apply until May 15, compared to February 8, the date originally scheduled for this change. “We are now pushing back the date that people will be asked to review and accept the terms. No one will have their account suspended or deleted on February 8th. We’re also going to do a lot more to clear up misinformation about how privacy and security works on WhatsApp. Then, we will inform people gradually to review the policy at their own pace before the...
    Founder and CEO of Bumble Whitney WolfeVivien Killilea | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty Images Online dating app company Bumble said in its IPO filing on Friday that changes like Apple's upcoming privacy updates could hurt its business. Bumble said it expects just 0 to 20% of its users to agree to opt-in to sharing a unique ID, called the IDFA, for targeted advertising following the upcoming change from Apple. That could result in increased cost per registration for app developers and a more limited ability for advertisers to accurately target and measure campaigns for specific users, Bumble said.  The company, which said in the document it will trade under the $BMBL ticker on the Nasdaq, runs dating apps Bumble and Badoo. In its risk factors, it included the IDFA change in a section on its reliance on third-party publishers and platforms to distribute and market its products. It said...
    Facebook Chairman and CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies at a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, U.S., October 23, 2019.Erin Scott | Reuters Facebook on Wednesday said it is aware that calls for violence "have been high" since the insurrection on the U.S. Capitol last week. Specifically, the company has identified flyers that are being shared elsewhere on the internet by people who are calling for rallies and protests against the results of the 2020 U.S. presidential election. The flyers are for events scheduled in the coming days. Facebook is "fingerprinting" the flyers so that they can quickly be removed from Facebook, Instagram and Messenger anytime a users tries to share them, a spokeswoman for the company told CNBC. "We've identified flyers shared from other sites, calling for people to rally/protest against the election results and banked them (taken a digital fingerprint of them) so that if people attempt to...
    GOOGLE has admitted to secretly hiding some news sites from users as part of an “experiment”. The controversial test – which is still ongoing in Australia – has been slammed as “chilling”. Google 2 Google has been warning Aussies that its services will soon get worse Block news sites are completely scrubbed from search results as part of the test. Instead, users searching for those pages will simply see links to other websites like Facebook, Twitter or Wikipedia. Australia’s government is currently trying to force Google and Facebook to pay for showing local news. Facebook has already warned that it may block Australians from sharing local news. And Google has also criticised the proposals by warning Australian users directly in messages. Google’s latest experiment was spotted by the Australian Financial Review this week, and was later confirmed by the tech giant. Google 2 Google has been widely criticised...
    As a preventive measure, Facebook suggests its employees not to wear clothing that identifies them as workers there after blocking Trump. Donald trump He remains exiled from the main social networks of the planet, after the episode of insurrection in the Capitol, where the indications point to the fact that he largely incited these riots that ended up killing five people. Your lock on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and the like started first as a temporary measure. But shortly after they decided to suspend their accounts indefinitely or permanently in some cases. This sparked a serious debate among Trump supporters arguing for an alleged (and highly distorted) right to free speech. So there is a group of people very upset with everything that relates to Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook. It is better prevent? It is under this tangled context that an internal memorandum has begun to circulate (via The Information)...
    YouTube has joined other platforms and social networks such as Twitter, Instagram or Facebook and has decided to suspend the channel of still US President Donald Trump. It will do it for at least one weekAlthough, as announced by the company, this period of time will possibly be lengthened after the channel receives a warning under the platform’s policies. Additionally, the company tells CNN, a recent video on Trump’s channel that had incited violence has been removed after having checked it. According to other media, for “violating” the platform’s policies. With its decision, YouTube joins others who have already suspended Trump in some way. Facebook suspended Trump’s account “indefinitely”, while Twitter vetoed him entirely.
    Facebook urged staffers not to sport the company’s brand in public following its crackdown on President Trump and his supporters, a new report says. The social-media giant’s security team issued an internal memo Monday telling staffers to avoid wearing or carrying branded gear out of apparent concern for their safety, according to The Information. “In light of recent events, and to err on the side of caution, global security is encouraging everyone to avoid wearing or carrying Facebook-branded items at this time,” read the memo shared on an internal service available to Facebook’s more than 56,000 employees, the outlet reported. The notice came four days after Facebook indefinitely banned Trump from posting to his page with more than 35 million followers after he incited his supporters’ deadly riot at the Capitol last week. Facebook also said Monday that it would remove all posts containing the phrase “stop the steal,”...
    More On: facebook Sheryl Sandberg: Facebook has ‘no plans’ to lift Trump ban Facebook to remove all posts using ‘stop the steal’ Facebook censors libertarian Ron Paul Big Tech alums flow into Biden administration amid crackdown on Trump allies Facebook urged staffers not to sport the company’s brand in public following its crackdown on President Trump and his supporters, a new report says. The social-media giant’s security team issued an internal memo Monday telling staffers to avoid wearing or carrying branded gear out of apparent concern for their safety, according to The Information. “In light of recent events, and to err on the side of caution, global security is encouraging everyone to avoid wearing or carrying Facebook-branded items at this time,” read the memo shared on an internal service available to Facebook’s more than 56,000 employees, the outlet reported. The notice came four days after Facebook indefinitely banned Trump...
    Liberals are criticizing Facebook executive Sheryl Sandberg's claims that her platform is not responsible for the attack on the U.S. Capitol despite significant evidence of violence being incited on Facebook in the days before the attack. “I think these events were largely organized on platforms that don’t have our abilities to stop hate, and don’t have our standards and don’t have our transparency,” Sandberg, the company's chief operating officer, told the Reuters Next conference on Monday. Media Matters for America, a liberal watchdog that has been monitoring Facebook content, said that Sandberg's claims are designed to deflect attention from Facebook and shift the blame to other platforms like Parler or Gab, which are popular among conservatives. On Monday, at the same time that Sandberg made these comments, there were at least 70 active “Stop the Steal” groups active on Facebook, according to Media Matters, meaning that tens of thousands...
    Web hosting service GoDaddy has booted gun site Arfcom from its servers. “ARFCOM IS DOWN. We've been booted from GoDaddy and are looking for an alternative solution,” the site announced in a Facebook post. The post encourages users to bookmark a backup URL, noting that their main URL will soon be offline. The news comes as Big Tech companies have created controversy over their banning of the social media network Parler, which bills itself as a platform more open to free speech. Many conservatives began flocking to Parler after President Trump was banned from both Facebook and Twitter, which cited concerns over him inciting violence following last week’s siege of the U.S. Capitol by a crowd of his supporters. Apple and Google removed the platform from their app stores. Amazon soon followed the trend by kicking Parler off its cloud-based server, with all three companies citing Parler’s lack of...
    Facebook plans to pause its contributions to political action committees (PACs) through the first quarter of 2021 in the wake of last week’s US Capitol riot. The company told Axios, which was the first to report on the development, it will also conduct a review of its political spending practices. “Following last week’s awful violence in DC, we are pausing all of our PAC contributions for at least the current quarter, while we review our policies,” a spokesperson for the company told News Brig. 
    VIDEO5:2005:20Palihapitiya: If I was at FB today, I would wonder what changed from 6 months agoHalftime Report Early Facebook executive Chamath Palihapitiya called out the social media giant for failing to regulate its product despite the ongoing misinformation and threats that have thrived on its pages over the past few years. "What I'm thinking to myself is that if I was working at Facebook today, I would be confused, and largely because I would wonder what changed from six months ago, one year ago, 24 months ago and today. The disinformation was the same, the amount of vitriol that flowed through some of the groups was the same. Their ability to organize was the same. Storm the Capitol existed before they actually stormed the capitol," the founder and CEO of investment firm Social Capital said Thursday during CNBC's "Halftime Report." False information that started on dark corners on the internet...
    A MOTHER bravely removed a huge huntsman spider from her car only to find HUNDREDS of its babies had hatched while she was driving. Mum-of-three Emma, from Adelaide, Australia, first spotted the creature on her dashboard on Christmas Day. 3The baby spiders left a network of webs in Emma's carCredit: Facebook 3The terrified mum spotted the huge huntsman spider on her dashboardCredit: Facebook Yet, while she promptly squashed the arachnid, the infestation had already begun. Over the next couple of days Emma said she saw babies “coming out of nowhere” as she drove with her kids in the back of the car. During one scary incident, the mum – who has a son, five, and two daughters, aged 10 and 12 - had to battle a baby spider while driving down a motorway at 60mph. She told the Daily Mail Australia: “Over next couple of days, when I was driving...
    New details have emerged about the deal Google and Facebook allegedly worked out to rig the lucrative online advertising market. The two tech titans dubbed their contract “Jedi Blue,” according to an unredacted version of the blockbuster Texas suit launched against the companies and obtained by the Wall Street Journal. The lawsuit, filed earlier this month, says the code name was “a twist on a character name from Star Wars,” suggesting it might be tied to Aayla Secura, a blue-colored Jedi. Google’s “unlawful agreement” with Facebook was allegedly hatched in return for the Mark Zuckerberg-led company refusing to embrace an ad-sales method called header bidding, which posed a threat to Google’s iron grip on the digital advertising marketplace. Header bidding had been helping website publishers circumvent Google’s marketplace for buying and selling digital ads and had been leading to more favorable prices for publishers. The alternative...
    More On: google Google reportedly told scientists to take ‘positive tone’ on AI research Google, Facebook reportedly agree to help each other in antitrust fights Google to provide free, weekly at-home COVID-19 tests for workers in US Google wins EU antitrust approval for $2B Fitbit deal New details have emerged about the deal Google and Facebook allegedly worked out to rig the lucrative online advertising market. The two tech titans dubbed their contract “Jedi Blue,” according to an unredacted version of the blockbuster Texas suit launched against the companies and obtained by the Wall Street Journal. The lawsuit, filed earlier this month, says the code name was “a twist on a character name from Star Wars,” suggesting it might be tied to Aayla Secura, a blue-colored Jedi. Google’s “unlawful agreement” with Facebook was allegedly hatched in return for the Mark Zuckerberg-led company refusing to embrace an...
    With a fresh approach to harassment on the horizon, Twitch is ending 2020 in an enviable position. Twitch is the undisputed king of live streaming platforms, with more than 10.5 million unique channels, compared to about 913,000 for YouTube Gaming and 268,000 for Facebook Gaming, according to Streamlabs. Between July and September this year, Twitch clocked more than 4.7 billion hours watched, while YouTube hit about 1.7 billion and Facebook got just over 1 billion.  One of Twitch’s rivals, Mixer, shut down in the summer, and even though Microsoft attempted to push its audience toward Facebook Gaming, most streamers ended up on Twitch. Following his exclusive gig on Mixer, Tyler “Ninja” Blevins, the most popular streamer in the world, re-joined Twitch in September. He currently has the most followers of anyone on the platform, with 16.5 million. Twitch isn’t out of the woods, but it’s built a nice cabin there...
    The social media giant, like other tech companies, has caught flak for using arrangements in Ireland to avoid paying taxes in other countries. The IRS sued Facebook in 2016 to learn more about its practices, and followed up with a court battle arguing that it owed over $9 billion and had masked its true value. Similarly, G20 countries have been pressing for tax law overhauls aimed at major tech firms. Facebook is acknowledging that it will pay more taxes regardless of its earlier efforts at creative accounting. This won’t necessarily lead to windfalls for the US, UK and other countries. However, it could be more in line with what you expect. In the UK, for instance, Facebook paid just £100,000 more in taxes in 2019 despite profits jumping over 25 percent. Those payments are likely to climb dramatically in the near future.
    In the wake of the groundbreaking Federal Trade Commission lawsuit against Facebook, The Washington Post is reporting new details of the company’s negotiations with regulators in the run-up to the case, including an unusual offer to license its code and network to competitors. According to the Post’s reporting, Facebook was willing to significantly alter its business practices in order to avoid litigation, including one measure “allow[ing] another firm or developer to license access to its powerful code — and its users’ intricate web of relationships — so that they could more easily create their own version of a social network.” Ultimately, the FTC declined Facebook’s offer, filing an antitrust complaint against the company on December 9th. The lawsuit alleges that Facebook used its platform power to stifle competitors, and it seeks to unwind the acquisitions of WhatsApp and Instagram. It’s not clear what a platform-licensing arrangement would look...
    Facebook's much talked about cryptocurrency launch of libra has been ditched and instead the social media giant is part of a new digital currency named diem. It will be supported by the Diem Association, which consists of 27 members, of which Facebook is one. It is set to launch in January 2021 and there have been bold claims it will transform the financial services industry.  What is this digital currency, what does it has to offer and how it can be used? Carpe diem: Facebook has ditched libra and is instead backing a new digital currency called diem - will it seize the day? Will the launch go ahead in January 2021?Most industry commentators believe that diem will be introduced in January in spite of the many delays of the launch of the original libra. But it may not be available immediately in every country. Graeme Moore, head of tokenisation at...
    States are receiving less vaccine than promised. We now know why. Another US coronavirus record; vaccine shipments reduced After suing Facebook, the FTC has a chance to show critics its not toothless The FTC was roundly criticized by lawmakers on both sides of the aisle following privacy settlements tech hawks deemed to be weak. Its new lawsuit against Facebook and privacy study involving nine tech firms gives it a chance to revise that narrative among critics. Sen. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., has called for the FTC to become another division within the Department of Justice and consolidate its competition enforcement under the Antitrust Division. © Provided by CNBC Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairman Joe Simon speaks during a press conference on September 4, 2019, at the FTC headquarters in Washington, DC. With its groundbreaking antitrust lawsuit against Facebook, the Federal Trade Commission is facing more than just a...
    WHETHER you've left putting the Christmas decorations up until the last minute or if you're simply looking for a head start on next year's plans, this is your chance to nab a tree, wreaths and door decs for less. Wilko has slashed the price of a massive range of Christmas goodies, with a huge variety of items reduced by up to 50%. 3Wilko has slashed the price of its Christmas decorations with 50% off trees and other festive goodiesCredit: Extreme Couponing and Bargains UK group/Facebook The offer appears to have been applied to both online and in store items. An eagle eyed shopper spotted an amazing value four-piece decoration set had been marked down to a mere £10. Writing on the Facebook group Extreme Couponing and Bargains UK, the happy shopper said: "Just brought this in Wilko it was priced at £40 then went to £20 I got it...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — As a wave of antitrust actions surges against Google and Facebook, states in two lawsuits are stretching beyond the cases made by federal competition enforcers to level bold new claims. The states are taking new legal approaches as they join the widening siege against the two once seemingly untouchable behemoths. The latest case came Thursday as dozens of states filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, alleging that the search giant exercises an illegal monopoly over the online search market, hurting consumers and advertisers. It was the third antitrust salvo to slam Google in the past two months. The U.S. Justice Department and attorneys general from across the country are weighing in with different visions of how they believe the company is abusing its immense power in ways that harm other businesses, innovation and even consumers who find its services indispensable. And last week, the Federal Trade Commission...
    Social media giant Facebook has run another full-page ad in three major newspapers claiming that Apple’s tracking change will harm small businesses and the internet as a whole. Apple has responded to Facebook’s attack ads, stating: “Users should know when their data is being collected and shared across other apps and websites — and they should have the choice to allow that or not.” MacRumors reports that for the second consecutive day, Facebook is lashing out at fellow tech giant Apple over an upcoming iOS 14 privacy measure that will require users to grant permission for their mobile activity to be tracked by apps for personalized ads. Facebook has once again taken out ads in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and the Washington Post claiming that Apple’s tracking change will not only harm small businesses but the internet as a whole. Facebook claims that due to Apple’s new policy, many apps...
    Google has been accused of secretly giving Facebook advertising data perks and engaging in a deal with the social media giant to manipulate sales to consolidate their market power illegally, a new antitrust lawsuit alleges.  Texas and nine other states filed the lawsuit against Google late Wednesday, accusing the search giant of using its 'monopolistic power' to control pricing of online advertisements, fixing the market in its favor and eliminating competition. The lawsuit, which brands Google as an 'internet Goliath' and was announced by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, targets the heart of the search giant's business - the digital ads that generate nearly all of its revenue.  It was prompted by complaints by publishers and other businesses whose publications rely on advertising revenue to survive. In the lawsuit, Google is accused of striking up an illegal deal with Facebook, a major competitor for online ad sales, to manipulate advertising auction. ...
    Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers the opening keynote introducing new Facebook, Messenger, WhatsApp, and Instagram privacy features at the Facebook F8 Conference at McEnery Convention Center in San Jose, California on April 30, 2019.Amy Osborne | AFP | Getty Images On Tuesday, a group of state attorneys general led by Texas filed a new antitrust suit against Google. Although the suit mostly focuses on Google's dominance of ad tech, it also accuses the company of conspiring with rival Facebook in several areas. Among other allegations, the complaint claims that Google entered a deal with Facebook subsidiary WhatsApp that gives Google access to WhatsApp messaging data, including texts, photos, and videos. However, Google says the claim is inaccurate, and seems to be based on a misunderstanding about a backup feature Google offers for WhatsApp and other messaging services to make it easier to transfer old messages to a new phone. "...shortly...
    (CNN)Facebook (FB) is now waging a public relations effort to attack Apple (AAPL) ahead of new iOS data privacy changes that would make it harder for advertisers to track users, in a possible sign of just how much the social network views the move as a threat to its core business.On Wednesday, Facebook held a press event to trot out small businesses opposed to the change, debuted a new hashtag to discuss it and placed ads in several national newspapers excoriating Apple for the move.In ads featured in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Washington Post, Facebook slammed Apple's upcoming requirement for users to give explicit permission for apps to track them across the internet. Facebook said the move could be "devastating" to millions of small businesses that advertise on its platform. The newspaper ads coincide with a new section of its Facebook for Business site called SpeakUpforSmall...
    The donations by Big Tech executives to President-elect Joe Biden’s campaign were “strategic,” Fox Nation host Lara Logan said Wednesday. “This was actually a plan that was thought out by Media Matters for America and many very powerful people within the Democratic establishment who wrote up their strategy in the wake of Trump’s election,” Logan told "Fox & Friends," saying Big Tech has shown its "true colors" with their treatment of President Trump.  As Trump was being inaugurated, Logan said left-wing media watchdog Media Matters for America presented a plan to donors to “counter” the way Trump used Big Tech platforms to his advantage during his 2016 campaign. “And, if you go back to President Obama’s exit interview from the White House ... He put his defeat down to two things: One was that the White working-class voters who voted him into power not once but twice did not vote Democrat in 2016. The other thing was Fox News...
    Facebook has publicly launched Collab, an experimental music-making app that first launched as an invite-only beta back in May, TechCrunch reports. The app allows users to create short-form music videos by combining up to three independent videos. So, for example, three musicians could each play a different part of a song and combine them into one video. But each video that’s created is also posted to a public “Collab” feed, where people can view and play along with it if they choose. So you could also record one part, then mix it with two other parts you find on the Collab feed that other people have recorded. Or you can just mix other people’s videos together — you don’t need to be a musician yourself. (Every user is properly credited for their contributions, according to Facebook.) You won’t have to worry about lining all the videos up —...
    A recent report from BuzzFeed News claims that a number of key Facebook employees are leaving the company following the election and criticizing the Silicon Valley giant on their way out. One data scientist said it is “embarrassing to work here.” BuzzFeed News reports in an article titled “After The US Election, Key People Are Leaving Facebook And Torching The Company In Departure Notes,” that a number of key Facebook employees have left the firm since the recent U.S. election and have criticized the firm following their departure. A Facebook data scientist left the company on Wednesday, writing in a farewell note that as part of a team focused on “Violence and Incitement,” had dealt with some of the worst content on Facebook and were proud of their work at the firm but felt that Facebook was still not doing enough. In their “badge post,” a traditional farewell note for...
    Today, Pornhub said that the  third-party Internet Watch Foundation had reported 118 incidents of child sexual abuse material on the Pornhub platform, compared to 84 million instances self-reported by Facebook. Pornhub also pointed out that, as of today, every piece of content on the site is from verified uploaders, “a requirement that platforms like Facebook, Instagram, TikTok, YouTube, Snapchat and Twitter have yet to institute.” The company’s responses certainly have a ring of self-righteousness, especially as it says it’s being targeted “not because of our policies and how we compare to our peers, but because we are an adult content platform.” But with Mastercard and Visa both cutting off payments to Pornhub, the company has clear financial incentive to cleaning up its act.