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    President Donald Trump revoked an executive order he signed in the early days of his presidency, which banned administration officials from becoming lobbyists within five years of leaving their position. In the final hours of his presidency Tuesday night, President Donald Trump revoked his executive order, which placed restrictions on White House officials’ ability to immediately work as a lobbyist after working in government, the White House said. Trump signed the order on Jan. 28, 2017 in a move that was considered a fulfillment of his 2016 campaign promise to “drain the swamp,” NBC News reported at the time. “The key thing for this administration is going to be that people going out of government won’t be able to use that service to enrich themselves,” former White House press secretary Sean Spicer said prior to Trump taking office, according to Politico. (RELATED: Trump Issues Executive Orders Designed To Deconstruct The...
    Former Libertarian presidential candidate Shaun McCutcheon sued the Federal Election Commission Friday in an effort to force the agency to declare whether or not Michael Bloomberg’s $18 million contribution to the DNC in March was illegal. Bloomberg bypassed the $35,500 individual contribution limit by funneling his donation through his presidential campaign, which was funded exclusively by the billionaire’s own wealth. The former Republican mayor was invited to speak in front of the Democratic National Convention in August, where he criticized President Donald Trump’s handling of the economy during the coronavirus pandemic.  A libertarian who unsuccessfully ran for president is suing the Federal Election Commission to force the agency to determine the legality of former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s donation to the Democratic National Convention, a copy of the complaint shows. The FEC did not rule on Shaun McCutcheon’s previous attempt to challenge the legality of Bloomberg’s...
    Former FBI agent Peter Strzok revealed in a new book that federal investigators believed it was 'conceivable, if unlikely' that President Trump was controlled by Russia after taking the Oval Office. Speculation that the November 2016 election faced interference from Russia, under the order of President Vladimir Putin, launched investigations that resulted in a Republican-led upheaval of the federal agency.  Then-FBI director James Comey was ousted, accusations surfaced that the agency was used as pawn in a 'witch hunt' and a series of disparaging text messages linked to Strzok were used as political ammo on the national stage. Those text messages were exchanged with former FBI attorney Lisa Page, who along with Strozk, was fired as news swirled of their secret affair.    But in his new book, 'Compromised: Counterintelligence and the Threat of Donald J. Trump,' Strzok attempted to set the record straight despite leaving out some pertinent details -...
    Los Angeles Lakers small forward LeBron James made the biggest headline in the summer of 2010 when he made a controversial decision as an unrestricted free agent. James ultimately ended up leaving the Cleveland Cavaliers to form a “Big Three” with Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh on the Miami Heat. However, before he agreed to sign with the Heat, James had been heavily linked to another NBA team – the New York Knicks. In a recent episode of The Bill Simmons Podcast, Bill Simmons of The Ringer discussed several topics, including James’ decision in the 2010 NBA free agency. Simmons revealed that the Knicks were James’ “first choice” before he had a “disaster” meeting with the team’s front office led by owner James Dolan. “From everyone that I’ve talked to in the know since then, it’s clear that the Knicks were the first choice,” Simmons said, as quoted by Dan...
    Harry and Meghan have decided to make a living by singing for their supper. They’ve signed up to the top U.S. speaking bureau, the Harry Walker agency, which has ex-presidents Barack Obama and Bill Clinton on its books as well as Meghan’s friend Serena Williams. It has reportedly secured its top clients up to $1 million a speech. The Sussexes will talk about topics that are important in their lives and in the world, we’re told. They will focus on social issues, racial and gender inequality, the environment and mental health. All perfectly laudable (yawn, yawn). But who really wants to hear them bang on in their woke way about green issues and gender and race when there are far more interesting things to talk about — like the Royal Family and Harry’s mother Diana? Of course, talking about the royals is not their plan, it’s said. But surely even...
    CHICAGO (CBS) — A vigil was held outside Munster Community Hospital Thursday evening for Jamal Williams, the Western Michigan graduate shot and killed last week by a retired police officer. Williams’ parents now have a growing list of agencies they say failed their son and a list of reasons they think their son changed — the COVID-19 pandemic, the death of George Floyd and the loss of Williams’ graduation ceremony. Williams’ mom noticed a change in her son’s normally upbeat demeanor, so she tells CBS 2 she put a tracker on him, and two weeks ago she got worried. “Here we are dropping our son off to get some help, and here ending up hearing the very place he went to get help from he ended up dying,” said Williams’ mother Patrice Patterson-Davis. Two weeks ago Williams made it halfway home from college in Kalamazoo. After jumping into the cab of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — A government whistleblower ousted from a leading role in battling COVID-19 alleged Thursday that the Trump administration has intensified its campaign to punish him for revealing shortcomings in the U.S. response. Dr. Rick Bright, former director of the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, said in an amended complaint filed with a federal watchdog agency that he has been relegated to a lesser role in his new assignment at the National Institutes of Health, unable to lend his full expertise to the battle against COVID-19. The complaint also said Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar is leading a “coordinated effort” to undermine Bright in his new role, and it formally requests that Azar remove himself from dealing with the case. Bright, a vaccine expert, was supposed to be working on virus diagnostic tests at NIH. But he “is cut off from all vaccine work, cut off...
    A lawsuit filed in Washington alleges that Michael Pack, the chief executive of the U.S. Agency for Global Media, acted illegally last week when he fired the heads of government-funded international news agencies. The suit filed Tuesday on behalf of the Open Technology Fund, a nonprofit corporation that supports global internet freedom technologies, contends that Pack did not have the legal authority to dismiss Libby Liu, the chief executive of Open Technology, or fire the chiefs of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio Free Asia and the Middle East Broadcasting Networks. FILE - Michael Pack, President Donald Trump's choice to lead the U.S. Agency for Global Media, is seen at his confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Sept. 19, 2019. Pack's nomination was confirmed June 4, 2020.Pack, who took control of USAGM this month, also oversees Voice of America, but the lawsuit pertains to Pack’s dismissals of the heads...
    Last summer, the Los Angeles Lakers made Kyle Kuzma untouchable on the trade market with the belief that he would be the third superstar that would help LeBron James and Anthony Davis bring the team back to title contention. Unfortunately, since the start of the 2019-20 NBA season, Kuzma failed to live up to expectations and has been noticeably struggling to co-exist with James and Davis on the court. As of now, most people believe that it would only be a matter of time before Kuzma and the Lakers head into different directions. If Kuzma is still available in the summer of 2021, Tony Pesta of Fansided’s Blue Man Hoop sees the Golden State Warriors as one of the NBA teams who would try to steal him from the Lakers in free agency. “Kuzma has done his best to buy into his new role but playing in Davis’ shadow has...
    President Trump says he will refile his executive attempt to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program “soon,” Fox News reported Saturday. Trump reportedly made the statement in an interview with Fox News prior to his speech in Tulsa, Okla. on Saturday night. The promise came just days after the Supreme Court struck down Trump’s initial attempt to end the program via executive order. DACA grants a path to citizenship for those who are brought to the U.S. illegally as children. In an exclusive interview with @FoxNews ,@realDonaldTrump told me he will soon refile on DACA — John Roberts (@johnrobertsFox) June 20, 2020 The conservative-appointed Chief Justice John Roberts joined with the court’s liberal wing to create a majority in the decision. Roberts explained his reasoning in the majority opinion. (RELATED: Supreme Court Overturns Convictions In New Jersey ‘Bridgegate’ Scandal) “The dispute before the Court is not...
    President TrumpDonald John TrumpProtesters tear down, burn statue of Confederate general in DC US attorney in NYC who spearheaded probes of Trump allies refuses to leave as DOJ pushes ouster Trump to host 4th of July event despite pleas from lawmakers to cancel MORE’s pick to lead the U.S. Agency for Global Media is coming under fire from Democrats and conservatives alike following a rash of high-level dismissals at the international broadcasts it oversees. Michael Pack, a conservative filmmaker who took over as CEO of the agency this past week, is facing pushback from congressional Democrats on the committees with oversight of the U.S. Agency for Global Media (USAGM). The criticism on the right has come from conservative commentators and foreign policy analysts, including those who supported his nomination two years earlier and are seen as Trump loyalists. Critics fear Pack will jeopardize the independence of the broadcast networks, which...
    WASHINGTON - The new chief of U.S.-funded international broadcasting on Wednesday fired the heads of at least three outlets he oversees and replaced their boards with allies, in a move likely to raise fears that he intends to turn the Voice of America and its sister outlets into Trump administration propaganda machines. U.S. Agency for Global Media CEO Michael Pack informed those he dismissed in email notices sent late Wednesday, just hours after he had sought to play down those concerns in an email to staff saying he is committed to ensuring the independence of the broadcasters who are charged with delivering independent news and information to audiences around the world. Two congressional aides said that among those removed from their positions were the head of Radio Free Asia, Bay Fang; the head of Radio Liberty/Radio Free Europe, Jamie Fly; and the head of the Middle East Broadcasting Network,...
    Rep. Val Demings, D-Fla., said on Sunday that the death of George Floyd while in police custody in Minneapolis proves that "it is long overdue” for an internal review to be conducted at law enforcement agencies nationwide. “I do believe we are long overdue for every law enforcement agency in our nation to review itself and come out better than before,” Demings said during an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” Demings previously served as the first female chief of the Orlando Police Department. POLICE CHIEFS ACROSS US CONDEMN OFFICERS INVOLVED IN GEORGE FLOYD DEATH “As we’ve dealt with misconduct involving police officers, that we’ve always tried to deal with it as an individual department or an individual city or an individual state,” she added. “But I do believe the time has certainly come, we are overdue, for us to look at the problem as a nation.” VideoGeorge Floyd,...
    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) - A senior Trump administration official misused his office for private gain by capitalizing on his government connections to help get a family member hired at the Environmental Protection Agency, investigators said. The Interior Department’s Inspector General found that Assistant Interior Secretary Douglas Domenech reached out to a senior EPA official in person and later by email in 2017 to advocate for the unnamed relative when that person was seeking a job at the agency. Investigators said Domenech also appeared to misuse his position to promote a second family member’s wedding-related business to the same EPA official, who at the time was engaged. TOP STORIES Amy Klobuchar missed chance to prosecute Minneapolis cop now at center of George Floyd death Cardi B: Looters who torched AutoZone, ransacked Target and liquor store had no choice Don Lemon ties Trump to George Floyds death: Black people tired...
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