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    Five seniors in a Kentucky nursing home who'd previously been diagnosed with COVID-19 suffered a more severe form of the illness after a second infection, indicating a need for vigilance, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday. “The findings of this study highlight the importance of maintaining public health mitigation and protection strategies that reduce transmission risk, even among persons with a history of COVID-19 infection,” according to the CDC report released on Thursday. The CDC reported that five out of 12 nursing home residents who had been diagnosed with COVID-19 during the first wave, spanning from July through August, tested positive again during the second wave, spanning from October through November. Those five reinfected patients each had more than three chronic underlying health conditions that worsened the severity of illness due to the coronavirus and increased the risk of death. A TIMELINE OF...
    MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — It’s been about a year since the first case of COVID-19 was detected in Minnesota. And since then, life has changed and the virus has evolved. Even though we know more about this virus now than we did last March, there’s still a lot of information to track — and it can get a bit overwhelming. So, every week, we’ll be asking experts about recent COVID-19 developments. Returning this week is Dr. George Morris, who is the Physician Vice President for Performance Excellence at CentraCare. Since January of last year, he’s been serving as the physician incident commander for CentraCare’s COVID-19 response. Watch the video above, or read his answers to some of the bigger COVID-19 questions below. Let’s start out with a viewer question. Lynda asked: “I had COVID-19 on Nov. 13. Could I get it again?” So, how long does immunity last after getting the...
    In the last few months, we have become familiar with terms such as viruses, antibodies, immunity, cellular memory… terms that, if not for the pandemic, most of us would have only heard in passing, but that now arouse a lot of interest. And it is that, to all, especially if they have already passed the disease, it interests what happens when we have antibodies, how long the immunity against the virus lasts or what happens when the antibodies disappear from the bloodstream. Although there is still much to clarify about this virus and the immunity caused by being in contact with it, Dr. Marcos López Hoyos, President of the Spanish Society of Immunology and Head of the Immunology Service of the Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla (Santander), clarifies some doubts about immunity against SARS-CoV-2. How does the immune system act against the coronavirus? When the virus comes into contact with...
    CONTRACTING coronavirus gives "at least as good" an immune defence agasints future infections as a vaccine, a study has claimed. Prior illness provided about 8 per cent protection against asymptomatic and symptomatic reinfection, according to the most comphrensive study into reinfection rates. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3The findings of the study suggested that herd immnity could be slowing the pandemicCredit: PA:Press Association 3Boris Johnson reached his pledge to have 200,000 jabs in a day two days earlyCredit: PA:Press Association Researchers followed thousands of people who contracted Covid-19 in the spring. Even though they found that a small number of people in the group did get reinfected, they typically suffered from a milder form of the disease. The findings, which are based on a study of about 21,000 healthcare workers, suggested that herd immnity could be slowing the pandemic, it has been...
    Immunity from Moderna Incs COVID-19 vaccine should last at least a year, the company said Monday at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare conference. The drugmaker said it was confident the messenger RNA (mRNA) technology it used was well suited to deploy a vaccine based on the new variant of the coronavirus which has emerged in a handful of countries. The companys vaccine, mRNA-1273, uses synthetic mRNA to mimic the surface of the coronavirus and teach the immune system to recognize and neutralize it. Moderna said in December it would run tests to confirm the vaccines activity against any strain. The company said Monday it expects to deliver between 600 million doses and 1 billion does of its vaccine in 2021 and forecast vaccine-related sales of $11.7 billion for the year, based on advance purchase agreements signed with governments. "The team feels very comfortable with the track record we have now ....
    A new study shows that coronavirus immunity cells persist for a significant amount of time after someone is vaccinated or infected. The study, published earlier this week in Science, contradicts earlier findings suggesting that coronavirus immunity could be short-lived and concluded that immunity to the virus could last for years. The paper examined blood samples from 188 men and women who had recovered from the virus, with most of the infections being mild and 7% requiring hospitalization. Researchers discovered that antibodies declined moderately after eight months (though that changed depending on the individual), T-cell numbers decreased only slightly, and B-cell numbers remained firm or even grew. “There was a lot of concern originally that this virus might not induce much memory,” Shane Crotty, a researcher at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology in California and one of the paper's coauthors, told MIT Technology Review. “Instead, the immune...
    Moderna's CEO said the company's new COVID-19 vaccine may prevent infection for years. While speaking at a virtual event by Oddo BHF, a financial service group, Moderna CEO Stephane Bancel said the once-believed "nightmare scenario" that the vaccine won't work is now out the window. "We believe there will be protection potentially for a couple of years," Bancel said.  He explained that the "antibody decay generated by the vaccine in humans goes down very slowly," Reuters reports. However, there are still questions about elderly patients because, as is true with every virus, their immune system goes down over time, Bancel said.  The CEO also said Moderna is close to proving its vaccine is effective against other variants of the coronavirus, Reuters reports.  The U.S. has received shipments of both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech shots, which both require two doses several weeks apart. The second dose must be from the...
    By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter (HealthDay) THURSDAY, Dec. 31, 2020 -- Folks who contract COVID-19 can expect to gain some durable immunity against future infection, according to a new study of memory cells within the immune systems of coronavirus patients. Previous studies have raised concern that COVID-19 patients might lose their immunity quickly once they recover, because the first wave of coronavirus antibodies tends to wane after the first few months. But painstaking work by Australian researchers has revealed that people infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus have immune memory to protect against reinfection for at least eight months. Samples from 25 COVID-19 patients found that they continued to carry stable levels of virus-specific memory B cells as long as eight months after their infection, the researchers reported online recently in the journal Science Immunology. "Because of the biology of the persistence of these memory cells, it anticipates that we will...
    THE CORONAVIRUS jab could last just nine months and people may need to be vaccinated more than once, experts have warned. The most vulnerable have this week received the first doses of the vaccine - but doctors have warned that restrictions such as social distancing could still be in place by March. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 6Professor Chris Whitty today warned that Brits could need to be vaccinated twice Credit: AFP England's chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty this morning warned that it's unlikely that the country would ever hit "zero risk" from the virus. Speaking at the Commons Health and Science Committee Prof Whitty said it is not yet known how long the Pfizer vaccine will prevent people from becoming unwell with Covid-19. He told MPs: “We know these are very good vaccines to provide short to medium-term protection -...
    (CNN) — Early research suggests immunity to the coronavirus that causes Covid-19 can last for at least six months — and possibly much longer, perhaps even years, when all components of the body’s immune memory are taken into consideration. The pre-print paper, posted on Monday to the online server biorxiv.org, adds to the body of research on immunity to the novel coronavirus. Several studies have focused on antibodies, or protein components of the immune system, and some suggested immunity could wane over just a few months. Yet the new study, which has not been peer-reviewed or published in a scientific journal, involves analyzing multiple compartments of immune memory over time: antibodies, B cells and T cells, among other features of immune memory. The study included 185 adults, ages 19 to 81, in the United States who had recovered from Covid-19. Most of the adults had mild disease. The researchers —...
    BOSTON (CBS) – Some good news for those who have recovered from COVID-19.  A new study finds that immunity may last years, even decades.  The news may also bode well for a vaccine. Researchers at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology recruited 185 men and women who had recovered from COVID-19. They found antibody levels were generally stable, falling only modestly over six to eight months. The number of B cells, which produce antibodies, grew in number over time. The researchers concluded that would likely protect most people from getting severe disease if they became infected with the coronavirus again for many years to come.
    In the ongoing debate of how long those who have recovered from a COVID-19 infection could have immunity against the novel coronavirus, a new study — which is said to be the most comprehensive to date — offers an encouraging answer.  In a study published to the pre-preprint server bioRxiv on Monday, researchers said that immunity against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes a COVID-19 infection, could last for at least six months, or it could be longer, perhaps a matter of years.  The study, which has not yet been peer reviewed or published in a scientific journal, was conducted by scientists at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology in California and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. Researchers analyzed various aspects of immunity, including antibodies, B cells and two types of T cells. T cells respond to a foreign invader such as a virus but are different...
    (CNN)Early research suggests immunity to the coronavirus that causes Covid-19 can last for at least six months -- and possibly much longer, perhaps even years, when all components of the body's immune memory are taken into consideration.The pre-print paper, posted on Monday to the online server biorxiv.org, adds to the body of research on immunity to the novel coronavirus. Several studies have focused on antibodies, or protein components of the immune system, and some suggested immunity could wane over just a few months.Immunity to coronavirus lingers for months, study findsYet the new study, which has not been peer-reviewed or published in a scientific journal, involves analyzing multiple compartments of immune memory over time: antibodies, B cells and T cells, among other features of immune memory.The study included 185 adults, ages 19 to 81, in the United States who had recovered from Covid-19. Most of the adults had mild disease.The researchers...
    Immunity to norovirus lasts at least eight months, new data shows - and it suggests that survivors could be protected for years.  Researchers at La Jolla Institute in California found that levels of immune cells to COVID-19 slowly start to decline in the months following infection but sufficient amounts linger to block re-infection - perhaps for years.  It's a welcome shift from a large pool of studies that have suggested that antibodies fade within three months.  And it could mean that protection conferred by COVID-19 vaccines made by Pfizer and Moderna, which are both more than 90 percent effective at preventing infection, according to early data will last longer than previously thought - although neither company has had a chance to prove that, yet.  In recent months, the focus of coronavirus immunity research has shifted away from looking solely at antibodies - bespoke immune cell that develop in response to...
    People infected with the coronavirus could remain immune for years after their recovery, a new study suggests, offering news that could quell worries about waning immunity as potential vaccines are nearing availability. Scientists at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology in California found that eight months after participants had been infected with COVID-19, they still had high enough immune cells to fight off the virus and prevent another round of infection. That slow rate of decline in the short term indicates that immunity may remain for years. Cartoons on the CoronavirusView All 428 Images"That amount of memory would likely prevent the vast majority of people from getting hospitalized disease, severe disease, for many years," Shane Crotty, a virologist at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology who co-led the new study, told The New York Times. The research has been posted online, but it has not been peer reviewed or...
    Once a person develops immunity against COVID-19, it could last for years, a new study suggests. The promising research comes on the heels of the news of two vaccines with potentially remarkable effective rates — all of which combine to offer significant hope to beat back the pandemic, experts say. Scientists at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology in California found in the new study that eight months after the pandemic first surfaced in the country, most of their participant survivors still have plenty of immunity to fight off another bout of the coronavirus — indicating such a slow rate of decline in protection that it could last for years, the New York Times reported Tuesday. “That amount of [immune] memory would likely prevent the vast majority of people from getting hospitalized disease, severe disease, for many years,” said Dr. Shane Crotty, a co-author of the study, to the...
    Once a person develops immunity against COVID-19, it could last for years, a new study suggests. The promising research comes on the heels of the news of two vaccines with potentially remarkable effective rates — all of which combine to offer significant hope to beat back the pandemic, experts say. Scientists at the La Jolla Institute of Immunology in California found in the new study that eight months after the pandemic first surfaced in the country, most of their participant survivors still have plenty of immunity to fight off another bout of the coronavirus — indicating such a slow rate of decline in protection that it could last for years, the New York Times reported Tuesday. “That amount of [immune] memory would likely prevent the vast majority of people from getting hospitalized disease, severe disease, for many years,” said Dr. Shane Crotty, a co-author of the study, to the site....
    Immunization against COVID-19 from the new Pfizer vaccine would hopefully last for at least a year, one of its developers said Monday. The head of the German firm BioNTech, which developed the vaccine with Pfizer, said research already shows that patients who had the coronavirus and consequently developed high levels of antibodies against it would have at least that much protection against reinfection — and vaccinated people should be no different. On the heels of the companies’ stunning announcement Monday that studies show their late-stage vaccine is 90 percent effective, BioNTech CEO Ugur Sahin told Reuters he is “optimistic that the immunization effect can last for at least a year.” The drug honcho added that current research shows the vaccine must be stored at a temperature of -94 degrees Fahrenheit at its central location before being shipped out — and then can last up to five days at refrigerator...
    T-CELL immunity to the coronavirus could last up to six months - but does not mean people cannot be reinfected, experts have claimed. Researchers found that immunity to the killer bug is present in most adults six months after they were first infected. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3Experts founds that T-cell immunity could last six months Credit: Getty Images - Getty The study, which has not yet been peer-reviewed, was formed of research from Public Health England (PHE) and the UK Coronavirus Immunology Consortium (UK-CIC). The findings demonstrated robust T-cell responses to Covid-19 peptides at six months in all participants following asymptomatic, mild or moderate infection. A T-cell is one of the main adaptive components of the immune system, its role in the body is to kill infected host cells and activate other immune cells. Professor Paul Moss, UK-CIC lead and...
    Far fewer Britons have coronavirus antibodies now than at the peak of the first wave, according to a Government-led study. It raises concerns that protection against the disease is short-lived and that people may be able to get reinfected just months after recovering the first time. The REACT-2 project — which sends out tens of thousands of DIY blood tests to work out how much of the population has been infected — found 4.4 per cent of people in England in September had Covid-19 antibodies, proteins in the blood trained to fight off the disease. By comparison, the first round of the study in June found 6 per cent tested positive for antibodies, marking a fall of 26 per cent in three months.  Worryingly, the biggest drop was spotted in the over-65s, who are most vulnerable to falling ill or dying from the disease. Imperial College London scientists, who led the research, said they...
    (CNN) — Three new reports show coronavirus immunity can last for months — and maybe even longer. The findings suggest that many, if not most, people who recover from coronavirus infections are protected for at least a period of time. They also suggest that coronavirus vaccines may be able to protect people for more than just a few weeks. One study found that people produce antibodies that protect against infection and last for at least five to seven months. “We have one person that is seven months out. We have a handful of people that are five to seven months out,” Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunobiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, told CNN. “We conclude that neutralizing antibodies are stably produced for at least 5-7 months after SARS-CoV-2 infection,” his team wrote in a report published in the journal Immunity on Tuesday. They have been working with county...
    (CNN)Three new reports show coronavirus immunity can last for months -- and maybe even longer.The findings suggest that many, if not most, people who recover from coronavirus infections are protected for at least a period of time. They also suggest that coronavirus vaccines may be able to protect people for more than just a few weeks.One study found that people produce antibodies that protect against infection and last for at least five to seven months."We have one person that is seven months out. We have a handful of people that are five to seven months out," Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunobiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine, told CNN.Fewer than 10% in the US have antibodies to the novel coronavirus"We conclude that neutralizing antibodies are stably produced for at least 5-7 months after SARS-CoV-2 infection," his team wrote in a report published in the journal Immunity on Tuesday.Read MoreThey...
    The World Health Organization has urged leaders to stop using lockdowns as a 'primary control method' amid the coronavirus pandemic, prompting President Trump to tell a Florida rally that he was right all along. Trump stepped out Monday for his first campaign event since he came down with coronavirus and defended his stance on keeping the economy open after the WHO noted the devastating impact the COVID-19 outbreak has had on the poor. 'We really do appeal to all world leaders: stop using lockdown as your primary control method,' WHO envoy Dr. David Nabarro told the Spectator magazine. 'We in the World Health Organization do not advocate lockdowns as the primary means of control of this virus,' he added to the British publication as the UK braced for renewed restrictions amid a surge in infections. On Monday President Trump told his supporters about WHO: 'They corrected themselves today and...
    Five sailors have been granted immunity to testify in the trial of a Navy SEAL charged with sexually assaulting a female colleague after July 4 celebrations in Iraq last year.  Special Warfare Operator First Class Adel A. Enayat, an enlisted SEAL, is charged with with sexual assault, aggravated assault via strangulation and assault by battery for allegedly biting the victim on the face, according to his charge sheet.  He denies the charges.  The alleged incident at the Ain al-Asad air base in western Iraq led to the entire Foxtrot platoon of SEAL Team 7, known as Trident 1726, being sent home early to San Diego. They had been in the country since March 2019.  It is not known what the witnesses granted immunity, which includes three Navy SEALs, plan to testify but Jeremiah Sullivan, the lawyer for Enayat, has previously said a number of people saw his accuser sitting on his...
    Matthew Rozsa September 16, 2020 10:58PM (UTC) Coronaviruses, as a class, encompass far more viruses than the one causing the pandemic, dubbed SARS-CoV-2 or the "novel coronavirus" (so named because it is new to science as of 2019). Having previous knowledge of the behavior of other coronaviruses has been a boon to science, as it allows for some predictions as to SARS-CoV-2's likely behavior.  On this premise, a study published on Monday in the scientific journal Nature Medicine reached a troubling conclusion about SARS-CoV-2 — namely, that people who become immune to it may not stay that way for long. The scientists reached their conclusion by studying whether those infected with previous seasonal coronaviruses retained their immunity. Unfortunately, they didn't. : "A key unsolved question in the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is the duration of acquired immunity," the scientists — who hailed from Belgium, the Netherlands and Spain — wrote...
    Coronavirus antibodies could last for at least four months and fade more slowly than previously reported, according to a new study. The findings come from a large-scale survey published Tuesday involving more than 30,500 people in Iceland. Billed as the most comprehensive look at the body’s response to the virus, scientists believe it gives hope to achieve immunity through a vaccine. If a vaccine generates antibodies that are as long-lasting, there is “hope that host immunity to this unpredictable and highly contagious virus may not be fleeting and may be similar to that elicited by most other viral infections,” wrote scientists in an editorial on the study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers are still trying to decipher built immunity to the virus. Previous smaller studies had suggested antibodies potentially protecting from re-infection faded over weeks, lasting no more than three months. But researchers involved in...
    Coronavirus antibodies could last for at least four months and fade more slowly than previously reported, according to a new study. The findings come from a large-scale survey published Tuesday involving more than 30,500 people in Iceland. Billed as the most comprehensive look at the body’s response to the virus, scientists believe it gives hope to achieve immunity through a vaccine. If a vaccine generates antibodies that are as long-lasting, there is “hope that host immunity to this unpredictable and highly contagious virus may not be fleeting and may be similar to that elicited by most other viral infections,” wrote scientists in an editorial on the study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Researchers are still trying to decipher built immunity to the virus. Previous smaller studies had suggested antibodies potentially protecting from re-infection faded over weeks, lasting no more than three months. But researchers involved in the...
    As she sat dangling her legs over the water while waiting for the ferry back to Stockholm, Carolinne Liden looked a picture of contentment after a day out on a sunny Swedish island.  But the pandemic has been tough for this young mother. She works in film production, so all her contracts were cancelled and she had to take a job in an equine shop to make ends meet. Her partner Tobias Moe, a freelance photographer, also saw his income fall.  Yet when I asked this affable couple about Anders Tegnell, the state epidemiologist steering their country’s strategy for tackling this crisis, their reply was instant. ‘He’s a hero,’ said Carolinne, 35. Supportive views: Film production worker Carolinne Liden and her photographer partner Tobias Moe ‘It is such a huge responsibility to take these decisions that affect the whole country and I like the way he sticks to his...
    The CEO of AstraZeneca said immunity from a coronavirus vaccine may only last for a year, which means people would need annual inoculations to protect themselves from the virus. Pascal Soriot told CNBCs "Squawk Box Europe" Thursday that one vaccine will likely not be enough. "What we know is that most companies are targeting two injections for the initial vaccination and then our own assumption based on what we know from the technology we use with SARS 1 is that the immunity could last 12 months, maybe 18 months," he said. "But the truth is that we dont know, this virus is very unpredictable." AstraZeneca is one of several dozen companies working to develop a COVID-19 vaccine as the pandemic continues to ravage the world. The companys goal is to make 2 billion vaccine doses, which will be spread to various countries. The United States, for example, would receive 400...
    A new study from King’s College London found that people that have recovered from the coronavirus might lose immunity to the disease within months. This suggests that like the common cold, coronavirus could infect people regularly, or on an annual basis. 90 patients and healthcare workers were studied. The research found that their antibody levels to destroy the virus peaked after three weeks and then declined rapidly. 60% of people showed a “potent” antibody response to the virus, but only 17% kept that potency three weeks later. The study found that antibody levels fell as much as 23-fold over the period. This research is significant to vaccine development and the so-called “herd immunity” in communities affected by the coronavirus. If antibodies don’t protect people over the long term, vaccines might only last for a short period and people could become reinfected seasonally. “People are producing a reasonable antibody response...
    There are over 300,000 viruses that infect mammals, but there are only seven coronaviruses that infect humans. Four of these, known by the less-than-alternative labels 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1 produce generally mild illnesses and are responsible for about 15% of what people refer to as the “common cold.” Exposure to these viruses generates a mild and rapidly falling immune response, meaning that people can be infected again by the same coronavirus in a matter of a few months. Of the remaining human coronaviruses, two are SARS-CoV and MERS-COV, which generate extremely serious illness with a high rate of fatalities. And then there is SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind the disease COVID-19. From the beginning, there have been worries that this virus might combine the worst of other coronaviruses: highly infectious, deadly, and not generating a lasting immune response. That nightmare scenario has had researchers, and a lot of nonresearchers, holding their breath for months. Well … breathe....
    Mother Jones illustration; Getty For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.Since the start of the pandemic, one of the biggest—and most critical—gaps in our understanding of the coronavirus has been about antibodies. Based on what we know about other coronaviruses, scientists have speculated that a person who recovers from COVID-19 would likely develop virus-fighting antibodies and may have some immunity, at least in the short term. The power of these antibodies would be crucial in protecting survivors, in reopening the economy, and perhaps even in treating patients still sick with the virus. But just how long the antibodies would last was a mystery. Still, as a card-carrying optimist, I’d argue that there isn’t reason to really agonize over your antibodies—at least not yet. Then last month, a study published in Nature Medicine delivered what seemed like bad news: Antibodies to the coronavirus may start to...
    The truth behind whether recovering from coronavirus grants immunity to future infections has been in near-constant flux since the virus was first allowed out of China, but as vaccine research progresses, doctors are getting closer to a final answer. The first bombshells came in the form of worrying reports out of Japan and Korea that a number of COVID-19 patients had contracted the virus again less than a month after being cleared to leave their hospitals. A study released in May downplayed reinfection stories, however, finding that while patients were testing positive post-recovery, they were merely shedding dead virus, were not infectious, and had not been reinfected, according to Science News. But while the study’s findings proved people were not being reinfected in the weeks after leaving hospitals, it did not determine whether those people were immune or how long that immunity lasted. A study published this week found that...
    Hopes of lasting Covid-19 immunity were raised today after scientists found SARS patients still have crucial disease-fighting cells.  SARS — another type of coronavirus very similar to the one that causes Covid-19 —was behind an epidemic that predominantly struck Asia in 2003. No cases have been identified for 15 years. But some infected during the outbreak still have key white T cells, suggesting they would be protected from ever getting re-infected.  The research, by scientists in Singapore, offers hope the same may be true for SARS-CoV-2 — the name of the coronavirus behind the pandemic. With some viruses, such as chickenpox, protection is life-long and it not possible to become sick again. But others, like the common cold, protection is short lived. Experts are still baffled as to how long immunity against Covid-19 lasts for because it has only been around since December 2019. Antibody studies have suggested it may...
    An 82-year-old man who spent four weeks in intensive care with Covid-19 was struck down by the virus again just 10 days after recovering.   The unidentified man went to an emergency department at Massachusetts General Hospital after suffering from a high fever for a week. He tested positive for Covid-19 and then his condition rapidly worsened while he was in hospital.   Doctors managed to save his life with a lengthy stay on a ventilator but he fell sick again less than a fortnight later, despite testing negative twice before being discharged.  The man's case is one of many that raises questions about the type of immunity people build up against Covid-19, and how long it really takes to be cleared from the body.  Medics title their article 'A case report of possible novel coronavirus 2019 reinfection' and discussed how it was possible that the man recovered and tested negative but fell...
    A woman in a protective face mask walks through Brixton Market in South London, as the UK continues in lockdown to help curb the spread of the coronavirus.Victoria Jones | PA Images via Getty Images Immunity to Covid-19 might only last a few months, according to a U.K. study that casts doubts over the longevity of potential coronavirus vaccines. Antibody responses to the coronavirus can peak three weeks after the initial onset of symptoms, but then begin to decline after as little as 2-3 months, researchers at Kings College London found. The study, published Saturday on  preprint server MedRxiv and not yet peer-reviewed, examined the antibody levels of 64 patients and six healthcare workers who had tested positive for the virus at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS foundation trust (which runs several London hospitals) between March and June. It also monitored an additional 31 members of staff who volunteered to have regular...
    (CNN)After people are infected with the novel coronavirus, their natural immunity to the virus could decline within months, a new pre-print paper suggests.The paper, released on the medical server medrxiv.org on Saturday and not yet published in a peer-reviewed medical journal, suggests that antibody responses may start to decline 20 to 30 days after Covid-19 symptoms emerge. Antibodies are the proteins the body makes to fight infection."We show that IgM and IgA binding responses decline after 20-30 days," the researchers from institutions in the United Kingdom wrote in the paper, which also found that the severity of Covid-19 symptoms can determine the magnitude of the antibody response. Why a positive Covid-19 antibody test doesnt mean much of anything yetThe new study included samples collected from 65 patients with confirmed Covid-19 up to 94 days after they started showing symptoms and from 31 health care workers who had antibody tests every...
    Ed CaraA minute ago•Filed to:coronaviruscoronaviruscovid-19SARS-CoV-2immunityscienceSaveA health care worker in Iraq holding up a blood sample taken from a recovered covid-19 patient. Photo: Asaad Niazi / AFP (Getty Images) A recent study making the rounds everywhere is certainly unnerving: It found that previously infected people can lose almost all of a type of antibody to the coronavirus within three months. But the study’s findings are far too limited to assume that immunity to the virus is so short-lived. The study was published last week in Nature Medicine. Using blood samples, researchers in China studied the immune response of 37 people who had tested positive for the coronavirus but never developed any symptoms. They were compared to 37 people who did get mildly sick, as well as a control group of people who tested negative for the virus. Both groups who caught the virus had relatively similar immune responses at first. But...
    A medical worker organizes antibody tests on April 29, 2020 in White Plains, NY.Pablo Monsalve | VIEW press | Getty Images Coronavirus antibodies may last only two to three months after a person becomes infected with Covid-19, according to a new study published Thursday in Nature Medicine. Researchers examined 37 asymptomatic people, those who never developed symptoms, in the Wanzhou District of China. They compared their antibody response to that of 37 people with symptoms. The researchers found people without symptoms had a weaker antibody response than those with symptoms. Within eight weeks, 81% of the asymptomatic people saw a reduction in neutralizing antibodies, compared with 62% of symptomatic patients. Additionally, antibodies fell to undetectable levels in 40% of asymptomatic people, compared with 12.9% of symptomatic people, according to the study's findings. Though the study is small, the researchers noted the findings may spur some world leaders to rethink issuing so-called "immunity...
    Covid-19 survivors may only be protected from reinfection for six months, according to a study which casts doubt over the prospect of long-lasting immunity. University of Amsterdam researchers followed 10 volunteers for 35 years and tested them every month for four seasonal and weaker coronaviruses, which usually cause mild illnesses similar to the common cold. They found those who had been infected with the strains — from the same family as SARS-CoV-2, the type that causes Covid-19 — had 'an alarmingly short duration of protective immunity'.   Levels of antibodies, substances stored by the immune system to allow the body to fight off invaders in the future, dropped by 50 per cent after half a year and vanished completely after four years.   By studying how people recover from viruses from the same family as the one that causes Covid-19, the scientists say their research is the most comprehensive look at how immunity...
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