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    New York's notorious Black Widow, Barbara Kogan, plans to work as an anti-violence counselor following her release from prison last month, and has admitted that she claimed the $4.3million life insurance left by the husband she had killed and spent every last dime, DailyMail.com can reveal. Kogan, was granted parole in July having served just 12 of a possible 36-year sentence for hiring a hitman to gun down her estranged husband, George Kogan, 49. Now, DailyMail.com has obtained the transcript of Kogan's Parole Board hearing and can today reveal exclusive details of the proceedings that led to her sensational release. Barbara Kogan, 77, was released on parole last month after serving 12 years of a possible 36-year prison sentence for her part in her husband's death Manuel Martinez, right, was convicted of arranging the hit for $40,000 with Kogan (left) He is currently serving a sentence of 25...
    Loading the player... LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari spoke to the nation about the unrest that has gripped the country in recent days, but without making any mention of the shootings of peaceful protesters at Lekki toll plaza on Tuesday night that prompted international outrage. The military opened fire without warning on thousands of peaceful protesters singing the national anthem Tuesday night, killing at least 12 people, according to Amnesty International. The shootings have been widely condemned but Buhari did not speak of them at all during his Thursday address, instead urging protestors to stop their demonstrations. Read More: Biden calls for violence to end in Nigeria after SARS fires at protesters “This government will not allow anybody or (any) groups to disrupt the peace of the nation,” he warned in his televised address, urging protesters to “resist the temptation of being used by some subversive...
    (CNN)When Embrace, a Wisconsin-based domestic violence shelter, put up Black Lives Matter signs in its offices earlier this summer, employees expected it would prompt tough conversations from people in the community.Their locations in the state are not too far from where George Floyd died at the hands of Minneapolis police in May -- and the signs were the shelter's gesture of solidarity with the nationwide movement against racial injustice.Instead of tough conversations, however, the shelter was met with backlash, said Katie Bement, executive director of Embrace.Bement said the non-profit, which serves about 90,000 people in four different counties in the state, was stripped of $25,000 of its funding from Barron County, and its services with more than a dozen local police departments were dismantled."We never expected our funding to be held hostage or to have joint services benefiting survivors dismantled," Bement told CNN.Read MorePushback from local officials, law enforcementWhen Embrace...
    One of the great misuses of power on the right is the reframing of protests for equal justice into attacks on general concepts most people do not have a problem with. Black Lives Matter, which is allied with movements for more equal representation, protecting democracy, and protections for marginalized groups, has received such a reframing. As conservatives turned Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand during the playing of the national anthem—in protest of racial injustice and law enforcement’s disproportionate use of violence against people of color—into an attack on military veterans, police departments across the country have turned the Black Lives Matter movement into an attack on police writ large. Even the good apples, so to speak. Of course, in doing this, law enforcement and those on the right turn any criticism or critique of very obvious failings on the part of police into a battle between law and perceived chaos. It’s racist by nature, but...
    A South African town was bracing for racial violence today as black protesters armed with golf clubs and cricket bats faced off with white farmers in pick-up trucks outside a court where two black men are accused of killing a farmer.  The killing of Brendin Horner has led to riots in the town of Senekal where white protesters waving stormed the courthouse, fired shots and set fire to a police car last week.  Today, hundreds of black protesters linked to the Economic Freedom Fighters movement - which supports redistributing land from white people - gathered outside the courthouse with some hurling rocks despite efforts to keep calm.  Local media said the black protesters were brandishing golf clubs, hockey sticks and cricket bats ahead of the two murder suspects' second court appearance today.  The farmers, who accuse the government of failing to protect them from violent crime, arrived in pick-up trucks...
    The United States has been experiencing an ongoing wave of civil unrest following the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Jacob Blake and other black people in police killings this year.
    DONALD Trump has told black voters that Black Lives Matter was “destroying many lives” because it “spread violence across the US’. The Republican President, 74, blasted the BLM movement during a speech at an event called “Black Economic Empowerment” where he set out his “platinum plan” for Black voters. 5Donald Trump made the comments at a 'Black Economic Empowerment' eventCredit: Getty Images - Getty 5There have been a number of Black Lives Matter protests across the country in the past few daysCredit: The Mega Agency Taking up the issue of the recent high-profile deaths of several Black Americans, such a Breonna Taylor, at the hands of the police, Mr Trump said: “Many of those who are spreading violence in our cities are supporters of an organization called Black Lives Matter or BLM. “It’s really hurting the Black community. This is an unusual name for an organization whose ideology and tactics...
    Whoever needed to hear it, LeBron James put it plainly Tuesday: “I do not condone violence towards anyone,” the Lakers star said. “Police, Black people, white people, anyone of color, anyone not of color, because that’s not going to ever make this world or America what we want it to be.” On Sept. 14, L.A. Sheriff Alex Villanueva told the Associated Press that he blamed sports figures, as well as elected officials and civic leaders, for “fanning the flames of hatred,” saying they instead ought to emphasize trust in the criminal justice system. Two days before he made those comments, an unknown gunman ambushed two Compton sheriff’s deputies, both of whom were discharged from the hospital Monday, and who face a “long road to recovery”, officials said. James has long been an outspoken advocate for racial justice, and he and his NBA colleagues have been especially active...
    Attorney General Bill Barr on Wednesday defended law enforcement officers, saying there’s a “false narrative” in the US that many unarmed black people are shot by white cops. Barr made the comments during a wide-ranging interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, where he also rejected the idea that systemic racism exists in the justice system. “I think the narrative that the police are in some epidemic of shooting unarmed black men is simply a false narrative and also the narrative that’s based on race,” Barr said. “The fact is that it is very rare for an unarmed African-American to be shot by a white police officer.” In many instances where cops use excessive force, Barr said, the cause is fear and “not because of race.” “I don’t think there are two justice systems,” he told Blitzer. While Barr acknowledged that there are situations where black Americans are treated differently in the...
    As a Black queer millennial, I’m often told I’m strong. For my mere existence alone is often said to be an act of resilience.  I live in a world where people who look like me are being extrajudicially killed by cops on viral videos. A global pandemic is taking away my skinfolk more rapidly than any other population. And bigotry, H.I.V., gun violence, opioids, and poverty continues to disproportionately cut at the intersections of my Black queer community unforgivingly. Living in Philadelphia, a city that is now second to Chicago in homicides, I have witnessed too many loved ones who have had to post a family member they have lost to senseless gun violence too frequently than I can count. The devastation of COVID-19 continues to take away the lives of Black mentors that I’ve looked up to in the industry, along with the mother of a dear...
    Peaceful protests can get hijacked by violent individuals, said Rep. James Clyburn, D-S.C., on Tuesday, responding to violence at Black Lives Matter demonstrations. “Our movement got hijacked in the ’60s. John Lewis never asked anybody to burn anything. We were overtaken by the slogan 'burn baby burn.' You can’t blame John Lewis for that,” Clyburn told “Fox & Friends.” “That’s not what I advocate,” said Clyburn, who serves as House Majority Whip and is a member of the Congressional Black Caucus. “John Lewis and I started out as 20-year-olds. Look at my 60-year record,” Clyburn said, responding to host Brian Kilmeade asking why more Democrats are not condemning riots and looting in U.S. cities like Chicago and Portland, Ore. KALAMAZOO, MICH., RALLY DEVOLVES INTO VIOLENCE ARRESTS: REPORTS Violence erupted in Portland late Sunday just blocks from the federal courthouse, after the driver of a pickup truck crashed, was reportedly pulled from the vehicle and then brutally beaten by a mob...
    A Nevada county sheriff advised an area library to not hassle calling 911 for assist after it expressed assist for Black Lives Matter, in response to a report. In an announcement of range and inclusion, the Douglas County public library denounced “all acts of violence, racism and disrespect for human rights,” The Reno Gazette-Journal reported. “We assist #BlackLivesMatter,” the assertion, drafted by the county’s board of library trustees, continued. “We resolutely assert and consider that every one types of racism, hatred, inequality and injustice don’t belong in our society.” However the message prompted Douglas County Sheriff Dan Coverley to publish a sharply worded open letter on the sheriff’s workplace web site, the Gazette-Journal reported. “Resulting from your assist of Black Lives Matter and the plain lack of assist or belief with the Douglas County Sheriff’s Workplace, please don’t really feel the necessity to name 911 for assist,” Coverley wrote....
    Washington (CNN)President Donald Trump made another series of false, dubious and misleading claims at a Wednesday coronavirus briefing in which he continued to paint an overly rosy picture of how the pandemic is affecting the United States.Despite the sharp uptick in cases he acknowledged and a US death toll that now exceeds 142,000, Trump declared that "it's all going to work out. And it is working out."He suggested children do not transmit the coronavirus, though early evidence suggests children can and do. He attributed the recent rise in cases in part to racial justice protests, though early evidence suggests the protests did not cause a spike, and in part to migration from Mexico, though there is no evidence for this either.Trump also claimed that he has done more for Black Americans than anyone else with the "possible exception" of President Abraham Lincoln. That is transparently ridiculous. Here is a look...
    The president of the African American Leadership Council told St. Paul school board members who voted to remove school resource officers from the schools they will have “blood” on their hands if a child or teacher is hurt or killed. Tyrone Terrill, who wrote a Sunday night email to board members in partnership with the St. Paul Black Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance, said the board was acting “on emotions and not facts.” The school board voted 5-1 last Tuesday to no longer pay the city of St. Paul to post police officers in seven high schools and to instead develop a new safety plan. St. Paul school board members previously debated whether officers belong in the schools and the May 25 death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody sparked the discussion again. “Once again SPPS has made it clear that you do not care about Black families as it is...
    BOSTON (CBS) — A bike ride in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement took place Saturday morning in Boston. Riders gathered in Franklin Park to put the spotlight on police brutality. The event was called the “Ride for Black Lives.” Riders said they hope to set an example for young people moving forward. “When it comes to police brutality, when it comes to violence in general — for the youth, it’s important that they know that their lives do matter,” one rider said. “They don’t have to continue in the same cycle of violence.” Bikers riding in support of the Black Lives Matter movement Saturday in Franklin Park. (WBZ-TV) The event also helped raise money for organizations that are fighting for change, like Mass Action Against Police Brutality.  
    A Fox News host got more than she could handle when she had Greater New York Black Lives matter president Hank Newsome on her show. Martha McCallum, host of the Fox news show The Story had Newsome on as a guest on Wednesday. READ MORE: Black Lives Matter protests have not caused increase in COVID-19 cases: research (Credit: Hank Newsome) While Fox is often derided for their biased programming, they do have guests on to presumably present a differing viewpoint or to further explain their position on issues of politics and race. Newsome would appear to be in that category as he was asked to explain the goals of the Black Lives Matter movement. McCallum started off by asking if the organization promoted violence. “You … have said that violence is sometimes necessary in these situations. What exactly is it that you hope to achieve through violence?” “Wow, it’s interesting that...
    EAST ORANGE, New Jersey (WABC) -- Year after year, the violence against the transgender community continues to be disturbing.In 2020 alone, there have been at least 16 transgender or gender non-conforming individuals violently killed thus far."We're human. We bleed and breathe just like anyone else. We're not odd, we're not freaks, we're not sexual objects or sexual beings," said Kali Marie Higgs, a transgender woman sheltered at the Rain Foundation in East Orange, New Jersey.The Human Rights Campaign, which tracks these violent deaths, estimates that 4 in 5 of all anti-transgender homicides are transgender women of color."We are the seeing the second-highest spike, even amid a quarantine, which shows the heightened level of violence perpetrated against trans individuals, and it just doesn't make sense," said Tori Cooper, Director of Community Engagement for the Transgender Justice Initiative at the Human Rights Campaign.As movements like Black Lives Matter continue to gain momentum,...
    A BLACK Lives Matter activist who was reportedly shot in the crotch with rubber bullets during a Los Angeles protest says the shooting caused him to lose a testicle. Bradley Steyn - a South African native who was once involved in anti-apartheid protests - is now planning to sue the LAPD, according to TMZ. 3 Bradley Steyn says he was shot in the crotch with rubber bullets by the LAPDCredit: Handout 3 Steyn said one rubber bullet hit him in the thigh and the other hit him in the genitalsCredit: GoFundMe Steyn claims he was hit with the rubber bullets during a May 30 protest over the police killing of George Floyd in the Fairfax district of LA. In an interview with South African network Newzroom Afrika earlier this month, Steyn said that the violence he witnessed - and experienced himself - at the hands of police reminded him of...
    ENGLEWOOD — Several years ago during a TED Talk, scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw had the audience participate in an exercise in which she named Black male victims of police violence, asking people to remain standing if they recognized them. When she began to name Black female victims, all but four audience members remained standing. Far too often Black female victims are forgotten, their stories caught in a never-ending news cycle that centers the deaths of Black men, calls for justice never answered. And it’s not just police violence that Black women have to contend with, it’s intimate partner violence and sexual violence as well. One local organization, Gyrls In The Hood, is working to keep the memories of Black women and girls felled by violence alive. Founder Chez Smith and Natalie Manning, co-founder of This Is Life, are hosting “Gone, But Not Forgotten,” an event that is part catharsis, part...
    Theodore Roosevelt's equestrian statue has stood in front of the Museum of Natural History since 1940. It will soon be removed.Vanessa Carvalho/ZUMA For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.The uprisings sparked by George Floyd’s death are, ostensibly, about the war on Black lives. Protesters demand that we say the names of the deceased, that their murderers be brought to justice, that the institution of policing be re-thought, defunded, dismantled. Yet as the anger and grief simmer, a deeper purpose has crystalized: dismantling white supremacy in all its various forms. Days after Floyd’s death, protesters defaced Confederate memorials and torched buildings connected to slavery. Within another week, more than a dozen racist statues were toppled, removed, or beheaded, sometimes with municipal support. Collective consciousness evolved in a frenzy; long-resisted changes suddenly felt like no-brainers. The Marines banned displays of Confederate flags on their bases, while brands...
    President Donald Trump on Monday night tweeted out random videos of Black men attacking people, demanding to know “where are the protests?” about them. The president’s encouragement of protest for random, unconnected incidents seemed to be equating the issue to the protests against police brutality and racism that have popped up across the country. The tweets were condemned by a number of people on social media. In one tweet, the president commented on a video of a Black man hitting a white man in a Macy’s. In another tweet, he commented on a woman who was shoved by a Black man in a subway car in New York City. After sharing the Macy’s video, Trump added: “Looks what’s going on here. Where are the protesters? Was this man arrested?” It appears that Trump’s tweets were trying to imply that the individual incidents were just as much...
    President Donald Trump retweeted a video Monday night showing a Black man repeatedly punching a white man, adding the caption, “Looks what’s going on here. Where are the protesters? Was this man arrested?” He retweeted a second now-deleted video showing a Black man pushing a white human into the side of a subway car. The clip was captioned “Where are the protests for this?” to which Trump added “So terrible!” Critics immediately called the president’s tweets out, saying that Trump is attempt to equivocate systemic violence against African Americans to that of random acts committed by individuals. The tweets come as protests against racial inequality and police violence continued across the country, with a particularly notable protest in front of the White House on Monday night. Trump has been facing charges of racism this week after using the term “Kung flu” at his rally in Tulsa on Saturday to refer...
    An aerial photo shows a mural reading "Black Lives Matter" painted on a bike path on June 19, 2020, in Atlanta, Georgia. Nationwide, murals and street art are highlighting the importance of ending racial inequality. Protesters and advocates across the nation are spreading the message through art and paint in addition to protest signs and banners. The street paintings are a call for justice following a global outcry over the death of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man who died at the hands of a white police officer in Minneapolis. While most cities have left the protest art up, some have opted to cover up the messages. A mural of the words “Black Lives Matter” on the street in front of the Florissant Police Department in Missouri was covered up due to a city ordinance, police said. Activists painted the mural in the middle lane on Lindbergh ahead of a...
    CNN New Day bravely called a controversial quote tweet sent by President Donald Trump very early Tuesday morning that depicts an African-American man beating up a white gentleman in what appears to be a department store. Axios’s Alexi McCammon said frankly  “this is another example of something that President Trump is doing, apparently to fan the flames and sort of, you know, exacerbate these racial tensions that we’re already seeing played out throughout the country. And ‘racial tensions’ is generous. These are overt and egregious acts of extreme racism.” The video clip is violent, short and presented with very little context, and Trump simply asked “Looks what’s going on here. Where are the protesters? Was this man arrested?” The source tweet came from Tariq Nasheed, who perhaps ironically calls himself the “the world’s #1 Race Baiter” and says that he “bait[s] racists & expose them-Get involved with our fight...
    A Milwaukee, Wisconsin community is outraged after a group of photos of victims of racial violence was found hanging on nooses in the city’s Riverside Park. According to WLKY, the photos were removed by local activists of the original Black Panther Panther (to distinguish them from the New Black Panther Party which has been defined as a hate group) and included pictures of Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Botham Jean, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor. Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor and George Floyd (Credit: Arbery family, Instagram/@keyanna.guifarro and Benjamin Crump) READ MORE: Black man found hanging from a tree, Palmdale City residents want an investigation King Rick of the Milwaukee chapter of the Black Panther Party says that the photos were definitely racist in intent. “Historically, African Americans have been hung and lynched,” Rick said. “I don’t care what anybody says, they can justify it all they want to. It was...
    In the latest poll, roughly 3 in 10 said police violence is a moderately serious problem. Those who say it is not a serious problem has declined from a third in 2015 to about 2 in 10 today. Floyd, a Black man, died in late May after a white police officer in Minneapolis knelt on Floyd's neck for several minutes, killing him. Experts say the dramatic change in opinion about police violence that has followed is an indication the country is grappling with how to confront centuries of structural racism and inequity. "I have long argued that we cannot have a racial reconciliation in the United States because there's not been an admission of what has gone on," said Wornie Reed, director of the Race and Social Policy Research Center at Virginia Tech. "The nation is constructed on (racism). It's not an accident or something that America decided to do...
    DETROIT - A dramatic shift has taken place in the nation's opinions on policing and race, as a new poll finds that more Americans today than five years ago believe police brutality is a very serious problem that too often goes undisciplined and unequally targets black Americans.  The new findings from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research suggest the death of George Floyd and the weeks of nationwide and global protests that followed have changed perceptions in ways that previous incidents of police brutality did not.  About half of American adults now say police violence against the public is a "very" or "extremely" serious problem, up from about a third as recently as September last year. Only about 3 in 10 said the same in July 2015, just a few months after Freddie Gray, a black man, died in police custody in Baltimore.  In the latest poll,...
    Public opinion on policing has shifted dramatically in the past five years, as more Americans believe that police violence is a very serious problem. A poll released Wednesday by the The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research found that 48% of Americans think police violence is a “very” or “extremely” serious problem. That number is a significant increase from the 32% of Americans who thought the same in 2015. A greater number of Americans now think police are more likely to use deadly force against a black person than a white person. 61% of respondents said that police violence disproportionately targets black people, up from the 49% of people who thought the same in 2015. When surveyed about the criminal justice system, 65% of respondents said that police officers who cause injury or death are treated too leniently, compared to the 41% of people who thought the same in...
    In response, Gaetz asked, "Are you suggesting that you are certain that none of us have nonwhite children?" Richmond then reclaimed his time from Gaetz, cutting off what he described as an attempt to "sidetrack" the debate. "It is not about the color of your kids. It is about Black males, Black people in the streets that are getting killed," said Richmond, " And if one of them happens to be your kid, I'm concerned about him too. And clearly I'm more concerned about him than you are." "You're claiming you have more concern for my family than I do? Who in the HELL do you think you are?" Gaetz shouted in response. From the June 17 congressional hearing: RICHMOND: I don't want to leave this conversation — and why I'm speaking now instead of later — is because I don't want you all to leave here saying, "Well, we...
    DETROIT (AP) — A dramatic shift has taken place in the nation’s opinions on policing and race, as a new poll finds that more Americans today than five years ago believe police brutality is a very serious problem that too often goes undisciplined and unequally targets black Americans. The new findings from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research suggest the death of George Floyd and the weeks of nationwide and global protests that followed have changed perceptions in ways that previous incidents of police brutality did not. About half of American adults now say police violence against the public is a “very” or “extremely” serious problem, up from about a third as recently as September last year. Only about 3 in 10 said the same in July 2015, just a few months after Freddie Gray, a black man, died in police custody in Baltimore....
    In announcing his executive order on police reform, President Donald Trump said that he met privately with Black families of police violence. The families did not attend the White House Rose Garden signing of the order. However, the president said he met with the families of Ahmaud Arbery, Botham Jean, Antwon Rose II, Jemel Roberson, Atatiana Jefferson, Michael Dean, Darius Tarver, Everett Palmer, Jr., and Cameron Lamb. READ MORE: President Trump to sign executive order on police reform The president’s executive order would limit the use of chokeholds and create a national database for police misconduct. Congress is working to pass additional legislation on police reform in response to the national outcry in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. S. Lee Merritt, an attorney who represents a number of the families called the order, a “step in the right direction.” Merritt is also scheduled to...
    CHICAGO — Activists are calling on the city to dismantle programs and policies they say are steeped in institutional racism. As protesters push the city to take bold action like defunding the police, community organizers have stepped up to start building the systems needed to replace the ones that have historically failed Black people. Black organizers are also building power in their communities to support protesters who are demanding an end to police violence. They are helping area businesses recover from the looting that tore through their neighborhoods. Simultaneously, many are still filling the resource gap that has left many families struggling through the coronavirus crisis. Many of those leading the charge want to ensure that this is an intersectional movement informed by Black feminism. They seek to remind us that the liberation of Black people is intertwined with the liberation of women and LGBTQ+ people. Here...
    A woman holds her son's arm while documenting damage to a burned Wendy's restaurant in Atlanta after the death of Rayshard Brooks on June 14. Protesters held "I AM A MAN" and "END RACISM" signs Monday outside of the Georgia Capitol where a large crowd marched to demand justice after yet another Black man was shot and killed at the hands of a white police officer. Rayshard Brooks, 27, was killed after failing an officer’s sobriety check and grabbing one of their Tasers in what Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms called a “tussle” at an Atlanta Wendy’s restaurant Friday. Brooks’ death prompted another weekend of protests in the city, continuing what started after the death of George Floyd, a Black man who died in police custody after a white cop kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes. “Ahmaud Arbery. George Floyd. Breonna Taylor. Rayshard Brooks. These and countless others have died at the hands...
    On Thursday, the editor of the website uncoverdc.com decided to post an anonymous letter from a purported professor at that bastion of leftism, the University of California, Berkeley, that challenged the “BLM (Black Lives Matter) narrative.” The editor, Tracy Beanz, wrote: I was sent this and felt the need to share it to a wider audience on Twitter. I shared a link to the original post in the tweet. Then, the post was removed, and I made the decision that this is an important perspective not given an equal share in the marketplace of ideas. It is for this reason that UncoverDC now publishes it, not only because it is newsworthy, but because it is a critical piece of history. Wilfred Reilly, mentioned in the letter alongside Thomas Sowell, retweeted my original tweet confirming that he personally received the email, thus verifying its credibility. Internationally famed economist Thomas Sowell Sowell...
    Many groups bear responsibility for the recent chaos in American cities: the rioters themselves, ­police departments and unions that fail to discipline bad cops, politicians who deliberately enflame resentment and hotheaded social-media influencers. Add another group to the mix: gangsters, who for decades have turned many inner-city, mostly African-American neighborhoods into war zones. As the evidence shows, though white men are killed more often by cops, it’s statistically more likely for a black man to be killed by a police officer than a white man is — a reality that might be explained by the fact that cops interact with black men far more often than they do with white men. The gangsters help explain that difference. The Bloods, Crips, Gangster Disciples, Vice Lords and other such factions draw cops into black neighborhoods — often at the urging of black citizens. These gangs commit a large share of the thousands...
    Washington (CNN)Nearly 60 black former US ambassadors condemned the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and others and called for reforms to address systemic racism and police brutality in the United States.The Association of Black American Ambassadors (ABAA) said in a statement that "it is time for all people of conscience to voice their opposition to legally sanctioned violence; it is tarnishing America's image at home and abroad.""We all want an equitable society where each of us has the right to breathe," the ambassadors said in the statement published on "All Africa" Tuesday.Their call for reform comes as protests against racism, sparked by the death of Floyd at the hands of the police, have swept across the globe.Pompeos deafening silence angers diplomats as protests over racial injustice spread globally"While acts of violence against unarmed Black citizens are not new, we speak now to express our contempt about ongoing...
    BURLINGAME, Calif. (KGO) -- Police are investigating after a multiracial family wearing "Black Lives Matter" shirts was threatened with violence while eating at a restaurant in Burlingame."We were just a family trying to have dinner."RELATED: 'Say their names': Stories of black Americans killed by policeBut before dinner had even started, Anthony Colon said a stranger interrupted."He basically banged the table, slammed his hands on the table," said Colon who described how another man who had been eating at the same restaurant approached their table, "looked directly at my son and said 'black lives matter... 'F' black lives. Blue lives matter.'"Anthony Colon, his wife Ciara Doherty, and their children: Arya, 7, Arlo, 5, and Etta, 2, we're having a celebratory dinner at Flights in Burlingame Sunday after their first family protest in San Francisco."I don't believe that if we were a white family that he would have come near us," said...
    NORTH LAWNDALE — Black and Latinx mothers held a vigil Friday in solidarity with the nationwide movement against police brutality in the wake of the police killing of George Floyd. The show of kinship between Black and Latinx mothers in Little Village and North Lawndale Friday were the latest display of unity with Black Lives Matter protests. The action came days after leaders and organizers condemned isolated acts of violence between Black and Brown communities, and called on partnerships to bridge relationships on the West Side. On Sunday, Little Village neighbors organized to protect businesses from looters. Some of the men who guarded businesses were members of the Latin Kings street gang, according to local leaders. While most neighbors have organized to support “each other in unimaginable ways,” a few Latino men indiscriminately targeted Black Chicagoans in the neighborhood, said Little Village Ald. Michael Rodriguez (22nd). RELATED: Latino And Black Leaders Unite Across Neighborhoods...
    The United States is calmer, though still threatening, following days of rioting that spread with lightning speed across the nation, with murderous assaults on police officers and civilians and the ecstatic annihilation of businesses and symbols of the state. Welcome to a real civilization-destroying pandemic, one that makes the recent saccharine exhortations to “stay safe” and the deployment of police officers to enforce outdoor mask-wearing seem like decadent bagatelles. This particular form of viral chaos was inevitable, given the failure of Minneapolis’s leaders to quell the city’s growing mayhem. The violence began on May 26, the day after the horrifying arrest and subsequent death of a black man named George Floyd as he lay handcuffed on the ground. EX-NYPD COMMISSIONER KELLY ADMITS NYC MAY NEED NATIONAL GUARD 'IF THIS CONTINUES FOR A COUPLE MORE NIGHTS' On the night of May 28, Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey ordered the city’s Third Police Precinct evacuated...
    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — The city of Louisville, Kentucky, plans to reach out for an independent review of its police department amid protests that erupted over the deaths of black people during encounters with police, the mayor said Wednesday. Officials plan to hire an outside group to perform a “comprehensive, top-to-bottom” review of the police department, Mayor Greg Fischer said. The evaluation comes two days after the shooting death of a black man in the city as police and National Guard soldiers tried to enforce a curfew. The police chief was fired after it came to light that officers involved in the shooting failed to activate their body cameras. The city has been hit by days of protests demanding justice for Breonna Taylor, a black woman who was killed in her home in Louisville in March. The 26-year-old EMT was shot eight times by narcotics detectives who knocked down her...
    Political leaders of every stripe have been decrying the nationwide carnage sparked by a white Minneapolis cop’s fatal confrontation with a black man, George Floyd. Yet even as they do, Democrats — Gov. Andrew Cuomo, Mayor Bill de Blasio, Joe Biden and others — are going to lengths to signal that the mayhem is at least sort-of justified. “Violence is not the answer,” Cuomo declared Saturday, after yet another night of mass arson, looting, Molotov cocktails and assorted other attacks. Yet in the same breath, he went on and on about how the Floyd case — a sickening, seemingly flat-out racist murder by a cop — was far from an isolated incident. You are “in denial if you are still treating each one like a unique situation,” he said. Cuomo fumed about “injustice in the criminal-justice system,” insisting it goes well beyond Floyd. “How many times have we seen the...
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