Saturday, Feb 27, 2021 - 19:28:15
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the police talk:

    In January, a video of police officers pepper spraying and arresting a 9-year-old Black girl in Rochester, New York, became the latest in a long line of viral videos and tragic cases of Black children being victimized by police violence. Black parents and families have long tried to mitigate their children's’ risk of violent encounters with the police. One way they’ve done so is “the talk,” a primer discussion where family members explain to Black children what to do and not do when stopped by the police. In recent years, primetime television and web documentaries have increasingly brought mainstream attention to the concept of the talk, but those conversations have centered on young Black boys. While Black men and boys do account for an overwhelming percentage of police killings, the sole focus on this demographic renders invisible Black girls’ experiences with law enforcement, and obscures how police brutality includes not...
    NEW YORK -- "The Rookie" is accused of betraying his badge when season 3 of the ABC show returns after a cliffhanger this past May.The character played by Nathan Fillion is actually being framed by a real, dirty cop -- but even more interesting is the way this police procedural drama is meeting its moment and reflecting real events this past summer."After the unrest, and the protests, and the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, I think we all just felt an obligation. We felt like we had to do something," said Mekia Cox, who plays opposite Fillion. "The idea is for the show's scripts to better reflect today's reality, so we of course talk about police reform which is really important."Even though Nolan is falsely accused, he's told he has it easier because he is white. Cox's character, Nyla Harper, is fond of bending the...
    ATLANTA — County sheriffs in Georgia publicly condemned Democrat plans for police reform Tuesday after President-elect Joe Biden told a group of civil rights leaders to avoid discussing police reform until after Georgia’s January 5 Senate runoff election. The sheriffs indicated that the “defund the police” movement is central to Democrat plans for police reform. They warned that if Democrat candidates Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock win their runoff races, Republicans will lose their Senate majority and police will thereby lose their last line of defense for funding. Gwinnett County Sheriff Butch Conway, speaking at a press conference Tuesday at Liberty Plaza, said, “All we’ve heard for months from the Democrat Party is ‘defund the police.’” “Now I understand Joe Biden’s talking the other way now, not wanting to talk about defunding the police until after this election, but that doesn’t change anything,” Conway continued. “The program by the...
    Three Georgia sheriffs spoke outside the state capitol to slam Democrats for pushing to defund the police as President-elect Joe Biden arrives in the state Tuesday to campaign for Senate candidates Jon Ossoff and Rev. Raphael Warnock. "We have to have more money for police if we want better police. It’s crazy talk to say you want to defund police," Gwinnett County Sheriff Butch Conway said at the press conference livestreamed by the Georgia Republican Party. BIDEN, IN LEAKED AUDIO, SUGGESTS GOP 'BEAT THE LIVING H--- OUT OF US' OVER 'DEFUND THE POLICE' Their comments come after Biden told a group of civil rights leaders that calls among progressives to defund the police allowed the GOP to “beat the living hell” out of Democrats during the 2020 election cycle, according to leaked audio that surfaced last week. Republicans are attempting to paint Georgia's Democratic Senate hopefuls as too radical. "99.7% of the time we get it right, and...
    In a new campaign video, Democratic candidate Jon Ossoff promises to fight against police brutality and racial injustice if he wins a U.S. Senate seat in Georgia. Read More: Ossoff forced to debate empty podium after Perdue refuses to show The 33-year-old former investigative journalist dropped a campaign ad Thursday titled, ‘The Talk.’ It features a Black mother, Lawanda G of Douglasville, Georgia as she describes the all too common conversation Black parents traditionally have with their sons about how to maneuver a society that too often views them as a threat. The video opens with Lawanda sitting down with her son at a table as she explains to him why he should always be mindful of how others perceive him in public. Lawanda sits down with her son at a table to have “The Talk.” (Photo: Jon Ossoff for Senate) “As a mom, I have to talk to my...
    Sen. Bernie Sanders maintained on Sunday his confidence in President-elect Biden to uphold the progressive policies their two teams agreed to prior to the election, insisting that his "far-left agenda" is in fact something "the majority of American people support." "I sometimes find it amusing when our opponents talk about the far left agenda," Sanders said over the weekend. "The truth is that when you talk about raising the minimum wage to 15 bucks an hour, when you're talking about expanding health care to all people as a human right, when you talk about effectively taking on climate change, when you talk about making public colleges and universities tuition free, these are not far-left ideas. SANDERS CONFIDENT BIDEN WILL FOLLOW THROUGH ON PROGRESSIVE POLICY PROMISES  "These are commonsense ideas that the majority of the American people support," Sanders asserted. "And we're going to fight to make sure that they are implemented." SANDERS BLASTS...
    Democratic socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.) really does not appreciate that many members of her party — from moderates to liberals who still think straight-up socialism is a losing issue — are blasting the agenda she and her "Squad" have pushed for Democrats' overall poor showing in the 2020 elections. The congresswoman has tried to lay the blame at the feet of moderates and their campaign failures. One moderate Democrat is daring to call her out and saying she's not a team player and that her ideas are "unworkable and extremely unpopular."What happened? Beyond the fight for the White House, Democrats were projected to expand their majority in the U.S. House, quite possibly flip the majority of the U.S. Senate, and flip multiple state legislative chambers. They failed on all counts. Following last week's election results, Democrats blamed anti-police and pro-socialism messaging from far-left members...
    Time and again we have seen bills pushed to control the ability of women of color to make our own reproductive health decisions, from when to become pregnant and raise children to creating more obstacles to abortion access. We heard the horrific news that immigrant women were being forced to have hysterectomies — and over the past year, bans on abortion have swept the nation. Let’s be clear: This is all part of a political agenda to deny autonomy to women of color. We are told when we can and can’t have kids, and what kind of health care we are allowed to get. This is all while people ignore the very real plight that Black women are facing when we seek to try to have healthy pregnancies. Black women are dying in childbirth at the same time I hear lawmakers talk about how much they value life....
    Denver has a lot to reckon with — gentrification, the political divide, racism, sexism and more — and that's exactly what the group Soul Stories is all about, says Creative Director Shelsea Ochoa. Through community gatherings, podcasts and large-scale performances, the organization tackles hard topics and works toward community healing. Now a year into the project, the group just released a podcast hosted by founder Danny Mazur and produced by Ochoa and former Westword staff writer and The Syndicate Podcast host Chris Walker; the show looks into the death of Elijah McClain, the 23-year-old massage therapist and violinist who died after a violent encounter with the Aurora Police Department in August 2019. Westword caught up with Ochoa to find out more about the podcast, which comes out today, October 16.  Related Stories Play It Forward: Alex Blocker Is Making Music for a Better World Lares Feliciano Mourns Victims of Police Violence in...
    Jim Wilcox spent years drumming in the Mesa, Arizona-based punk band Authority Zero. After moving to Colorado a few years ago, he wanted to start playing again, so he posted a message on Facebook expressing this desire. That’s how he met Mike Waterhouse, singer from Denver punk outfit Boldtype, and the two met at a Denver bar to talk music. “Mike and I started writing songs, just the two of us, for a little bit,” Wilcox says. “When we got the initial band together, the whole sound kind of just took its own turn.” That’s how Record Thieves came about, and after a few lineup fluctuations, the five-piece band is just about to drop its debut, Wasting Time — eleven tracks of melodious punk rock that recalls Millencolin and, in particular, Face to Face. Related Stories Sixteen Songs by Denver Musicians That Confront Police Violence Ross Swirling of Allout Helter...
    Left-wing progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y) suggested Tuesday that lawmakers need to stop "asking if white supremacy in policing exists" and instead work to determine the scope of the problem. Ocasio-Cortez made the remarks during a House Oversight and Reform hearing about the supposedly "pervasive" problem of white supremacists infiltrating the nation's police departments. During the hearing, law enforcement officers, legal experts — and even a former neo-Nazi — were asked by lawmakers to testify about their past experiences with racist police officers. When it was Ocasio-Cortez's turn to speak, she suggested that "far too much of the discussion around the issue of white supremacist infiltration of policing focuses on whether this problem exists." "We have known for generations that it's not a question about whether this problem is an issue, it's a matter of how we have allowed it to sustain for so long," she said. "Congress, as...
    Loading the player... It’s finally time for the highly-anticipated film, Antebellum, to hit streaming services and the project that stars Janelle Monáe is sure to cause a commotion.  The first feature film written, produced, and directed by Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz forces viewers to reckon with modern day “progress” and this nation’s despicable past, blurring the line between the two.  theGrio caught up with Monáe who stars as a successful author, wife and mother that finds herself trapped in a horrifying reality that forces her to confront the past, present, and future to save her own life.  (Photo by Amy Sussman/Getty Images) Read More: Janelle Monae rants against sexism in music, religion and other institutions “This is a film that now more than ever is for these times and it connects the dots between the past, the present and what can be the future. I think that making...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- It's a conversation no mom or dad looks forward to -- explaining to a child how most interactions with police will go smoothly, but when they go bad, it can happen in a split second. Or it can go on for an interminable period of time.As a human, what happened to George Floyd at the hands of police rocks you to your core -- dead because a police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes. But, as a Black parent, what keeps you up at night is the thought, "That could have been my dad, my brother or even one of my kids."BUILDING A BETTER BAY AREA: Race and Social Justice"I have had the official 'talk,' if you will, with my oldest child," says Autumn McDonald of Oakland. She is a senior fellow with the think tank New America, formerly known as the New...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. Key to police reform: Voting in new leaders Meaningful reform of police performance and behavior isn’t going to happen until voters express their displeasure with the status quo by voting for change. In California, as well as many other states controlled by Democrats, those in power are so overwhelmingly tied to the support from public employee unions, including the police, that meaningful changes to performance standards and discipline will not occur until elected officials are held accountable for their abdication of control of police organizations. Public protests, especially looting, pro-sports protests, police defunding, all the rhetoric will change nothing. Meaningful reform is going to require all of us to vote for political leaders with the courage to take back control of police union contracts: re-establish performance and effective discipline standards, and elimination of arbitrators (union...
    An as-yet identified Black Lives Matter activist and leader has called for the death of police officers as well as for action to burn down the White House. The incident took place in Washington, D.C., on Saturday night at a Black Lives Matter event as tensions continue to grow across America over police brutality. What are the details? Reporter Brendon Leslie shared a now-viral video of the incident on Twitter, captioning it, "A BLM leader is encouraging this crowd of protesters to fight the DC cops on the frontlines. Saying he's 'ready to put them in their graves' — this may lead to another violent night in DC." In the video, the demonstrator shouted, "I'm at a point where I'm ready to put these police in the f***ing grave! I'm at the point, where, I want to burn the White House down! I...
    Rep. Cedric RichmondCedric Levon RichmondSunday shows preview: Protests continue over shooting of Blake; coronavirus legislation talks remain at impasse The Hill's Convention Report: Democratic National Convention kicks off virtually Hillicon Valley: 'Fortnite' owner sues Apple after game is removed from App Store | Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations MORE (R-La.) suggested President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump to visit Kenosha on Tuesday amid unrest Warner calls Intelligence chief's decision to scale down congressional election security briefings 'outrageous' Katyusha rocket lands in Baghdad 'Green Zone': report MORE’s efforts to reach out to Black male voters won’t be effective amid protests over police brutality and what the congressmen said is Trump’s failed efforts to address issues facing Black Americans.  “Donald Trump very effectively in 2016 raised the question to Black men, ‘what do you have to lose?’” Richmond said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press” when asked about Trump’s...
    Los Angeles Clippers coach Doc Rivers was the latest professional sports figure to speak out on Jacob Blake, who was shot in Wisconsin by police over the weekend. Rivers talked about Blake and racism in the U.S. after the Clippers defeated the Dallas Mavericks in their playoff game Tuesday night. KENOSHA VIOLENCE: 3 SHOT, INCLUDING 2 FATALLY IN ANOTHER NIGHT OF UNREST “It’s just so sad. What stands out to me is just watching the Republican convention, viewing this fear. All you hear is Donald Trump and all of them talking about fear,” Rivers said, according to the Los Angeles Times. “We’re the ones getting killed. We’re the ones getting shot. We’re the ones that we’re denied to live in certain communities. We’ve been hung. We’ve been shot. All you do is keep hearing about fear. It’s amazing why we keep loving this country, and this country does not love us back. It’s...
    There seems to be no low to which sheriffs in California won’t stoop to fight off even a modicum of oversight. The latest example, of course, comes from L.A. County’s very own Alex Villanueva. Apparently irked by Supervisor Hilda Solis, who recently dared to point out the obvious, saying that law enforcement engages in clear patterns of race-based brutality, the sheriff questioned whether she was trying to create distrust between his department and the community. Never mind that one of his deputies shot a Latino teenager, Andres Guardado, five times in the back last month and the sheriff is refusing to release any information. “I don’t know,” Villanueva said of Solis, streaming live on Facebook. “Are you trying to earn the title of a La Malinche? Is that what it is?” A “La Malinche”? SERIOUSLY?! You are calling a county supervisor a TRAITOR? But you know what? I’m calm....
    In a multi-part series, the Bay Area News Group will be discussing racial justice in America with former Warriors players from the last six decades. Jamaal Wilkes supports the police, up to a point. The former Golden State Warriors forward said he’s proud to be an American and wants law and order while at the same time seeing the need for change in the wake of demonstrations after the May 25 killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer. “I’m not an activist. I’m not in the guts of the stuff, but we need some kind of reform with the police department (while) recognizing that the majority are good police,” Wilkes said in a recent conversation with the Bay Area News Group’s Wes Goldberg. “And they are probably as sick and embarrassed and disgusted with the Floyd incident as most of the country is.” Wilkes,...
    BY NANCY MCLAUGHLIN, The News & Record GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) — With Black families, the timing for “The Talk” traditionally comes later, with getting a driver’s license. But Marcus Gause found himself sitting down with his 12-year-old son earlier this month. “He said, ‘Daddy, why are you crying?’” Gause said of that day looking into his son’s eyes with his wife, Tomakio beside him. “I said, ‘I feel like I’m taking something away from you.’” Soon after the Andrews High School principal watched his first born come into the world, the new father promised himself he would envelope him with the same love and guidance he got from parents, grandparents and extended family. That he would always make it his mission to protect him and do his part to make the world a better place for him. He didn’t expect “The Talk” — how interactions with the police for Black...
            by Amy Forliti   MINNEAPOLIS, Minnesota (AP) — The fiery leader of Minneapolis’ police union has built a reputation of defying the city, long before he offered the union’s full support to the officers charged in George Floyd’s death. When the mayor banned “warrior training” for officers last year, Lt. Bob Kroll said the union would offer the training instead. When the city restricted officers from wearing uniforms at political events, he had T-shirts made to support President Donald Trump. He commended off-duty officers who walked away from a security detail after players on the state’s professional women’s basketball team, the Minnesota Lynx, wore Black Lives Matter T-shirts. And after Floyd’s death, he didn’t hold back as he called unrest in the city a “terrorist movement.” As Minneapolis tries to overhaul its police department in the wake of Floyd’s death, city leaders will collide with...
    The Associated Press By AMY FORLITI, Associated Press MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The fiery leader of Minneapolis' police union has built a reputation of defying the city, long before he offered the union's full support to the officers charged in George Floyd's death. When the mayor banned “warrior training” for officers last year, Lt. Bob Kroll said the union would offer the training instead. When the city restricted officers from wearing uniforms at political events, he had T-shirts made to support President Donald Trump. He commended off-duty officers who walked away from a security detail after players on the state's professional women's basketball team, the Minnesota Lynx, wore Black Lives Matter T-shirts. And after Floyd's death, he didn't hold back as he called unrest in the city a “terrorist movement.” As Minneapolis tries to overhaul its police department in the wake of Floyd’s death, city leaders will collide with a pugnacious...
    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The fiery leader of Minneapolis’ police union has built a reputation of defying the city, long before he offered the union’s full support to the officers charged in George Floyd’s death. When the mayor banned “warrior training” for officers last year, Lt. Bob Kroll said the union would offer the training instead. When the city restricted officers from wearing uniforms at political events, he had T-shirts made to support President Donald Trump. He commended off-duty officers who walked away from a security detail after players on the state’s professional women’s basketball team, the Minnesota Lynx, wore Black Lives Matter T-shirts. And after Floyd’s death, he didn’t hold back as he called unrest in the city a “terrorist movement.” As Minneapolis tries to overhaul its police department in the wake of Floyd’s death, city leaders will collide with a pugnacious and powerful union that has long resisted such...
    MINNEAPOLIS – The fiery leader of Minneapolis' police union has built a reputation of defying the city, long before he offered the union's full support to the officers charged in George Floyd's death. When the mayor banned “warrior training” for officers last year, Lt. Bob Kroll said the union would offer the training instead. When the city restricted officers from wearing uniforms at political events, he had T-shirts made to support President Donald Trump. He commended off-duty officers who walked away from a security detail after players on the state's professional women's basketball team, the Minnesota Lynx, wore Black Lives Matter T-shirts. And after Floyd's death, he didn't hold back as he called unrest in the city a “terrorist movement.” As Minneapolis tries to overhaul its police department in the wake of Floyd’s death, city leaders will collide with a pugnacious and powerful union that has long resisted such change....
    Tulsa Police Maj. Travis Yates is warning of the dire consequences that will result from the "defund the police" movement and the prominent anti-police narrative in the mainstream media. On Friday, Yates published a viral essay about the current climate surrounding law enforcement. The essay was titled, "America, We Are Leaving." "I wouldn't wish this job on my worst enemy. I would never send anyone I cared about into the hell that this profession has become," Yates wrote. "I used to talk cops out of leaving the job. Now I'm encouraging them. It's over, America. You finally did it You aren't going to have to abolish the police, we won't be around for it." Speaking with Fox News host Tucker Carlson later on Friday, Yates shockingly revealed that police officers nationwide are looking to walk away from their profession. Yates explained that morale among law enforcement is at its...
    It is worth remembering what Donald Trump said about law enforcement during his speech at the 2016 Republican convention. An attack on law enforcement is an attack on all Americans. I have a message to every last person threatening the peace on our streets and the safety of our police: when I take the oath of office next year, I will restore law and order our country. I will work with, and appoint, the best prosecutors and law enforcement officials in the country to get the job done. In this race for the White House, I am the Law And Order candidate. For a party that vacillated between being post-truth and post-policy, the mantra of “law and order” has always served as a dog whistle to the racists in their ranks, which effectively rallied the troops when Trump promised to crack down on “those people.” The president is now deluding himself about garnering...
    In a viral video, a police officer seems to instantly regret FaceTiming his child while on the job. It’s unclear what sparked this interaction, but a New York City police officer gets his son on the phone to talk to what seems to be a protester. Based on the relatively quiet and clear streets, it doesn’t look like a protest is happening at that moment. “This is a buddy of mine right here,” the New York police officer says to his child, pivoting the camera to a protester. “Say hi to my son,” the officer continues. The officer’s son greets the protester with a “hello.” “How do you feel about your dad going out every night to beat peaceful protesters?” the protester asks. “Uhhhhh, I feel bad, and I want him to come home,” the child responds. The officer, seemingly taken aback by the protester’s question, asks, “Don’t...
    Donald Trump is not an ideas man. This has been a defining feature of his presidency. He’s not a learned policy wonk, understanding the complex nuances of law and governance. He is, at his core, just a former game show host and a con man. Never is this more clear than when reporters ask him about public policy problems he’s not prepared for. (Of course, even on topics where Trump should be prepared, like health care, he struggles to put together a coherent thought.) This happens even with friendly outlets. On Wednesday, Trump appeared with Fox News host Brian Kilmeade on his radio show. And in an exchange flagged by CNN’s Daniel Dale, Kilmeade asked a surprisingly decent and provocative question. Trump had no idea how to respond, so he just rambled. But his rambling was revealing. It’s worth quoting the entire exchange in full: Kilmeade: But this is the...
    Instead of X’s and O’s, the Denver Broncos spent Tuesday talking about racial injustice, police brutality and healing a nation rocked by demonstrations over George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis on top of the coronavirus outbreak and its economic devastation. Team president Joe Ellis addressed the offense and defense in separate Zoom calls that replaced the team’s regular video conference sessions, which are a substitute for in-person training during the pandemic. Coach Vic Fangio and general manager John Elway also participated in the calls in which Ellis emphasized society’s need to eradicate racism and told the players that the organization shares in the outrage over Floyd’s death at the hands of police. TOP STORIES Univ. of Alabama Birmingham professor instructs rioters on how to tear down monuments Lay down your arms: Prominent veterans urge troops to defy Trump Retired St. Louis police captain killed by looters Ellis, who told players...
    (CNN)Despite being a legendary Hall of Fame basketball player, Magic Johnson understands the realities of being a black man in America. His grandfather prepared his father, who prepared him, Johnson told CNN's Anderson Cooper Monday, and he's had "the talk" with his two sons about interacting with police. It's the discussion all black and brown parents have with their children so they don't say or do the wrong thing around a police officer, ending up on the ever-growing list of men and boys who have died at the hands of police."I had that conversation because it's important that I have that conversation with both E.J. and Andre," Johnson said on talking with his sons. "Let's look at George Floyd. He did everything he was supposed to do. And this police officer put all his body weight, all his body weight on his neck, right, for eight minutes. So if that...
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