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    Protesters stand in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement against police brutality on June 3, 2020, in Stockholm, Sweden. It’s difficult to gauge the success of any movement aimed at affecting widespread and systematic change. That’s especially true for the Black Lives Matter movement, which has what can feel like the insurmountable aims of eradicating white supremacy and fighting police brutality in Black communities. But as difficult as it is to quantify the movement’s success, it’s just as difficult to ignore its impact. A new study cited in the Scientific American found that in cities where Black Lives Matter protests had been staged, police killings dropped an estimated 20% between 2014 and 2019. Travis Campbell, the author of the study and an economist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, concluded in his research that Census areas with Black Lives Matter protests saw about 300 fewer police homicides. "BLM protests also increase the probability of a police...
    MinnPost photo by Peter CallaghanSenate Majority Leader Paul Gazelka said Minneapolis’ recent move to spend $6.4 million to hire more police was a step in the right direction, but maintained the city should have hired more officers previously.When Gov. Tim Walz unveiled a $35 million plan in late January to help pay costs for security around the March 8 trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, the governor asked state lawmakers to swiftly adopt it so law enforcement could prepare for what might be a tumultuous period. Weeks later, as Chauvin’s second-degree murder trial in the killing of George Floyd inches closer, legislators remain fractured over not only over who should pay for security help, but what exactly the state’s role should be in handling protests and civil unrest. REUTERS/Lucas JacksonGov. Tim WalzThe Minnesota Senate, which is controlled by Republicans, passed a bill Monday over Democratic objections that would...
    HOLLYWOOD -- There is a new movie heading to on demand involving a young Black man killed by a white police officer. It was filmed almost two years ago- before the deaths of George Floyd and others that culminated in the creation of the Black Lives Matter movement.Nate Parker directs and stars, and he had no trouble assembling his cast."We knew we needed to be a part of it," said Omari Hardwick. "And it's so ironic because we did it so long ago.""We were in 2019 and we were still making a film about something that, in 2021, is still quite relevant," said Sierra Capri."So all of these issues are just making this movie even stronger, showing us the differences in race, in police vs. people, people vs. people. It's bringing up a lot of topics that we have to examine and how can we make things different? How can...
    Bureau of Prisons agents block protesters from assembling in front of Lafayette Park in Washington DC on June 3, 2020.Sue Dorfman/ZUMA Wire Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.Congress is set to approve a defense policy bill that bars unidentified federal law enforcement officers from policing protests. The bill responds to a phenomenon that Mother Jones flagged in June: Unidentified federal law enforcement officers with no identifying insignia joined in the Trump administration’s coordinated crackdown on protests against police violence in several cities earlier this summer. The 4,500-page annual defense policy bill that emerged from a House-Senate policy committee Thursday requires any armed forces personnel, including National Guard members, and federal law enforcement agents who respond to a “civil disturbance”, to display either their name or some other “individual identifier”, as well as...
    Former presidential candidate Andrew Yang offered a warning to his fellow Democrats this week following his underwhelming performance in the 2020 primaries.  While Joe Biden appeared to be inching his way toward 270 electoral votes -- potentially denying President Trump a second term -- many of the down-ballot Democratic candidates were not nearly as successful.  Results from Tuesday's election suggested the party likely failed to win control of the Senate and actually lost several House seats while maintaining a majority.  During a CNN panel discussion Wednesday, Yang shared his own experience on the campaign trail trying to earn the votes of working-class people.  CLICK HERE TO SEE FOX NEWS’ LIVE PROBABILITY DIALS "I would say, 'Hey! I'm running for president!' to a truck driver, retail worker, waitress in a diner. And they would say, 'What party?' And I'd say 'Democrat' and they would flinch like I said something really negative or I had just turned...
    WASHINGTON - Before a U.S. federal judge on Thursday halted the work of a Trump administration law enforcement commission - saying it had violated public meetings laws - the panel had been warned about shutting out public input by several of its own participants, internal records reviewed by Reuters show.   The commission had planned to deliver a slate of proposals recommending sweeping new powers for police shortly before the November presidential election, the documents show. It also called for bolstering due-process protections for officers accused of wrongdoing, according to draft proposals reviewed by Reuters.   But the secretive process to produce the planned report drew criticism from some law enforcement representatives helping draft the document, internal emails among the participants show.   The order to halt the commission's work, from U.S. District Judge John Bates, came in response to a lawsuit filed by the NAACP Legal Defense and...
    By Sarah N. Lynch WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Before a U.S. federal judge on Thursday halted the work of a Trump administration law enforcement commission - saying it had violated public meetings laws - the panel had been warned about shutting out public input by several of its own participants, internal records reviewed by Reuters show. The commission had planned to deliver a slate of proposals recommending sweeping new powers for police shortly before the November presidential election, the documents show. It also called for bolstering due-process protections for officers accused of wrongdoing, according to draft proposals reviewed by Reuters. But the secretive process to produce the planned report drew criticism from some law enforcement representatives helping draft the document, internal emails among the participants show. The order to halt the commission's work, from U.S. District Judge John Bates, came in response to a lawsuit filed by the NAACP Legal Defense...
    Left-wing progressive Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y) suggested Tuesday that lawmakers need to stop "asking if white supremacy in policing exists" and instead work to determine the scope of the problem. Ocasio-Cortez made the remarks during a House Oversight and Reform hearing about the supposedly "pervasive" problem of white supremacists infiltrating the nation's police departments. During the hearing, law enforcement officers, legal experts — and even a former neo-Nazi — were asked by lawmakers to testify about their past experiences with racist police officers. When it was Ocasio-Cortez's turn to speak, she suggested that "far too much of the discussion around the issue of white supremacist infiltration of policing focuses on whether this problem exists." "We have known for generations that it's not a question about whether this problem is an issue, it's a matter of how we have allowed it to sustain for so long," she said. "Congress, as...
    On Thursday, Ring, the home security subsidiary of Amazon, released a new dashcam embedded with a novel feature called “Traffic Stop” that could help bring more accountability to policing. That could be a powerful thing, especially as tens of millions of people have poured onto the streets in cities across the country to demonstrate against systemic racism, white supremacy, and police brutality. It could also be a privacy nightmare. The Ring Car Cam, which will cost $199, has two cameras: one pointed out the front windshield and one that points toward the car’s interior. The camera can send alerts whenever an event such as a break-in, towing, or accident is detected, and owners can tap into the cameras’ feeds to see what’s happening. The Car Cam relies on either Wi-Fi or LTE for connectivity. “Alexa, I’m being pulled over” But the most interesting feature is Traffic Stop. All a...
    Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is expected to make an announcement on legislative proposals about public safety on Thursday. Abbott is slated to speak at noon at the Dallas Police Association’s headquarters at noon. His remarks will be livestreamed in this article; if there is not a livestream available, check back at a later time. The announcement comes amid weeks of criticism from Abbott, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and other Republican lawmakers over activists' efforts to defund the police amid a summer of civil unrest due to police brutality and racial injustice. Just Wednesday, the Dallas City Council voted to approve a budget that increased police spending but cut $7 million for overtime for officers, according to the Associated Press. San Antonio councilmembers passed a $2.9 billion budget last week that makes few changes to the SAPD budget. That’s a stark difference from the decision handed down by Austin in August,...
    (CNN)Based on a well-received, one-sentence tweet, a University of Pennsylvania professor is preparing to lead a direct-action, walkout-style event over two days for educators and students to address racial violence and unjust policing."I would be down as a professor to follow the NBA and Strike for a few days to protest police violence in America," Anthea Butler tweeted last week, referring to the recent walkout by pro athletes over the police shooting of Jacob Blake and other Black men.Anthea Butler of the University of PennsylvaniaThose in higher education plan to pause classes and administrative duties on September 8 and 9 for the Scholar Strike, a teach-in about racial violence, policing and community organizing. Some 600 professors have committed across multiple universities, and #ScholarStrike has taken off as a hashtag. "We're not so much protesting our individual universities," Butler explained, "as we are protesting police violence and racial injustice in this...
    (CNN)Elijah McKnight admits he was drunk. The 25-year-old says he'd had a fifth of Jim Beam with a buddy before passing out on his way home on a sidewalk just outside Aurora, Colorado. That is where sheriff's deputies found him.They nudged him awake and the conversation was calm for the first several minutes. Deputies told him they were just checking to see if he was all right. But the encounter ended with McKnight on life support after being injected with a high dose of a drug called ketamine. "I was out cold for three days on life support," he said. "My family didn't know where I was."When McKnight finally woke up in an Aurora hospital, he couldn't believe what he was seeing on the news. His eyes widened when he saw a story about another young black man named Elijah. Elijah McClain was in a coma and near death after...
    By Reina Sultan As the United States changes over the years, so do the ways in which the government surveils the population. With the reauthorization of the Patriot Act (during Ramadan no less), Americans—especially Black, brown, and Muslim Americans—are set for the continued infringement of their right to privacy. The added bonus, of course, is that the government can continue to legally surveil our online activity without a warrant. The codification of surveillance doesn’t only take place through the Patriot Act, but through other programs as well, often framed as anti-terrorism. In 2011, the Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) task force was created under the Obama administration. As Nabihah Maqbool, Muslim Advocates legal fellow, has previously written, “CVE programs fund programs that promote contact between police entities and young, Black Muslims.” In attempting to implement so-called anti-extremist programming in communities, Maqbool says the government “deputize[s] communities to surveil and report...
    Public Advocate Jumaane Williams has made a career of being Gotham’s fiercest opponent of the NYPD. He has campaigned against broken-windows policing, sponsored legislation to restrict how cops do their job and worked overtime to keep criminals on the streets. No wonder why: It’s easy to want less policing when you live in the city’s safest and best-guarded gated community. As City & State reported in an August profile, Williams and his fiancée now live within the confines of the Fort Hamilton army base. Internet searches confirm his new, sequestered address. Fort Hamilton, New York’s only active military garrison, sits boldly at the southwest corner of Brooklyn at the foot of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, guarding the entrance to New York Harbor. Its residences, which are mostly meant to house military families, are now open to “qualified members” of the general public. The Fort is fenced in by a secure perimeter...
    Mayors Lori Lightfoot of Chicago and Muriel Bowser of Washington, D.C., headlined a portion of the Democratic National Convention (DNC), discussing police reform and racial injustices against Black people, but critics pointed to both their handlings of recent protests in their own cities that some say contradict Monday night's message. TRUMP SUPPORTER DIES OF COROANVIRUS, DAUGHTER SAYS AT DNC HIS ONLY PREEXISTING CONDITION 'WAS TRUSTING DONALD TRUMP' "It's about economic empowerment," Lightfoot said during a DNC panel with presumptive presidential nominee Joe Biden. "Because if people are lifted out of poverty and they are given an opportunity to feel a stake in their own future, that goes a long way." Lightfoot's city has faced ongoing unrest and demonstrations with calls to defund the police, even as homicides and shootings nearly doubled from the same time last year. Lightfoot announced last week that she would be forming a task force to...
    Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot continues to be a critic of President Donald Trump, this time for remarks he made pledging policing support for the beleaguered Windy City. According to Lightfoot, the need was not for federal or any other outside help but “commonsense gun reform.” “Those are the words of somebody who doesn’t understand the first thing about local policing, the — doesn’t understand the first thing about building authentic relationships with members of the community,” Lightfoot said. “Case in point is, look at the disastrous efforts of the federal government under this administration in Portland, it didn’t help, it hurt. It exacerbated problems. I’m not letting that happen in my city.” “Yes, of course, we have our challenges, but the thing that the federal government is uniquely qualified to do is things like pass commonsense gun reform,” she continued. “Make sure that everybody has background checks, stop the availability...
    NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – CBS2 is taking on the hard question: Where does the conversation about race go from here? CBS2’s Maurice DuBois spoke with David Simon, former journalist, author and creator of hit TV shows, about policing and the war on drugs. “I think the demonstrations are necessary,” Simon said. Simon has spent most of his career writing about police in urban America, including 15 years as a reporter at the Baltimore Sun. “I want to start here David with your take on what’s going on right now in society, people in the streets, more police killings it seems by the week. What are you seeing?” asked DuBois. “The thing that has changed in a profound way and necessarily for the better is the power of the cell phone, of the smart phone, with its camera, with its video camera,” said Simon. “The fact that everyone has one. The...
    EVANSTON, Ill. (WLS) -- Young people took to the streets in Evanston Monday, demanding that police be defunded- which they believe is a key step to eradicating racism.In wake of the death of George Floyd and the growing Black Lives Matter movement, the City of Evanston held a question-and-answer series with the mayor about how to move forward.Activists, mostly young, typically local students moved from the mayor's home to the Evanston City Center demanding to be heard as the mayor embarked on a series of talks about policing.Along with the city's chief of police and an expert on police training, the seminar was broadcast on Facebook and the municipal tv channel. Hazel Crest police chief Mitchell Davis said addressing implicit police bias is key to improving outcomes.The meeting came as workers washed away a painted "defund the police" banner on the street outside the Evanston police department."We had a situation...
    Republican representative Matt Gaetz launched into a tirade during a Wedgnesday House Judiciary Committee while responding to remarks from a black congressman from Louisiana.  The Florida politician had the tense exchange with Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-LA) while the Democrat offered comments about the Justice in Policing Act.  Richmond was speaking to his frustration with Republican efforts to include language in the legislation geared towards Antifa.     'By the time I am finished you will be clear that we are not good friends,' Richmond said before explaining that he had experienced police brutality and feared for his son. The Florida politician had the tense exchange with Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-LA) while the Democrat offered comments about the Justice in Policing Act 'To my colleagues, especially the ones who keep introducing amendments that are a tangent and a distraction to what we are talking about, you all are white males, you...
    Our state and nation are grieving. The horrific murder of George Floyd is an image that will be indelibly etched into our minds as our nation calls out for justice. We know this murder was not an isolated incident. Black and brown people are too often killed with impunity by police. Now may be a tipping point and we should not squander this opportunity to make fundamental changes in policing. The psychology behind “group think,” especially among male officers, results in an “us vs. them” mentality in police agencies even when there is benevolent leadership at the top. In Minneapolis, this is underscored by a union president (like other police union leaders who are usually men) who has been modeling this mindset for years. No matter how egregious the behavior, even in a video-documented officer-involved killing, he has not condemned the officers involved in the death of George Floyd and...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The novel coronavirus pandemic and protests over the death of George Floyd are having a major impact across the world but also in cities across the Bay Area. Join anchor Kristen Sze for ABC7's new interactive newscast weekdays at 3 p.m. with live updates about what's happening where you live.On Tuesday, June 16, former member of the SF Police Commission Joe Alioto Veronese will be joining Kristen to talk about President Trump's new executive order on police reform.Check back here to stream the show Monday-Friday at 3 p.m. and to join the conversation on Facebook live and YouTube.LIVE UPDATES: Here's the latest on the COVID-19 pandemic in the Bay Area, US.LIVE UPDATES: Get the latest on George Floyd protests in the Bay Area and across the countryWATCH PREVIOUS ABC7 UPDATES ON FACEBOOK HERE:Monday, June 15Friday, June 12 Thursday, June 11 Wednesday, June 10Tuesday, June 9Monday, June...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- The novel coronavirus pandemic and protests over the death of George Floyd are having a major impact across the world but also in cities across the Bay Area. Join anchor Kristen Sze for ABC7's new interactive newscast weekdays at 3 p.m. with live updates about what's happening where you live.On Tuesday, June 16, former member of the SF Police Commission Joe Alioto Veronese will be joining Kristen to talk about President Trump's new executive order on police reform.Check back here to stream the show Monday-Friday at 3 p.m. and to join the conversation on Facebook live and YouTube.LIVE UPDATES: Here's the latest on the COVID-19 pandemic in the Bay Area, US.LIVE UPDATES: Get the latest on George Floyd protests in the Bay Area and across the countryWATCH PREVIOUS ABC7 UPDATES ON FACEBOOK HERE:Monday, June 15Friday, June 12 Thursday, June 11 Wednesday, June 10Tuesday, June 9Monday, June...
    President Trump signed an executive order on law enforcement reform Tuesday following weeks of police brutality and racial injustice protests that have rippled across the nation and globe after the death of George Floyd. The "Safe Policing for Safe Communities" order vows to "uphold clear and high policing standards, promote accountability in law enforcement, and help equip police officers for constructive community engagement," the White House said. Here's what's in the executive order: Chokehold ban It calls for prohibiting the use of the chokehold technique except when law enforcement officers' lives are in danger. Information sharing on problem officers  The order says the attorney general will create a database to share information between law enforcement agencies and track officers who have repeated complaints against them. The database will track “excessive use of force,” while still accounting for privacy and due process rights. The DOJ will withhold discretionary grant funding from agencies that do not submit...
    If Barr's fingerprints are on it, it's not really going to help. Impeached president Donald Trump promised last week that he was going to do away with four centuries of American "bigotry and prejudice" in no time, that he'd take care of it "very quickly and very easily." Easy peasy. On Tuesday he's going to show us how with his new executive order on policing. The problem is, it doesn't actually sound like he's really got a problem with the "racism" part of the whole deal. "The overall goal is we want law and order, and we want it done fairly, justly, we want it done safely," Trump told reporters on Monday. "But we want law and order. It's about law and order. But it's about justice also, and it's about safety." Translation: It's about making sure cops can still bash heads with impunity. He also told reporters that his...
    (CNN)"Cops" has patrolled the airwaves for more than 30 years, which made Paramount Network's withdrawal of the show's return noteworthy. That action came amid questions and protests about policing, which also prompted A&E to postpone "Live PD," a newer iteration of the ride-along idea that's one of the network's most popular series.Television's historic infatuation with cop shows, both scripted and unscripted, has prompted renewed conversation in the current moment. Have decades of TV crime drummed home a heroic image of the police, skewing public perceptions and providing cover for excesses?It's too soon to know whether the last few weeks of mass protests will fundamentally alter how people see such programming, and more to the point, how networks approach scheduling them. The viewing audience is hardly monolithic, with an abundance of options catering to all sorts of tastes and niches.These scheduling moves nevertheless felt like a tacit admission that TV has...
    Iraq War veteran and political analyst Rob Smith argued that the debate over U.S. law enforcement reform in the wake of George Floyd's death is distorted by serious misconceptions. "When we have this conversation about policing in America, it seems to be so black and white because there's this idea that the victims of police violence are always black and all the police are always white," said Smith, who is African-American. "We have hundreds of thousands of African-American police officers that are serving honorably every single day," he continued on Fox Nation's "Deep Dive." AFRICAN-AMERICAN CONSERVATIVES BLOW UP STEREOTYPES: 'WE BOTH DON'T EXIST' Smith pointed to the tragic murder of retired St. Louis police captain, David Dorn, 77, who was gunned down last week while working as a security guard at a pawn shop.  Dorn was African-American. "This is somebody that they gave his life protecting a store from the looting and the rioting and all that stuff that has...
    Across the world, millions of people have gathered to protest police brutality and systemic racism after an officer in Minneapolis killed George Floyd, an unarmed black man. Amid the outpouring of grief and support, tech companies like Google, Amazon, and Reddit have issued statements backing protestors and the Black Lives Matter movement. But these same companies also provide platforms and services that prop up communities of hate and help law enforcement disproportionately track and convict people of color. This week on Gadget Lab, a conversation with WIRED senior writers Sidney Fussell and Lily Hay Newman about hypocrisy in tech, police surveillance, and how to safely exercise your right to protest.Show NotesRead Sidney’s story about tech companies’ relationships with law enforcement here. Read Lily and Andy Greenberg’s tips for how to protect yourself from surveillance while protesting here. Read Lauren Goode and Lauryn Strampe’s story about what to bring and...
    (CNN)The police show is one of TV's most durable staples. And after 30 years of "Law & Order" and its spinoffs, the genre finds itself again drawn into a conversation about how all those cops and crimes, neatly resolved in an hour, shapes the way the public views police and policing amid widespread protests about systemic injustice.The term "Law & Order" has cropped up in President Trump's Twitter feed, connoting the platform Richard Nixon rode into the White House in 1968. The actual TV series, meanwhile, became a small part of the story when a writer on a spinoff starring Christopher Meloni was fired after a threatening Facebook post about looters.Despite the popularity of crime shows, the relationship between them and public opinion remains complicated. People watch TV and movies for all sorts of reasons, which doesn't necessarily translate into an unqualified endorsement.Decades ago, the late media scholar George Gerbner...
    (CNN)Nine days before George Floyd died an agonizing death under the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer while others watched, law enforcement officials broke up what has been described as a massive block party in my Florida hometown of DeLand and the surrounding unincorporated Volusia County. Video footage of police shutting down a local store and chasing some in the crowd led many to accuse local authorities of engaging in another incident of racist law enforcement targeting African Americans. But what actually happened there is more complex than what was initially reported -- and this local example has lessons for all of us looking for ways to facilitate effective community policing of African American communities during the Covid-19 pandemic. Theodore W. Small, JrThe DeLand "block party" took place only a few city blocks from where I grew up. The mostly African American neighborhood known as Spring Hill is one...
    Retired Missouri Highway Patrol Capt. Ron Johnson, who led the law enforcement response to the violence in Ferguson, Mo., following the 2014 death of Michael Brown, told "The Story" Tuesday that it is time to have tough conversations about race and policing in America. "We have to change, it's a cultural change that we have to change throughout our nation and I think that we are seeing that more and more," Johnson told host Martha MacCallum. "After Ferguson, I talked about [how] we needed to make some changes and we needed to have some in-depth conversations, some real conversations. NYPD COMMISSIONER SHEA BLASTS CUOMO'S 'DISGRACEFUL COMMENT' ABOUT RIOTS, POLICE Video"Most people said we are not ready to have that now," Johnson added. "I would say that now it is a must and we have to be ready to have that conversation because we are seeing it across our country and not just in one city. People are protesting across this nation and people have stories that add some fact and merit to what's...
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