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    Martin Luther King Jr. Getty While working on her thesis, Anna Malaika Tubbs became interested in the mothers behind civil rights icons.  She found that the women directly influenced their sons' work. Understanding history through the eyes of Black women can help society make change today, Tubbs says. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. There's a saying that behind every man, there's a great woman. Anna Malaika Tubbs hates this saying, but is also intrigued by it. As a Ph.D candidate in sociology at Cambridge University, Tubbs thought about how it might relate not to a man's wife, but to his mother.  "I wanted to focus on the women before the man was even conceived," Tubbs told Insider. "To switch us talking about the woman behind the great man, to thinking about the woman first." As part of her thesis, Tubbs began researching the mothers of three...
    Suspect in shooting at gun store in Louisiana had been asked to unload gun, sheriff says No time to lose: Puerto Rico governor authorizes gradual school reopening in March © ET If there’s one person in Hollywood who is considered a true trailblazer, it’s Sidney Poitier. The longtime actor broke barriers onscreen with films like Guess Who's Coming to Dinner and In the Heat of the Night and during the height of the Civil Rights movement in 1964, he became the first Black man to win the Academy Award for Best Actor. During Black History Month, Oprah Winfrey is opening up to ET’s Kevin Frazier about the 94-year-old actor’s legacy and how he laid the groundwork for herself and many others within the industry.  “When I tell you profoundly, I could start weeping right now, I was profoundly, deeply, sincerely moved by that moment,” Winfrey says, looking back on...
    It’s Black History Month, but here at the Los Angeles Times we tell stories of Black life and Black L.A. 365 days a year. We want to take this opportunity to highlight some of our Black reporters and columnists, and to celebrate the upcoming arrival of two more. We are proud of the work they do, while every journalist in our newsroom takes on the responsibility of uplifting and amplifying Black voices. Join us on Thursday, Feb. 25, at 6 p.m. for a virtual event with Times journalists reflecting on being Black while documenting this moment in history. We hope you can will part of this important conversation. You can register at Eventbrite. In the meantime, here are a few stories over the last year that have resonated with our communities: 18 ways to honor Black History Month around L.A. A Black reporter’s road trip to the inauguration...
    California school board members caught disparaging parents on accidental Zoom broadcast Power outages, storms slow vaccine rollout at 2k sites; California to reopen schools; Biden to pledge $4B to COVAX: Latest COVID-19 updates Dominique Fishback went beyond the usual prep when it came to playing Deborah Johnson, the girlfriend of doomed Black Panther Party chairman Fred Hampton (Daniel Kaluuya), in Judas and the Black Messiah. © Dia Dipasupil/WireImage The actress is a scene-stealing marvel in the Oscar-contending film. "I journal as all of my characters," says Fishback, 29, who made a splash as precocious high-schooler Robin opposite Jamie Foxx in last year's Project Power. "For me it was taking every single moment [with Kaluuya] and writing a poem about it, or a thought. I [listened] to a lot of Nina Simone music… I put a song to each scene and journal about it. I got to really go into...
    One year ago this week, a group of scholars, leaders and activists – mostly Black – gathered to defend our nation’s founding, inaugurating a movement we called 1776 Unites.   We chose "1776" because that is and has always been the year of our nation’s true founding, and "Unites" because our founding values have always – despite our current state of toxic polarization – had the ability to bring all Americans together.    At the time, the catalyst for the gathering was the New York Times’ 1619 Project, which asserted that "Our founding ideals of liberty and equality were false when they were written," and that America’s promises were made in bad faith from the very beginning.  DR. BEN CARSON: BLACK HISTORY IS AMERICAN HISTORY – AND THIS IS WHY IT'S ALL WORTH CELEBRATING That proposition – which was eventually walked back by its author – threw gasoline on the fires of division in our nation. Today, the Project itself has faded into the rearview mirror enough...
    Welcome to Off the Beat, a weekly Q&A with a local business person doing something a little different. Have an idea or pitch that reflects some unusual business activity? Email mneibauer@bizjournals.com. Ceece Kelley is the founder and principal author of D.C.’s Soaring Kite Books, an independent publishing company that specializes in books featuring characters of color. She recently debuted a Kickstarter campaign for its new children’s book series. What was the inspiration for the “Georgie Dupree” series? I was inspired to write Georgie because when I was growing up, there weren’t a lot of books with main characters that looked like me or that had Black main characters at all. So, I was inspired by “Ramona,” “Junie B. Jones” and books like that that I used to love, but I wanted it to feature a spunky Black character that children could relate to and also see characters of different ethnicities...
    Three Phoenix police officers were caught on bodycam video saying they wanted to 'gas' and 'stomp on' Black Lives Matter protesters last year following the arrests of 15 people. The officers also disparaged the protesters in the bodycam video by calling them 'd**kheads', a**hole kids' and 'liberal pieces of s**t' as they sat in their patrol car in downtown Phoenix back on October 17 last year. The footage, obtained by ABC15, came to light at the weekend after attorneys for the 15 protesters used it in their case to argue the three officers were politically motivated during the arrests.  Just hours after the video was made public, the Maricopa County Attorney's Office announced it was dismissing the charges against the 15 people so they can review the evidence.  The officers have not been identified.  Three Phoenix police officers were caught on bodycam video in October last year saying they wanted to...
    DANIEL Kaluuya is a British actor who's been making waves in Hollywood after starring in the 2017 horror film Get Out and the hit film Black Panther. But, what else do we know about the Bafta 2018 winner and Oscar-nominated star and what else has been in? Here's the lowdown... 2 Daniel Kaluuya shot to fame after appearing in the 2017 horror film Get OutCredit: AP:Associated Press Who is Daniel Kaluuya and who is he dating? Daniel was born in London on 8 May 1989 - that makes him 28. He began his career as a teenager in improvisational theatre, and appeared in the first two seasons of the E4 teen Skins, which he also co-wrote. He's currently enjoying a career high after his 2017 horror film Get Out earned him nominations for a BAFTA, Golden Globe, SAG Award and a Critics' Choice Award in the best actor in a leading...
    Good evening, MarketWatchers. Here are today’s top stories:Personal Finance Do not miss this: Texas lawyer commits hilarious Zoom fail by keeping kitten filter on 'I’m here live. I'm not a cat,' lawyer Rod Ponton told the virtual court when he couldn't get the cat filter offTake a look inside Kevin James’ $14 million oceanfront mansion in Delray Beach Pretty nice for a "Mall Cop." The actor Kevin James has purchased an oceanfront property in Delray Beach, FL, for $14 million. ‘Real estate is your sex now’: SNL sketch skewers people’s obsession with Zillow — 3 reasons why millennials can’t stop scrolling Here's the real reason why so many people are fantasy scrolling through online real-estate listings these days.Lost a loved one to coronavirus? You may be eligible for funeral-expense reimbursements Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez told New Yorkers Monday that they could expect to receive up...
    Hollywood star Jenna Dewan stunned her fans after appearing as the covergirl of Women’s Health. In the photo, she flaunted her figure in a bandeau top and bikini bottoms. The bandeau was a bright red color that highlighted the California resident’s sun-kissed skin. The neckline was low enough to show off Jenna’s collarbone and décolletage and appeared to be on a slight diagonal, suggesting that it was a one-shouldered style. The hem cropped just below the bust to show off her washboard abs. Jenna paired the top with a pair of mismatched bikini bottoms. They were a mid-rise silhouette with sides that rested just above the dancer’s hips in a style that accentuated her hourglass figure. Instead of the fire engine red shade of the top, the briefs were a chic black color that offered a pop of contrast to the photo. To complete the look, the Resident star wore...
    70-year-old Tennessee man wanted for 2 murders found dead Only 38% of nursing home workers accepted COVID-19 vaccines, new data shows How Brands and Retailers Are Tackling Diversity — Both Within and Beyond Their Organizations © Diane Bondareff/AP Click here to read the full article. Following a year marked by national unrest over racial inequity, a number of retailers, fashion groups and footwear brands are taking a new approach to celebrating Black History Month. Beyond product launches and collaborations with Black talent, companies like Gap, Neiman Marcus and Walmart are upping the ante on diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives by donating millions of dollars in product and funds to nonprofits, addressing representation within their own organizations and committing to allocate shelf space for Black-owned brands, among other moves. More from Footwear News With a Spate of New Initiatives, Macy's Steps Up Diversity Efforts in Honor of Black History...
    Hi there, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories:Personal FinanceNBA star Kyrie Irving bought a house for George Floyd’s family The basketball star Kyrie Irving has bought George Floyd's family a house.Disney closes Hall of Presidents attraction to add Joe Biden animatronic — some say it’s time to end it Some are calling for the attraction to be removed, citing today’s political divisions. I’m predisposed to early-onset Alzheimer’s. I want to propose to my girlfriend — but unsure how to divide my estate between her and my daughter This letter writer asks: ‘Is it wrong to leave funds passed down from generation to generation solely for my daughter, and leave other funds to my new wife?’My wife has a degenerative neurological disease. My father-in-law wants to put her in a facility — and take over our finances ‘My father-in-law now seems obsessed with moving my wife out of our home to...
    Kamala harris Share on Facebook Share on twitter Share in mail Share on whatsapp Biden’s cabinet will be made up of a record number of women “We did it, Joe,” said US Vice President-elect Kamala Harris as the media projected a Democratic victory in the November 3 presidential election. And, although Joe Biden had achieved it, the triumph of his running mate is not negligible, but it is one more milestone to add to the list of barriers that he has overcome. The 56-year-old Harris’ political career is fraught with momentous achievements. The daughter of immigrants from Jamaica and India, she has been a San Francisco district attorney, California’s first black female attorney general, and in 2017, she became the second black senator from the United States. From there, and as the first vice president of the North American nation –...
    The Akatsuki are the most powerful evil organization that Naruto, his friends and the rest of the ninja world have to deal with in Naruto. They have a complex plan that they have been working on for decades, and towards the end of Naruto Shippuden, they almost manage to carry it out. Along the way, they manage to clinch a few wins, while other times in the series, they come very close to winning the day, only to be thwarted in their efforts at the last second. It’s obvious that if they hadn’t had such formidable opponents, and if there hadn’t been some betrayals in the ranks, the Akatsuki might have carried out their plan successfully. 10 The Pain Almost Destroys Konohagakure The philosophy of pain is that the only way for people to truly understand each other is for everyone to experience the...
    Washington (CNN)It was hard not to notice how Rev. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff's Democratic victories in Georgia's January 5 runoff elections evoked the history of the Black freedom struggle -- a continuing struggle, as evidenced by a Confederate flag-carrying mob's takeover of the US Capitol on Wednesday."When I think about the arc of our history, what Georgia did (on Tuesday) is its own message in the midst of a moment in which so many people are trying to divide our country, at a time we can least afford to be divided," Warnock told CNN's John Berman on Wednesday morning on "New Day," even before the assault on the US Capitol and multiracial democracy.Insurrectionists -- one person in a "Camp Auschwitz" shirt, so many others in MAGA hats -- rioted in an attempt to block President-elect Joe Biden's free and fair win. To the surprise of no one, a remarkably...
    Political differences: 10 ways to de-escalate political discussions with friends and family who disagree with you Trump has suggested he wants to pardon himself: NYT Black NBA players and coaches grapple with how their power can really effect racial justice changes On Aug. 26, 2020, Milwaukee Bucks guard George Hill made a small choice, creating ripples that eventually brought sports to a brief, unplanned halt. He decided he couldn’t play basketball in a bubble while Kenosha, Wisconsin, just south of Milwaukee, was erupting with protests after Jacob Blake, a 29-year-old Black man, was shot multiple times and paralyzed by Kenosha officer Rusten Sheskey. The players flipped the script: If sports are a distraction, what do sports owe society in exchange? Perhaps a vested interest in social justice on behalf of billionaire team owners. The NBA was quick to get on the players’ side, to voice support for what was...
    Black Lives Matter disorder spread across the Atlantic with remarkable speed in 2020 after the death of George Floyd in the United States, with statues torn down or vandalised across the country and London repeatedly plunged into violent disorder, despite lockdowns. The far-left revolutionary radicalism of the Black Lives Matter was put on full display during months of protests in Britain’s multicultural capital in 2020, as Breitbart London saw first hand on the ground. On May 31st, just five days after Floyd’s death, thousands of Black Lives Matter protesters took to the streets of London, in stark defiance of the city’s coronavirus restrictions. As activists gathered in Trafalgar Square, a wild-eyed activist proclaimed from a bullhorn: “It’s time to wake up and get out [of] the house and f*** this place up, man. I’m tired of this sh*t. We need to burn this sh*t down. I don’t care what the...
    Six years after 'The Dress' confounded social media users — was it black and blue, or white and gold? — another color mystery has the internet buzzing. On December 29, Reddit user Megzies1997 shared a pair of side-by-side photos of a ribbed sweater, writing: 'My shirt appears to be two vastly different colors in different lighting.' And sure enough, one photo shows what seems to very clearly be a light gray sweater, while the other shows the same sweater — which now appears unmistakably purple. Confounding! A Redditor has shared two pictures of the same sweater, which looks like completely different colors in different lighting  On December 29, Reddit user Megzies1997 shared the pair of side-by-side photos The images make clear how much lighting can drastically change what something looks likes, and show how people could so easily disagree over the true color of an item of clothing. The...
    (Clockwise) Former Minneapolis police officers, Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, Thomas Lane, and J. Alexander Kueng are booked into Hennepin County jail for the death of George Floyd. Minnesota Department of Corrections and Hennepin County Sheriff's Office/Handout via AP Photo and Reuters People being considered to serve as jurors in the criminal trial stemming from George Floyd's death are being asked to answer questions as part of the jury selection process. The questionnaire includes questions about their views on Black Lives Matter, whether they attended protests over police brutality, and their personal experiences with police officers. Floyd was killed on May 25 when a former Minneapolis police officer kneeled on his neck for more than eight minutes as Floyd pleaded with him, "I can't breathe." Four officers are facing charges related to his death. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. People being considered to serve as jurors in...
    Happy Monday, MarketWatchers. Don’t miss these top stories:Here’s when most Americans will be able to get a COVID-19 vaccine The first U.S. doses of Moderna's vaccine have started rolling out, a week after Pfizer and BioNTech began distribution. When will you get your shot?See inside Tom Brady and Gisele Bundchen’s $40 million NYC penthouse Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady is also a serious player in the real estate world. When will I get my second stimulus check? Mnuchin says they’ll arrive ‘very fast’ “I’d be shocked if the Treasury doesn’t hit send by the end of next week,” one expert said. Our building is tipping staff 25% extra due to COVID-19. My husband wants to tip this for 2021 too. I disagree. What do you say? ‘I am an Upper East Side wife and mother with two children. I realize I am very fortunate.’I didn’t receive a $1,200 stimulus...
    When December hits, a common sentiment might bring joy and excitement or it might freeze you in your tracks: It’s the most wonderful time of the year. For those of us navigating grief and loss during the holiday season, these words can add pressure to an already delicate time. To grieve is to navigate the process of adapting to life after loss has transpired. Navigating that uncharted territory can be fraught with challenges and stress, including unfair expectations of what grieving “should” look or feel like, or an unrealistic timetable about when you are “supposed” to be over your loss. On top of that, this is not a normal holiday season—it’s coming after a year defined by loss. Since March, whether it has been losing loved ones and friends to illness, losing employment, losing the freedom to travel, or being thrust into virtual work and learning spaces and losing the community of...
    Ten years after the adoption of the 1990 International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of their Families, the UN General Assembly recognized Dec. 18 as International Migrants Day. Migrants across the globe are often made up of vulnerable populations facing obstacles in both their home country and the one they immigrate to. This year alone the United Nations identified about 272 million people as migrants, a large increase over previous years despite the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the United Nations, this increase in numbers is a result of a variety of factors including trade, rising inequalities, demographic imbalances, climate change, and conflict. The U.S. itself has one of the largest number of migrants worldwide––approximately 50.7 million people, or 15% of the population. Research has found that these migrant populations are the “most vulnerable to economic shocks like lockdowns and COVID-19 infections given...
    That didn’t take long.   Now that Black Lives Matter activists have served out their useful purpose for Democrats – energizing Black and White liberals voters to turn out for Joe Biden – they have apparently been dumped by the president-elect.  Patrisse Cullors, a co-founder of the Black Lives Matter movement, sent Joe Biden and Kamala Harris a letter shortly after the election, requesting a meeting. She argued, “Without the resounding support of Black people, we would be saddled with a very different electoral outcome. In short, Black people won this election.”   HANS VON SPAKOVSKY: SUPREME COURT RULING PROBABLY DOOMS TRUMP ATTEMPT TO BLOCK BIDEN ELECTION AS PRESIDENT In return, she wrote, “We want something for our vote.” So far, she has not heard back from the incoming administration.   Most recently, BLM was excluded from a meeting Biden and Harris hosted for civil rights leaders.   CLICK HERE TO GET THE OPINION NEWSLETTER The BLM crowd is not happy, posting on...
    Rana Daggubati! With a towering frame, an endearing smile, an enigmatic persona are what endear him endlessly. A man of quite a few virtues – actor, producer, photographer, visual effects coordinator, Rana has not only garnered critically, audience and commercial acclaim as an actor but also is a creative force who has been enriching multiple film industries with his expertise spanning almost over a decade. On the fashion front, Rana’s off-screen sense of style play is replete with casual and dapper looks that feature fitted tees, shirts, denim or trousers and sneakers or formal shoes. But what really elevates his vibe is an I-Am-Dapper-and-I-Know-It demeanour armed with a strong beard game. He turns a year older today. We briefed up a fashion capsule of some of these smart-casual moments. Smart casuals give off a relaxed, calm, cool, collected and simple vibe. Rana plays with silhouettes and colours that suit his...
    On the latest episode of Bravo’s “Southern Charm,” the reality show depicts the effects of the Black Lives Matter movement in Charleston earlier this year, as Leva Bonaparte gathered a group of her girlfriends to support the removal of a statue of John C. Calhoun (an ancestor of Kathryn Dennis) in the park. The episode followed with an intense brunch discussion about racism, privilege and Dennis’ recent misstep with the monkey emoji. Bonaparte sat down for an exclusive interview to share her feelings on the matter and the advice she gave Dennis. Subscribe to our YouTube! ShareFacebook Twitter Pinterest Linkedin ReddIt Victoria-Gosling RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR UncategorizedDe Blasio picks Margaret Forgione to take over DOT UncategorizedBryan Cranston still can’t fully taste and smell after COVID-19 UncategorizedOff-duty cop finds missing man by following dog’s paw printsTop ArticlesBig Brother’s Memphis Garrett’s Nude Photos Leak Online December 2, 2020Braunwyn Windham-Burke’s husband supports her...
    SAN ANTONIO – Black Friday deals have been phased in throughout the month to allow for social distancing at stores, but some retailers are still holding their biggest sale of the year this Friday. The National Retail Federation says people are predicted to spend a little less than $1,000 on gifts this holiday season. The Better Business Bureau is offering the following tips for those who plan on shopping during this Black Friday: Make sure to follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s COVID-19 guidelines. That means frequent handwashing, wearing a face covering, keeping 6 feet of distance between you and others at the store and staying at home if you’re sick. When you’re planning your Black Friday spending, set a budget and use sales flyers to find the best deals. You’ll also want to do a deep dive on reviews for the items you want to ensure...
    Rick Pitino wants college basketball season to get pushed back to March, but it wont happen Here’s Why The Crown Skipped Princess Diana and Prince Charles’s Royal Wedding Black Friday Sales: How to Find the Best Deals and Earn Cash Back Love it or hate it, Black Friday is an American tradition. And like most things in 2020, this traditional shopping holiday is not shaking out to look the same as usual. © Money; Getty Images Smart-Tips-Shopping-Black-Friday In normal years, masses of shoppers gather around big box retailers on Thanksgiving night or the wee hours of the following morning in the hopes of scoring the best deals on big-ticket items like smart TVs and new gaming systems. Load Error Due to the coronavirus pandemic, most (if not all) retailers like Target and Walmart offering Black Friday deals have put most of their energy towards online shopping, and they...
    By any reckoning, she was one of the biggest fashion icons of the 20th Century.  But not every item in Princess Diana’s wardrobe has endured as long as her reputation for style, with several dresses having apparently ‘disappeared’. But now David and Elizabeth Emanuel, the designers behind her wedding gown, are set to recreate some of her ‘lost’ dresses for a possible exhibition. The Princess of Wales seated in her lavish bridal gown at Buckingham Palace after marrying Prince Charles The former husband and wife will use photographs and sketches to recreate some of the 20-plus outfits they created for Diana during the 1980s. ‘I only know of the whereabouts of those few that have been auctioned and are now in museums or with private collectors,’ Ms Emanuel said last night. ‘Originals do turn up from time to time in charity shops,’ she added. ‘Fortunately I am a hoarder...
    HBO Angela Bassett, Between the World and Me This feature film adaptation of Ta-Nehisi Coates’ bestselling book and the Apollo stage performance of the same name, Between the World and Me premieres Saturday, November 21 at 8 p.m. ET/PT on HBO. If you don’t have HBO and you’ve used your HBO Max free trial, here are some other ways you can watch Between the World and Me streaming online for free:Heavy may earn an affiliate commission if you sign up via a link on this pageAmazon Prime’s HBO ChannelAmazon Prime subscribers (Prime comes with a 30-day free trial) can watch all live and on-demand HBO content on the Prime HBO channel. You can try both Amazon Prime and the HBO Channel at no cost with a free trial right here: Watch HBO on Amazon Prime Once you’re signed up for the Prime HBO Channel, you can watch Between...
    (CNN)Sixty years ago, Ruby Bridges walked to school escorted by four federal marshals as a White mob hurled insults at her.Bridges, just 6 years old on November 14, 1960, was set to begin first grade at William Frantz Elementary School in New Orleans. As the first Black student to attend the school, Bridges carried integration on her small shoulders.Her first day at William Frantz came four years after Black parents in New Orleans filed a lawsuit against the Orleans Parish School Board for not desegregating the school system in the wake of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, which determined in 1954 that state laws establishing segregation in public schools were unconstitutional. The year Bridges walked into the school, Judge. J. Skelly Wright had ordered the desegregation of New Orleans public schools. The Orleans Parish School Board, however, had convinced the judge to require Black students to apply for...
    At least 1,500 nurses in the Philadelphia area may be on the verge of going on strike Analysis: Beijing gives up on even the pretense of allowing opposition in Hong Kong Seniors On Medicare Are Getting a Big Pay Day in 2020 Ad Microsoft Full screen 1/5 SLIDES © Elizabeth Sisson/NBC Tackling current events head on. During their Wednesday, November 11, season premieres, Chicago Med, Chicago Fire and Chicago P.D. — three shows that follow the lives of first responders — tackled the current events happening in 2020. While Chicago Med and Chicago Fire dove into the coronavirus, Chicago P.D. went deeper into the Black Lives Matter movement and police reform. “As a hospital show, we always knew we would have to cover it,” executive producer Diane Frolov told Us Weekly ahead of the season 6...
    ProPublica Illinois is a nonprofit newsroom that investigates abuses of power. Sign up to get weekly updates about our work. This story was co-published with Block Club Chicago. EAST GARFIELD PARK — Growing up in Chicago’s East Garfield Park neighborhood in the 1960s, Annette Britton spent a lot of time on Madison Street. She picked up produce for her mother at N&S Certified Food Mart, skated at the Albany roller rink and went to movies at the Imperial Theatre. A neighborhood pharmacy, Sacramento Drugs, not only filled prescriptions but served customers ice cream at a diner in back. Durham’s, an appliance store, sold washing machines and refrigerators. Back then, stores, often with apartments above them, lined Madison Street from downtown west to the city limits. The east-west axis of Chicago’s grid system, the street once thrived as a commercial beltway known as the “Equator of Chicago” and the “Heart of...
    Matthew Rozsa - Ashlie D. Stevens November 11, 2020 1:50AM (UTC) On Tuesday afternoon, Pennsylvania politician Dean Browning — a white, heterosexual, self-described "proud pro-life & pro-2A Christian conservative" — tweeted, "I'm a black gay guy and I can personally say that Obama did nothing for me, my life only changed a little bit and it was for the worse."  The tweet continued: "Everything is so much better under Trump though. I feel respected — which I never do when democrats are involved." : Browning, who is a former commissioner in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, sent this tweet in response to one of his earlier posts, in which he said, "What Trump built in 4 years, Biden will destroy in 4 months."  Twitter users leapt on Browning's bizarre response, many speculating that it was obvious that he had forgotten to log out of his "sock puppet" account. A sock puppet account is...
    Washington (CNN)"Trump: You're fired! Democracy saved! Thanks, Black voters!"So reads a poster at Washington's Black Lives Matter Plaza, across from the White House. Arch and overflowing with spirit, the sign nods to the consequential role that Black voters played in the 2020 presidential election.In March, South Carolina's Black voters -- who make up more than 60% of the Palmetto State's Democratic electorate -- revived now President-elect Joe Biden's campaign, after the former vice president's poor performances in the Iowa caucuses, New Hampshire primary and Nevada caucuses.Last week, vote counts from cities including Detroit, Milwaukee and Philadelphia -- all important areas with significant Black populations -- helped Biden flip several of the "blue wall" states that President Donald Trump won in 2016.And don't forget Georgia. A recount is expected, and CNN hasn't yet projected a winner. But Biden has a small lead in the Peach State -- which the Republican nominee...
    2020 is the year of the Croc. Following its hot-selling collaborations by Post Malone, Bad Bunny and Justin Bieber, the shoe brand is not stopping. On Tuesday, country singer Luke Combs released his third collaboration with the company, this time featuring a fuzzy lining ideal for cold weather. Priced at $65, the Luke Combs x Crocs LC3 clogs are white with a black fleece interior, decorated with the “Better Together” singer’s black “Skully” graphic, which is plastered across the back of his tour bus. Also included are Combs-themed Jibbitz featuring tour memorabilia, his favorite Gibson guitar and a nod to his pup, Jojo. Previous designs from Combs include wood-patterned clogs, a twist on slides and a super popular camo pair, all of which sold out within hours of launching and can now be found on the resale market for more than $250. Combs’ latest Crocs were released at 12 p.m....
    Opinions | How North Dakota became a covid-19 nightmare 12 fast-food releases customers loved in 2020 How Stacey Abrams, LaTosha Brown and other Black women changed the course of the 2020 election As the 2020 presidential election comes down to the wire, it's clear that Black women continue to be the Democratic Party's most powerful voting group. © Provided by CNBC Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams waits to speak at a Democratic canvass kickoff as she campaigns for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris at Bruce Trent Park on October 24, 2020 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Not only did 91% of Black women vote for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden according to NBC News exit poll results, but Black women have also been on the front lines of this year's election, working to ensure that all eligible voters have their voices heard at the polls. In Georgia, Stacey Abrams,...
    The latest entry in the Call of Duty franchise, Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War, will launch on November 13th. But what does that mean for the series’ free-to-play battle royale, Call of Duty: Warzone, which is itself based on 2019’s Call of Duty: Modern Warfare? In a lengthy blog post, the games’ developers, Infinity Ward and Raven Software, break down how content will be synchronized across the three titles in the future. The big takeaway is that weapons, cosmetics, and other unlockables (including attachments, perks, and killstreaks) will be shared across the games. That means weapons from both Cold War and Modern Warfare, including blueprints and camo variants, will be available in Warzone, creating “the largest weapons arsenal ever seen in Call of Duty.” Sharing content and player progression across games is a huge challenge Player progression will also be synchronized across the three games’ multiplayer modes,...
    Joe Biden campaign signs. Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images Police in Lake Oswego, Oregon, are investigating how two severed deer heads ended up next to signs for Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and Black Lives Matter in one neighborhood.  The residents told local media they feel like they have been targeted, but police say they haven't yet ruled out the possibility that animals dragged the garbage bags to the homes.  The incidents come after a string of viral incidents that appear to show attempts at voter intimidation by supporters of President Donald Trump in the days ahead of the presidential election Tuesday. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Police are investigating after two severed deer heads were found next to signs supporting Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and Black Lives Matter at different locations in a Lake Oswego, Oregon, neighborhood. Both decapitated deer heads were found on...
    NFL legend Herschel Walker has accused James Clyburn of taking Trump 'out of context' after the House Majority Whip slammed the President for calling an ex White House aide 'a dog'.  Clyburn appeared on FoxNews on Sunday, where he expressed his disbelief that a black man could vote for Trump after he appeared to call former Obama aide Omarosa Manigault Newman 'a dog'.  He added that he would have to 'pray' for the black men voting for Trump.  Early this morning Walker tweeted a video of himself in which he said: 'I'm going to pray for you as well because you took the president a little bit out of context, which is okay because the Democrats have been doing that for a long time just to get a vote and I think that's what you're doing right now.'  In 2018, Trump was criticized for a tweet in which he appeared to...
    The "Karen" meme has evolved to reference a hair style, white women who ask to speak to the manager, and people being racist in public. Left to right: Michael Kovac/FilmMagic; Melody Cooper/Twitter; @savsoares/TikTok The "Karen" meme is being used to describe women who commit acts in public that are perceived to be racist, such as unjustly calling the police on Black people. The meme, often combined with the "Can I speak to the manager?" haircut, is used as a "pejorative for middle-aged white women" to depict their entitlement, a senior editor at Know Your Meme said. While it's hard to confirm the true origins of the meme, many believe it's derived from a Dane Cook comedy routine. But the use of viral monikers becomes problematic when it assigns an innocuous and anonymous name to a person who has seemingly committed overtly racist actions. Visit Insider's homepage for more...
    FORMER Wolves goalie and Sky TV pundit Matt Murray has revealed how his love of football was almost killed at birth by the ignorance and blind prejudice of a grassroots REFEREE - when he was only eight! Murray went on to become a Molineux legend before injury forced him to retire when he was just 29. 2Former Wolves star Matt Murray has detailed the racism he experienced as a child from a refCredit: Getty Images - Getty But in a moving interview to mark Black History Month, he revealed how he was almost lost to the game as a mixed race kid growing up in the Midlands.  “I will never forget my first ever game of proper football, for Lichfield Colts under-9s, away at Cannock,” he told Wolves website. “We were in the first couple of minutes and I slid and collected the ball. It was in my hands....
    Alicia Mundy October 25, 2020 6:27PM (UTC) Read more articles from the DCReport here. This is the second of two articles about the firing of Pentagon official Warren S. Whitlock. In Part One, we showed how racists in the Trump administration targeted the career public servant and dismissed him without a pension or health care. Warren S. Whitlock, the federal civilian officer assigned to get the U.S. Army moving on racial diversity issues, was fired after two secret, unauthorized investigations. : The firing was justified by the Army because of one erroneous keystroke on his Army computer. In a statement the Army defended the firing without addressing any of the misconduct DCReport uncovered. Whitlock never got a chance to defend himself before he was fired in January 2019. In part that was because a Trump appointee covered up the improper nature of one of the investigations by requesting retroactive approval. No one...
    Texas boy, 3, dies after accidentally shooting himself in the chest at birthday party Burger Kings new 2021 restaurants will have food lockers, conveyor belts that deliver Whoppers to your car, and modern, minimalist dining areas. Take a look inside. Im a Black founder. Heres how Im practicing self-care during the pandemic and the Black Lives Matter movement. © Jasmine Crowe Jasmine Crowe is the founder and CEO of Goodr. Jasmine Crowe Jasmine Crowe is the founder and CEO of Goodr, an Atlanta-based company that fights food waste and hunger by picking up surplus foods from local restaurants and stores and delivering them to hungry families. During the pandemic, Crowe has been busier than ever expanding Goodr to help more people who are facing food insecurity. She says in order to better serve others, she's adopted several daily rituals to prioritize her own mental and physical well-being and avoid...
    Loading the player... A celebration of Black hair is at the forefront of the conversation for the latest photography book by Atlanta husband and wife duo Reg Bethencourt and Kahran Bethencourt.  GLORY is the first project created by the CreativeSoul Photography founders as a part of their new deal with St. Martin’s Press. The six-figure book deal they signed in 2018 came after they received national recognition for their AfroArt series, in which they empower and celebrate Black beauty and natural hair through striking and vibrant images of Black children.  Read More: Issa Rae has teamed up with hair care brand Sienna Naturals Their newest project, GLORY, continues to pay homage to this celebration of Black culture and hair through imagery, and now words. This book features not only a preface from Amanda Seales speaking to the power and necessity of these images, but also features backstories on the...
    OAKLAND, Calif. (KGO) -- Four Bay Area teenagers are leading the Black Lives Matter charge and have mobilized nearly 50,000 people combined against police brutality, social injustice and the killing of George Floyd.The local grassroots movement was initiated after 19-year-olds Akil Riley and Xavier Brown watched the viral video of Minneapolis police officers killing George Floyd, an African American man who had allegedly used a counterfeit $20 bill at a convenience store.Riley texted his childhood friend, Brown, to help him organize a march from Oakland Tech High School to the Frank Ogawa Plaza.RELATED: Find resources to help with equality, justice and race issues"He said, 'I'm trying to organize a solidarity march for Tuesday and I wonder if you want to be part.' I said, 'Let's do it,'" Brown said.The two freshmen, Brown at UCLA and Riley at Howard University, described to ABC7 News reporter Luz Pena their personal experiences with...
    This weekend, your Whittier neighbors become farmers' market vendors, El Five becomes a Basque eatery, and a food hall becomes a music and comedy club. Find out how to experience these tasty events below, then read on for more deliciousness in the coming weeks. Friday, October 9 On Friday, October 9, El Five, 2930 Umatilla Street, is kicking off two months of Friday and Saturday night Basque tasting menus. The seven-course spread, inspired by the wine and cuisine of the northern Spanish state, includes foraged mushrooms with sofrito and black garlic; bacalao served alongside leeks and piquillo potatoes; Iberico pluma (pork loin from Iberian hogs) with sherry and romesco; oxtail stew; and Basque cheesecake. All courses in the $95 meal can be paired with Spanish wines (both red and white) for an additional $45. Reservations are available for parties of four to six people on Tock at 6:15 or 8:30...
    INDIANAPOLIS —  So I was wrong. Up until the start of Wednesday’s vice presidential debate, I had been worried that Kamala Harris would fall victim to Mike Pence’s Midwestern nice schtick, honed during his time as governor of Indiana. That if the California senator came after him like the hard-charging former prosecutor that she is, Pence would just shake his head and smile that smarmy smile, making Harris look like an angry Black woman and himself the picture of calm and civility. But then it happened. With just one exchange, Harris out-Midwestern-niced the Midwestern nice master, exposing Pence for the overconfident, condescending, weak and scared white man that he really is. And even more importantly, she put a different kind of dent in the glass ceiling. Using a perfectly timed combination of pointed statements, glares, smiles and exasperated sighs, Harris reset the notion of what is...
    The year 2020 has been a battle for Asian Americans. A battle for their lives in a pandemic. A battle against racial bias and attacks. A battle for respect as essential workers and business owners. Most of all, it has always been a struggle to be seen and heard as Americans.  George Takei, the "Star Trek" actor and civil rights activist, spent time in a Japanese American internment camp when he was a child in World War II. He says this is history repeating itself: "Asian American hate is as old as American history and overnight, this country was swept up by suspicion and fear and naked, outright hatred. We had nothing to do with Pearl Harbor. There was no charge. Other than looking like this." In "Asian Americans: Battling Bias," a CBSN special produced by the CBS News Race and Culture unit, CBSN anchor Elaine Quijano reports on the...
    LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. — Eight years removed from a defining moment in his career, LeBron James still remembers the weight of it well. Sitting in a Detroit ballroom in March of 2012, James and his then-teammates on the Miami Heat reflected on the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed Black 17-year-old who was killed upstate in Florida. The Heat were his favorite team. The men in that room thought about their sons, several of whom would be teenagers in just a few years. Thirteen players posed for a picture wearing hooded sweatshirts — the same article of clothing Martin was wearing — and James tweeted the photo with the caption: #WeWantJustice. “We knew that it was going to be uncomfortable to a lot of people,” James said this week. “But we didn’t care, because we understood how much it hit home for us and a...
    A TEACHER who was desperate for a marble worktop has revealed how she saved thousands by faking her own with spray paint. Brittany Harris, 23 from Pennsylvania, saved £1000’s on buying a marble kitchen top, with this simple hack. 6Brittany Harris was desperate to replace her dated worktops with marble ones but didn't want to spend the moneyCredit: TikTok / brittany_e4497 6But after spending just £99 she managed to fake herself a black marble counter-top Credit: TikTok / brittany_e4497 The cost of updating kitchens can be very expensive and run into 5 figures very quickly. However, middle school teacher Brittany, used her ingenuity to create a ‘marble effect’ countertop for her new kitchen. By using two acrylic black paints, two ‘marble effect’ spray cans, primer and an epoxy glaze, Brittany was able to create an expensive looking marble kitchen top for just £99. Brittany told money-saving shopping site LovetheSales.com:...
    (CNN)Chadwick Boseman was more than just a movie star.We need to only look to the outpouring of grief over his untimely death to know that the "Black Panther" star was influential beyond the screen.Portraying T'Challa, one of the world's most beloved Black superheroes, Boseman helped break box office records. But he also came to embody something that people are just now starting to wrap their minds and hearts around in the aftermath of his death.As I expected, there was some pushback on social media against a piece I wrote about what Boseman meant to the Black community -- an "all Marvel fan lives matter" reaction, if you will.And while I was in no way trying to negate the universality of admiration for the actor, there can be no denying the symbolism and importance of Boseman and "Black Panther" to African Americans in particular.Read MoreThe complaints did get me thinking of...
    America is drowning in conspiracy theories: QAnon cultists are taking over the Republican Party, the occupant of the Oval Office praises them in press conferences, rational COVID-19 pandemic measures are met with armed protests and raging open defiance, and Proud Boys and militiamen are bringing violence to liberal cities while armed vigilantes riled up about nonexistent “antifa arsonists” harass strangers and journalists in fire-stricken rural areas. So I wrote a book about it. More importantly, it’s a book intended not just to document and explain the phenomenon, but to also be a guide for finding our way out of the morass. It’s titled Red Pill, Blue Pill: How to Counteract the Conspiracy Theories That Are Killing Us, out this week from Prometheus Books. Here’s an excerpt. [The following excerpt is from Chapter Seven, “Chaos By Design,” which describes how and why people are effectively radicalized online by conspiracism and its attendant disinformation. It seemed especially appropriate for the current moment.] It may be...
    Ed Buck's former friends have revealed how the Democratic donor became addicted to drugs and detailed his love of black men ahead of a court appearance over two deaths at his West Hollywood apartment.  The Democratic donor has pleaded not guilty to distributing methamphetamine resulting in the deaths of Timothy Dean in January 2019 and Gemmel Moore in 2017. Federal prosecutors say Buck, 65, preyed on vulnerable gay men and pressured them to let him inject them with drugs as part of a sexual ritual. Buck is also charged with providing meth to three more men, including one who overdosed. Now former acquaintances and friends have detailed how Buck's personality changed after he got addicted to drugs. The activist who obtained Moore's diary has also shared the journal for the first time with a New York Times reporter.  One former friend, known only as M, told the paper Buck had told M.'s then...
    Conspiracy theorists like QAnon cultists have a wide range of motivations but follow very similar online pathways into the alternative universe they occupy. America is drowning in conspiracy theories: QAnon cultists are taking over the Republican Party, the occupant of the Oval Office praises them in press conferences, rational COVID-19 pandemic measures are met with armed protests and raging open defiance, and Proud Boys and militiamen are bringing violence to liberal cities while armed vigilantes riled up about nonexistent “antifa arsonists” harass strangers and journalists in fire-stricken rural areas. So I wrote a book about it. More importantly, it’s a book intended not just to document and explain the phenomenon, but to also be a guide for finding our way out of the morass. It’s titled Red Pill, Blue Pill: How to Counteract the Conspiracy Theories That Are Killing Us, out this week from Prometheus Books. Here’s an excerpt. [The following excerpt...
    Michelle Obama's revealed on her podcast this week that her brother Craig Robinson was grabbed by police and accused of stealing his own bike when he was 10 — and they didn't believe he wasn't a thief until they took him home and checked with his mother. The former First Lady invited Craig and their mother Marian Robinson onto the Michelle Obama Podcast on Spotify this week, and when the trio reached the subject of police brutality and the protests erupting across the country, they recalled one of their own unpleasant experiences with officers in Chicago. Michelle, 56, said that while she and her brother were raised with certain values, 'when you leave the safety of your home and go out into the street, where being black is a crime in and of itself,' one has to operate with 'a level of caution and fear.'  Family time: The former First...
    The right wing is committed to the obliteration of context. Whether operating out of the Oval Office or the basement of Sean Hannity’s Long Island mansion, its propagandists strive to convince Americans that simple issues are hazy and complex, and that complicated realities are simple. It’s one way for an increasingly destructive Republican Party to maintain power, while not even making an effort to represent the interests of the American people. Recently, Attorney General William Barr offered an illustrative example of this manipulative tactic as hideous as his corrupt leadership of the Department of Justice. In an interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, Barr performed rhetorical acrobatics to avoid the implications of questions regarding “systemic racism” in American law enforcement, prisons, and courtrooms. After claiming—contrary to the facts—that Jacob Blake was “armed” when Kenosha, Wisconsin, police officers shot him, and while denying the persistence of racial bias in the criminal justice system,...
    A Texas ranger plied an 80-year-old serial killer with pizza, Dr Pepper and art supplies over 700 hours of interviews to get him to confess to killing 93 people across the US.  Last year, the FBI declared that Samuel Little was the most prolific serial killer in the country. Little confessed to 93 murders - mostly of women - across the US between 1970 and 2005. And one Texas ranger by the name of James Holland has revealed just how he managed to get Little to make those confessions.  Holland told CBS News that he and FBI agent Christie Palazzolo spent 48 days straight interviewing Little, who eventually started to talk about killing three people in Texas.  Scroll down for video  Texas ranger, James Holland (right), has revealed how he plied Samuel Little (left), 80, with pizza, Dr Pepper and art supplies over 700 hours of interviews to get him to confess...
              Live from Music Row Wednesday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed a call from Markell to the newsmakers line to talk about the state of the union and Black Lives Matter. Leahy: We are delighted to have on our phones a caller named Markell from Nashville. And Markell is a supporter of Joe Biden. Welcome back, Markell. Thanks for sticking around through the break. Caller Markell: No problem. I’m happy to be here. Leahy: First, let me just add how is it that a supporter of Joe Biden at six o’clock in the morning is listening to The Tennessee Star Report on Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC in the morning. Because if you’ve listened you’d know that we come from...
    JESSICA A Krug fooled the world when she pretended to be black during her entire career teaching African history. But why did she do it and what has she said about her false identity? 4Jessica A Krug holding a copy of her book, Fugitive ModernitiesCredit: Getty Images Who is Jessica A Krug? Jessica A Krug, 38, grew up in suburban Kansas City to a Jewish family. She is a white professor who has taught African history at George Washington University since 2012. She has also written extensively about Africa, Latin America, the diaspora and identity. In a bombshell blog post on September 3, she revealed that she has pretended to be black during her entire teaching career. "For the better part of my adult life, every move I’ve made, every relationship I’ve formed, has been rooted in the napalm toxic soil of lies," she explained. "... I have eschewed my...
    John Boyega is not letting Disney off the hook for how Star Wars mishandled his character. In his first major interview since Rise of Skywalker premiered last winter, the actor called out the way Finn and Kelly Marie Tran’s character, Rose Tico, were sidelined. “Like, you guys knew what to do with Daisey Ridley, you knew what to do with Adam Driver,” Boyega told British GQ. “You knew what to do with these other people, but when it came to Kelly Marie Tran, when it came to John Boyega, you know fuck all.” “So what do you want me to say?” Boyega continued. “What they want you to say is, ‘I enjoyed being a part of it. It was a great experience...’ Nah, nah, nah. I’ll take that deal when it’s a great experience. They gave all the nuance to Adam Driver, all the nuance to Daisy Ridley. Let’s be...
    (CNN)This past April, as life in the city that never sleeps came to a halt and only ambulance sirens were heard outside, a Black 9-year-old named Rahsaan Humphrey developed a fever.His mom, Ronda Lamb, was alarmed: Not only was a fever unusual for her son -- Rahsaan is not one to get sick -- but New York City, including their Harlem neighborhood, was under a strict lockdown with a climbing death toll from Covid-19. Black and Hispanic children are impacted more severely by coronavirus, research shows Unable to control the 101-degree fever with cold compresses and Tylenol, and worried about her boy's headache and occasional chest tightness, Lamb took Rahsaan to the emergency room. Beyond the fever, doctors couldn't find anything wrong with Rahsaan and sent him home with instructions to come back if his temperature kept climbing. A few weeks later, across the East River in Queens, Joseph Mendoza...
    Get Inspired With Our Definitive Ranking of Movies About Outcasts Overcoming the Odds Best robo-advisers in September 2020 How John Thompsons Proudly Black Georgetown Teams Changed College Basketball – and America © Focus on Sport–Getty Images Head coach John Thompson of the Georgetown Hoyas looks on and reacts during an NCAA basketball game circa 1984 at the Capital Centre in Landover, Maryland. Thompson coached at Georgetown from 1972 to 1999. John Thompson Jr. won a single NCAA basketball title. He never appeared in another Final Four after his Georgetown teams reached three national title games in four seasons from 1982 through 1985. And he hadn’t coached a team in more than two decades, since stepping away from Georgetown in 1999. But that, ultimately, never mattered. His power never waned. Thompson, who was the first Black coach to win an NCAA basketball title, died Sunday at age 78. Other coaches...
    Chadwick Boseman, the actor best known for his lead role in 2018’s celebrated Black Panther, died on Friday after a lengthy battle with colon cancer. To help celebrate his life and legacy, you’ll be able to stream Black Panther Sunday night. The ABC Black Panther broadcast starts commercial-free at 8pm ET. Hide Immediately following the movie, ABC will air an ABC News-produced special on Boseman. Titled ‘Chadwick Boseman —A Tribute for a King,’ it will be hosted by Robin Roberts. Hide When: Sunday, August 30, 8pm ET (with ABC News special on Boseman starting apx. 10:20pm ET) Broadcast: ABC Streaming on: Hulu Live TV, Vidgo, AT&T TV Now, and YouTube TV (and select markets with Fubo) Where to stream ABC Hulu Live TV Free Trial $54.99 – $60.99 per month Vidgo Core Free Trial $40 AT&T TV NOW Free Trial...
    Image copyright Getty Photos Picture caption Chadwick Boseman and the Black Panther movie assisted quite a few discover their interior superhero Chadwick Boseman’s job as Black Panther delighted young children and older people close to the entire world. Boseman played T’Challa, a superhero and leader of Wakanda, in the movie Black Panther – which was praised as a cultural milestone for obtaining a principally black cast. The character was seen as an inspiration for younger black people in unique – as Black Panther was the 1st large-profile black Marvel superhero, and Wakanda was a solid state with the most advanced technological innovation on Earth. As tributes pour in for Boseman, who died of most cancers aged 43, many are remembering the impact that his character experienced on them, and their families. Little ones – and instructors – had even adopted the “Wakanda handshake” soon after the...
    Chadwick Boseman was famous for playing the titular role of Black Panther in the Marvel franchise - but while he was fighting villains on screen, he was fighting a very real battle in his personal life. Boseman was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 2016. But the actor never publicly discussed his condition and continued to work on major Hollywood films during his battle with the deadly disease.  He died on Friday, at home with his family and wife, aged 43. 'It was the honor of his career to bring King T'Challa to life in 'Black Panther,'' they said. Chadwick Boseman was famous for playing the titular role of Black Panther in the Marvel franchise - but while he was fighting villains on screen, he was fighting a very real battle in his personal life. Pictured in Black Panther 'A true fighter, Chadwick persevered through it all,' the...
    Cincinnati Bengals quarterback Joe Burrow has been outspoken about social justice issues since entering the NFL, and used his platform again Thursday. Burrow’s latest tweet came as the NBA, WNBA and MLB postponed games in wake of the shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wis., over the weekend. NHL PLAYERS CALL ON LEAGUE TO DO MORE AS NBA, WNBA, MLB POSTPONE GAMES IN WAKE OF JACOB BLAKE SHOOTING “How can you hear the pain Black people are going through and dismiss it as nothing. How can you hear the pain and respond with anything other than ‘I stand with you,’" he tweeted as the NBA players’ decisions to boycott games this week sparked a heated debate across social media. The NBA and NBPA confirmed that all three games were officially postponed. They put out a joint statement saying that games will not be played due to boycotting. "The NBA and the National Basketball...
    Family of Jacob Blake, a Black man who was shot several times in the back by a police officer, arrive at a news conference outside the Kenosha County Courthouse in Wisconsin on August 25, 2020. Reuters/Stephen Maturen Three young children between the ages of three and eight witnessed a Wisconsin police officer shoot their father multiple times in the back on Sunday. A child psychiatry expert told Insider that the trauma Jacob Blake's sons are experiencing is likely worsened by the fact that the violence they witnessed was against a parent, and was perpetrated by figures of authority. Children are taught from a young age to trust their parents to provide comfort and safety, and to trust police officers to protect them. Breaking that trust can be particularly harmful to children enduring trauma. "What this does is it makes it hard for kids to feel safe," Dr. Sarah...
    The year 2020 has been one of reckoning with the inequities that shape American life. The killing of George Floyd, among others, has brought national attention to how people of color are targeted by law enforcement. And the disproportionate death toll from COVID-19 among Black and Latinx people has revealed longstanding inequities in health and access to care.[ U.S. News Q&A: How the U.S. Government Promoted Housing Segregation in U.S. Cities ]It is no surprise, then, that our greatest existential challenge – climate change – also reflects racial disparities and the widening gulf between rich and poor. Climate change does not affect all people equally: low-income communities and people of color are hit first and worst by climate impacts, such as extreme heat and flooding. Struggling communities also receive fewer resources for recovery, so disasters push many into a downward spiral of poverty and vulnerability. But while climate change illuminates our nation's...
    Sen. Tim Scott, the only black Republican in the Senate, told his personal story at the GOP convention Monday of how his family went from 'cotton to Congress' – as he made a case for the 'goodness of America' and ripped Joe Biden for recent flubs on race. Scott, a South Carolina senator who says he was raised by a single mother and dropped out of school in ninth grade only to return to complete his education, spoke of his connection to his grandfather, who got to witness his own rise. 'Growing up, he had to cross the street if a white person was coming,' said Scott.  'Our family went from cotton to Congress in one lifetime,' said Sen. Tim Scott at the Republican convention Monday 'He suffered the indignity of being forced out of school as a third grader to pick cotton. And he never learned to read...
    So, ComicCon could not happen this year due to the pandemic. Wonder Woman 1984’s release has been delayed for the same reason. But that is not stopping DC and Warner Bros from connecting with their fans. Enter, DC FanDome, a non-stop 24-hour mega-event with separate panels for every upcoming DC project. The event was so big that it was divided into two parts, so that fans don’t miss out on anything. The first part of DC FanDome, dubbed Hall Of Heroes will take place on August 22-23. DC FanDome’s Hall of Heroes Main Trailer is Out and It Looks Damn Exciting! (Watch Video). DC FanDome is like a ComicCon but online. The audience from across the globe can attend the panels online. The event will kick off at 10:30 PM (IST). You can watch the event at DCFandome.com. You can find the schedule for the panels here. You can use this...
    More than once in our conversation, the Broadway producer Brian Moreland qualifies an optimistic thought with, “I know that sounds very Pollyanna of me.” Moreland, one of the few Black producers working on Broadway, is hopeful for not just the healthy, post-pandemic return of Broadway, but also for a renewed kind of commercial theater which looks, sounds, and feels more diverse. “I feel there’s change in the air,” he told The Daily Beast. The lead producer of upcoming productions of Charles Randolph-Wright’s play Blue (which had been set to open at the Apollo Theater in May) and Keenan Scott II’s Thoughts of a Colored Man, Moreland was recently elected to the board of governors of the Broadway League, the national trade association for the Broadway industry created in 1930. Moreland was elected alongside Kendra Whitlock Ingram, president of Milwaukee’s Marcus Performing Arts Center. Both serve on the League’s...
    The road to closing the racial wealth gap runs through the courthouse, according to civil-rights attorney Ben Crump. But many decisions coming out of America’s legal system have the opposite effect: For example, an unreasonably high bail can shred a family’s budget, Crump notes, while a conviction can lock out all kinds of job options. Officials in seven states can deny licenses for any profession, no matter how unrelated a past felony might be, according to a public-interest law firm’s recent report. For America to become more just, the country needs to think about bail policies and licensing-board rules even as it focuses on police accountability and issues of race, Crump says. To him, economic justice is inseparable from the broader concept of justice. Crump, 50, is in the national spotlight again as he represents the family of George Floyd, a Black man who died with a white...
    Kamala Auntie prompts examination of anti-Blackness for South Asians This Beloved Dominos Menu Item Is Healthier Than You Think How Biden has — and hasn’t — harnessed the national reckoning on race June 2, 2020, was Joe Biden’s moment to rally America. The nation was reeling from days-long protests over the police killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man in Minneapolis, and the systemic racism that has long plagued the country. © Drew Angerer/Getty Images Joe Biden participates in a virtual fundraising event from a makeshift studio at the Hotel DuPont on August 12, 2020, in Wilmington, Delaware. Instead of addressing protesters’ calls, President Donald Trump had responded with his go-to “law and order” refrain a day earlier, just minutes after federal law enforcement tear-gassed peaceful protesters in front of the White House. America — in the middle of a pandemic it was ill-equipped to handle — was...
    It’s not expected to happen anytime soon, but one scientist has calculated when the universe will end. The research, published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, notes that sometime over the “next few trillion years,” when the universe is dead as we know it, stars will continue to explode, not with a giant bang, but “very, very slowly fizzle.” “It [the universe] will be a bit of a sad, lonely, cold place,” the study’s lead author, theoretical physicist Matt Caplan, said in a statement. “It’s known as ‘heat death,’ where the universe will be mostly black holes and burned-out stars.” In the research, Caplan looked at potential stellar explosions and found that white dwarfs will explode in a supernova in the future. As they become denser, these stars will become “black dwarf” stars capable of producing iron in their cores. “Stars less than about 10...
    THE only 'Black Moon' of 2020 is happening this week and will provide a great chance for stargazers to see more of space. The Black Moon occurs around every 32 months and sometimes it only affects certain time zones. 2Black Moons aren't visible from Earth It basically means we won't be able to see the Moon at all but a lack of moonlight will let you see more stars. This year's Black Moon is happening on August 19 at 02:41 GMT. That's 22:41 ET the night before for some stargazers in the US. Black Moon as a phrase can have several meanings. 2This year's Black Moon is happening on August 19 August 2020's Black Moon refers to the third New Moon in a season with four New Moons. Moon seasons last about three months and usually only feature three new moons. A New Moon is a phase in the Moon's...
    universe it will become inhospitable and end up consuming itself in silence and darkness. “data-reactid =” 12 “> Unlike how it arose, with a great explosion just under 14 billion (14,000 million) years ago, at the end of the times the universe will become inhospitable and will end up consuming itself in silence and darkness. Illinois State University (ISU) Matt Caplan. “Data-reactid =” 13 “>“ It will be a sad, lonely and cold place, ”explained Illinois State University (ISU) assistant professor of physics Matt Caplan. In his latest theoretical work, the academic predicted by means of a computer simulation that many white dwarfs will detonate in the far future, generating supernovae, long after everything else has died. “Accentuating the darkness could be silent fireworks: explosions from the remnants of stars that were never supposed to explode,” the agency said in a press release. This scenario is known as “death by...
    Dear Abby advice columnists and sisters among Iowas influential Women of the Century This Mega Grocery Chain Is Now Open Later Than Ever Ayesha Curry on Black Lives Matter and how she’s teaching her kids about it In a recent interview with Shape magazine, Ayesha Curry explained how she’s handling the pandemic and talking to her kids about the Black Lives Matter movement. “I go through so many emotions. Sometimes I want to cry. Some­times, seeing people from all walks of life stand up for justice and fight for what’s right, makes me feel like, Wow, people are inherently good, and the universe is giving us an opportunity to weed out the bad,” she told the outlet, adding that it feels like an opportunity. “I think about my par­ents experiencing this, and their parents experiencing this, and I’m like, I don’t want my children to have to experience this....
    Doja Cat is best known for singles like "Say So" and "Juicy." Scott Dudelson/Getty Images Videos have surfaced online that appear to depict Doja Cat participating in "racist chat rooms" along with a song from 2015 that used a racist term that originated on 4chan. The singer posted an apology on Instagram addressing both the chatroom and song, saying that she had never been involved in racist conversations and that the song was an attempt to flip the meaning of the racist term.  Hashtags like #WeAreSorryDoja and #dojacatisNOToverparty continued to trend on Twitter between May 22 and May 24.  In August, Nas referenced the controversy in one of his songs.  Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Pop icon Doja Cat is more online than many celebrities. She first broke into the public consciousness with a viral single about being a cow (aptly titled "Mooo!") and is now...
    Bastiaan Slabbers/ZUMA For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.Representative Barbara Lee is a big fan of fellow Californian Senator Kamala Harris. Last year, Lee was the first high-profile politician to endorse Kamala Harris’ bid for the Democratic presidential nomination. After Joe Biden clinched the top spot in the Democratic primaries, the former vice president’s eventual choice of running mate was obvious, at least for Lee. “Kamala should be president,” she said last week in a livestream conversation with Mother Jones Podcast host Jamilah King, just days before Harris got the nod—but Veep was the next best thing.  “We know how to lead,” Lee said of Black women in the Democratic party, and beyond. “We know how to help regain the soul of America. And we have our unique history in this country to be able to lead out of the White House...
    Mother Jones illustration; Getty For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis and more, subscribe to Mother Jones' newsletters.The argument seemed reasonable in theory: “We are pleased that our state values life no matter an individual’s potential disability, gender, or race.”  In reality, it wasn’t. Back in March 2016, Mike Fichter, the president and chief executive of Indiana Right to Life, was talking about the law then-Gov. Mike Pence just signed that would bar “the knowing provision of sex-, race-, or disability-selective abortions by abortion providers.” The bill was not nearly as innocuous as Fichter and his ideological peers in state government made it seem. In fact, the legislation, colloquially known as a “reasons ban,” operates very much on racist and ableist assumptions—and has the power to inflict acute harm on pregnant individuals.  Justice Clarence Thomas called abortion “an act rife with the potential for eugenic manipulation” and wrote that Indiana’s...
    There were plenty of surprises in store for the 50,000 revelers who flocked to Fisherman's Wharf to see flamboyant California Democrat Willie Brown sworn in as San Francisco's first black mayor. But it wasn't the elaborate firework display, the 10,000 meals dished out to the homeless, nor the gushing congratulatory phone call from President Bill Clinton broadcast live over the public address system that piqued the Bay City's scribblers. The press has expected the maverick politician to parade his attractive young girlfriend, Kamala Harris, an ambitious deputy district attorney 31 years Brown's junior and his 'constant companion' on the campaign trail. To their puzzlement, he was instead joined on stage for the 1996 inauguration by his estranged wife Blanche, despite announcing years earlier that the two had amicably split. Vice Presidential nominee Kamala Harris dated San Francisco's first black mayor Wilile Brown in the 1990s, while he was still...
    'It's time for me to pay for all the things I've done in my life,' Jose Martinez told the stunned detective. Martinez had just confessed to murdering 36 people in California and across the United States. It was June 2013 and the man known as the 'Black Hand' or 'El Mano Negra' in Spanish told police he was a drug cartel enforcer who first killed as payback for his half sister's murder in the late 1970s and then mostly for money starting in 1980, according to a new book, The Devil's Harvest.   If Martinez's claims are true, he is a serial killer in the same league as Ted Bundy and John Wayne Gacy, Jessica Garrison, the book's author and an investigative journalist, noted in one of her articles about him.   For more than 30 years, Martinez managed not to get caught for his crimes and he told Garrison that was because...
    Participants in a demonstration against racism hold a sign with a clenched fist, the so-called "Black Power" symbol, at Neumarkt. The rally of the "Black Lives Matter Dresden" group wants to draw attention to structural racism after the violent death of George Floyd.Sebastian Kahnert | picture alliance via Getty Images It is intolerable, and frankly immoral, to ignore the outrage, sorrow and torment within our fragmented and unequal society. The epidemic of social and economic injustice persists as our country's attempts to halt prejudice and build inclusivity have fundamentally failed. The inequity is evident in innumerable aspects of our society, most clearly demonstrated by the racial wealth gap that has endured for generations. Anger is justified. No longer can shortsighted, mute or indifferent actions be used as a way to react to the equity struggle that Black and Latinx Americans face. Racism is a reality. It is not a buzzword...
    Ashlie D. Stevens July 27, 2020 7:00PM (UTC) Samaria Rice — the mother of Tamir Rice, the 12-year-old Black boy who was killed in Cleveland in 2014 by a white police officer — has said that she wakes up every day not knowing how or where she is going to see her son's death depicted by artists.  "I'm not normal because of what America has done to my family,'' Rice said in a recent interview with Cleveland.com. "I'm just dealing with it. I can't even have my son in peace. That's what it feels like." : Earlier this summer, the Cleveland Museum of Contemporary Art canceled "The Breath of Empty Space," a planned exhibition by New York artist Shaun Leonardo. The solo show, which interprets the police killings of unarmed Black and Latino men and boys, would have featured charcoal illustrations based on the surveillance video of Tamir Rice's...
    New York (CNN Business)R&B superstar Ciara wants her fans to do more to support Black-owned businesses that have been struggling to stay afloat through the coronavirus pandemic.The Grammy-winning singer, who gave birth to her third child on Thursday, is partnering with Discover on "Eat It Forward," an initiative that aims to award $5 million to Black-owned restaurants across the United States."I thought it was an incredible campaign," Ciara told CNN Business in an interview Wednesday. "The reality is during this era of Covid, Black-owned restaurants and the Black community in general has been disproportionately affected by all that's happened. I loved that there was a strong since of urgency and awareness to reach out and help in this area." View this post on Instagram I'm proud to partner with @Discover on the #EatItForward initiative. They're giving a total of $5 million to Black-owned restaurants selected from YOUR nominations. Here's...
    A BOMBSHELL genetics study revealed the horrific legacy of the transatlantic slave trade is reflected in modern DNA. On Thursday, the stark findings compiled from 23AndMe data were published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Researchers found how the trauma of slavery is reflected in modern DNA Researchers gathered genetic data from 50,000 consenting research participants from both sides of the Atlantic and found that today's genetics reflect the horrors of slavery. DNA from one African region may be underrepresented here because many slaves – like those from the Senegambian region – died of malaria on American plantations, the study revealed. "Our study combined the genetic data of more than 50,000 people on both sides of the Atlantic with historical records of enslaved people to create one of the most comprehensive investigations of the transatlantic slave trade," said Steven Micheletti, a population geneticist at 23andMe. "One of the disturbing truths...
    Bernie Ecclestone has told Lewis Hamilton that Formula One is not racist. The 89-year-old creator of modern grand prix racing has hit back at the six-time world champion after his crusading for Black Lives Matter, including encouraging his fellow drivers to take a knee and striking a 'Black Power' salute after winning in Austria earlier this month. Hamilton, 35, has previously called Ecclestone 'ignorant and uneducated' for his claims that there is no discrimination in the sport. Former F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone has hit back at six-time world champion Lewis Hamilton (pictured) after his crusading for Black Lives Matter  RELATED ARTICLES Previous 1 Next 'To be second feels like a victory': Max Verstappen... Can anyone stop Lewis? Hamilton is on course for his seventh... 'They have got to do a BETTER job': Lewis Hamilton hits out... 'I saw Michael last week,...
    If anyone had a doubt about what is at stake in the November 2020 election, it was cleared up over the Fourth of July weekend. After President Trump’s two powerful speeches, the election has now come down to an elemental choice. Will America continue as a democratic republic which upholds the rule of law, equality of rights and opportunity for citizens of all races and religions, and the individual freedoms guaranteed by our Constitution? Or, will we erase our history and descend into a Marxist dystopia of violence, mob-rule, racial hatred and ethnic tribalism? What happened?  On July 3, President Trump addressed the American people from Mount Rushmore and again from the shadow of the Washington Monument on the Fourth of July.  The President simply told it like it is — briefly recounting some basic U.S. history and poignantly demonstrating how and why American principles of individual and religious freedom,...
    Virginia State Police announced Wednesday that they are investigating a state trooper who was seen in a video forcefully removing a black man from his car and yelling expletives. Today, we sent a letter to @MarkHerringVA about Virginia State Trooper Charles Hewitt. In April 2019, Derrick Thompson was driving to work when Hewitt terrorized and assaulted him. pic.twitter.com/YTSCeDLM9j — Joshua Erlich (@JoshuaErlich) July 13, 2020 The video released July 13 by attorney Joshua Erlich shows Trooper Charles Hewitt forcefully removing Derrick Thompson from his vehicle during a traffic stop that allegedly occurred in April of 2019. (RELATED: Dashcam Video Shows Cop Saving A 3-Week-Old Choking Baby) “The conduct displayed by Trooper Hewitt during the course of the traffic stop is not in agreement with the established standards of conduct required of a Virginia trooper,” Virginia State Police Superintendent Col. Gary Settle said in a statement, “Nor is it characteristic of...
    The coronavirus pandemic and resulting economic collapse has hit Black and brown communities hard. If COVID-19 didn't make it clear how our system is grounded in racism, the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and so many more have forced us into a racial reckoning that this country hasn't seen in a generation. All of these social, political and economic currents are flowing across the country and through all of our institutions, yet they all began in one place: cities. Because cities have been hit hardest over the last few months, our recovery and re-building must be anchored there, and particularly in communities of color. But our recovery efforts to date have only reinforced the existing racial structures, rather than breaking them down. For example, up to 90% of businesses owned by people of color were shut out of the Paycheck Protection Program, a signature federal recovery initiative meant...
    A BLACK single mom put up a sign revealing how her neighbors have allegedly been threatening her with guns and throwing feces on her yard. Jennifer McLeggan, a nurse in the Long Island, New York, put up the sign as an "SOS" to her neighbors, CBS 2 reported. 9 Jennifer McLeggan posted a message to her door as an 'SOS' to her neighbors, detailing alleged harassment she's enduredCredit: Facebook 9 McLeggan claims that she captured several incidents on her security cameraCredit: Instagram 9 'They walk around in the back with guns and it was recorded,' McLeggan wroteCredit: Instagram In a sign posted to her door, McLeggan alleged that her neighbors "have been racially harassing" her since she moved in to her home. She said she used video footage of the incidents, and won $5,000 in court – but she begged her neighbors for help. "They have thrown Human Feces on my...
    (CNN)On both a societal and individual level, the last few months have been daunting yet enlightening -- exhausting yet motivating. While struggling through a global pandemic, we faced the reality that racism in our health care and criminal justice system continue to cripple the lives of Black people across the nation. As we hear people across the world cry out "Black Lives Matter," it is the constant reminder that we are in pain; we are grieving; and, at times, we are struggling to find hope.Stacey AbramsAmerica FerreraProtestors all across this nation are advocating an uprooting of systemic inequities that have left too many behind for generations. As we protest in the streets and in our workplaces, we must leverage every element of our democracy that can ensure lasting change for our communities. Demonstrations express our collective feelings of frustration and despair at the current system. In order to enact and...
    Trump administration drops rule barring foreign students from taking online-only classes A Trendy LA Restaurant Was Accused Of Scraping Mold Off Of Jam Before Serving It Viola Davis reveals more about why she regrets starring in The Help and how it feels like a self-betrayal © Provided by INSIDER Viola Davis at the premiere of "The Help" in Beverly Hills, California, on Tuesday, August 9, 2011. AP Viola Davis regrets starring in the 2011 movie "The Help," a film that received Hollywood awards but was met with criticism from Black writers. In a new interview with Vanity Fair, Davis says "there's a part of me that feels like I betrayed myself, and my people, because I was in a movie that wasn't ready to [tell the whole truth]." She also said it was "created in the filter and the cesspool of systemic racism." Davis first spoke out about...
    Following weeks of nationwide protests over a spate of police killings of Black people, President Trump has claimed that “more white people” actually die at the hands of law enforcement. The president made the comment after appearing to briefly lose it when asked about the hot button topic in a CBS News interview. "Why are African-Americans still dying at the hands of law enforcement in this country?" host Catherine Herridge asked, prompting the president to immediately recoil. "So are white people. So are white people! What a terrible question to ask," he huffed. "So are white people." Studies have shown that Black men are about 3.5 times more likely than white men to die in police custody. White men were killed by the police in the highest numbers between 2013 and 2017, but white people account for a greater percentage of the U.S. population than Black people, according to...
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