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    Hong Kong authorities charged 47 pro-democracy activists in the city with “conspiracy to subvert state powers” over the weekend, Radio Television Hong Kong reported Sunday. Police in Hong Kong said they had charged 39 men and eight women, aged 23 to 64, with the offense, and that the group would be detained overnight on February 28 and then brought to the city’s West Kowloon court for mention on March 1. Hong Kong’s League of Social Democrats, a pro-democracy political party, said its vice chairmen, Leung Kwok-hung and Jimmy Sham, were among those charged. Subversion is a crime under Hong Kong’s national security law, which China imposed on the city last summer as a means to discourage Hong Kong’s then year-long pro-democracy protest movement. The legislation undermined Hong Kong’s former semi-autonomy from China and precipitated a crackdown by authorities on the movement’s leaders. The “national security” law requires a minimum of...
    More On: thailand New virus found in bats similar to one that causes COVID-19 ‘Power in solidarity’: Myanmar protesters inspired by Hong Kong and Thailand Thai fisherman finds rare orange pearl worth $330K Thais seek to restore fortunes with mock funerals BANGKOK — A new faction of Thailand’s pro-democracy movement staged a protest march Sunday, linking their cause with that of demonstrators in Myanmar battling that neighboring country’s coup-installed military government. Marchers sought but failed to go to Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha’s house, which is on an army base in Bangkok. Shipping containers were situated to block them and police using water cannons, rubber bullets and tear gas barred the way. The demonstrators abandoned their plan several hours later after taking an online vote of their supporters. Police said a 41-year-old officer died in the tumult, with local media reported he had a heart attack. According to the...
    The British government is reportedly seeking to extend powers granted to police to crack down on protests even after lockdown restrictions are lifted, raising concerns about the state of freedom of speech in the country. A freedom of information request has revealed that Home Secretary Priti Patel wrote to the HM Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS), questioning how the government could continue to limit protests. In the September letter, reported by The Observer on Sunday, Patel said that while protesting is “a cornerstone of our democracy”, she inquired as to how the Home Office could prevent protests from impacting upon “the rights of others to go about their daily business”. “I would like to know… what steps the government could take to ensure the police have the right powers and capabilities to respond to protests,” she wrote to the head of HMICFRS, Sir Thomas Winsor. The letter...
    BANGKOK (AP) — A new faction of Thailand’s pro-democracy movement staged a protest march Sunday, linking their cause with that of demonstrators in Myanmar battling that neighboring country’s coup-installed military government. Marchers sought but failed to go to Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha’s house, which is on an army base in Bangkok. Shipping containers were situated to block them, and police using water cannons, rubber bullets and tear gas barred the way. The demonstrators abandoned their plan several hours later after taking an online vote of their supporters. Police said a 41-year-old officer died in the tumult, with local media reported he had a heart attack. According to the Erawan EMS center, 23 policemen and 10 protesters were injured. Thai pro-democracy demonstrations have recently become marred by increasing violence. Much of it has been initiated by particularly confrontational protesters using tactics including throwing small homemade “ping-pong” bombs with the power...
    The Daily Beast Saudi Crown Prince Is Directly to Blame for Khashoggi Killing: U.S. Intel Sarah Silbiger via ReutersAn unclassified intel report detailing the heinous assassination of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi has just been released by the Biden administration—and it points the finger directly at Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. “We assess that Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman approved an operation in Istanbul, Turkey to capture or kill Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi,” the four-page report, released on Friday, said. “We base this assessment on the Crown Prince’s control of decision making in the Kingdom since 2017, the direct involvement of a key adviser and members of Muhammad bin Salman’s protective detail in the operation, and the Crown Prince’s support for using violent measures to silence dissidents abroad, including Khashoggi.” While the long-anticipated assessment places the blame for Khashoggi’s death squarely on the shoulders of the Saudi...
    Students protested the detention of 22-year-old Indian climate activist Disha Ravi on Tuesday after she was arrested over the weekend for allegedly helping create a digital "toolkit" to help people around the world support India's protesting farmers. Ravi, who heads up a local branch of Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg's advocacy group, is known for her work cleaning up lakes, planting trees, and campaigning against plastic in her local area, Bengaluru. She was detained after Thunberg tweeted a link to a document which suggested ways people in countries around the world could support India's farmer protests, including by tweeting at authorities and demonstrating outside their local Indian embassies. Here’s an updated toolkit by people on the ground in India if you want to help. (They removed their previous document as it was outdated.)#StandWithFarmers #FarmersProtesthttps://t.co/ZGEcMwHUNL— Greta Thunberg (@GretaThunberg) February 3, 2021 "Historically marginalised farmers, who were first exploited by feudal landlords...
    HONG KONG (Reuters) - Two Hong Kong pro-democracy activists pleaded guilty on Tuesday to charges related to an illegal assembly during mass anti-government protests in August 2019, while seven others, including media tycoon Jimmy Lai, pleaded not guilty. The 2019 protests, fuelled by a perception Beijing was curbing the wide-ranging freedoms promised to the former British colony upon its return to Chinese rule in 1997, plunged the semi-autonomous city into its biggest crisis since the handover. The rally in August 2019 was estimated to have drawn more than 1 million people, despite heavy rain, and provided a respite from the clashes between protesters and police seen often at demonstrations in the months before and after. Former pro-democracy politician and activist Au Nok-hin pleaded guilty to organising and knowingly taking part in an unauthorised assembly, while Leung Yiu-chung, another activist, pleaded guilty to participating in an illegal assembly. Leung and Au...
    (Reuters) - Anti-coup demonstrators in Myanmar sat in inflatable tubs lined up in a street in the commercial capital Yangon on Wednesday in an effort to show their peaceful intent after the worst day of violence since last week's military takeover. A few dozen protesters sat slumped in the colourful, beach-themed inflatable pools - some featuring cartoon images of crabs and fish - outside the Japanese embassy. Some held placards denouncing the overthrow of Aung San Suu Kyi's government and mocking junta leader Senior General Min Aung Hlaing. One sign said: "We asked for democracy, not armed robbery", while another said "We are peacefully protesting". Tension flared on Tuesday during protests in Mandalay and Naypyitaw as riot police used water cannon and fired gunshots to disperse crowds, with some demonstrators seen hurling stones and bottles. Wednesday's rally called on Japan, a big investor in Myanmar, to maintain its support for...
    More On: myanmar Myanmar military blocks internet access amid protests against coup Myanmar blocks Facebook as resistance grows to coup Health workers in Myanmar stop working amid COVID-19 outbreak to protest coup Myanmar police file charges against Aung San Suu Kyi after coup Days after a military coup in Myanmar, the army’s top general virtually shut down the internet as pro-Democracy protesters took to the streets. The biggest rally yet against Monday’s overthrow of the government came in the city of Yangon, where demonstrators marched past police outfitted in riot gear, chanting, “Military dictator, fail, fail; Democracy, win, win,” while holding banners reading, “Against military dictatorship.” The protests came as the general, Min Aung Hlaing, blocked access to Twitter and Instagram, then virtually shut down the internet Saturday — a move to stop the spread of “fake news.” New York’s robust Burmese community is tracking the protests minute-by-minute....
    Myanmar’s new military leaders blacked out nearly all access to the internet on Saturday as protests over last week’s coup continued. Internet connectivity dropped to 16% of ordinary levels, the monitoring group NetBlocks Internet Observatory told BBC News. The shutdown followed hours after access to Twitter and Instagram were shut off to stop people from communicating about protests. Facebook, used by more than half of the people in Myanmar, was blocked on Thursday. The military said people were trying to spread “fake news.” Many users had evaded the restrictions on social media by using virtual private networks, but the wider blackout made it harder to evade the bans. Despite the efforts to curtail communications, about 1,000 protesters marched past police barricades in the streets of the capital, Yangon, chanting, “Military dictator, fail, fail; Democracy, win, win,” and held up and held banners reading “Against military dictatorship.” Riot police stand guard...
    (Reuters) - Red balloons are strung across some streets, red ribbons have been tied to houses, shop displays feature only red clothes and some people have simply hung red dresses outside their homes. Loyalists of Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi are showing their support for the ousted leader in the main city of Yangon with displays in the colour of her National League for Democracy (NLD) party. "Everybody in the street is united to install the red balloons," said Myint Myint Aye, 49. "This campaign is to prove that we all stand with her." Suu Kyi was overthrown on Monday by the army, which alleged fraud in a Nov. 8 election that the NLD had won in a landslide. The electoral commission dismissed the allegations. Opponents of the coup have held nightly protests, banging on pots and pans and honking car horns. A growing civil disobedience movement started with doctors...
    The Biden administration on Tuesday called the military seizure of power in Myanmar and detainment of civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi a coup d’etat as pro-democracy groups protested across Asia. Driving the news: The official designation will open a broader review of U.S. assistance programs to the Southeast Asian country, which was under military rule before becoming a civilian-led democracy in 2011. Get smarter, faster with the news CEOs, entrepreneurs and top politicians read. Sign up for Axios Newsletters here. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell said he talked with President Biden and Secretary of State Tony Blinken on Tuesday about the coup and stressed his support for sanctions, per the Washington Post. The big picture: The Myanmar military declared a one-year state of emergency after the detaining de facto civilian leader on Monday in an attempt to thwart November’s election results, which Suu Kyi’s National...
            by Andrew Trunsky  Over 4,000 pro-democracy protesters gathering in support of Alexi Navalny, a vocal Kremlin critic, have been detained by Russian police since the beginning of last weekend, according to local media and pro-democracy organizations. The arrests have occurred across the country, from European cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg to far-eastern cities like Vladivostok, according to Russian monitoring groups, BBC reported. Large-scale protests began in Russia last weekend following Navalny’s arrest. He was arrested on Jan. 17 upon returning to Russia from Germany, where he had been recovering from a near-fatal poisoning from a deadly nerve agent, which he has said was done at the orders of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Protesters in central Moscow chanting “Down with the Tsar!” Some have broken off and are heading to the Matrosskaya Tishina jail where opposition leader Navalny is being held. pic.twitter.com/O0q1JlKpAu — Matthew Luxmoore...
    Over 4,000 pro-democracy protesters gathering in support of Alexi Navalny, a vocal Kremlin critic, have been detained by Russian police since the beginning of last weekend, according to local media and pro-democracy organizations. The arrests have occurred across the country, from European cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg to far-eastern cities like Vladivostok, according to Russian monitoring groups, BBC reported. Large-scale protests began in Russia last weekend following Navalny’s arrest. He was arrested on Jan. 17 upon returning to Russia from Germany, where he had been recovering from a near-fatal poisoning from a deadly nerve agent, which he has said was done at the orders of Russian President Vladimir Putin. (RELATED: ‘It Was Him’: Navalny Blames Putin For Near-Fatal Poisoning) Protesters in central Moscow chanting “Down with the Tsar!” Some have broken off and are heading to the Matrosskaya Tishina jail where opposition leader Navalny is being held. pic.twitter.com/O0q1JlKpAu —...
    TUNIS, Tunisia (AP) — Police used tear gas to disperse violent protests led by disgruntled youths in several Tunisian cities overnight, including in the capital of Tunis and in the seaside city of Sousse. Tunisians in general are angry that the North African country is on the verge of bankruptcy and has dire public services. And many feel disappointed that on the 10-year anniversary of the revolution that ousted autocratic President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali there is little to show in terms of improvement. Police swooped in as shops and banks were looted and vandalized, arresting “dozens” of youths, according to state news agency TAP. Protesters blocked roads by burning tires and threw stones and other objects at police and businesses, according to the Interior Ministry, which said the situation was now “calm” across the country on Sunday. Videos circulating on social media showed dramatic chases down...
    The Beijing-appointed leader of Hong Kong accused U.S. officials on Tuesday of having a double standard for backing huge pro-democracy protests in her city while condemning the violent attack on the U.S. Capitol by supporters of President Donald Trump. Chief Executive Carrie Lam issued the remarks, which mirror sentiments voiced by the central Chinese government, in response to a question about the mass arrests last week of pro-democracy activists in the Chinese region. More than 50 activists and politicians were swept up in the raids, most of whom were later released, under a controversial new "national security" law imposed on Hong Kong by Beijing. U.S. and European leaders, along with many Hong Kongers, have condemned the law as the nail in the coffin of the city's long-time semi-autonomy from Beijing. Hong Kong activist says arrests should worry U.S.   The arrests on January 6 brought swift condemnation from U.S....
    The Business Roundtable and the United States Chamber of Commerce, two of the staunchest proponents of outsourcing American jobs, are condemning protests that occurred at the U.S. Capitol building, calling them “unconscionable and tragic events.” On Wednesday, supporters of President Donald Trump breached security barriers at the U.S. Capitol following the “Save America” rally near the White House just as Congress was set to certify the 2020 presidential election. Chamber of Commerce CEO Thomas Donohue called the protests “attacks against our nation’s Capitol Building and our democracy” and demanded they “end now.” “The Congress of the United States must gather again this evening to conclude their constitutional responsibility to accept the report of the Electoral College,” Donohue said. “We extend our respect and appreciation to all of the law enforcement officials who are protecting our government, our elected officials, and our fellow citizens.” Similarly, executives at the Business Roundtable released...
    The Chinese Foreign Ministry on Thursday compared Wednesday’s riot at the Capitol with the Hong Kong protest movement, essentially arguing that Americans should now understand why it was correct and lawful for the Chinese Communist Party, and its proxies in Hong Kong government, to use force to crush the pro-democracy movement. Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying’s comments were teed up by an AFP reporter who literally invited her to make the comparison.  “Does the Chinese foreign ministry have any comments on the violence that has taken place? Separately, what are the ministry’s comments on some people in the country comparing Washington’s riots with the unrest in Hong Kong?” the reporter asked. “We have noted what’s now unfolding in the United States. We believe that people in the United States certainly hope for an early return of normal order,” Hua replied. After mentioning the reactions of “Chinese netizens” – a strong...
    Try as I might I can’t get out of my head the juxtaposition of the awful storming of the U.S. Capitol Building on Jan. 6, 2021, and the gathering of hundreds of thousands in the Women’s March of Jan. 21, 2017. Both events were a result of deep dissatisfaction with the outcome of the presidential election. The similarities end there; the differences are telling. The Women’s March resulted in the largest single-day demonstration in our nation’s history. Organically organized and largely attended by women, more than 670 events were held on all seven continents. It was a remarkable and peaceful demonstration of anger, disappointment and desire to make sure we never felt like that again. It allowed a worldwide vent for frustration, fear and trepidation about the future. Not once that day, while in the midst of the tens of thousands of marchers in St. Paul, did I ever worry...
    Hong Kong police arrested about 50 former lawmakers and pro-democracy activists Wednesday for allegedly violating the new national security law by participating in unofficial election primaries for the territory's legislature last year. The mass arrests, including of former lawmakers, were the largest move against Hong Kong’s democracy movement since the law was imposed by Beijing to quell dissent in the semi-autonomous territory last June. In a video released by former lawmaker Lam Cheuk-ting on his Facebook page, police turned up at his house and told him he was "suspected of violating the national security law, subverting state power." Police told those recording the video to stop or risk arrest. Police did not immediately comment on the arrests, reported by the South China Morning Post, online platform Now News and various political groups and figures. HONG KONG MEDIA TYCOON JIMMY LAI'S BAIL REVOKED  At least seven members of Hong Kong’s Democratic...
    Former Houston Rockets GM Daryl Morey now claims that he stands behind the pro-democracy tweet that brought such turmoil to the NBA despite the troubles it started. Last year, Morey was excoriated by the NBA, and China after tweeting his support for the pro-democracy movement in Hong Kong. “Fight For Freedom. Stand With Hong Kong,” the tweet said. This year he stepped down from his position with the team and has been brought on by the Philadelphia 76ers. Still, Morey apologized for the tweet and deleted it only a few days after sending it. However, now Morey says he stands behind the pro-democracy tweet. ESPN’s Jackie MacMullan spoke to the former Rockets boss who claims that he feared getting fired after the Chinese raised a ruckus over his pro-democracy tweet. “In the last 12 months, I had moments where I thought I might never work in the NBA again, for...
    By Panu Wongcha-um and Kay Johnson BANGKOK (Reuters) - Below is a brief history of Thai protest and coups. 1932 - The Siamese Revolution ends centuries of absolute royal rule, officially establishing a constitutional monarchy and democracy in Siam, later called Thailand. 1933 - The Boworadet Rebellion, aimed at restoring an absolute monarchy, is put down by the ruling People's Party, a military-bureaucrat alliance. 1946 - King Bhumibol Adulyadej becomes monarch aged 18. During his 70-year reign, Thailand sees 10 coups and 17 constitutions. 1947 - A coup by royalist-military forces ends the People's Party's political role. 1957 - "Lese majeste" laws against insulting the king, dating back to the days of absolute monarchy, are carried over into a new Criminal Code. 1973 - Student pro-democracy protests end in a crackdown in which 77 people die, according to official estimates. On Oct. 14, King Bhumibol intervenes and announces the resignation...
    Hong Kong civil servants swore a new pledge of allegiance to the city's Beijing-backed government today as China tries to enforce greater loyalty in the financial hub after last year's huge democracy protests.  The city's chief executive Carrie Lam oversaw a closed-door ceremony in which a group of senior officials took the pledge on Wednesday. All of the finance hub's 180,000 civil servants will be expected to make the pledge in the coming weeks, promising to 'bear allegiance' to the city and its government and uphold Hong Kong's mini-constitution.   Civil servants were one of the groups that took to the streets in large numbers last year calling for greater democracy and police accountability.   Hong Kong civil servants line up at an oath-swearing ceremony at a government building in the city today as the Beijing-backed government tries to enforce loyalty in the financial hub  Tens of thousands of civil servants...
    More On: hong kong Hong Kong activist sentenced to jail for anti-government protests China sanctions top US officials for promoting democracy in Hong Kong Hong Kong to shut bars, nightclubs for third time as new COVID-19 cases jump Hong Kong activist faces three to five years in jail Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Jimmy Lai was thrown behind bars without bail on Thursday as part of a growing crackdown on dissent in the semi-autonomous city. Jimmy Lai, the chairman of Next Digital, which publishes the Apple Daily newspaper, was among 10 people arrested on Aug. 10 on suspicion of violating a national security law and collusion with a foreign country. But on Wednesday, the 73-year-old was charged along with two Next Digital executives with fraud over accusations that they violated lease terms for the company’s office space. His case was adjourned until April 16. Beijing imposed the national security law...
    More On: hong kong China sanctions top US officials for promoting democracy in Hong Kong Hong Kong to shut bars, nightclubs for third time as new COVID-19 cases jump Hong Kong activist faces three to five years in jail Three ex-Hong Kong opposition lawmakers arrested for disrupting legislative meetings Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong and two others were sentenced to jail Wednesday over anti-government protests that rocked the region last year. Wong, 24, was sentenced to thirteen and a half months in jail after pleading guilty to organizing and taking part in the June 21, 2019 rally outside Hong Kong’s police headquarters over the extradition bill and police use of force against protesters. Two others, Agnes Chow and Ivan Lam, also copped to charges. Chow was sentenced to 10 months for participating and inciting other protesters and Lam was given seven months on incitement charges. The three men...
    HONG KONG (AP) — A pro-democracy Hong Kong media tycoon who was arrested during a crackdown on dissent was charged Wednesday with fraud but no national security offenses, two newspapers reported. Jimmy Lai of Next Digital, which owns the Apple Daily newspaper, was among 10 people arrested Aug. 10 on what police said was suspicion of violating a national security law and collusion with a foreign country. Lai, 71, was later released on bail but police raided his company’s offices in October. Two Next Digital executives were charged with fraud along with Lai, the South China Morning Post and Apple Daily reported. It said they were accused of violating lease terms for Next Digital office space in the Tseung Kwan O neighborhood. Beijing imposed the national security law in response to protests in Hong Kong that began in June 2019 over a proposed extradition law and expanded to include...
    HONG KONG (Reuters) - Agnes Chow, 23, a prominent Hong Kong democracy activist, was jailed on Wednesday for 10 months on charges related to unlawful assembly near the city's police headquarters during last year's anti-government protests. WHO IS AGNES CHOW? Chow, along with prominent activists Joshua Wong and Nathan Law, founded the now-disbanded democracy group Demosisto in 2016. The party was dissolved hours after Beijing passed a contentious national security law for the city on June 30 amid fears it could be targeted under the legislation. Chow was most recently arrested in August under the new security legislation on suspicion of "colluding with foreign forces," a charge that carries a maximum sentence of life in prison. POLITICS: Chow, who has a strong youth following, became active in politics in the former British colony at the age of 15 and played a leading role in pro-democracy protests in 2014 that paralysed...
    HONG KONG (Reuters) - Joshua Wong, 24, one of Hong Kong's most prominent democracy activists, was jailed on Wednesday for 13-1/2 months after pleading guilty to charges of organising and inciting an unlawful assembly during last year's anti-government protests. WHO IS JOSHUA WONG? Wong rose to international prominence as one of the leaders of Hong Kong's 2014 student-led Umbrella democracy protests, in which roads in the heart of the financial centre were blocked for 79 days. Two years earlier at the age of 15, and with the help of secondary school activists who formed a group called Scholarism, he forced the Hong Kong government to shelve plans to introduce a pro-China national education scheme in schools. A familiar face at Hong Kong protests, Wong is also no stranger to jail. He spent five weeks in jail last year - his third stint - for contempt of court, before being released...
    BRAZIL — Picture day: Egili Oliveira, a member of the Mocidade Unida do Santa Marta samba school, smiled for a portrait as she attended a ceremony marking Black Consciousness Day in the Santa Marta favela of Rio de Janeiro, Friday. Brazilians celebrate the holiday with Afro-Brazilian dance, music and religious ceremonies, reflecting the deep cultural and social ties of the Black community to the country’s history and honoring legendary anti-slavery leader Zumbi dos Palmares on the day of his death. Photo: Bruna Prado/AP   CHILE — Protests for protesters: Protesters ran past a burning bus stop as they looked for refuge from police during clashes after a protest in Santiago on Friday that demanded President Sebastian Pinera release anti-government protesters who have been detained since protests began in 2019. Photo: Esteban Felix/AP   THAILAND — Pro-democracy protests: The three-finger protest gesture was flashed by a protester while holding a yellow...
    Joshua Wong and two other prominent pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong have been taken into police custody after pleading guilty to charges related to last year’s anti-government protests.  Wong, 24, was not a leading figure in last year’s pro-democracy protests that overtook the city. Still, being a famous face for the movement, Wong continued to draw the ire of the Chinese Communist Party, becoming a target in Beijing’s dismantling of the city’s promised political autonomy. Prosecutors charged Wong, along with fellow activists Ivan Lam and Agnes Chow, with organizing and knowingly inciting an unauthorized assembly. The charges stemmed from a demonstration that took place outside Hong Kong police headquarters in June of last year, at the height of the protests. Ahead of the hearing, Wong told reporters that China’s efforts to crack down on dissent would not stop their pro-democracy work. “I am persuaded that neither prison bars, nor election...
    Three Hong Kong pro-democracy activists were arrested Monday after pleading guilty to organizing an anti-government protest last year. Joshua Wong, Ivan Lam, and Agnes Chow have been taken into custody and are expected to be sentenced on Dec. 2nd. The group was charged for leading, inciting, and organizing an unauthorized protest of thousands of people outside police headquarters in June of 2019, reported AP News. Those found guilty of unlawful assembly in Hong Kong could face up to five years in prison, according to the Los Angeles Times. (RELATED: Police Fire Tear Gas As Hongkongers Protest Anniversary of Chinese Communist Rule) Joshua Wong, 24, wrote in a Facebook post that he decided to plead guilty after reviewing the prosecution’s evidence and consulting a legal team, according to The New York Times. Before the court hearing, Wong stated, “I am persuaded that neither prison bars, nor election ban, nor any other...
    Hong Kong — Three young Hong Kong dissidents were remanded into custody on Monday after pleading guilty to inciting a rally during last year's pro-democracy protests, deepening the crackdown against Beijing's critics. Hong Kong was convulsed by seven straight months of huge and often violent pro-democracy rallies last year in which millions took to the streets. Beijing has refused demands for free elections and authorities have pursued democracy supporters with criminal cases and a sweeping new national security law. Prominent activist Joshua Wong, 24, was prosecuted on Monday alongside fellow activists Ivan Lam and Agnes Chow over a protest that took place last summer outside the city police headquarters. Pro-democracy activists Ivan Lam and Joshua Wong (center) arrive at Lai Chi Kok Reception Center after pleading guilty to charges of organizing and inciting an unauthorized assembly near the police headquarters during last year's anti-government protests, in Hong Kong, China,...
    HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Joshua Wong on Monday pleaded guilty to charges of organising and taking part in an unauthorised assembly near the police headquarters during last year's anti-government protests. Wong, who was just 17 years old when he became the face of the 2014 student-led Umbrella Movement democracy protests, faces a maximum five-year jail term if convicted. Before entering the courtroom, Wong said he would not be surprised if immediate detention followed. "Perhaps the authorities wish me to stay in prison one term after another," Wong said. "But I am persuaded that, neither prison bars, nor election bans, nor any other arbitrary powers would stop us from activism. What we are doing now is to explain the value of freedom to the world." Wong was not a leading figure in last year's pro-democracy and anti-China protests, but his continued activism has drawn the wrath of...
    Hong Kong residents who test positive for COVID-19 will be given $645, Health Secretary Sophia Chan said on Sunday, as a way to encourage people to get tested. Bloomberg also reported that Hong Kong will be imposing new restrictions, including scrapping plans for a travel bubble between the city and Singapore. Hong Kong also ordered its first compulsory testing order, targeting people who were at 14 dance centers this past month believed to be linked to coronavirus clusters, according to the news outlet. Chan also reportedly said in a radio interview that the government would be setting up five community testing centers, bringing the total up to nine The developments come as the city reports a rising number of coronavirus cases, recording 68 cases on Sunday, the most it has seen in three months. Most of the cases were considered to be locally transmitted, with only 7 without immediately identifiable sources. Hong...
    Thousands of protesters returned to the streets of Thailand's capital on Wednesday, hours after a protest outside the parliament led to clashes with police that left 55 people injured. The pro-democracy protesters are demanding reforms of the country's military-backed government, military-drafted constitution, and its all-powerful monarchy.  As the protesters hit the streets again on Wednesday, the Thai parliament voted on seven potential changes to the constitution. Two were adopted, but they only allow for more discussion about real changes. In effect, the adopted measures will only buy the government more time — and make the protesters even more frustrated.  One of the pro-democracy movement's key demands is that Prime Minister Prayut Chan-ocha step down. As a general in the Thai army, he led a bloodless coup in 2014 that brought him to power.  Thai protesters defy ban on gatherings 03:18 Another proposed reform, aimed at reining in the powers...
    An American citizen facing trial for his role in Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests claimed he was turned away by the city's U.S. consulate after asking for protection. Ansen Wong, a 20-year-old student activist, was among hundreds of thousands of Hong Kong citizens who rallied in the streets for demonstrations beginning in March 2019.  Wall Street Journal reports that the California-born activist was convicted of criminal damage, similar to vandalism, for his role in the wide scale protests.   Ansen Wong, a 20-year-old student activist and American citizen, said he was denied refuge at the U.S. consulate while seeking protection from prosecution  A demonstrator throws a rock on a footbridge during an anti-government protest near City University in Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong, China His most recent charge of unlawful assembly came after he joined others in a massive pro-democracy protest outside of Hong Kong's legislature last year. 'I am running out...
    BANGKOK – With flawless makeup and costume that blends cabaret with catwalk and rainbow pride with royal court pageantry, Aunchalee Pokinwuttipob symbolizes how Thailand’s protests are about much more than calls for a change of government. Aunchalee, 26, is a transgender drag queen and reality television show winner who is riding the momentum of youth rallies against the military and royalist establishment, hoping to advance a drawn-out struggle for same-sex marriage and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights. Alongside the broader calls for greater democracy, is anger at government failure to change laws and policies that transgender Thais see as discriminatory. “We really want human rights. We’ve wanted it for a long time. It’s related to freedom of speech and equality,” said Aunchalee, better known by the stage name, Angele Anang. “This is a new phenomenon in Thailand, because they didn’t have this kind of opportunity to speak up...
    BANGKOK – With flawless makeup and costume that blends cabaret with catwalk and rainbow pride with royal court pageantry, Aunchalee Pokinwuttipob symbolizes how Thailand’s protests are about much more than calls for a change of government. Aunchalee, 26, is a transgender drag queen and reality television show winner who is riding the momentum of youth rallies against the military and royalist establishment, hoping to advance a drawn-out struggle for same-sex marriage and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) rights. Alongside the broader calls for greater democracy, is anger at government failure to change laws and policies that transgender Thais see as discriminatory. “We really want human rights. We’ve wanted it for a long time. It’s related to freedom of speech and equality,” said Aunchalee, better known by the stage name, Angele Anang. “This is a new phenomenon in Thailand, because they didn’t have this kind of opportunity to speak up...
    The king of Thailand has said 'we love them all the same' about pro-democracy protesters who are demonstrating in a bid to curb his powers.  King Maha Vajiralongkorn also called Thailand 'the land of compromise' on Sunday in his first direct public comments on months of protests.   One protest leader said it sounded like 'just words.' The king responded to questions from Channel 4 News during a walkabout with thousands of yellow-shirted royalists, putting on their biggest show of support since the start of protests that also seek the removal of the government. When asked what he would say to the protesters, the king said 'We love them all the same.'  The king of Thailand has said 'we love them all the same' about pro-democracy protesters who are demonstrating in a bid to curb his powers. Pictured: A pro-democracy protester in Bangkok  King Maha Vajiralongkorn also called Thailand...
    In the latest twist to Republicans’ sprawling efforts to tie Joe Biden to the Chinese Communist Party, an American senior executive of a Trump-supporting Hong Kong tabloid has resigned after admitting to paying a blogger as much as $10,000 to commission a fake “intelligence” report about Hunter and Joe Biden’s supposed financial ties to China. The story of the ginned-up 64-page dossier highlights the global reach of Trump’s nationalist movement—and a strange connection between what remains of Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement and the impending U.S. election that some of the movement’s supporters believe could decide the city’s fate. The conspiracy theory-filled report, published in early September, was promoted over the last week by prominent Trump allies including former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, who shared the article with his 2.3 million followers, and former Trump adviser Steve Bannon, who waved a copy of the report on his talk show, calling it...
    Movie theaters in New York outside NYC can reopen October 23, with limits Where to find good, cheap pasta in every state Transit shutdowns fail to deter fourth day of Thai pro-democracy protests in Bangkok BANGKOK — Pro-democracy activists in Thailand staged a fourth straight day of high-profile protests in the capital on Saturday, thwarting efforts by the authorities to stop them, including a shutdown of the city’s mass transit systems. Young Thai protesters back on Bangkoks streets USA TODAY See more videos SHARE SHARE TWEET SHARE EMAIL What to watch next Trump oversees Israel, 2 Arab states sign pacts USA TODAY Street poet Virgil Killebrew looks back on the Million Man March 25 years later USA TODAY Taxes and white supremacy: President Trump faces hard questions at town hall USA TODAY Biden is not a fan of court packing, decision...
    BANGKOK (AP) — Pro-democracy activists in Thailand staged a fourth straight day of high-profile protests in the capital on Saturday, thwarting efforts by the authorities to stop them, including a shutdown of the city’s mass transit systems. Unlike protests a day earlier, in which police used a water cannon to disperse protesters, Saturday’s demonstrations were peaceful, with no reports of any clashes by the time participants started heading home in the evening. The protesters are calling for Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha to leave office, the constitution to be amended to make it more democratic and the nation’s monarchy to undergo reform. All stations of Bangkok’s elevated Skytrain transit system were closed Saturday afternoon to try to keep protesters from gathering. The underground MRT system was also shut, and police blocked off several roads. Protesters met anyway as planned at the Skytrain stations, where they held small impromptu rallies, in effect...
    (CNN)Thailand's government arrested several prominent protest leaders and announced a ban on gatherings of more than five people under an emergency decree Thursday aimed at quelling pro-democracy demonstrations that have gripped the country for more than three months. The decree, which came into effect in the capital Bangkok at 4 a.m. local time, was enforced after thousands of protesters marched from the city's Democracy Monument and broke through a police barricade to camp outside Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha's offices late Wednesday. Demonstrators were calling for Prayut's resignation and reform of the monarchy. "As it has appeared that there have been several groups inviting, inciting and committing illegal assembly," the decree read. "There have been activities which affected the public's peace and order." Thailands unprecedented revolt pits the people against the KingThe government also cited protesters obstructing a royal motorcade as reason for the emergency decree. Video from the scene showed...
    Remember when the New York Times caved to pressure to pull down an op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) advocating for the U.S. military to intervene and stop the rioting and looting in major U.S. cities? If you would recall, a Times editor actually resigned amid outrage from the paper's staff that he would dare publish Cotton's opinion, an opinion they said would put people in danger. Will the Times retract this op-ed by a Chinese communist propagandist celebrating the authoritarian crackdown on protesters in Hong Kong? The op-ed, titled "Hong Kong is China, like it or not," was written by Regina Ip, a legislator and member of the Executive Council in Hong Kong. Ip is an advocate for Hong Kong's new expansive national security law, a law supported by the Chinese Communist Party leadership in Beijing that critics say will severely encroach on...
    HONG KONG (Reuters) - Hong Kong democracy activist Joshua Wong was granted bail on Wednesday after being formally charged in court in connection with participating in an unauthorised assembly in October 2019 and violating a city anti-mask law. The court decision comes as Wong and other activists face prosecution on suspicion of several offences related to last pro-democracy protests last year, which prompted Beijing to impose a sweeping national security law in the Asian financial hub on June 30. Wong, 23, who was arrested on Sept. 24, was defiant. "We just want to send a clear message to the world, even if they arrest us, prosecute us and even lock us up in prison, there's no reason for us to give up," he said outside the court. His case was adjourned until Dec. 18. Just 17 years old when he became the face of student-led Umbrella Movement democracy protests in...
    ‘America will always be a leader in human rights,’ Trump said It’s not only in the United States where protests against racial injustice are part of the national conversation. A handful of America’s critics have taken note too, using recent months’ demonstrations and graphic images of police violence to denounce the country at the United Nations’ gathering of world leaders this year. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani invoked the killing of George Floyd, the Black American man who died after a white police officer in Minneapolis pressed his knee against his neck even as he repeatedly said he could not breathe. Floyd’s death, caught on video, set off nationwide protests in support of Black lives.  Read More: Making 911 calls based on race is now illegal in New Jersey Rouhani said the scene was “reminiscent” of Iran’s own experience in its quest for freedom and liberation from domination, and that Iran...
    By AYA BATRAWY, Associated Press DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — It's not only in the United States where protests against racial injustice are part of the national conversation. A handful of America's critics have taken note too, using recent months' demonstrations and graphic images of police violence to denounce the country at the United Nations' gathering of world leaders this year. Iranian President Hassan Rouhani invoked the killing of George Floyd, the Black American man who died after a white police officer in Minneapolis pressed his knee against his neck even as he repeatedly said he could not breathe. Floyd’s death, caught on video, set off nationwide protests in support of Black lives. Rouhani said the scene was “reminiscent” of Iran's own experience in its quest for freedom and liberation from domination, and that Iran instantly recognized "the feet kneeling on the neck as the feet of arrogance on...
    Joshua Wong, the face of the Hong Kong protest movement, was arrested on Thursday over an assembly last year deemed illegal by authorities. Wong, 23, was released on bail a few hours after being detained during a routine visit to a Hong Kong police station. The pro-democracy activist is required to show up to this station twice a week as a condition of his bail related to previous charges. Koo Sze-yiu, another activist, was also arrested. Police confirmed that two male suspects, aged 23 and 74, had been arrested on suspicion of taking part in an illegal assembly. The arrest was reportedly in connection to a protest which took place on Oct. 5. "Joshua is arrested when reporting to Central Police Station at about 1pm today. The arrest is related to participating in an unauthorized assembly on 5Oct last year. He is told to have violated...
    HONG KONG – Hong Kong police arrested prominent democracy activist Joshua Wong on Thursday for participating in an unauthorized assembly in October 2019 and violating the city’s anti-mask law, according to a post on his official Twitter account. Wong’s latest arrest adds to several unlawful assembly charges or suspected offenses he and other activists are facing related to last year’s pro-democracy protests, which prompted Beijing to impose a sweeping national security law on June 30. Hong Kong police confirmed they arrested two men, aged 23 and 74, on Thursday for illegal assembly on Oct 5, 2019. The arrest of Wong, aged 23, comes around 6 weeks after media tycoon Jimmy Lai was detained on suspicion of colluding with foreign forces. Wong had been a frequent visitor to Washington where he appealed to the US Congress to support Hong Kong’s democracy movement and counter Beijing’s tightening grip over the global financial...
    United States House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) condemned violent unrest during a Thursday speech on the House floor with the most forceful remarks she has delivered since nationwide uprisings began in May. Pelosi said a Republican member had asked her, “Where are you when you’re talking about violence, this or that?” She responded: “We’re there. We support peaceful demonstrations. We participate in them. They are part of the essence of our democracy. That does not include looting, starting fires, or rioting. They should be prosecuted. That is lawlessness.” President Donald Trump has attacked Democrats over the last several months for allegedly failing to take a strong enough stance against violence that has broken out at protests against police brutality over the summer. “When is Slow Joe Biden going to criticize the Anarchists, Thugs & Agitators in ANTIFA?” Trump wrote on Twitter last month. Polling has suggested voter sentiment turning against Democrats and...
    Hong Kong (CNN)Police in Hong Kong police have come under heavy criticism after a widely-circulated video showed officers tackling a 12-year-old girl to the ground during a pro-democracy protest.The video, posted by the student media group of Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), showed the girl walking along a sidewalk when riot police officers stopped her. The girl started running away before the police chased after her and tackled her to the ground. In a statement, the force defended its officers' actions, saying they had deployed "minimum necessary force" in the situation. It said protesters, including the girl, had been intercepted for a stop and search. Future of political art in Hong Kong uncertain as Beijing tightens grip"During the interaction, she suddenly ran away in a suspicious manner," it said. "Officers, therefore, chased and subdued her with the use of minimum necessary force." Police said the girl...
    Shocking video shows Hong Kong police tackle a 12-year-old girl to the ground near a pro-democracy protest. The girl, who is only being identified as Pamela, said she was out buying art supplies with her brother Sunday afternoon when she got caught in the protest crowds in the Mong Kok area, the BBC reported. “The streets were cut off by police cordons so we had to double back to meet our family… but the police suddenly ran towards us,” she told local media, adding that she “panicked.” Footage shows two cops approaching her and telling her to stand still before she takes off away from them. One of the cops tackles her to the ground, while several others work to pin her down, video shows. see also UN experts raise concerns over Hong Kong security law HONG KONG — Seven human rights experts affiliated with the... Police defended...
    The lead actress in a new Disney movie is at the center of fierce criticism from pro-democracy groups that disagree with her stances on pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong. Hong Kong activist Joshua Wong accused Mulan star Liu Yifei of "proudly" endorsing the actions of police officers, who were seen assaulting protesters in Hong Kong to protest extradition laws with China throughout the past year. "This film is released today," Wong tweeted. "But because Disney kowtows to Beijing, and because Liu Yifei openly and proudly endorses police brutality in Hong Kong, I urge everyone who believes in human rights to #BoycottMulan." This film is released today. But because Disney kowtows to Beijing, and because Liu Yifei openly and proudly endorses police brutality in Hong Kong, I urge everyone who believes in human rights to #BoycottMulan. https://t.co/utmP1tIWNa— Joshua Wong 黃之鋒 ???? (@joshuawongcf) September 4, 2020 In August 2019, amid protests in...
    Hong Kong police arrested 16 people Wednesday on charges related to anti-government protests last year, including two opposition lawmakers. Pro-democracy legislators Ted Hui and Lam Cheuk-ting were arrested early Wednesday, according to posts on their Facebook pages. Posts on Lam's Twitter account said he had been arrested on charges of conspiring with others to damage property and obstructing the course of justice during a protest in July 2019. The tweets said he has also been accused of rioting on July 21, 2019. That was the day a group of more than 100 men clad in white attacked protesters and passengers with steel rods and rattan canes in a subway station. Protesters and many from the opposition camp have accused the police of colluding with the attackers, as they arrived late to the scene and did not make arrests that night. The post on Hui's Facebook page...
    HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong police arrested 16 people Wednesday on charges related to anti-government protests last year, including two opposition lawmakers. Pro-democracy legislators Ted Hui and Lam Cheuk-ting were arrested early Wednesday, according to posts on their Facebook pages. Posts on Lam’s Twitter account said he had been arrested on charges of conspiring with others to damage property and obstructing the course of justice during a protest in July 2019. The tweets said he has also been accused of rioting on July 21, 2019. That was the day a group of more than 100 men clad in white attacked protesters and passengers with steel rods and rattan canes in a subway station. Protesters and many from the opposition camp have accused the police of colluding with the attackers, as they arrived late to the scene and did not make arrests that night. The post on Hui’s Facebook...
    European Union (EU) leaders on Wednesday spoke out in solidarity with Belarusians protesting for democratic rights and demanding the resignation of President Alexander Lukashenko, the country's leader of 26 years who was once referred to as "Europe’s last dictator." “The European Union stands in solidarity with the people of Belarus, and we don’t accept impunity," European Council President Charles Michel said after EU officials held a virtual emergency summit. "We don’t recognize the results presented by the Belarus authorities." The 27-nation bloc also threatened sanctions on "a substantial number" of people linked to violence and election fraud, Michel said, while declining to name anyone. WHO IS BELARUS PRESIDENT ALEXANDER LUKASHENKO, 'EUROPE’S LAST DICTATOR'? In this Sunday, Aug. 16, 2020 file photo Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko addresses his supporters gathered at Independent Square of Minsk, Belarus. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, File) Lukashenko, who has led the ex-Soviet nation of 9.5 million since 1994, claimed victory...
    The eastern European country of Belarus is wracked by strikes and protests. That follows last week’s presidential election the opposition and international observers say was rigged, and then the subsequent crackdown by authorities. Few countries are watching all of this closer than neighboring Lithuania. And few public figures are playing a bigger role than its Foreign Minister Linus Linkevicius. With his country’s history of breaking free from then-Soviet bonds, Linkevicius marvelled at the outpouring of people against what’s seen as an oppressive government. “They deserve a better life,” he told Fox News via Zoom, “they deserve a normal democratic environment.” He reflected on the embattled Belarusian president and dictator Alexander Lukashenko.  “He should understand that something is changing,“ Linkevicius said, “He’s being met with anger, open anger, he should be shocked, this can’t be ignored.” The Foreign Minister made news this week when he branded any possible Russian military support for Belarus as...
    By JERRY HARMER, Associated Press BANGKOK (AP) — High school students in Thailand's capital held blank signs and flashed three-fingered salutes to show opposition to the government on Tuesday, as the pro-democracy movement continued to spread. Around 30 students at Samsen Wittayalai school in Bangkok shouted “Down with dictatorship, long live democracy” and held up sheets of plain white paper, meant to convey the message that they were not free to express themselves. Some girls tied white ribbons to their bags, a recently emerged symbol of dissent. “People realize nowadays politics isn’t something remote,” said an 18-year-old student who only gave her nickname, Nudee. “When people realize this, they want a better future. That’s why we came out to protest.” Pro-democracy hashtags linked to the school protests were trending on social media with photographs and video clips showing young students at schools in a number of Thai cities lined up...
    BANGKOK (AP) — High school students in Thailand’s capital held blank signs and flashed three-fingered salutes to show opposition to the government on Tuesday, as the pro-democracy movement continued to spread. Around 30 students at Samsen Wittayalai school in Bangkok shouted “Down with dictatorship, long live democracy” and held up sheets of plain white paper, meant to convey the message that they were not free to express themselves. Some girls tied white ribbons to their bags, a recently emerged symbol of dissent. “People realize nowadays politics isn’t something remote,” said an 18-year-old student who only gave her nickname, Nudee. “When people realize this, they want a better future. That’s why we came out to protest.” Pro-democracy hashtags linked to the school protests were trending on social media with photographs and video clips showing young students at schools in a number of Thai cities lined up on playgrounds and giving...
    By Panu Wongcha-um BANGKOK (Reuters) - Pupils at more than a dozen Thai high schools raised three-finger "Hunger Games" salutes during the national anthem on Tuesday in a sign of spreading support for student-led anti-government protests. Demonstrations that began on university campuses have taken place almost daily since mid-July in an increasing challenge to the ruling establishment in the Southeast Asian country that has long been dominated by the army and the monarchy. High school protests during morning assemblies began in at least eight schools on Monday. The three-finger salute has been a symbol of calls for democracy since Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha first took power in a 2014 coup. Some students also wore white ribbons to show their support for protesters, who seek Prayuth's departure, a new constitution and an end to the harassment of activists. Some students have also called for reforms to the monarchy, once a taboo...
    HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai was arrested Monday on suspicion of collusion with foreign powers, his aide said, in the highest-profile use yet of the new national security law Beijing imposed on the city after protests last year. “Jimmy Lai is being arrested for collusion with foreign powers at this time,” Mark Simon wrote on Twitter. Hong Kong police said seven people had been arrested on suspicion of violating the national security law, but the statement did not reveal the names of those arrested. Lai, who owns popular tabloid Apple Daily, is an outspoken pro-democracy figure in Hong Kong and regularly criticizes China’s authoritarian rule. The national security law came into effect June 30 and is widely seen as a means to curb dissent after anti-government protests rocked Hong Kong last year. Simon said that police searched both Lai and his son’s home, as well...
    I’m not being hyperbolic or melodramatic when I say that democracy itself is on the line on November 3. Donald Trump has been on a mission to subvert our democracy and to push it toward an autocracy. No president has ever disavowed democracy like Trump. No president has ever wanted to change our democratic way of life like Trump. Trump has shown little interest or intent in following our Constitution. He is not abiding by the emoluments clause. He breaks norms and rules at will. He does not recognize that the three branches of government are co-equal. He operates as if the executive branch has total power. Our democracy is not based on the executive branch having absolute power. It requires that the three branches have separate powers in a check-and-balances system. Trump impugns democracy because it limits his power and requires him to be held accountable. Trump has crossed...
    By Jeffrey Heller JERUSALEM (Reuters) - Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu struck back on Sunday at demonstrations calling for his resignation, accusing protesters of trampling democracy and the Israeli media of encouraging them. Netanyahu, who was sworn in for a fifth term in May after an election, has often complained of press bias against him, and some of the charges he faces in a corruption trial relate to alleged attempts to seek favourable coverage from media barons in return for state favours. Thousands of Israelis have been taking to the streets, including outside Netanyahu's Jerusalem home, to protest against alleged corruption and economic hardship stemming from lockdowns during the coronavirus crisis. Netanyahu, who heads the right-wing Likud party, has denied wrongdoing in the three graft cases against him. Criticising the protests and media at the weekly cabinet meeting, Netanyahu said that while demonstrators portray their campaign as an attempt to "preserve...
    A group of Kentucky militiamen showed up last weekend at a Black Lives Matter protest in Louisville, but were heavily outnumbered. For most of its existence, the “Patriot” militia movement has been described by those monitoring its spread as “antigovernment”—which isn’t fully accurate, since most of its adherents openly say that they don’t have a problem with government regulations in such areas as abortion and “law and order.” (They mostly hate the government when it enforces progressive democratic measures: gun control, civil-rights and anti-discrimination law, environmental protections, and the like.) A closer and more accurate term—manifested by its hostility to calling America a “democracy” rather than a “republic”—might well be “antidemocratic.” This has manifested itself increasingly during the Trump years, when militiamen from the “III Percenters” and “Oath Keepers”—alongside such street-brawling outfits as Patriot Prayer and the Proud Boys, all of whom declare themselves likeminded “Patriots”—have shifted their strategies from...
    BANGKOK (AP) — Hardcore supporters of Thailand’s monarchy held a small rally Thursday in the capital to express their concern over the country’s pro-democracy movement, which they feel besmirches the royal institution. Their demonstration was held at Bangkok’s Democracy Monument, a traditional venue for protests that in recent weeks has hosted several larger pro-democracy, anti-government protests organized by students. Chanting “Long live the King” and singing songs associated with past nationalist movements, some 75 people gathered held signs calling for the protection of the monarchy. The protest was organized by a little-known group calling itself “Vocational School Students Protecting the Nation,” and about two dozen college-age students were among the attendees as were many senior citizens. “I am here today because there are many protests that have anti-monarchy sentiment,” said 17-year-old student Thanapat Putipat. “We are able to live on our land because of the kings and our ancestors. We...
    A FACEBOOK ad released by President Donald Trump's reelection campaign used a pro-democracy protest photo from Ukraine to depict "chaos and violence" in the US. The ad published on Tuesday includes a photo of President Trump listening to police leaders beside another image that appears to show a group of protesters attacking a cop on the ground. 4A Facebook ad for President Trump's reelection campaign used a photo from a protest during the 2014 Ukranian revolutionCredit: Wikimedia Commons/Mstyslav Chernov "Public safety vs chaos & violence," the caption beneath the photos reads. The photo used in the reelection ad is actually from a pro-democracy protest in Kyiv during the 2014 Ukrainian revolution. Photographer Mstyslav Chernov confirmed to Business Insider on Tuesday that he shot the photo in Ukraine six years ago. The image was uploaded on Wikimedia Commons in 2014 with the label "a police officer attacked by protesters during clashes...
    KHARTOUM (Reuters) - Sudan's police chief and his deputy were fired on Sunday, the transitional government said, days after large protests demanding more measures against officials linked to ousted President Omar al-Bashir. Adel Mohamed Bashaer, director-general of Sudan's Police Force was "relieved of his duties" and replaced with Ezz Eldin Sheikh Ali, Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok said on Twitter without elaborating. Later, the cabinet said in a statement that Othman Mohamed Younes, Bashaer's deputy, was also dismissed. No further details were given. One person was killed and several others injured during largely peaceful demonstrations across Sudan on Tuesday, as tens of thousands of people took to the streets demanding faster reform and a greater role for civilians in the country's transition towards democracy. Protesters and pro-democracy groups link the two fired police officials with the administration of Bashir, who was removed from power in April 2019 after months of protests....
    (CNN)Nathan Law, a former lawmaker and prominent pro-democracy activist, has fled Hong Kong, he announced Thursday on Facebook. The news comes days after China's central government imposed a controversial national security law in the territory.Law said he left the city because he wanted to continue the protest movement's advocacy work on the international stage.He did not say where he had gone, noting only that he would not reveal too much about his personal whereabouts and situation, and does not know when he will return to Hong Kong. Defiance and fear as Hong Kong settles into new normal after China-backed law takes holdLaw is one of the most famous protest leaders to come out of Hong Kong's 2014 demonstrations, which shut down parts of central Hong Kong for more than two months. He was elected as a lawmaker in 2016, but was disqualified from office by Hong Kong courts after Beijing...
    Pro-democracy activists in Hong Kong are primed for demonstrations after the Chinese Communist Party approved its “national security” law on Tuesday morning, a day before the 23rd anniversary of the handover of Hong Kong from the British Empire. The legislation, passed unanimously by China’s National People’s Congress, represents the most serious violation of the “One Country, Two Systems” policy China agreed to since the handover of Hong Kong in 1997. Under the new law, any activities considered as undermining Beijing’s authority are criminalized. Examples of such “crimes” will include “secessionism” or working with foreign countries to advocate against the interests of the Communist Party. The law also bans “terrorism” and “subversion of state power.” Hongkongers are once again preparing to take to the streets in protest against Beijing’s interference, although the region’s generally pro-China police force has banned the annual July 1 pro-democracy march for the first time since 2003, citing violence...
    The norm, feared as a threat to Hong Kong liberties, was approved according to local media by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (ANP, legislative). Since last month, Beijing had announced its intention to pass a security law against what it considers to be attempts to secede from subversive and terrorist movements. It is the response of the Chinese authorities to the sometimes violent protests for democracy in Hong Kong. When Chinese authorities announced their intention to pass the rule last month, critics expressed fear that it would mean “the end of Hong Kong.” Since then Washington had voiced strong opposition and began work on dismantling the special status that Hong Kong enjoys under the laws of the United States. In fact, US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross had announced on Monday that Hong Kong’s special treatment of China was suspended. “The risk of sensitive US technology being diverted...
    One of the leaders of Hong Kong's protest movement has stepped down from his post after China passed a new national security law targeting the territory. Joshua Wong, who was the secretary-general of a pro-democracy group called Demosisto, resigned early Tuesday, and the group will be disbanding. "I hereby declare withdrawing from Demosisto. ... If my voice will not be heard soon, I hope that the international community will continue to speak up for Hong Kong and step up concrete efforts to defend our last bit of freedom," Wong announced on Twitter. I hereby declare withdrawing from Demosisto...If my voice will not be heard soon, I hope that the international community will continue to speak up for Hong Kong and step up concrete efforts to defend our last bit of freedom. pic.twitter.com/BIGD5tgriF— Joshua Wong 黃之鋒
    BANGKOK – Political activists from a number of teams throughout Thailand staged peaceable protests across the nation on Wednesday to mark the anniversary of the 1932 revolt which ended absolutely the monarchy within the nation. The demonstrations come as extra Thais are talking out towards a military-dominated political system and as monuments to the institution of democracy have been disappearing right here from public areas. The 1932 revolt, led by a gaggle of civilian bureaucrats and navy officers generally known as the Individuals’s Celebration, has in recent times emerged as a symbolic date for pro-democracy teams. Thailand was below navy rule for 5 years till an election final yr that stored former junta chief Prayuth Chan-ocha in energy in a vote that opposition events mentioned was rigged. Prayuth and Thai courts reject claims the election was manipulated.A professional-democracy activist confronts a police officer throughout an indication at democracy monument...
    BANGKOK – Political activists from several groups across Thailand staged peaceful protests around the country on Wednesday to mark the anniversary of the 1932 revolt which ended the absolute monarchy in the country. The demonstrations come as more Thais are speaking out against a military-dominated political system and as monuments to the establishment of democracy have been disappearing here from public spaces. The 1932 revolt, led by a group of civilian bureaucrats and military officers known as the People’s Party, has in recent years emerged as a symbolic date for pro-democracy groups. Thailand was under military rule for five years until an election last year that kept former junta leader Prayuth Chan-ocha in power in a vote that opposition parties said was rigged. Prayuth and Thai courts reject claims the election was manipulated. A pro-democracy activist confronts a police officer during a demonstration at democracy monument in Bangkok.Reuters At one...
    By Panu Wongcha-um and Panarat Thepgumpanat BANGKOK (Reuters) - Political activists from several groups across Thailand staged peaceful protests around the country on Wednesday to mark the anniversary of the 1932 revolt which ended the absolute monarchy in the country. The demonstrations come as more Thais are speaking out against a military-dominated political system and as monuments to the establishment of democracy have been disappearing https://www.reuters.com/article/us-thailand-democracy-monuments/in-thailand-its-statues-of-democracy-leaders-that-are-disappearing-idUSKBN23V024 from public spaces. The 1932 revolt, led by a group of civilian bureaucrats and military officers known as the People's Party, has in recent years emerged as a symbolic date for pro-democracy groups. Thailand was under military rule for five years until an election last year that kept former junta leader Prayuth Chan-ocha in power in a vote that opposition parties said was rigged. Prayuth and Thai courts reject claims the election was manipulated. At one of the protests at Bangkok's Democracy Monument, 30-40...
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