Saturday, Feb 27, 2021 - 13:19:43
15 results - (0.000 seconds)

wildlife management:

    Sen. Steve Daines (R-MT) grilled Rep. Deb Haaland (D-NM), President Joe Biden’s nominee to run the Department of the Interior (DOI), on her thoughts about wildlife management during a confirmation hearing Tuesday. Daines asked Haaland about the Endangered Species Act and whether she supports returning wildlife management to the states during an Energy Committee hearing on Haaland’s qualifications to serve as DOI secretary. Haaland said that science should “of course” serve as the basis for those decisions. The Montana conservative asked Haaland if she knew the Grizzly Bear’s recovery period in the greater Yellowstone ecosystem, to which she said that she did not. Daines said in response that the “most conservative estimate” reveals the grizzly bear population is well above the recovery period to take the bear species off of the endangered species list and allow states such as Montana to better manage their wildlife. He further noted that, despite...
    Students in the OTC Fish & Wildlife Management Program were featured in the Georgia Department of Natural Resources Fall Volunteer Newsletter for constructing large bat boxes for the Evans Public Fishing Area. “This was an incredible experience for the students in our program,” said Casey Corbett, an Instructor in the Fish and Wildlife Management Program. “They were able to provide a valuable service to our community while also learning about bat habitats in Georgia and picking up some general carpentry skills along the way.” The student were able to construct nine large bot boxes that will be placed throughout the Evans Public Fishing Area. “Bats feed on insects, among other things, and the boxes will help cut down on insect populations that often overwhelm these areas in the late evenings,” said Corbett. The Fish & Wildlife Management program prepares graduates for careers...
    JACKSON HOLE, Wyo. (AP) — A federal appeals court has upheld a ruling that allows some hunting on privately owned land within Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming. The decision Wednesday by the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals reaffirms the state's authority over wildlife on the 1% of land that belongs to private owners or the state within the 484-square-mile (1,254-square-kilometer) park, the Jackson Hole News and Guide reported. Several conservation groups had sued over the issue. The appeals court ruled against them as it upheld a 2018 U.S. District Court ruling. The dispute began in 2014, when a wolf was shot and killed on private land in the park. Rangers initially sought to prosecute, but the National Park Service delayed it as it began a review about government jurisdiction over such land in Grand Teton. The park service later ceded authority over wildlife on private land in the...
    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced this week that it will be conducting the first sale of oil and gas drilling leases in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge on Jan. 6, 2021 via video livestream on the agency’s website. The left-wing media is reporting that the development is devastating to the pristine part of Alaska and that President Donald Trump is pushing through the long-planned sales before Joe Biden replaces him, including the New York Times:  The Trump administration on Monday announced that it would begin the formal process of selling leases to oil companies in a last-minute push to achieve its long-sought goal of allowing oil and gas drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska. That sets up a potential sale of leases just before Jan. 20, Inauguration Day, leaving the new administration of Joseph R. Biden Jr., who has opposed drilling in the refuge, to try...
    This insect is so enormous, it was mistaken for a reptile. In late October, a concerned Midlothian, Virginia, resident spotted a strange “snake” measuring roughly 10 to 12 inches long with a head shaped like a half-moon. Unsure what it was, the individual called the Virginia Wildlife Management and Control’s Snake Identification Hotline, sending over a video of the bizarre creature. “We identify thousands of snakes every year … but the problem is, we’ve never seen anything like it before and we’re not sure if it’s a freak of nature,” Virginia Wildlife Management and Control wrote in a since-deleted Facebook post on Oct. 28., the Charlotte Observer reported. They were so confused as to the creepy crawler’s species, they put out a public call for tips. “So, if anyone has any idea what it is, please feel free to comment,” they wrote. Eventually, the group figured out that the odd...
    Commissioner of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Mark Williams has announced the appointment of Ted Will to serve as the Director of the Wildlife Resources Division of DNR, effective December 1, 2020. Ted Will has been an employee of this division for twenty (20) years, and most recently was serving as Assistant Director. He previously served as Chief of Game Management, Assistant Chief for both Fisheries Management and Game Management, Region Supervisor, and was a fisheries biologist in southeast Georgia for over seven years. Will holds a master’s degree in wildlife ecology from Mississippi State University having earned his bachelor’s in forest resources from the University of Georgia. He is an avid hunter and angler, and currently resides in Bogart with his wife and two sons. “Growing up in the heart of Georgia, I hold a special place...
    ATLANTA (AP) — A new wildlife management area in Georgia is a step closer to fruition. The Georgia Board of Natural Resources voted Tuesday to acquire nearly 8,000 acres (3,237 hectares) of the historic Cabin Bluff property in Camden County for designation as a state wildlife management area, The Savannah Morning News reported. The Nature Conservancy and the Open Space Institute bought the property in 2018 along with an adjacent tract of nearly 3,200 (1,294 hectares) acres that will become a retreat for a church congregation based in Jacksonville, Florida, the newspaper reported. Cabin Bluff includes salt marshes, tidal creeks and longleaf pine woodlands located across the Intracoastal Waterway from the Cumberland Island National Seashore. It serves as habitat for threatened and endangered species including the gopher tortoise, wood stork and eastern indigo snake. “An incredible array of native species will continue to call the property and its waters home,...
    Bill and Betty Perkis Credit: DNR (CBS DETROIT) – Camping and exploring nature are passions for Bill and Betty Perkis, an Upper Peninsula couple who enjoy planning their vacations around visits to national parks. The two recently decided to bring a bit of nature home by actively managing their property for wildlife. The Perkises sought the help of forestry and habitat experts to incorporate sustainable forestry techniques that would improve their 40 acres for species like the golden-winged warbler –  a rare, yellow and gray songbird that prefers young forests for breeding and nesting. Golden-Winged Warbler Credit: DNR The property originally consisted of 25 acres of cedar swamp and 15 acres of overgrown tag alder, an aggressive, shrubby tree that prevented other forest types from thriving. “The tag alder made it really hard to enjoy the property,” said Bill Perkis. In addition to the tag alder, the property presented another...
    Charles Austion, a spring 2019 graduate from Ogeechee Tech’s Fish & Wildlife Management program, was invited to OTC as a guest speaker to share with students how earning his degree jumpstarted his career. “After I started working with the Department of Environmental Protection in the office of Greenways and Trails, I learned that the leadership there was impressed with the Fish and Wildlife courses that I took at OTC, and that those courses may have been the tipping point that helped me land my job,” he said. Prior to attending OTC, Austion earned a BS in Outdoor Recreation from Georgia Southern University and plans on continuing his education to advance his career. “I currently work as an Outdoor Recreation Specialist and my time at OTC played a large role in the career path I have chosen,” said Austion. “I’m looking...
    Bowhunting season is underway and runs through Jan. 17, 2021. Dan Skinner, forest wildlife program manager with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, said recreational hunting is vital for the protection and management of the outdoor environment in Illinois. “People may never hunt or fish a day in their lives, but they are still benefiting from the purchases that hunters are making,” Skinner said. “The sale of hunting and fishing licenses and the sale of deer permits is money that we use to do a lot of good for wildlife all over the state.” There are 102 counties in Illinois. Each county has its own deer population goals. Without the help of recreational hunters, it would be impossible for the employees of the Department of Wildlife Management to meet those goals, Skinner said. Illinois has lost most of its natural predators for deer. “We don’t...
    MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department will be doing road improvement projects in three wildlife management areas through mid-December, using unanticipated federal funding that must be used by the end of the year. Most roads will be open but drivers should use caution and travel may be delayed at times, officials said. The road work is taking place at the Wenlock, West Mountain, and Bill Sladyk wildlife management areas in the towns of Ferdinand, Brunswick, Maidstone and Derby Line in the Northeast Kingdom. “We recognize that this is an unfavorable time of year to conduct this work, which could interfere with hunting access and other activities on these lands,” wildlife biologist Paul Hamelin said in a written statement. But, in order to take advantage of the funding, “the projects must be conducted during this period," he said. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material...
    SHREWSBURY, Vt. (AP) — Officials from the Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife, the town of Shrewsbury and others on Saturday are going to be celebrating the state’s 100th Wildlife Management Area. The Rutland Herald reports the event in which the name of the area in Shrewsbury will be held Saturday from noon until 2 p.m. Biologists will give tours of the area. The 526-acre property was acquired by the Fish and Wildlife Department earlier this year and connects other parcels of conserved land. In addition to being Vermont’s 100th wildlife management area, 2020 is also the 100th anniversary of the state having wildlife management areas. Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. Tags: Vermont
    "Birds can't vote, and they can't file a lawsuit — but we can. This is an all-hands-on-deck moment to defend the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and protect America's bird nursery from drilling," David Yarnold, president and CEO of the National Audubon Society, said in a statement. The lawsuit asserts that Bernhardt didn't have permission to authorize a broad oil and gas leasing program because it violates government statutes managing the plain. It also claims the program violates the Endangered Species Act and other environmental policies. In the other lawsuit, the Gwich'in Steering Committee — an Indigenous group formed to protect the refuge — and 12 other groups allege that Bernhardt and the Interior Department's Bureau of Land Management violated several laws, including the Endangered Species Act and the Wilderness Act. Nearly 200,000 animals in the Porcupine caribou herd, which are also known as reindeer, travel freely between Alaska and Canada...
    SHREWSBURY, Vt. (AP) — The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department has established its 100th Wildlife Management Area. The 526-acre property in Shrewsbury is “a key parcel in a strategic, state-significant wildlife corridor, connecting state land to the north with federal and privately conserved land to the south,” said commissioner Louis Porter. The area is used by black bear, bobcat, moose and deer, as well as upland bird species and migratory songbirds, according to the department's public land section chief Jane Lazorchak. It contains small wetlands, vernal pools, early successional forest, and mast-producing trees, she said. “In addition to protecting valuable habitat and forest connectivity, this property safeguards public-use for hunting, hiking, wildlife viewing and other dispersed wildlife-based recreation,” she said. The site was originally settled in the late 1700s and bought by the town in 1870 to create a town farm to house the poor, officials said. The town farm...
1