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    The Supreme Court on Thursday granted bail to Kannada film actor, Ragini Dwivedi, arrested for her alleged involvement in the Sandalwood drugs case. Ragini had filed the Special Leave Petition (SLP), challenging the Karnataka High Court’s order of November 3, last year, declining her relief. She was arrested by the Central Crime Branch (CCB), Bengaluru, on September 4, last year, on the charges of her alleged association with an international drug peddling racket involved in supplying psychedelic drugs to customers at rave parties and other events. Sandalwood Drug Case: Ragini Dwivedi and Sanjjanaa Galrani’s Bail Pleas Rejected by Karnataka High Court Ragini has been booked under provisions of the NDPS (Narcotics Drugs and Psychotropic Substances) Act and Indian Penal Code (IPC) Acts, for her alleged involvement in the drugs case. Ragini had claimed that the prosecution had allegedly framed her in the false case to attract public attention. Sandalwood Drug Case:...
    PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – The billboard battle on Mount Washington is over. The state Supreme Court rejected the city’s claims that the billboard is illegal. Photo Credit: KDKA Photojournalist Tim Lawson That means Lamar Advertising, the owner of the billboard, will keep the space that has been promoting Iron City Beer. The feud with the city has been going on since 2016. RELATED STORIES: Iron City Beer Sign Goes Up On Mt. Washington American Flag Foundation Takes Over Mt. Washington Billboard City Loses Latest Battle Over Mt. Washington Sprint Sign Sprint Changes Sign Atop Mt. Washington As Legal Battle Continues City Demands Mount Washington Sign Must Go Following Ruling Judge Orders Lamar Advertising To Clean Rust From Back Of Old Bayer Sign Lamar Advertising Tells City They Will Not Be Taking Down Sprint Ad
    The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday on a climate case that could determine the future of climate litigation against energy companies within the federal court system. The argument in BP P.L.C. v. Mayor and City Council of Baltimore considers whether energy companies should be held accountable for the impact of climate change. The lawsuit was filed in 2018 by the City of Baltimore and argues that 26 companies should be held liable for environmental damages in the city — including coastal flooding and rising temperatures. But the Supreme Court will not rule whether energy companies should pay for environmental damages. Instead, the justices will decide whether the case should be ruled on by a federal court or a state court. How the Court rules on this jurisdictional question would impact at least 19 other cases where local governments are suing the energy industry, according to SCOTUSBlog. A ruling for...
    Vice President Kamala Harris takes the oath of office administered by Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor. SAUL LOEB/POOL/AFP via Getty Images Justice Sonia Sotomayor mispronounced 'Kamala' while swearing in Vice President Harris. Her name is pronounced "COMMA-luh," not "ku-MAH-luh." Republicans mocked her name while campaigning, so it was disappointing to see it mispronounced again. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Vice President Kamala Harris made history on Wednesday when she was sworn in as the first Black and South Asian woman to serve as second-in-command. However, the groundbreaking moment was marred by a mistake — Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor mispronounced her name, saying "Kuh-MAH-luh" instead of "COMMA-luh." People on Twitter took notice of the misstep.—Delia Cai (@delia_cai) January 20, 2021—Lauren Tighe (@laurenatighe) January 20, 2021—Melissa Kotačka (@mkotnc) January 20, 2021—Nelly ???? (@_nellaayy_) January 20, 2021  Harris didn't miss a beat, repeating the oath after Justice Sotomayor...
    The Supreme Court of the United States confirmed that it received a bomb threat this Wednesday before the inauguration of the already president Joe Biden, but that it was a false alert. Miami World/The newspaper Courthouse spokeswoman Kathy Arberg confirmed the report of the threat this Wednesday morning when the judges were meeting in the federal Capitol for the inauguration of the new government. Arberg clarified that the unforeseen event did not require the evacuation of the building in Washington DC. “The Court received a bomb threat, the building and the surroundings were examined, and the building has not been evacuated,” said the spokeswoman as quoted by Law 360. At the moment, there are no details of who or who would be the authors of the threat or the exact content of the message. Two members of that court swore in Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, Judge John Roberts...
    A Michigan federal judge on Wednesday announced her intent to retire only hours after President Biden took office. Judge Victoria Roberts, who was nominated to the Eastern Michigan District Court by then-President Bill Clinton, said in a letter submitted to Biden that she intends to retire in late February. "It has been my honor to serve," she wrote. "With respect, I congratulate you on your election as 46th President of the United States, and Kamala Harris on her election as Vice President." Roberts's retirement leaves Biden with 50 vacancies to fill as his administration settles into the White House. When President Donald Trump took office in 2017, there were 108 federal judicial vacancies, the result of then-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's block of many of President Barack Obama's nominations. One of Obama's picks, Judge Merrick Garland, whom the 44th president unsuccessfully nominated to the Supreme Court, will likely leave...
    The Supreme Court’s three oldest justices did not attend President Biden's inauguration Wednesday due to the coronavirus pandemic.  Justices Stephen Breyer, 82; Clarence Thomas, 72; and Samuel Alito, 70, skipped the swearing-in ceremony as a precaution, according to the court. "They elected not to attend the inauguration ceremony in light of the public health risks posed by the COVID pandemic," Supreme Court spokesperson Kathleen Arberg said in a statement to Fox News.  BIDEN SWORN IN AS 46TH PRESIDENT Breyer was appointed by then-President Bill Clinton. Alito was appointed by then-President George H.W. Bush and Thomas by then-President George Bush.  The other six justices were in attendance. Chief Justice John Roberts swore in President Biden while Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor swore in Vice President Kamala Harris.  Biden, at 78, is older than two of the justices who did not attend, and he became the oldest president ever to take office. He has received both doses of his coronavirus vaccine.  BIDEN,...
    What does DC look like on Inauguration Day? These photos capture the mood at the Capitol as Joe Biden becomes president Salvation Army, José Andrés are feeding the National Guard in DC for inauguration 3 oldest Supreme Court justices skip inauguration due to pandemic The three oldest U.S. Supreme Court justices opted not to attend President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration Wednesday due to the coronavirus pandemic. © Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images Members of the U.S. Supreme Court listen to a speech. Justices Stephen Breyer, 82; Clarence Thomas, 72; and Samuel Alito, 70, all opted to skip the inauguration, according to Supreme Court spokesperson Kathleen Arberg. The other six justices were in attendance. “Several of the Justices elected not to attend the inauguration ceremony in light of the public health risks posed by the COVID pandemic,” Arberg said. The pandemic has disproportionately claimed the lives of older Americans. ...
    January 20, 2021 12:34 PM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. The president-elect of the United States (USA), Joe Biden, and the vice president-elect, Kamala Harris, arrived at the Capitol for their inauguration, which takes place in a city turned into a fortress, with dozens of fences and 25,000 members of the National Guard. Biden and Harris arrived at Congress escorted by police cars in 2 black vehicles. They were accompanied by their husbands, Jill and Doug, respectively. The 4 of them stopped for a moment to speak with some congressmen, such as the senator for Minnesota, Amy Klobuchar. Then, they went up the steps of the Capitol together to greet those present at the investiture ceremony from the top. Bomb threat Almost at the same time, A spokeswoman for the US Supreme Court reported in a statement that the building, which is located in front of Congress, had...
    Way-too-early 2021 college football storylines to follow Democracy has prevailed: President Biden says unity is the path forward in inaugural address Inauguration Day security live updates: Bomb threat at Supreme Court; security remains tight in and around Capitol WASHINGTON – Joe Biden was sworn in as the nation's 46th president Wednesday as Inauguration Day festivities rolled on outside the U.S. Capitol on a chilly day against a backdrop of historic security.   The streets of Washington were quiet and there were no throngs of supporters or protesters. Security remained tight, and multiple media organizations including CNN were reporting that the U.S. Supreme Court was the target of a called-in bomb threat. An all-clear was later reported. Capitol Police told USA TODAY there was no evacuation of the court and no threat. The building has been closed to the public for months because of COVID 19. Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning. The...
    President Biden will overturn a series of Trump-era immigration court victories with executive orders aimed at undoing “the gravest damages of the Trump administration.” Biden early Wednesday morning announced 17 orders that he plans to sign hours after taking office. These include reversals of Trump’s climate policies, as well as his immigration stances, his coronavirus response, and his policies on sexual orientation. Biden’s immigration orders, in effect, undo some of the outgoing administration's hardest-fought victories at the Supreme Court. Biden will sign an order undoing Trump’s exclusion of noncitizens from the census and the apportionment of congressional representatives. Trump in July ordered that illegal immigrants be excluded from the counts used in congressional redistricting, a move that earned him a lawsuit from the American Civil Liberties Union as it called the move unconstitutional. The Supreme Court in December ruled that it could not decide on the ACLU’s case, finding that...
    January 20, 2021 1:41 PM | With information from EFE 15 minutes. Democrat Kamala Harris made history on Wednesday by swearing in as vice president of the United States (USA), becoming the first woman, the first African-American and the first person of Asian origin to reach this position in the country. “I solemnly swear that I will uphold and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will maintain real faith in this very thing.” Thus began Harris, who was sworn in with the help of Judge Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina magistrate of the federal Supreme Court. The oath is a fixed formula that all vice presidents pronounce when they swear in office. Like his predecessors, Harris ended his oath with a pledge that he will “perform the duties of the post well and faithfully.” The ceremony is held on the west...
    President Joe Biden was sworn into office by Chief Supreme Court Justice John Roberts just before noon in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday. Biden took the oath of office on a Celtic bible that has been in his family since the 19th century. According to the New York Times, he also used the bible during his swearing in ceremonies for the U.S. Senate and Vice Presidency. (RELATED: National Guard Investigates Reported Bomb Threat At Supreme Court Just Before Biden Arrives At Inauguration) “Every important date is in there,” Biden added of the bible in a recent interview. “For example, every time I’ve been sworn in for anything, the date is inscribed.” WATCH: Biden’s swearing in took place directly on the heels of Vice President Kamala Harris’ own swearing in. Supreme Court Justice Sony Sotomayor administered Harris’ oath of office. WATCH: You can watch Biden’s entire inauguration ceremony, including his...
    History was made Wednesday when now-former Senator Kamala Harris was sworn in as the first woman, the first Black person, and the first person of South Asian descent to hold the office of vice president of the United States. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor led VP Harris through the oath of office, which Harris took with her hand on a Bible that belonged to late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall — the first Black American to serve on the Court. Upon taking the oath — “I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to...
    Heightened tensions in the nation's capital were on full display Wednesday after a series of tweets from reporters falsely reported that the Supreme Court had been evacuated because of a bomb threat. "The Supreme Court evacuated after bomb threat," Fox News's Chad Pergram tweeted. The Supreme Court evacuated after bomb threat.— Chad Pergram (@ChadPergram) January 20, 2021 In a since-deleted tweet, CNN's Jim Sciutto said that "the Supreme Court is being evacuated for bomb threat." The Supreme Court's Public Information Office told the Washington Examiner that a bomb threat had been called in, but after authorities checked the grounds, no threat was detected. "The Court received a bomb threat, the building and grounds were checked out, and the building is not being evacuated," the Supreme Court's Public Information Office said. The U.S. Capitol Police confirmed that a threat had not been detected and that the building had...
    Vice President-elect Kamala Harris (right) will be sworn in with Thurgood Marshall's Bible on Inauguration Day. Bettmann/Contributor/Getty Images, Win McNamee/Getty Images Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will be sworn in with a Bible that belonged to Thurgood Marshall. Marshall was a lawyer, civil rights activist, and the first Black Supreme Court justice. Harris called Marshall "one of my heroes and inspirations" in her memoir. Visit Insider's homepage for more stories. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris will use the Bible of Thurgood Marshall, the first Black Supreme Court justice, when she is sworn in as vice president on Wednesday. Harris will also involve a Bible that belonged to Regina Shelton, a family friend whose house she and her sister Maya visited every day after school. She previously used Shelton's Bible to swear in as California attorney general and a US senator. Harris will become the first Black and South Asian...
    National Guard troops investigated a reported bomb threat Wednesday morning at the U.S. Supreme Court, just one and a half hours ahead of President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. Members of the National Guard rest near the US Supreme Court (rear) on January 19, 2021 in Washington, DC, ahead of the 59th inaugural ceremony for President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris in Washington, DC on January 19, 2021. (Photo by BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images) “The Court received a bomb threat, the building and grounds were checked out,” a Supreme Court spokesperson said in a statement. “The building is not being evacuated.” (RELATED: Trump Departs Washington For The Last Time As President) NEW: Supreme Court spox says: “The Court received a bomb threat, the building and grounds were checked out, and the building is not being evacuated.” — John Kruzel (@johnkruzel) January 20, 2021 Multiple reports originally claimed that...
    The Supreme Court building in Washington, located near the Capitol, was evacuated Wednesday morning (4:15 p.m. in Belgium) following a bomb threat, CNN and NBC report.
    A man on the street interview segment on CBS: This Morning on Tuesday revealed several people are unaware of basic information about the U.S. Constitution and government. “I don’t know, 12?” one person responded when asked by CBS’s Tony Dokoupil how many members served in the House of Representatives. “Fourteen?" another person said. One woman in the video was unable to name more than one branch of government, and another man was unable to name a Supreme Court justice and was unaware that the court had a “chief.” “The vast majority of people were stumped,” Dokoupil said about the interviews. CBS asked Americans what they know about the Constitution. The results are scary. pic.twitter.com/l5yzuTaVog— Scott Whitlock (@ScottJW) January 19, 2021 Polling last year showed that only 51% of people know that the Supreme Court has the final say on the constitutionality of an action taken by the...
    The secretary of Organization of Podemos and deputy Alberto Rodriguez will have to go to Supreme court next January 28 at 12:30 p.m. He will do so as a defendant in the open case in which the High Court is investigating whether, as the Prosecutor’s Office believes, he kicked a policeman in a demonstration against the LOMCE seven years ago. This was announced this Wednesday by the Supreme Court in a press release in which he recalled that Rodríguez is accused of committing an alleged crime of attack against authority and a lack (or minor crime) of injuries for that alleged assault committed. January 25, 2014 in a demonstration against the LOMCE in La Laguna (Santa Cruz Tenerife). The Prosecutor’s Office and the investigating judge consider that there are indications that during these incidents Alberto Rodríguez kicked a policeman. Then, the Court of Instruction number 4 of La Laguna...
    The Kraken has waved the white flag of surrender. Sidney Powell, the pro-Trump attorney who filed several lawsuits claiming that the election won by President-elect Joe Biden was tainted by widespread fraud, has withdrawn a lawsuit seeking to throw out the results in Georgia. The motion to dismiss was filed by Powell with the Supreme Court on Tuesday - just a day before Biden is set to take the oath of office. The withdrawn lawsuit was the last legal challenge filed by President Trump and his allies seeking to overturn the November 3 election result.  Trump and his allies have filed more than 60 claims in state and federal court alleging that Biden's victory was fraudulent, but nearly all of them have been denied. Sidney Powell (left), the conservative lawyer, withdrew a lawsuit she filed with the Supreme Court challenging President Trump's (right) election loss in Georgia ...
    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — The New Jersey Supreme court has overturned a man’s bank robbery conviction because of a prosecutor’s reference to a classic horror movie. During closing arguments in the case against Damon Williams, the prosecutor showed jurors a photo from the movie “The Shining” depicting a character played by Jack Nicholson telling his terrified wife and son, “Here’s Johnny!” moments after breaking through a door with an axe. The reference was meant to illustrate that actions can speak louder than words, and to support the prosecutor’s contention that Williams should be convicted of a more serious offense even though no threatening words were spoken to the bank teller in Camden County in 2014. The jury convicted Williams of second-degree robbery, which requires the use of force or the threat of force, rather than the less serious crime of third-degree theft. Prosecutors argued that Williams’ conduct before and after...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Tuesday seemed cautious about siding with oil and gas companies in a case involving global warming. The case the court was hearing is not about whether the companies can be held responsible for harms resulting from global warming. Instead, it’s an important preliminary fight that could help determine whether similar global warming cases ultimately wind up being argued in state court or federal court, which is the companies’ preference. “I think this is a close call, this case,” Justice Brett Kavanaugh said during a little over an hour of arguments, which the justices have been hearing by phone because of the coronavirus pandemic. The case is important to more than a dozen similar global warming lawsuits filed around the country by state and local governments against energy companies. But it’s also important to a range of other civil cases, the companies have argued,...
    Report: 2 Guard members dropped from inauguration for right-wing militia ties Biden to block Trumps proposal to lift US travel restrictions on Europe Supreme Court Hints It Will Let FCC Relax Media-Ownership Limits (Bloomberg) -- The Supreme Court suggested it will let the Federal Communications Commission ease limits on the ownership of local media outlets, giving the broadcast industry and President Donald Trump’s administration a mostly favorable reception in a long-running fight. © Bloomberg The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) seal hangs inside a meeting room at the headquarters ahead of a open commission meeting in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The FCC is slated to vote to roll back a 2015 utility-style classification of broadband and a raft of related net neutrality rules, including bans on broadband providers blocking and slowing lawful internet traffic on its way to consumers. Hearing arguments by phone Tuesday, the justices...
    U.S. judge rejects Pharma Bro Shkrelis bid for compassionate release from prison Bidens pick to lead State Department to emphasize new direction at confirmation hearing Supreme Court Hints at Openness to Easing Media-Ownership Limits (Bloomberg) -- The Supreme Court appeared inclined to let the Federal Communications Commission ease limits on the ownership of local media outlets, giving the broadcast industry and President Donald Trump’s administration a mostly favorable reception in a long-running fight. © Bloomberg The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) seal hangs inside a meeting room at the headquarters ahead of a open commission meeting in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, Dec. 14, 2017. The FCC is slated to vote to roll back a 2015 utility-style classification of broadband and a raft of related net neutrality rules, including bans on broadband providers blocking and slowing lawful internet traffic on its way to consumers. Hearing arguments by phone Tuesday, the...
    At least 60 lawyers are reportedly calling on the Missouri Supreme Court to investigate the actions of Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyHawley's forthcoming book picked up by conservative publishing house Trump allies, Washington insiders helped plan rallies before Capitol breach: reports What Martin Luther King, at 39, taught me at 35 MORE’s (R-Mo.), an attorney, before the deadly riot by President TrumpDonald TrumpGiuliani used provisional ballot to vote in 2020 election, same method he disparaged in fighting to overturn results Trump gets lowest job approval rating in final days as president Fox News' DC managing editor Bill Sammon to retire MORE's supporters at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6. According to The Kansas City Star, local attorney Hugh O’Donnell said that the lawyers have signed onto a formal complaint asking the court’s Office of Chief Disciplinary Counsel to look into Hawley’s efforts to challenge the certification of 2020 presidential election results. O’Donnell...
    One of Vice President-elect Kamala Harris' first tasks in her new job could be to preside over an impeachment trial of President Trump.  Politico reported on Tuesday that Chief Justice John Roberts "wants no further part" in overseeing the politically charged situation after he presided over the first impeachment trial of Trump less than one year ago.  The Constitution says that in impeachments for presidents, the chief justice of the Supreme Court is the presiding officer. For lesser impeachments, the presiding officer has been the same as for other Senate business — either the vice president or a senator. The Constitution is not clear on who should preside over impeachments for former presidents.  If Roberts does not preside over a Senate trial, Harris would likely have the choice of whether to preside herself. The transition organization for the incoming Biden administration did not respond to a request for comment asking whether Harris would do...
    (CNN)Here's a timeline of key events involving Trump and the Supreme Court over the past four years:2017 Jan. 20: Chief Justice John Roberts administers the oath of office to President Donald Trump, who swears to "preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States." Jan. 27: Trump signs an executive order for a new travel ban, a key provision of which bars foreigners from seven countries, most of them majority-Muslim. Read More Jan. 31: Trump nominates Neil Gorsuch, a judge on a Denver-based US appeals court, for the Supreme Court vacancy that has been open since Justice Antonin Scalia died in February 2016. Feb. 3: US District Court James Robart temporarily blocks the Muslim travel ban. The next day, Trump calls Robart a "so-called judge" and says, "if something happens blame him and the court system." (Litigation over the travel ban continues, and the administration twice amends the order...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump will exit the White House on Wednesday but leave behind three of the nine Supreme Court justices and a majority that was willing to partner with him for much of his agenda. Trump's imprint on the Supreme Court and overall three-tier federal judiciary represents one of the most significant right-wing successes of his tenure, even as his instigation of the US Capitol assault and final destructive days appear to be leaving the most indelible mark of his legacy. John Roberts cant escape the shadow of Donald TrumpWith forceful leadership from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Senate Republicans enabled Trump to make lifetime appointments to nearly 30% of the 870-seat federal bench. A majority of the powerful US appellate courts are now dominated by Republican appointees. At the Supreme Court, the Trump administration won more than it lost during the past four years, largely prevailing as it argued...
    Armed gunmen killed two female Supreme Court judges in Afghanistan’s capital city of Kabul on Sunday, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani confirmed in a statement. Unidentified gunmen opened fire on a vehicle in Kabul on January 17 around 8:30 am killing two judges and wounding two others — the driver and another woman — police in the capital said. The wounded woman is believed to be an employee of Afghanistan’s Ministry of Education, according to Tolo News on Sunday. Afghanistan’s Presidential Palace (Arg) issued a press release on January 17 addressing the incident. “[A]ttacks by the Taliban and other terrorist groups against defenseless people are against Islamic teaching and against the spirit of peace and means illegal war and hostility against the people that could undermine the national consensus of the people on peace,” Ghani said in the statement. “The Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan reiterates its call on...
    BP and other oil majors are calling on the Supreme Court to deal a blow to the growing number of city and state-led lawsuits seeking to force the companies to pay billions for climate damages. The Supreme Court justices will hear arguments over one of the cases, brought by the city of Baltimore, on Tuesday. Baltimore is arguing oil companies deliberately understated the effect their products would have on rising greenhouse gas emissions. The city is asking courts to hold the companies liable for the costs of adapting to climate change effects such as sea level rise, flooding, and extreme weather. The number of similar cases has now reached two dozen, brought by cities, counties, and states across the country. However, on Tuesday, the Supreme Court won’t consider the heart of the case, whether the oil companies should pay. Instead, the justices will hear arguments over a narrow procedural issue...
    (CNN)Here's a look at the life of John Roberts, chief justice of the United States.PersonalBirth date: January 27, 1955Birth place: Buffalo, New YorkBirth name: John Glover Roberts Jr.Read MoreFather: John Glover Roberts Sr., steel company executiveMother: Rosemary (Podrasky) RobertsMarriage: Jane (Sullivan) Roberts (July 27, 1996-present) Children: Adopted with Jane Roberts: John and Josephine Education: Harvard University, A.B., 1976; Harvard Law School, J.D., 1979Religion: Roman Catholic Other FactsHe grew up in Long Beach, Indiana.As an attorney for the government and in private practice, he argued 39 cases before the US Supreme Court and won 25 of them.He is a member of the American Law Institute, and a member of the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers and chancellor of the Smithsonian Institution.Roberts is the youngest chief justice since John Marshall in 1801.Timeline1979-1980 - Clerk for Judge Henry J. Friendly, US Court of Appeals, Second Circuit.1980-1981 - Clerk for Associate Supreme Court Justice...
    Loading the player... On Wednesday, Kamala Harris will officially become the first U.S. Vice President who is a woman and of Black and Asian descent. When the California Democrat takes the oath of office, she will be sworn in by the first woman of color to sit on the Supreme Court. CNN reports that Justice Sonia Sotomayor will be on hand at Wednesday’s Presidential Inauguration to swear in Harris. Sotomayor, who was nominated to the Supreme Court by President Barack Obama in 2009, is the first Latina and the third woman to be a member of the high court. READ MORE: Vice President-Elect Harris to resign her Senate seat Monday Sotomayor and Harris shared more in common than being barrier-breaking women in U.S. government. Both of them were once prosecutors. Sotomayor was a prosecutor in New York and Harris in California. In addition, Harris will also...
    Kamala Harris will be sworn in this Wednesday as Vice President of the United States by Judge Sonia Sotomayor, the first magistrate of Hispanic origin of the Supreme Court of Justice of the United States. MiamiMundo / Telemundo51 This gives an even more historic tone to the swearing-in of Karris, who will become the first woman to hold the US vice presidency, a black woman with Asian roots to reach the White House. For her part, Sotomayor, born in New York and whose parents were Puerto Rican, became in 2009 the first Hispanic judge to ascend to the Supreme Court in the country’s history, after being nominated by then-President Barack Obama (2009-2017). Currently, Sotomayor is part of the minority of three progressive Supreme Court justices, and is probably the most admired figure by Democrats on the high court, following the death of veteran Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in September 2020....
    TWO female judges from Afghanistan's Supreme Court were assassinated in Kabul on Sunday, according to officials. The attack is the latest in a continuing spate of high-profile murders that have plagued the country in recent months. 6The unidentified women were killed in a court vehicle by gunmenCredit: Alamy Live News 6The bodies of the female judges from the Supreme Court being carried outCredit: Reuters The women, who have not yet been identified, were killed en route to their office in a court vehicle, according to said Ahmad Fahim Qaweem, a spokesman for the Supreme Court. The attack at around 8:30 am in the capital also left their driver wounded, and police say it is being investigated by security forces. "Unfortunately, we have lost two women judges in today's attack. Their driver is wounded," Qaweem said. More than 200 female judges work for the country's top court, he added. The shooting...
    “Unfortunately, we lost two female judges in today’s attack. Their driver is injured,” Ahmad Fahim Qaweem, spokesperson for the institution, told .. “Armed men attacked (their) vehicle,” he said, adding that the two women were on their way to their workplace when they were murdered. More than 200 female judges work for the Supreme Court, he said. The two women were shot dead in central Kabul at 8:30 a.m. local time (04:00 GMT), according to Kabul police spokesman Ferdaws Faramarz. The Supreme Court had already been the target of an attack in February 2017 during a suicide bombing targeting a crowd of employees that left at least 20 dead and 41 injured. The country has been the scene in recent weeks of a series of targeted assassinations of personalities, including members of the media, politicians and human rights defenders. Members of the security forces are also often targeted. On...
              Members of the Georgia House of Representatives have submitted a resolution that asks the U.S. Congress “to reject any and all actions to increase the number of justices on the United States Supreme Court.” Staff for U.S. Sen.-elect Jon Ossoff and U.S. Sen.-elect Raphael Warnock, both Democrats scheduled to soon represent Georgia in the U.S. Senate, did not return The Georgia Star News’ requests for comment on the matter. Five members of the Georgia House are sponsoring the resolution: • Georgia State Rep. Todd Jones (R-South Forsyth) • State Rep. Jan Jones (R-Milton) • State Rep. Barry Fleming (R-Harlem) • State Rep. James Burchett (R-Waycross) • State Rep. Matt Dubnik (R-Gainesville) The five legislators, in their resolution, said changing the number of justices on the court undermines its independence. They also said an independent court “is an essential and fundamental element of the...
    Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has slammed the Trump administration's federal execution spree saying 'this is not justice', as convicted killer Dustin Higgs became the 13th person put to death since July.  Sotomayor issued a scathing written dissent Friday after the Supreme Court ruled 6 to 3 in favor of plowing ahead with Higgs' execution despite his lawyers pleaded for clemency after he caught COVID-19.   Higgs, 48, was pronounced dead at 1.23am on Saturday after receiving a lethal injection of pentobarbital in the federal death chamber at the U.S. Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana.  Higgs conspired with two other men to kidnap and murder three young women in Washington DC on one night in January 1996.    His federal execution marks the 13th and final to be completed by the Department of Justice under President Donald Trump after a 17-year hiatus. Trump will go down in history as the most prolific modern president for...
    Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor will reportedly swear in Vice President-elect Kamala Harris at Wednesday's inauguration. Harris, who will be sworn in along with President-elect Joe Biden, will take her oath of office using two Bibles, according to ABC News. One of them previously belonged to Regina Shelton, whom Harris has credited with essentially being a second mother to her, and the other previously belonged to the late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. Harris and Sotomayor are both historic firsts: Harris will be the first black female vice president, while Sotomayor is the first Latina Supreme Court justice. Prior to their roles, both served as prosecutors — Harris in California and Sotomayor in New York. Biden and Harris's inauguration is unprecedented, given the changes that have been made to account for the coronavirus pandemic as well as the increased security threat at state capitols across the nation. Since the...
    Supreme Court Justice Sonia SotomayorSonia SotomayorSupreme Court rules Trump administration can enforce rule requiring abortion pills be obtained in person Biden's identity politics do a disservice to his nominees The Supreme Court punts, once again, in census ruling MORE issued a sharp rebuke of the court's decision to clear the way for a federal execution on Friday, panning what she described as "justice on the fly." Sotomayor joined others from the court's liberal wing in opposition to a brief, unsigned order from the majority-conservative court that paved the way for executing Dustin Higgs. Higgs early Saturday became the 13th person executed by the Trump administration within the past six months after the federal government resumed capital punishment last summer. Before the execution, Higgs's lawyers argued to the Supreme Court that the execution should be postponed because Higgs had contracted the coronavirus. The lawyers argued that the damage done to Higgs's lungs from the virus would make the lethal...
    The Virginia Supreme Court was evacuated Friday amid reports of a possible bomb threat, according to local law enforcement. Capitol Police wrote in a tweet that it began to evacuate the North Ninth Street building around 1:30 P.M. Officers and police K-9 dogs are searching the building at the time of this publication. This story is developing. Check Breitbart News for updates. 
    (CNN)As the country focused on the aftermath of riots in the US Capitol and the unprecedented second impeachment of President Donald Trump, the liberal justices of the Supreme Court spent Trump's last full week in office battling his administration's long-term objective to execute 13 federal death row inmates in six months.Late Friday night, over the fiery objection of two Supreme Court justices, Dustin John Higgs became the 13th federal inmate to be put to death. It marked the last federal execution to take place under the Trump administration that announced in July 2019 that it was reinstating the federal death penalty after a nearly two-decade pause. Then-Attorney General William Barr said that his office owed it to the victims and their families to carry forward sentences imposed by the justice system. But Justice Stephen Breyer -- the only sitting justice who believes the court should reconsider the constitutionality of the...
              Live from Music Row Friday morning on The Tennessee Star Report with Michael Patrick Leahy – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. –  host Leahy welcomed the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael to the studio. During the second hour, Carmichael explained Section 230 in relation to the actions of private and public companies suggesting evidence based on past Supreme Court rulings allowing for the government to operate their one-party agenda through Big Tech back door. Leahy: We are joined by the original all-star panelist Crom Carmichael in studio. And Crom, I was watching the Tucker Carlson Tonight show last night and the chief policy officer of Parler there had some very chilling things to say about what’s going on with Parler. In particular, what struck me as very dangerous Crom is that it wasn’t just the...
    By Jonathan Allen | Reuters TERRE HAUTE, Ind. – The U.S. government planned to carry out the 13th and final execution under President Donald Trump’s administration on Friday evening, just five days before President-elect Joe Biden takes office with a promise to try to end the death penalty. Dustin Higgs, 48, was convicted and sentenced to death in 2001 for overseeing the kidnapping and murder of three women on a federal wildlife reserve in Maryland in 1996: Tanji Jackson, Tamika Black and Mishann Chinn. The U.S. Department of Justice plans had planned to execute him at 6 p.m. with lethal injections of pentobarbital, a powerful barbiturate, at its death chamber in its prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. But more than an hour later the department was still fighting legal challenges delaying the execution. The Supreme Court’s conservative majority has so far dismissed any orders by lower courts delaying federal executions...
    SOLDIERS in the world’s second largest army must be banned from bonking each other’s wives, commanders have claimed in court. Top Brass warned it would damage morale if adultery was decriminalised for India's 1.25 million troops. 1Indian soldiers parade during the official celebration of India's Independence day in Srinagar, Kashmir on August 15, 2019Credit: Alamy Live News Undercover manoeuvres are known as “stealing the affection of brother officer’s wife” under Indian military law. The Indian Army is ten times bigger than Britain's three armed services. Only China's army is larger. Lawyers claimed troops in frontline posts would be haunted the prospects of their partners playing away. "There will always be a concern in the minds of the army personnel who are operating far away from their families under challenging conditions about the family indulging in untoward activity,” India’s Attorney General K. K. Venugopal told the country’s Supreme Court. The Supreme...
    For the first time in nearly 50 years, anti-abortion activists will not march on the Supreme Court this January. The March for Life, the largest annual anti-abortion protest, announced Friday afternoon that because of the twin concerns of COVID-19 and increased security on Capitol Hill, it will not hold the event in Washington, D.C., this year. Instead, it will hold an online rally in late January. "We are profoundly grateful for the countless women, men, and families who sacrifice to come out in such great numbers each year as a witness for life — and we look forward to being together in person next year," the group said in a statement. The event, which has taken place every year since the landmark 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, typically consists of a rally on the National Mall and a march up Constitution Avenue to the Supreme Court. It gained...
    The Swiss supreme court explained Friday why it has ordered a retrial for Olympic swimming champion Sun Yang in a doping case, citing anti-China bias related to killing dogs for food by one of the judges in the case. Hostile social media posts on Twitter by Court of Arbitration for Sport judge Franco Frattini persuaded the federal court he should not have presided over banning the Chinese swimmer. Federal judges last month sent the case back for a second hearing at CAS, where Sun was previously banned for eight years for violating anti-doping protocols. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM Frattini, a former Italian foreign minister, has been barred from the retrial, which is likely to decide if Sun can compete at this year's delayed Tokyo Olympics. "In his tweets, the arbitrator (Frattini) castigates a Chinese practice of dog slaughter and denounces the consumption of this meat at a local festival in China," the...
    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court says that when a person's car has been impounded and they file for bankruptcy, the car does not have to be immediately returned.In an opinion announced Thursday, Justice Samuel Alito wrote for a unanimous eight-justice court that "mere retention" of a debtor's property by a creditor does not violate the law.The case involved several people whose cars were impounded by the city of Chicago who then filed for bankruptcy and hoped to get their vehicles back.RELATED: Chicago man sues the city after his impounded car was soldJustice Sonia Sotomayor wrote separately and singled out the situation of George Peake, whose 2007 Lincoln MKZ was impounded in 2018 for unpaid parking and red-light tickets. Sotomayor noted the "far too common" situation Peake found himself in."Drivers in low-income communities across the country face similar vicious cycles," she wrote, where a driver is fined an amount he cannot...
    Reuters January 15, 2021 0 Comments When a U.S. appeals court declared that Florida could make it harder for convicted felons to vote – a ruling decried by civil rights activists – the impact of President Donald Trump’s conservative judicial appointments was plain to see. The Atlanta-based 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was divided 6-4 in the September ruling, with five Trump appointees in the majority. It reversed a decision by a federal judge who found that the Republican-governed state’s effort to require felons after their sentences are completed to pay fines, restitution and legal fees before they could cast ballots violated their voting rights under the U.S. Constitution. The dissenting 11th Circuit judges were all Democratic appointees. The outcome illustrated that Trump’s success in moving the U.S. judiciary to the right was not limited to the Republican president’s three Supreme Court appointments – Amy Coney Barrett, Brett...
    ‘TV’s Top 5′: Inside the Fact and Fiction of Apple’s ‘Dickinson’ Citigroup is set to report fourth-quarter earnings – heres what the Street expects Dog-meat tweeting judge in Sun doping case had doubtful impartiality: Swiss court ZURICH (Reuters) - Chinese swimmer Sun Yang did not get an impartial hearing when he was banned for eight years for doping offences as one of the judges had tweeted anti-Chinese messages concerning animal rights, Switzerland's highest court said on Friday. © Reuters/DENIS BALIBOUSE FILE PHOTO: CAS public hearing of WADA appeal against Chinese swimmer Sun Yang and FINA in Montreux The Federal Supreme Court said tweets by one of the arbitrators at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) had exhibited possible bias against Chinese people and their treatment of dogs. "The Federal Supreme Court therefore considered that the doubts as to the impartiality of the arbitrator were objectively justified," the...
    Johnson was convicted of murdering seven people in Virginia in 1992 The federal execution of convicted murderer Corey Johnson is underway. Minutes after the U.S. Supreme Court denied emergency motions to stay the execution on Thursday night, witnesses were loaded into vans at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana to be taken to the death chamber. Johnson had been scheduled to be executed by lethal injection at 6pm EST on Thursday.   Johnson was convicted of murdering seven people in Virginia in 1992 as part of a drug-trafficking ring. His lawyers say he has an intellectual disability that means it would be unconstitutional to execute him. They have said the IQ score of 77 that was presented at his 1993 trial was incorrect, and his real IQ is even lower, within the range of 70-75 threshold courts have used to determine intellectual disability. Developing story, more to follow. 
    One of president-elect Joe Biden’s top Department of Justice (DOJ) nominees previously expressed openness to packing the United States Supreme Court. After the death of Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg last year, Vanita Gupta claimed that the Trump administrations’s push to fill the seat could force Democrats to break old precedents for the sake of “democracy.” “Nothing is off the table,” Gupta told the Associated Press, specifically noting the recent embrace among progressives of packing the Supreme Court. “The legitimacy of the court and our democracy is at stake.” Gupta, whom Biden plans to nominate to the position of associate attorney general, made the argument to the Associated Press in her position as the president of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights. The group, which was founded in the 1950s to push for civil rights, has expanded in the half-century since to be one of the nation’s largest...
    Two death row inmates on Thursday looked to the Supreme Court in a last-ditch attempt to prevent themselves from becoming the final Trump-era executions. Cory Johnson, a Virginia man convicted of connection to bloody gang violence, appealed to the high court late Thursday afternoon after two lower appeals courts vacated a stay on his sentence. The other man, Dustin Higgs, who was convicted of a triple homicide in Maryland, said on Thursday he plans to appeal to the Supreme Court after unsuccessfully pursuing a stay on his own sentence. Johnson is set to be executed late Thursday afternoon. Higgs will receive his punishment on Friday. Theirs are likely to be the last of a spate of executions that the government resumed in 2019 under former Attorney General William Barr's direction. The federal government had not previously executed anyone since 2003. Both Johnson and Higgs, who have been on...
    People who want a medication abortion will once again have to go in person — during a pandemic. Earlier this week, the conservative 6-3 majority at the Supreme Court ruled that patients must go in person to pick up mifepristone, the drug used in medication abortions. It's the latest in a long line of actions by conservative judges and legislators to make access to abortion both more difficult and more dangerous. In August 2020, physician groups including the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, alongside the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, sued the Food and Drug Administration. The lawsuit sought to suspend the FDA's in-person pickup requirement for mifepristone until the coronavirus pandemic was over.  Lower courts agreed and suspended the rule, but the Trump administration appealed to the Supreme Court, which held on Tuesday, in a brief...
    The California Supreme Court ruled against San Bernardino County on Wednesday, Jan. 13, denying its petition to overturn the state’s current stay-at-home order, court records show. The ruling was decided by five members of the seven-member court, with Associate Justices Goodwin H. Liu and Martin J. Jenkins recusing themselves. San Bernardino County filed a lawsuit Dec. 14 arguing the order — intended to slow the spread of the coronavirus by banning all gatherings except protests and religious services, closing many types of businesses and halting outdoor dining at restaurants — is illegal and an abuse of power. Reasons for not granting thesbsun.com/…/san-bernardino-county-sues-gov-newsom-to-stop-coronavirus-lockdown county’s petition were not given. “I am surprised we didn’t get some kind of legal opinion. I expected the Supreme Court would’ve put some thought behind the denial,” said county Supervisor Curt Hagman on Wednesday. In a Dec. 29 brief, state Attorney General Xavier Becerra argued the governor...
            by Mary Margaret Olohan  The United States Supreme Court reinstated a requirement Tuesday that women seeking to obtain abortion pills must pick up the pills in person from a hospital or medical office rather than receiving them by mail. The case is the Supreme Court’s first ruling on abortion since Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett joined the court, the New York Times reported, and the three liberal justices dissented. “The question before us is not whether the requirements for dispensing mifepristone impose an undue burden on a woman’s right to an abortion as a general matter,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote in the unsigned ruling. “The question is instead whether the District Court properly ordered the Food and Drug Administration to lift those established requirements because of the court’s own evaluation of the impact of the COVID–19 pandemic.” Breaking News: The Supreme Court reinstated an abortion-pill restriction...
              A Georgia Gwinnett College student appeared before the Supreme Court on Tuesday to defend free speech on campuses. The student, Chike Uzuegbunam, was prohibited by campus officials from speaking about the Christian faith on campus twice in 2016, following alleged complaints from other students. A day before the Supreme Court hearing, Uzuegbunam published an opinion piece recounting his experience at the college and throughout the subsequent court hearings. Uzuegbunam explained that he was barred from passing out fliers and discussing his faith with fellow students publicly. According to his account, he was having one-on-one conversations with students when he was stopped by a campus official and told he needed to file a request for a speech zone. Even after obtaining permission to speak in a speech zone, officials sought out Uzuegbunam and stopped him from speaking about his faith. After that, Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF)...
    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a 20-year prison term for former President Park Geun-hye over bribery and other crimes as it wrapped up a historic corruption case that marked a striking fall from grace for the country’s first female leader and conservative icon. The ruling means Park, who was ousted from office and arrested in 2017, potentially serves a combined 22 years behind bars, following a separate conviction for illegally meddling in her party’s candidate nominations ahead of parliamentary elections in 2016. But the finalizing of her prison term also makes her eligible for a special presidential pardon, a looming possibility as the country’s deeply-split electorate approaches the presidential election in March next year. President Moon Jae-in, a liberal who won the presidential by-election following Park’s removal, has yet to directly address the possibility of freeing his predecessor. But...
    Supreme Court Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor wrote the dissent in the abortion pill case ruling announced Tuesday. In its first abortion ruling since Amy Coney Barrett was rushed onto the Supreme Court before the November election, six justices took an unsurprising stance in a ruling Tuesday, proving that reproductive rights will be taking hits as long as the conservative majority dominates the court, which could be a very long time. With the court’s three liberals in opposition, the majority overturned a lower court decision in the case of FDA v. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and ruled that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can reinstate its requirement making abortion by pill more difficult than medically necessary by requiring women to obtain the first of the two-pill regime in person from the provider instead of by mail. Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor issued a scathing dissent. Although the FDA regulation has been in effect for two decades, women’s...
    Abortion rights victories are getting more and more tenuous in the hands of the conservative Supreme Court. Last week, the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals handed abortion advocates in Arkansas a victory when it upheld a lower court's ruling blocking four laws that restricted or banned abortion from taking effect. However, the concurrences in the case highlight the fragility of access, providing a roadmap of how to undermine the constitutional right to an abortion. There are two laws at issue in the case: one that would ban all abortions after 18 weeks and one that would ban the procedure depending on the reason given for seeking an abortion. The Eighth Circuit held that both laws violated the Constitution. Back in 1992, the Supreme Court decided Planned Parenthood v. Casey. In that case, the court found that "a State may not...
    DALLAS (AP) — Texas’ solicitor general who did not join embattled Attorney General Ken Paxton’s failed efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 presidential election is resigning, a person with knowledge of the move told The Associated Press. Solicitor General Kyle Hawkins informed Paxton’s office of his plans to resign on Tuesday, said the person, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the move had not been announced publicly. It was not immediately clear why he resigned or exactly when he will leave office. Hawkins’ departure is set to be the latest exit of a senior official in Paxton’s office since September, when the Republican’s top deputies accused him of bribery and abuse of office on behalf of a donor. All eight of his accusers have since quit or been fired, and their accusations are the focus of an FBI investigation into Paxton. Neither Paxton’s office nor Hawkins...
    Screengrab via CSPANRepublican Rep. Greg Steube cited a case involving a KKK leader in his impeachment defense of President Donald Trump, contending Trump said nothing that qualifies as inciting violence under law established by that case. Speaking Wednesday during debate for a second Trump impeachment, Steube insisted the President never said anything to incite or provoke people to violence, and so was not legally responsible when a mob left his speech, went to the U.S. Capitol, seized and sacked it, and killed a police officer. “The legal elements of incitement are based on the Supreme Court case of Brandenburg v. Ohio,” Steube said, referring to the 1969 case involving an Ohio Ku Klux Klan leader charged with inciting violence. “Brandenburg called for violence against Americans. And the Supreme Court said … that was protected speech. And he was calling for violence! That’s the current law of the land.” Steube contended there was no...
    The Supreme Court overturned Cardell Hayes’ manslaughter conviction in the murder of former NFL player Will Smith on Monday. The Supreme Court based its decision on the Ramos v. Louisiana case, which found non-unanimous verdicts to be unconstitutional, according to People magazine. “In accordance with the United States Supreme Court ruling in Ramos v. Louisiana, which struck down Louisiana’s Jim Crow-era non-unanimous jury law, today the U.S. Supreme Court remanded two cases to lower courts for new trial,” Orleans Parish District Attorney Jason Williams said in a statement, according to People magazine. (RELATED: Former NFL Player Reche Caldwell Shot And Killed In Tampa) “Both of those cases — one well known, and one relatively unknown to the public — will receive thorough review and a decision in the coming weeks on the best way to proceed under the law to deliver justice,” Williams added, the outlet reported. Hayes was convicted of...
    Republican Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley said in a recent op-ed that he and others have been wrongly accused of inciting violence simply because they chose to object to the electoral college certification. “In the past, when Democrats objected, they were praised for standing up for democracy,” Hawley wrote in Southeast Missourian. “In 2005, when Democrats objected to counting Ohio’s electoral votes, Nancy Pelosi praised the objections, saying, ‘This debate is fundamental to our democracy’ and ‘we are witnessing democracy at work’.” “This time around, anyone who objected has been called an ‘insurrectionist.’ Sadly, much of the media and many members of the Washington establishment want to deceive Americans into thinking those who raised concerns incited violence, simply by voicing the concern,” he continued. “That’s false. And the allegation itself is corrosive and dangerous.” Hawley pointed out that Democrats objected to the elections of 2000, 2004 and 2016–all of which were...
    The U.S. Supreme Court granted a request from the Trump administration Tuesday evening to restore a rule requiring women to have an in-person visit with a medical professional prior to receiving abortion-inducing drugs. In a 6-3 vote, the Court halted a lower court’s decision to allow the mailing of abortion drugs mifepristone and misoprostol to women who wish to end their pregnancies at home as long as the pandemic continues. Judge Theodore D. Chuang of the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland, an Obama appointee, granted a preliminary injunction in July after pro-abortion groups filed a lawsuit. The Trump administration appealed the ruling, arguing it would be safer for women to see a doctor prior to taking the drugs because of safety concerns. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in the order: The question before us is not whether the requirements for dispensing mifepristone impose an undue burden on a woman’s right...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court's action Tuesday limiting access to an abortion drug highlights its pattern of letting the Trump administration enforce highly charged priorities before legal challenges have been resolved.The conservative court majority swept aside a lower court injunction and reinstated a requirement that women prescribed mifepristone, to end a pregnancy in its early weeks, pick up the pill in person despite the Covid-19 pandemic. With President Donald Trump having just a week left in office, the justices' decision in the abortion-drug case stands for one of the last of a four-year pattern that allowed, among other Trump agenda items, a limit on transgender people in the military; funding for a wall at the US southern border; and a new rule disadvantaging green-card applicants who seek food stamps or other non-cash public benefits.Supreme Court grants Trump administration request to limit access to abortion drugAll of these cases emerged from the justices...
    The US Supreme Court on Tuesday reinstated the requirement that women seeking medical abortions must receive them in person from a medical provider, after that requirement was suspended in recent months due to the pandemic. Miami World / EFE The Court upheld a request by the government of outgoing President Donald Trump, which sought to restore the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provisions that women pick up the pills instead of receiving them by mail, as authorized by a judge as a result of the COVID-19 health emergency. The conservative majority won 6-3 over progressives Sonia Sotomayor, Elena Kagan and Stephen Breyer. “Of the more than 20,000 drugs approved by the FDA, Mifepristone is the only one that the FDA requires to be collected in person for patients to take at home,” Sotomayor and Kagan wrote in their dissent. The magistrates questioned that government policy “now allows patients to receive...
    The federal government early Wednesday morning executed the first woman in 67 years, following a series of late-night Supreme Court interventions. The woman, Lisa Montgomery, died by lethal injection at Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana, hours after the high court issued a series of orders throwing out stays on her sentence. Montgomery's execution was the latest in a series of last-minute death penalty sentence to be carried out in the waning days of the Trump administration. The court, which made its decision in a 6-3 split with the liberal justices dissenting, first denied to hear an appeal from Montgomery against the Justice Department. It then threw out a stay on the sentence given by the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals, given earlier this year. The court also denied a separate application from Montgomery for a stay. And in the final hours of Wednesday, it vacated a stay given...
    In a ruling on Tuesday evening (local time), the court reinstated a rule that women must go in person to a clinic or doctor’s office to obtain abortion pills containing Mifepristone, despite the coronavirus pandemic. . In doing so, the Supreme Court overturned a lower court ruling that said that, given the pandemic, pills could be mailed for medical abortions in the first few weeks of pregnancy. The Supreme Court ruling follows a request by President Donald Trump’s outgoing US administration against an earlier order by a federal judge. Trump was able to expand the Conservative majority on the Supreme Court to six of the nine seats with the appointment of decades-long staunch Catholic Justice Barrett. Tory president of the court, Chief Justice John Roberts, wrote that the case was not a fundamental decision on abortion, but that it was about whether the judges could go against it of...
    WASHINGTON (AP) – The Supreme Court ordered Tuesday that women must visit a doctor's office, hospital or clinic in person to obtain an abortion pill during the COVID-19 pandemic, though similar rules for other drugs have been suspended during the public health emergency. Eight days before President Donald Trump leaves office, the justices granted a Trump administration appeal to be able to enforce a longstanding rule on getting the abortion pill, mifepristone. The pill need not be taken in the presence of medical professionals. The court split 6-3, with the liberal justices in dissent. The new administration could put the in-person requirement on hold after Joe Biden takes office on Jan. 20. A federal judge had suspended the rule since July because of the coronavirus, in response to a lawsuit from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other groups. SON OF NY SUPREME COURT JUDGE LINKED TO CAPITOL...
    A federal judge in Indiana granted a stay of execution on mental-health grounds to Lisa Montgomery, the only woman on federal death row in the US — though her scheduled Tuesday death sentence remained in the balance. In granting the stay late Monday, Judge Patrick Hanlon cited the need to determine Montgomery’s mental competence to face execution, the Topeka Capital-Journal reported. Later Tuesday night, the Supreme Court vacated a separate stay put in place by the US Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. The Supreme Court is also expected to rule on the 8th Circuit stay Tuesday night. If the Supreme Court clears the second stay, she will be the first federally executed woman in the US since 1953. Montgomery the so-called “womb raider,” was convicted in 2007 of strangling Bobbie Jo Stinnett in Missouri and then cutting her unborn baby from her womb.
    THE "womb raider" killer Lisa Montgomery has been executed after the Supreme Court cleared all stays just after midnight Wednesday and upheld her sentence. Montgomery, who was convicted of killing a pregnant woman and carving out her child, was put to death by lethal injection at a federal prison complex in Indiana. 9Lisa Montgomery is set to be put to death on TuesdayCredit: 2004 Wyandotte County Sheriff's Department 9The Supreme Court backed the sentenceCredit: Twitter On Tuesday night, the Supreme Court vacated stays put on the case in an effort to delay the execution until Donald Trump leaves office. The Trump administration restarted federal executions for the first time since 2003 over the summer, and has since carried out 10. The administration has been heavily critiqued by opponents of the death penalty, who believe they are trying to push through as many executions as they can before they leave...
    (Adds quotes from Montgomery’s lawyer, background) By Bhargav Acharya and Kanishka Singh Jan 13 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned astay on convicted murderer Lisa Montgomery’s execution by the8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, clearing the way forapplication of the death penalty for the only woman on federaldeath row in the United States, who doctors say is brain-damagedand mentally ill. Montgomery’s execution would mark the first time the U.S.government has implemented the death sentence for a femaleprisoner since 1953. Challenges were fought across multiple federal courts onwhether to allow execution of Montgomery, 52, who had initiallybeen scheduled to be killed by lethal injections ofpentobarbital, a powerful barbiturate, at 6 p.m. EST (2300 GMT)on Tuesday in the Justice Department’s execution chamber at itsprison in Terre Haute, Indiana. Kelley Henry, Montgomery’s lawyer, in scathing remarks,called the pending execution, “vicious, unlawful, andunnecessary exercise of authoritarian power.” “No one can credibly dispute...
    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for the Justice Department to carry out the first execution of a female death-row inmate in almost seven decades.  The rulings, handed down just after midnight on Wednesday, allow the federal Bureau of Prisons to proceed with the execution of Lisa Montgomery.  The court lifted an injunction that had been put in place by the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that had temporarily halted Montgomery’s execution. It came hours after the Supreme Court also lifted a separate injunction by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia.  Montgomery is scheduled to be put to death at the federal prison complex in Terre Haute, Indiana.  Her lawyers have argued she is not mentally competent and should not be executed. They say she suffered from years of physical and emotional abuse and is severely mentally...
    The Supreme Court has issued an order allowing the execution of the only woman on federal death row to proceed. The order just before midnight on Tuesday allows the execution of Lisa Montgomery to proceed, removing the final legal barriers to what may be the final federal execution under President Donald Trump. Montgomery's execution had been scheduled for Tuesday at the Federal Correctional Complex in Terre Haute, Indiana. It was not immediately clear how quickly the execution would proceed early on Wednesday, following the ruling. Because Montgomery's scheduled execution date passed before the death penalty could be carried out, the Bureau of Prisons is required to issued a new execution date, according to Robert Dunham, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center. However, reporters in Terre Haute said that witnesses were being moved into the execution area early on Wednesday. The order just before midnight on Tuesday allows the execution...
    More On: supreme court Fate of death row ‘womb raider’ hangs in balance as legal fight continues Supreme Court rules women must pick up abortion pill in person Ted Cruz proved that GOP won’t simply return to Reaganism after Trump Big Tech’s sinister pro-Biden bias and other commentary TERRE HAUTE, Ind. — The U.S. Supreme Court has cleared the way for the Justice Department to carry out the first execution of a female death-row inmate in almost seven decades.  The rulings, handed down just after midnight on Wednesday, allow the federal Bureau of Prisons to proceed with the execution of Lisa Montgomery.  The court lifted an injunction that had been put in place by the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that had temporarily halted Montgomery’s execution. It came hours after the Supreme Court also lifted a separate injunction by the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District...
    More On: death row Judge blocks execution of only woman on federal death row Only 5 women have been federally executed — and Lisa Montgomery could be next Court OKs execution of ‘womb raider’ who killed, cut baby out of pregnant mom Murderer who survived botched execution dies of possible COVID-19 complications The Supreme Court ruled Tuesday night ruled “womb raider” Lisa Montgomery be put to death, a day after a federal judge in Indiana put a hold on her execution due to the state of her mental health. The six to three vote, means Montgomery will become the first woman to be executed by the federal government in nearly 70 years. The decision comes eight days before President Trump, who has been on an execution spree since last year, leaves office. President-elect Joe Biden adamantly opposes the death penalty. On Monday, federal judge Judge Patrick Hanlon...
    THE execution of the "womb raider" killer Lisa Montgomery will go ahead tonight as the Supreme Court made a last minute decision to back the sentence. Montgomery was convicted of strangling a pregnant woman to death, then savagely slicing open her body to retrieve the unborn child, in Missouri in 2004. 9Lisa Montgomery was set to be put to death on TuesdayCredit: 2004 Wyandotte County Sheriff's Department 9The Supreme Court backed the sentenceCredit: Twitter On Monday night, a federal judge in Indiana blocked Montgomery's execution on mental health grounds just hours before she was due to become the first woman put to death by the federal government in almost 70 years. However, a 6 to 3 Supreme Court vote on Tuesday will let the execution move forward. The decision on the execution would have been pushed into Biden’s administration had the Supreme Court not intervened tonight. Biden opposes the...
    Pennsylvania Supreme Court Justice Thomas Saylor, a Republican, will leave the court this year when he hits the mandatory retirement age of 75. Democrats currently hold a 5-2 majority on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, but they could strengthen their grip further in November because Republican Justice Thomas Saylor will hit the mandatory retirement age of 75 this year, creating an open seat. At least two Democrats and one Republican who currently sit on the Superior Court, the more prominent of the state's two intermediate appellate courts, are already running for Saylor's seat, while the AP reports that one GOP judge on Pennsylvania's other appellate court, the Commonwealth Court, is considering. Primaries are scheduled for May 18, though state parties will convene before then to consider endorsements, which could clear the field on either side. Democrats won a trio of races to flip the court in 2015, which opened the way...
    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ordered Tuesday that women must visit a doctor's office, hospital or clinic in person to obtain an abortion pill during the COVID-19 pandemic, though similar rules for other drugs have been suspended during the public health emergency.Eight days before President Donald Trump leaves office, the justices granted a Trump administration appeal to be able to enforce a longstanding rule on getting the abortion pill, mifepristone. The pill need not be taken in the presence of medical professionals.The court split 6-3, with the liberal justices in dissent. The new administration could put the in-person requirement on hold after Joe Biden takes office on Jan. 20.A federal judge had suspended the rule since July because of the coronavirus, in response to a lawsuit from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other groups.MORE: Bill legalizing abortion passed in pope's native ArgentinaEMBED More News Videos Crowds in...
    By Andrew Chung | Reuters The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday reinstated a requirement that women visit a hospital or clinic to obtain a drug used for medication-induced abortions, lifting an order by a lower court allowing the drug to be mailed or delivered as a safety measure during the coronavirus pandemic. The justices granted a request by President Donald Trump’s administration to lift a federal judge’s July order that had suspended the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) rule requiring in-person visits for the duration of the pandemic. The pandemic is still raging nationwide. Coronavirus infections remain at record highs in many U.S. states. Nearly 130,000 Americans were hospitalized with COVID-19 as of midnight on Monday and the country had reported 22.5 million infections and 376,188 deaths. The court’s three liberal justices said they would have denied the Trump administration’s request while litigation over the dispute continues in lower...
    WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court ordered Tuesday that women must visit a doctor's office, hospital or clinic in person to obtain an abortion pill during the COVID-19 pandemic, though similar rules for other drugs have been suspended during the public health emergency.Eight days before President Donald Trump leaves office, the justices granted a Trump administration appeal to be able to enforce a longstanding rule on getting the abortion pill, mifepristone. The pill need not be taken in the presence of medical professionals.The court split 6-3, with the liberal justices in dissent. The new administration could put the in-person requirement on hold after Joe Biden takes office on Jan. 20.A federal judge had suspended the rule since July because of the coronavirus, in response to a lawsuit from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and other groups.MORE: Bill legalizing abortion passed in pope's native ArgentinaEMBED More News Videos Crowds in...
    Activists protest outside the Supreme Court on March 4, 2020, as it hears oral arguments regarding a Louisiana law about abortion access. Caroline Brehman/AP Let our journalists help you make sense of the noise: Subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter and get a recap of news that matters.The Supreme Court issued its first abortion-related ruling since Justice Amy Coney Barrett took the bench in the fall, and it’s a win for abortion foes. The justices ruled to reinstate a federal restriction on medication abortion, one that requires women pick up the medication in person; the regulation had been temporarily lifted in July to reduce the potential spread of the coronavirus. The Supreme Court’s timing couldn’t really be worse: The United States is experiencing a new horrible peak in the pandemic right now, as the United States has begun to average 3,000 deaths per day due to the virus.  Now, people seeking medication...
    The United States Supreme Court reinstated a requirement Tuesday that women seeking to obtain abortion pills must pick up the pills in person from a hospital or medical office rather than receiving them by mail. The case is the Supreme Court’s first ruling on abortion since Associate Justice Amy Coney Barrett joined the court, the New York Times reported, and the three liberal justices dissented. (RELATED: World Health Organization: Abortion Is ‘Essential’ During Coronavirus Pandemic) “The question before us is not whether the requirements for dispensing mifepristone impose an undue burden on a woman’s right to an abortion as a general matter,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote in the unsigned ruling. “The question is instead whether the District Court properly ordered the Food and Drug Administration to lift those established requirements because of the court’s own evaluation of the impact of the COVID–19 pandemic.” Breaking News: The Supreme Court reinstated an...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court on Tuesday granted the Trump administration's request to reinstate long-standing restrictions for patients seeking to obtain a drug used for abortions early in pregnancy -- with the three liberals dissenting in a potential preview of a new chapter in the court's rulings on the procedure.The order's timing was a surprise, coming after close of business in the waning days of the Trump administration and ahead of Wednesday's possible House impeachment vote. READ: Supreme Court ruling on FDA abortion drug ruleIt also marks the first abortion case to come before Justice Amy Coney Barrett, backing abortion rights supporters' fears that she will move the court to the right in cases related to the divisive issue. Federal courts, citing the Covid-19 pandemic, had previously blocked the enforcement of Food and Drug Administration rules that require an in-person visit with a medical professional to pick up the medication. Tuesday, the...
    (CNN)The Supreme Court on Tuesday granted the Trump administration's request to reinstate long-standing restrictions for patients seeking to obtain a drug used for abortions early in pregnancy.Read the ruling and dissent here:
    Enlarge Image The Supreme Court has ordered that women must visit a doctor’s office, hospital or clinic in person to obtain an abortion pill during the COVID-19 pandemic, though similar rules for other drugs have been suspended during the public health emergency. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File The Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled women must pick up an abortion pill in person during the COVID-19 pandemic. In a 6-to-3 vote, the justices ordered that if women want to obtain the drug mifepristone, they need to visit a doctor’s office, hospital or clinic in person. Women don’t have to take it in front of a medical professional, the court added. Mifepristone was approved by the Food and Drug Administration to be taken with another drug, misoprostol, to terminate a pregnancy or deal with a miscarriage. The ruling, eight days before President Trump leaves office, grants a Trump...
    The Supreme Court on Tuesday renewed a requirement for women to obtain abortion pills at medical facilities, following a request from the Trump administration. In a 6-3 decision split along conservative versus liberal bloc lines, the court decided that a July ordinance allowing women to receive the pills in the mail, per the coronavirus pandemic, is no longer in effect. The Trump administration asked for the requirement to be reinstated late last year. Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in a concurrence with the unsigned majority opinion that the "courts owe significant deference to the politically accountable entities with the 'background, competence, and expertise to assess public health,'" referring to a Food and Drug Administration rule requiring women to pick up abortion pills in person. Justice Sonia Sotomayor, in a dissent joined by Justice Elena Kagan, decried the decision as "unnecessary, unjustifiable, irrational, and undue burden on women seeking an abortion...
    (CNN)The Manhattan district attorney's criminal investigation into President Donald Trump's business has slowed as investigators wait for a ruling by the US Supreme Court, according to people familiar with the investigation, making it likely that a decision on whether there is a case to bring will be weeks or months away.A fight over a subpoena for the President's tax returns has churned through the courts since September 2019, which has handicapped investigators' efforts, people familiar with the investigation say. Prosecutors can't confront key witnesses without the documents or determine whether there is evidence that any laws have been broken, the people say. New York prosecutors also don't have the type of leverage that federal investigators have when interviewing people, since New York state law does not have an equivalent of the federal false statements law, which makes it a crime to lie to federal officials.Prosecutors, led by Manhattan District Attorney...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court reimposes rule forcing women to obtain abortion pill in person during COVID-19 pandemic. Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.
    In 2016, Chike Uzuegbunam, a former Georgia Gwinnett College student, was told that if he wanted to share his faith on campus, he would need to get permission to use one of two “speech zones.” When Uzuegbunam complied, campus police officers arrived at the “speech zone” he was using and threatened to discipline him if he continued speaking about his faith. “School officials violated his constitutional rights when they stopped him twice from speaking in an open area of campus,” Tyson Langhofer, the director of ADF’s Center for Academic Freedom told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “The only permit students need to speak on campus is the First Amendment.” The Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a key case concerning free speech and religious liberty rights on college campuses. The case involves Chike Uzuegbunam, a former Georgia Gwinnett College student who sought to share Christian pamphlets on...
    The Supreme Court on Tuesday shut down a last-minute attempt to halt one of the last executions to take place during the Trump administration. The court, in an unsigned order, denied an application for stay of the death sentence that had been presented to Chief Justice John Roberts. The woman set to be executed, Lisa Montgomery, will likely face her sentence tonight, as originally scheduled. The court is set to weigh in on several other stays before Tuesday ends. The decision comes a day after a lower court judge issued a stay for Montgomery's execution on the grounds that her "mental competence" needed to be evaluated. More than 1,000 anti-death penalty advocates lobbied against her sentence, arguing that her history of mental illness, being abused, and her experience being sexually trafficked as a child should be taken into account. The Justice Department appealed the stay on the execution on Tuesday,...
    The U.S. Supreme Court has thrown out the manslaughter conviction for the man who shot former New Orleans Saints star Will Smith to death in 2016. Monday's order in favor of Cardell Hayes had been expected. In December 2017, a jury convicted Hayes by a vote of 10-2 on charges of manslaughter and attempted manslaughter in the death of Smith and the wounding of Smith's wife, who was struck in the leg by gunfire. But the Supreme Court has since ruled that such convictions must be unanimous. CLICK HERE FOR MORE SPORTS COVERAGE ON FOXNEWS.COM A state appeals court gets the case next but, ultimately, it will be up to the new district attorney in New Orleans, Jason Williams, to decide whether to put Hayes, 33, on trial again. Hayes is serving a 25-year sentence. The shootings followed arguments after a traffic crash. Hayes said he shot in self-defense. A...
    ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia’s highest court heard arguments Tuesday on whether taxpayers should cover portions of the legal defense for a man facing trial in the 2005 slaying of a high school teacher whose disappearance remained a mystery for more than a decade. Ryan Duke had been scheduled to stand trial on murder charges in April 2019 in the killing of teacher and beauty queen Tara Grinstead. The COVID-19 pandemic that’s shuttered courtrooms statewide has contributed to the long delay. But it’s rooted in an ongoing dispute over whether Duke is entitled to state funding. Duke’s attorneys asked the Georgia Supreme Court to overrule the trial judge, who twice has refused to provide the defense team with funding for expert witnesses in DNA, false confessions and psychology. Duke’s lawyers argue he won’t get a fair trial without them. Tift Judicial Circuit Superior Court Judge Bill Reinhardt has ruled Duke gave...
    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Tuesday wrestled with whether to revive a lawsuit brought by a Georgia college student who sued school officials after being prevented from distributing Christian literature on campus. The school, Georgia Gwinnett College, has since changed its policies and the student has graduated. A lower court dismissed the case as moot and an appeals court agreed, but the student, Chike Uzuegbunam, is urging the justices to allow the case to move forward. He’s seeking just $1 and says he wants the Lawrenceville, Georgia, school to be held accountable for its past policies. Groups across the political spectrum including the ACLU say the case is important to ensuring that people whose constitutional rights were violated can continue their cases even when governments repeal the policies they were challenging. During arguments the justices heard by phone because of the coronavirus pandemic, both conservative and liberal justices...