2020-09-21@16:52:07 GMT
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The vaccine:

    [The stream is slated to start at 11:00 a.m. ET. Please refresh the page if you do not see a player above at that time.] The World Health Organization is holding a press briefing Monday on the coronavirus pandemic, which has infected more than 31 million people worldwide and killed at least 961,200 people, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. The briefing follows Friday's deadline for countries to enter into the WHO-backed Covid-19 vaccine global access facility, or COVAX, which aims to work with vaccine manufacturers to provide countries with "equitable access to safe and effective vaccines" and protect the most vulnerable populations, such as older people and health-care workers.  The WHO has previously said more than 170...
    A health worker injects a person during clinical trials for a Covid-19 vaccine at Research Centers of America in Hollywood, Florida, on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020.Eva Marie Uzcategui | Bloomberg | Getty Images As trust in federal health agencies has withered over the last few months, a group of Black physicians has been working on an antidote: creating their own expert task force to independently vet regulators' decisions about Covid-19 drugs and vaccines as well as government recommendations for curbing the pandemic. Organized by the National Medical Association — founded in 1895 as an answer to racist professional societies excluding Black doctors — the committee is meant to safeguard against any unscientific guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and...
    Human trials of Oxford's vaccine are still on hold in the US over safety concerns, two weeks after they were first paused. AstraZeneca, the drug giant which owns the rights to the experimental jab, stopped global trials on September 8 because a British volunteer was hospitalised.  Leaked documents claimed the patient, a 37-year-old woman, developed 'transverse myelitis' — inflammation around the spinal cord, typically triggered by viruses but a potential side effect of other vaccines.  Doctors restarted trials in the UK five days later on September 12 after it was deemed safe to do so by an independent safety review committee and the UK regulator, the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency. They have also continued in Brazil, India and...
    Donald Trump has blasted America's libel laws for preventing him from taking action against The Atlantic after they claimed he called dead troops 'suckers' and 'losers'. The President, speaking to Fox News in an interview aired Sunday night, claimed the story was a 'lie' but there was nothing he could do about it. He also ranted against John Bolton, calling him a 'very stupid person' as well as his opponent Joe Biden who he once again of being barely coherent. Donald Trump has blasted America's libel laws for preventing him from taking action against The Atlantic after they claimed he called dead troops 'suckers' and 'losers' The report in The Atlantic, published at the start of this month, quoted unnamed military...
    Donald Trump has accused Democrats of not wanting a vaccine against COVID-19 before the election, fearing that it will boost the president's chances of winning a second term. Speaking to Fox News for an interview aired on Sunday night, Trump discussed the fight against coronavirus, fears over mail-in voting, and accused his opponent Joe Biden once again of being barely coherent. The interview was recorded before Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death on Friday, and so host Mark Levin did not ask the president about the Supreme Court decision.  He opened his hour-long discussion with questions about coronavirus, as the United State edged towards the grim milestone of 200,000 dead. Trump said he was confident the virus was going away, and was...
    Bill Gates has said he is 'optimistic the pandemic won't last indefinitely' and predicts the United States will be 'back to normal' by the end of 2021.  The billionaire, a longtime philanthropist on issues of global healthcare and poverty, told Fox News host Chris Wallace in an Interview airing Sunday: 'If a vaccine approval comes by early next year as I expect, then by next summer the U.S. will be starting to go back to normal and by the end of the year our activities can be fairly normal.' America on Sunday neared 200,000 deaths from coronavirus with the University of Washington predicting the number of fatalities will nearly double by January. The virus continues to spread and there is currently no...
    In an interview with Fox News broadcast on Sunday, Microsoft co-founder and philanthropist, Bill Gates, said that Americans need to acknowledge the fact that the United States is not handling the coronavirus pandemic as good as other countries, The Hill reported. Speaking with anchor Chris Wallace, Gates said that the U.S. “did a very poor job” compared to other developed nations. “I do think we need to own up to the fact that we didn’t do a good job,” he said, describing the testing system in America as “outrageous.” “Part of the reluctance, I think, to fix the testing system now is nobody wants to admit that it’s still outrageous,” Gates stated, noting that only the wealthiest Americans have access...
    mAbxience, from Grupo Insud, will manufacture the active substance of the vaccine, which will be packaged in Mexico. We tell you why they chose it Until President Alberto Fernández appointed him, very few Argentines had heard of mAbxience, the biotechnology company that, as the president announced, will be in charge of producing the Oxford vaccine for Latin America. However, this laboratory, which is dedicated to producing drugs for oncological and autoimmune diseases, seems to have been tailor-made to meet this challenge. mAbxience is not only dedicated to something similar, but it has a unique advantage: last February, just before the arrival of the coronavirus in Argentina, it had opened a massive new state-of-the-art plant on...
    The fact that there is so much diversity in the production of vaccines is an advantage, since immunity is different according to the population group; for example, the immune response is not the same in children and the elderly as in adults. Additionally, having multiple vaccines will ensure that we have global supplies. And who will get the vaccine first? The logical thing is to think that people with a depressed immune system and people over 65, that is, those most at risk of serious complications, should be in the front row, as well as health personnel. The WHO, for its part, suggests that countries receive doses proportional to their populations. But a group of 19...
    NEW YORK (WABC) -- In this week's edition of The Countdown, Bill Ritter is joined by ABC News political director Rick Klein and political consultant Hank Sheinkopf to discuss President Trump's push for a COVID-19 vaccine and the upcoming debates.President Donald Trump announced Friday that the U.S. will have 100 million doses of an approved coronavirus vaccine manufactured by the end of 2020."As soon as a vaccine is approved, my administration will deliver it to the American people immediately. Distribution will begin 24 hours after notice," Trump said during the Friday news conference.He said the government will have enough vaccines to distribute to every American by April.The president's recent statements on vaccine readiness contradict the government's top health experts.On Thursday...
    President Donald Trump says we are on track to start delivering and distributing a COVID-19 vaccine sometime in October. U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield says the vaccine won’t be widely available until the second or third quarter of next year. Who’s right? Scientists side with Redfield. But the dispute comes at a time of growing worry about whether political pressure from the White House could influence regulators — and erode public confidence in vaccines. To help you navigate the political thicket and understand what’s really happening, here’s a guide to vaccine approval, the likely timeline and the potential consequences, based on the perspectives of key researchers and regulators. There’s unlikely to be a vaccine...
    Rocío Fernández OrtizSantander Updated: 09/13/2020 9:30 PM Save The countdown begins for the Covid-19 vaccine that is being tested in Spain. This Monday the first doses of ‘Ad26Cov2S’ are started, than from the company Janssen de Johnson & Johnson, to the 40 volunteers from the Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital in Santander. The Madrid centers of La Paz and La Princesa also participate in the study, but the injection to the 150 candidates who will be tested in the capital is delayed until Tuesday. Thus, Cantabria becomes the starting point for an analysis that will last at least six months, when the first results of the clinical trial are expected to be known. To administer...
              Live from Virginia Friday morning on The John Fredericks Show –  weekdays on WNTW AM 820/ FM 92.7 – Richmond, WJFN FM 100.5 – Central Virginia, WMPH AM 1010 / FM 100.1 / FM 96.9 (7-9 PM) Hampton Roads, WBRG AM 1050 / FM 105.1 – Lynchburg/Roanoke and Weekdays 6-10 am and 24/7 Stream –  host Fredericks welcomed US Rep. Rob Wittman to the show. During the show, Wittman discussed the ongoing stall of Congress and the need to get out a vaccine that is safe and effective for the coronavirus. He added that although Operation Warp Speed was to quickly develop a cure, that it will still go through all the necessary FDA and approval...
    LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- Can wearing glasses help protect you from COVID-19?When is the best time to get a flu shot this year?Can coronavirus particles be carried through secondhand smoke?These were some of the questions addressed by Dr. Anthony Cardillo in his latest Ask the Doctor session with Eyewitness News.Cardillo is an ER specialist and CEO of Mend Urgent Care in the Los Angeles area.Q: If you wear glasses, could you be at lower risk for COVID-19?Cardillo says a recent study out of China found a lower rate of COVID-19 hospitalizations among people who wear glasses.The study noted that about one-third of China's population is nearsighted and wears glasses. So it would make sense that about one-third of the patients...
    President Trump raised the stakes for the delivery of a coronavirus vaccine, promising a faster timeline than that promised by his advisers and accusing the Biden campaign of undermining the effort. Trump said Friday that his administration will have enough doses of a coronavirus vaccine for every person in the United States by April 2021, far sooner than what federal health officials have predicted. “Hundreds of millions of doses will be available every month, and we expect to have enough vaccines for every American by April,” Trump said. He added that the vaccine distribution process “will go quicker than most people think.” Health officials in the Trump administration have said that a vaccine could become available...
    There are special flu shots for people over 65. fotostorm/Getty Images Seniors can get the standard flu shot, but it may not be as effective, since people over the age of 65 have a weaker immune system. A high dose flu vaccine that has four times as many antigens than a regular flu shot is a better option for seniors.  Seniors can also get an adjuvanted flu vaccine, which contains a substance that increases the efficacy of the shot for seniors. This article was reviewed by Jason R. McKnight, MD, MS, a family medicine physician and clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Medicine.  Visit Insider's Health Reference library for more advice. Each year, 63% of adults in...
    CDC Director Robert Redfield stated this week that a vaccine wouldn't be available this year, and Trump promptly attacked him With rising concern that Donald Trump would attempt to push out a vaccine ahead of the election, despite a lack of data on safety and efficacy, nine leading vaccine researchers and manufacturers signed a pledge earlier this month not to submit their vaccine candidates to the FDA until large-scale “Phase 3” trials have been completed. However, with Trump promising a vaccine “very soon” since the beginning of March, and the CDC shocking states by telling them to prepare for a vaccine by Nov. 1, restoring faith in the vaccine process called on many to demand that the manufacturers practice radical transparency by releasing their plans...
    It’s hardly new or revelatory to say this, but it’s critical to remember the role that “The Apprentice” played in turning Donald Trump, a notoriously bad businessman with a string of bankruptcies, into an American icon of capitalist success. Everything from careful editing to set designers giving the dreary Trump Organization offices a glow-up came together to create the illusion of success where only failure and mediocrity had been before. It was an experience so profound for Trump that he did something highly unusual: He learned something. He absorbed the idea that a well-constructed illusion of competence gets you all the benefits of being accomplished, without having to do the hard work of actually achieving anything. Unfortunately, it was a lesson we are...
    Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York City By Carl O’Donnell and Michael Erman U.S. President Donald Trump and the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) this week disagreed about when a COVID-19 vaccine would become widely available. Trump has said one could initially be available by the Nov. 3 election, while the CDC director said vaccines were likely to reach the general public around mid-2021, an assessment more in line with most experts. WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR A VACCINE TO GENERALLY AVAILABLE? General availability is when every American who wants the vaccine can get it. There are currently no COVID-19 vaccines approved by...
    Amanda Marcotte September 18, 2020 5:07PM (UTC) It's hardly new or revelatory to say this, but it's critical to remember the role that "The Apprentice" played in turning Donald Trump, a notoriously bad businessman with a string of bankruptcies, into an American icon of capitalist success. Everything from careful editing to set designers giving the dreary Trump Organization offices a glow-up came together to create the illusion of success where only failure and mediocrity had been before.  It was an experience so profound for Trump that he did something highly unusual: He learned something. He absorbed the idea that a well-constructed illusion of competence gets you all the benefits of being accomplished, without having to do the hard work of actually...
    Gun man targeted home of New Jersey police officers and their baby, publics help sought 15 Walmart Hacks That Take Full Advantage of Their Deals Morning Bell With Jim Cramer: The TikTok Deal and Trump The stocks in the Dow, Nasdaq and S&P 500 are down this morning but are fluctuating as investors look to close out this week on a positive note. © TheStreet Morning Bell With Jim Cramer: The TikTok Deal and Trump In the last episode of Mad Money, Jim Cramer explains why some buyers apparently don't care how much they're paying for these high-flying IPOs, and what that means to the market. Load Error TheStreet's Katherine Ross and Cramer are on Street...
    Reuters September 18, 2020 0 Comments Here’s what you need to know about the coronavirus right now: Biden rejects Trump claim that vaccine is imminent U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Thursday bluntly contradicted President Donald Trump’s suggestion that a coronavirus vaccine may be only weeks away, warning Americans they cannot trust the president’s word. “The idea that there’s going to be a vaccine and everything’s gonna be fine tomorrow – it’s just not rational,” Biden said during a CNN town hall in Moosic, Pennsylvania. Trump again said on Wednesday that a vaccine for COVID-19 could be ready for distribution ahead of the Nov. 3 election. Most health experts, including Robert Redfield, the director of the Centers for...
    Former Vice President Joe Biden made it clear he trusts science — not President Donald Trump — when it comes to a coronavirus vaccine, saying “If [Dr. Anthony] Fauci says a vaccine is safe, I’d take the vaccine.” At Thursday night’s drive-up CNN town hall event, a teacher named Joe Vadala asked Biden about mandating a coronavirus vaccine for public school students. “I am a high school teacher who has multiple sclerosis. I’m on a drug that has compromised my immune system,” Vadala said, and asked, “will you and your administration mandate the vaccine to be taken like the MMR to enter school when it becomes safe and available to the public? Because I love teaching, but I don’t...
    Terry H. Schwadron September 18, 2020 10:23AM (UTC) Read more articles from the DCReport here. How exactly the coronavirus reads an election calendar is unclear. How the FDA might read scientific reports to announce a timely vaccine by Nov. 1, now that is more understandable because that means that the White House is doing its reelection lean on the data. Indeed, the political stench is so strong that even federal health officials are downplaying any vaccine announcement before November. : At this moment, following so many weird, disorganized or uncoordinated virus prescriptions from Washington, we have absolutely no confidence that any announcement of a preventive coronavirus vaccine timed with Election Day will be at all effective. Not that such...
    Cubs shoot for 5th straight as Twins drive cross town 7 Things You Had No Idea Walmart Actually Sells Dr. Fauci: ‘We may be able to put this coronavirus outbreak behind us’ — but says the American public must play a critical role KEY WORDS © Getty Images Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: ‘If the vaccine is moderately effective, enough that you definitely want to use it, then you’re going to have to get a lot more people to get vaccinated to get that veil of protection in the community.’ Whether a vaccine is effective — or not — will also depend on the role the public plays. That’s according to Dr....
    When you’re the CEO of a company, you have the final say. If subordinates are pushing a different view, they either get with the program or they’re gone. Donald Trump, long accustomed to running his own real estate empire, has taken a similar approach as the government’s chief executive. When he grew dissatisfied with Jeff Sessions, Jim Mattis, Rex Tillerson, John Kelly, John Bolton and many others, they were shown the door (and in some cases rushed to go through it.) But there are two areas where it is problematic for a president to take a my-way-or-the-highway approach: science and law enforcement. The latest media uproar over Trump--there seems to be at least one a day--was triggered by the way...
    (CNN)With the timeline of a widely available vaccine still unknown, the nation's top doctor says the US doesn't have to wait to get Covid-19 under control. "We can do it right now," US Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams said Thursday. "The tools to stop this virus are already in our communities."It's been done before -- in places like New York, Adams said. The state was the hardest-hit by the virus in early spring, implemented one of the earliest shutdown orders in the US and reopened regions only when they met several health requirements. In recent weeks, New York has maintained an infection rate lower than 1%.Internal AstraZeneca safety report sheds light on neurological condition suffered by vaccine trial participant "Our...
    In a few days, the president contradicts his government’s scientists. A risky bet for his re-election? Presidents seeking reelection often confront their political rivals. But American Donald Trump has decided instead to contend with science. Two clear signs of that defiant attitude emerged this week, less than 50 days before the November 3 election. On Wednesday, Trump publicly contradicted the director of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), who had ruled out that a coronavirus vaccine could be massively available before mid-2021 and said that use of masks can be more effective than the vaccine to prevent infections. “He made a mistake,” Trump said of each of those two Dr. Robert Redfield considerations. The president insisted...
    Masks are “the most powerful public health tool” to combat the coronavirus pandemic in the United States and may even provide better protection than a vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). English). “We have clear scientific evidence that they work and are our best defense,” said Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the CDC. “I could even go so far as to say that this mask has more guarantees to protect me against COVID-19 than to get the vaccine.” Redfield told the US Senate that a potential coronavirus vaccine, which President Donald Trump says would begin shipping by the end of this year, can only have 70% immunogenicity (the ability of...
    Masks are “the most powerful public health tool” to combat the coronavirus pandemic in the United States and may even provide better protection than a vaccine, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). English). “We have clear scientific evidence that they work and are our best defense,” said Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the CDC. “I could even go so far as to say that this mask has more guarantees to protect me against COVID-19 than to get the vaccine.” Redfield told the US Senate that a potential coronavirus vaccine, which President Donald Trump says would begin shipping by the end of this year, can only have 70% immunogenicity (the ability of...
    Hang in there, MarketWatchers, and don’t miss these stories:Personal Finance Trump’s crackdown on ‘critical race theory’ training leads to cancellation of Justice Department ‘unconscious bias’ program Earlier this month, the Office of Management and Budget said ‘critical race theory’ was ‘divisive, false and demeaning.’‘This is just slowing the clock on evictions’: Why the CDC’s moratorium on evictions won’t solve America’s looming $100 billion rental crisis ‘The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced in early September that it was establishing a temporary ban on evictions across the country.’ Senators Elizabeth Warren and Chuck Schumer say U.S. should immediately cancel $50,000 in student loans for millions of borrowers 'Even before the COVID–19 pandemic, the United States also faced a historic student...
    The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is pictures on May 26, 2020 at Wall Street in New York City.Johannes Eisele | AFP | Getty ImagesDow Jones Industrial Average drops 130 points The Dow closed 130.40 points lower, or 0.47%, to 27,901.98. The S&P 500 slid 0.84% to 3,357.01. The Nasdaq Composite dropped 1.27% to 10,910.28. The sell-off in Big Tech resumed Thursday, dragging down the broader market.Tech slide continuesShares of Apple and Microsoft were down 1.6% and 1%, respectively. Amazon dropped 2.25% and Alphabet slid 1.66%. Facebook shares closed 3.3% lower and Netflix lost 2.8%. Those losses added to Big Tech's steep declines this month. For September, Facebook, Amazon, Netflix, Microsoft and Apple are all down at least 10%. Coronavirus...
    White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows portrayed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention head as out of the loop on the heels of Dr. Robert Redfield saying coronavirus vaccines wouldn't be readily available until mid-2021.  'I'm not saying he's not part of the process, I'm saying he's not closest to the decision making as it relates to the clinical 3 trials and the distribution thereof,' Meadows told reporters outside the White House Thursday.  Meadows was echoing comments made by President Donald Trump at Wednesday's press briefing, as the president pushed back on the two sound bites that came out of Redfield's testimony earlier in the day before a Senate committee.  White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows...
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Robert Redfield threw the Trump administration into a whirlwind on Wednesday by appearing to break with the official timeline on when Americans can expect a widely-available coronavirus vaccine.
    The number of people who intend to get a flu shot this year is on the rise, but people are increasingly hesitant about getting the coronavirus vaccine, data from Civic Science showed. When asked about their plans to get a flu shot this year, 72% of respondents said that they have either already gotten a flu shot or plan to in the future, while 28% said they don’t plan to get a shot, the Civic Science survey showed. In 2019, people were less inclined to get the flu shot, with 64% saying they planned to or already got the flu shot and 36% saying that they didn’t plan to. The 2019 data is based on 3,206 survey responses from U.S....
    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Thursday he believes President Donald Trump over the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions chief when it comes to the timeline of having a COVID-19 vaccine. "Were going to have a safe and effective vaccine this year, and listen to the preparation of what weve been able to do with Operation Warp Speed, to be able to deliver it. When that time comes, if I just take the words of the CDC and the president, the presidents right," said McCarthy, The Hill reported. On Wednesday, Trump said CDC director Robert Redfield was wrong when he told a Senate panel that a vaccine wont be widely available until the second or third quarter of 2021....
    Distribution of a vaccination was supposed to be the candy castle at the end of the Candyland coronavirus journey for all of us. We were told our lives must remain in shambles and our faces must be covered until there is a vaccine. Well, in one fell swoop, whether he meant to say this or not, CDC Director Robert Redfield told a Senate panel that the post-vaccine situation on the ground will be less stable than the current untenable situation in America. In what is perhaps the most cloddish comment to be uttered by a public official since March, Redfield went out of his way to tell a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on Wednesday that masks are better than...
    Mike Tyson came inches from knocking his trainer clean out with a series of ferocious punches in his latest comeback training video Americas oldest general stores 5 things to know before the stock market opens Thursday 1. Wall Street set to drop with tech stocks under continued pressure © Provided by CNBC Many retailers across the U.S. are shuttering storefronts like this Manhattan outlet in New York amid the ongoing Covid-19 downturn. Dow futures were pointing to an over 200 point decline at Thursday's open ahead the government's 8:30 a.m. ET report on weekly jobless claims. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was able to hold on to gains Wednesday, though it closed well off the highs after the Federal...
    VIDEO0:4300:43U.S. stocks set to slide at open following Fed's pledge to keep interest rates lowMorning Report Check out the companies making headlines before the bell: Snowflake (SNOW) — Shares of Snowflake dropped more than 6% after the cloud company's shares more than doubled at its market debut on the New York Stock Exchange. The initial public offering marked the largest software debut ever. Snowflake was worth $70.4 billion at the end of Wednesday's trading, more than five times its $12.4 billion valuation in February. Carnival (CCL), Norwegian Cruise Line (NCLH), United Airlines (UAL) — Shares of airlines and cruise operators came under pressure amid conflicting messages about the timeline of a coronavirus vaccine. President Donald Trump said late Wednesday that the U.S. could distribute a vaccine...
    NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) – A COVID-19 vaccine could be available by November, but not for everyone, said CDC director Robert Redfield, testifying in front of a U.S. Senate subcommittee Wednesday. Redfield said, it will likely take until next summer to get the vaccine to general public. “To get back to our regular life, I think, we’re probable thinking late second quarter, third quarter, 2021.” That speed of vaccine development would be unprecedented. President Trump, though, went further, hours later, contradicting Redfield to say he expects wide distribution even sooner. “I think he made a mistake when he said that,” the president told reporters at a press conference. “We are ready to go immediately as the vaccine is announced.” The U.S....
                   Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association     Welcome to The Hill’s Morning Report. It is Thursday. We get you up to speed on the most important developments in politics and policy, plus trends to watch. Alexis Simendinger and Al Weaver are the co-creators, and readers can find us on Twitter @asimendinger and @alweaver22. Please recommend the Morning Report to friends and let us know what you think. CLICK HERE to subscribe! Total U.S. coronavirus deaths reported each morning this week: Monday, 194,081; Tuesday, 194,536; Wednesday, 195,942. Thursday, 196,802. President TrumpDonald John TrumpBarr criticizes DOJ in speech declaring all agency power 'is invested in the attorney general' Military leaders asked...
    Joe Biden held a campaign event late Wednesday afternoon in Wilmington, Delaware. Addressing reporters, the Democratic presidential nominee spoke very eloquently on the true destructive nature of Trump’s politicization of our current public and economic health crisis, saying that the lack of “trust” in the current occupant of the White House was more than simply a political problem. Polls show that Trump’s anti-science agenda has led to people not trusting his “word” on anything scientific, and this lack of trust is affecting whether or not the American public can trust the scientific community we must rely on in order to successfully and safely navigate our way out of the COVID-19 pandemic. The fact is the majority of Americans do not trust that any vaccine Trump touts without any verifiable evidence. This...
    Joe Biden’s huge media cheering squad claims the ex-veep has an all-star group of consultants able to take over and vanquish the novel coronavirus. In fact, these consultants would undermine the one factor this nation must resume regular life: a vaccine quickly. They’d additionally revive the Obama-era concept of creating individuals 65 and over a lesser precedence for well being care. In case you’re in that age class, and caught at house due to the virus, watch out for what Biden advisers take into consideration. Biden adviser Ezekiel Emanuel desires to reverse the Trump ­administration’s intent to supply the vaccine to these over 65 forward of the overall inhabitants. Folks over 65 are at highest danger from COVID-19. However...
    Joe Biden’s vast media cheering squad claims the ex-veep has an all-star team of experts ready to take over and vanquish the novel coronavirus. In truth, those experts would undermine the one thing this nation needs to resume normal life: a vaccine soon. They’d also revive the Obama-era idea of making people 65 and over a lesser priority for health care. If you’re in that age category, and stuck at home because of the virus, beware of what Biden advisers have in mind. Biden adviser Ezekiel Emanuel wants to reverse the Trump ­administration’s intent to offer the vaccine to those over 65 ahead of the general population. People over 65 are at highest risk from COVID-19. But in a new...
    Joe Biden held a campaign event late Wednesday afternoon in Wilmington, Delaware. Addressing reporters, the Democratic presidential nominee spoke very eloquently on the true destructive nature of Trump’s politicization of our current public and economic health crisis, saying that the lack of “trust” in the current occupant of the White House was more than simply a political problem. Polls show that Trump’s anti-science agenda has led to people not trusting his “word” on anything scientific, and this lack of trust is affecting whether or not the American public can trust the scientific community we must rely on in order to successfully and safely navigate our way out of the COVID-19 pandemic. The fact is the majority of Americans do not trust that any vaccine Trump touts without any verifiable evidence....
    Democratic nominee Joe Biden demanded 'transparency' from President Donald Trump in developing and distributing a coronavirus vaccine, as the White House has continued to push that one would be available to every American by the end of the year.  'So let me be clear, I trust vaccines. I trust the scientists. But I don't trust Donald Trump - and the American people can't either,' Biden said during a brief speech Wednesday afternoon from Wilmington, Delaware's Queen theater.   Biden floated that Trump could be fast-tracking a vaccine to help his re-election chances, noting that 'scientific breakthroughs don't care about calendars any more than the virus does.'  Democratic nominee Joe Biden demanded 'transparency' in the development and the distribution of a...
    Sign up here to get our daily updates on coronavirus in Minnesota delivered straight to your inbox each afternoon. And go here to see all of MinnPost’s COVID-19 coverage. MinnPost provides updates on coronavirus in Minnesota Sunday through Friday. The information is published following a press phone call with members of the Walz administration or after the release of daily COVID-19 figures by the Minnesota Department of Health. Here are the latest updates from September 16: 85,813 confirmed cases; 1,933 deaths MDH starts COVID-19 survey initiative Health officials express concern over prospect of sports resuming CDC releases vaccine playbook in anticipation of eventual vaccine 85,813 total cases; 1,933 deaths Seven more Minnesotans have died of COVID-19, the Minnesota...
    The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday that masks are the most effective way to prevent the spread of COVID-19 — even more effective than a vaccine. Director Robert Redfield, testifying before a Senate committee, urged everyone in America to wear masks in public, saying the pandemic could be controlled in six to 12 weeks if everyone complied. "These face masks are the most important, powerful public health tool we have," Redfield said. "And I will continue to appeal to all Americans, all individuals in our country, to embrace these face coverings. I've said it, if we did it for six, eight, 10, 12 weeks, we'd bring this pandemic under control. These, actually...
    Welcome to The Hill’s Campaign Report, your daily rundown on all the latest news in the 2020 presidential, Senate and House races. Did someone forward this to you? Click here to subscribe. We’re Julia Manchester, Max Greenwood and Jonathan Easley. Here’s what we’re watching today on the campaign trail:  LEADING THE DAY:  Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenCoons beats back progressive Senate primary challenger in Delaware Biden courts veterans amid fallout from Trump military controversies Biden campaign manager touts 'multiple pathways' to victory MORE on Wednesday questioned whether the public can trust a coronavirus vaccine distributed by the Trump administration in an election year. Biden said politics should not interfere with the development and distribution of a vaccine, which should be...
    Joe Biden gave an unequivocal defense of vaccines on Wednesday, responding to President Donald Trump’s contention that he and running mate Kamala Harris are casting doubt on their safety. Biden, the Democratic presidential nominee, leveled his own attack on the Republican president, saying hes put Americans at risk by ignoring science. “Let me be clear,” Biden said after a 90-minute briefing from experts on COVID-19. “I trust vaccines, I trust scientists, but I don’t trust Donald Trump.” Biden also said he would issue an executive order requiring people to wear masks in public if it were deemed legal, after first urging governors to do so in their states. In remarks after a lengthy briefing on vaccines, Biden said the public should listen to...
    Washington (CNN)Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden said Wednesday that politics cannot interfere with the development, approval and distribution of a potential Covid-19 vaccine. "Scientific breakthroughs don't care about calendars any more than the virus does. They certainly don't adhere to election cycles," Biden said, speaking from Wilmington, Delaware. "And their timing, their approval and their distribution should never, ever be distorted by political considerations.""They should be determined by science and safety alone," he said. "One thing is certain, we can't allow politics to interfere with the vaccine in any way," Biden said. This story is breaking and will be updated.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Robert Redfield speaks at a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing on a "Review of Coronavirus Response Efforts" on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020, in Washington. AP Photo For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Earlier today, Robert Redfield, head of the Centers for Disease Control, provoked the ire of some parts of the internet when he suggested that masks might be more effective than vaccines. “I might even go so far as to say that this face mask is more guaranteed to protect me against COVID than when I take a COVID vaccine,” Redford said while testifying before the Senate Subcommittee on...
    As physicians and members of Congress, we know the surest and safest way to defeat coronavirus and return life to a state of normal is by developing a safe, effective vaccine. When the coronavirus pandemic began, the Trump administration had the foresight to launch Operation Warp Speed (OWS), a multi-agency wide effort to develop and deliver a vaccine, therapeutics, and diagnostic tests that could identify and treat the virus in record time. This public-private partnership, which uses federal research dollars to supplement and accelerate private companies’ vaccine development efforts, could now be mere months away from having a COVID-19 vaccine approved and ready to save lives. VideoThanks to this effort, it is entirely possible vaccinations could begin by the end...
    Federal health officials announced a plan on Wednesday to distribute the coronavirus vaccine — if/when one is developed and approved for deployment — free of charge to every American who wants one, The Associated Press reported. A “playbook” released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) outlines how a campaign of mass vaccination will be carried out gradually, beginning in January 2021 or even perhaps before the end of this year, pending the eventual approval of one or more of the candidates currently being tested. As the guidelines make clear, the process will be complicated and will involve the cooperation of the manufacturer, the U.S. military, state and local health officials, multiple federal agencies, and the country’s information...
    (CNN)During a town hall on ABC Tuesday night, moderator George Stephanopoulos asked President Donald Trump why he said that he liked to "downplay" the threat posed by Covid-19 to the American public. Here's the exchange that followed:Trump: I'm not looking to be dishonest. I don't want people to panic. And we are going to be OK. We're going to be OK, and it is going away. And it's probably going to go away now a lot faster because of the vaccines.It would go away without the vaccine, George, but it's going to go away a lot faster with it.Stephanopoulos: It would go away without the vaccine?Read MoreTrump: Sure, over a period of time. Sure, with time it goes away.Stephanopoulos: And...
    A new coronavirus survey conducted in late August reveals Donald Trump's approval ratings on the pandemic to be damn near disqualifying for anyone seeking reelection to the highest office in the land.   In the nationwide poll of more than 21,000 adults fielded by a consortium of colleges—including Northeastern University, Harvard University, Rutgers University, and Northwestern University—Trump didn't clear 37% approval on the coronavirus in any single battleground state and he averaged about 33% across 13 of those states. Here's Trump's approval rating in 13 swing states, according to "The COVID-19 Consortium for Understanding the Public’s Policy Preferences Across States"  survey: Arizona: 31% Florida: 29% Georgia: 35% Iowa: 34% Michigan: 32% Minnesota: 35% North Carolina: 34% New Hampshire: 33% Nevada: 32% Ohio:...
    Meaghan Ellis September 16, 2020 0 Comments Vice President Mike Pence claims his family “wouldn’t hesitate” to get a COVID-19 vaccine approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as he noted the Trump administration’s plan to urge Americans to take the flu vaccine ahead of what could be a harsh flu season. Pence spoke with The Hill on Tuesday where he discussed the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) comprehensive plans to prioritize at-risk Americans for the coronavirus vaccine. He also expressed confidence in the safeness and effectiveness of an FDA-approved vaccine as he admitted he and his family members would be willing to get the vaccine. “So we’ll...
    On Tuesday evening, someone at the Trump campaign thought it would be a great idea to have Donald Trump sit down with some regular Pennsylvania folks and answer some questions at a “town hall” conducted by ABC News.  While the session touched on a number of topics, both the people and the audience and host George Stephanopoulos kept returning to Trump’s handing of the COVID-19 crisis that has left 200,000 Americans dead and close to 7 million known to be infected.   Asked about his handling of the virus, Trump denied that he could have done anything more. Then, incredibly, he denied that he had ever downplayed the deadliness of COVID-19 just days after admitting that he had. In fact, Trump claimed,...
    The United Arab Emirates has approved a largely untested Chinese vaccine for emergency use, making the vaccine available to health-care workers as the country experiences a surge in COVID-19 cases. It’s a reckless move, experts told The Daily Beast, one they described as just the latest sign of the global race for a coronavirus vaccine going off the rails. Pushing a vaccine before the completion of large-scale Phase 3 trials risks exposing people to dangerous complications—and, of course, it might not even protect anyone. Welcome to Rabbit Hole, where we dive deep on the biggest story. It’s for Beast Inside members only. Join up today.
    COVID-19 | September 16 News of outbreaks, the second wave and measures against the pandemic Coronavirus | All the news about the COVID-19 pandemic in Spain and the world They are almost 28.8 million people infected by coronavirus worldwide, according to data from John Hopkins University, while the death toll reaches 920,231, already close to one million. In Spain, the Ministry of Health reported Tuesday that Covid-19 has already left 30,004 dead and that there are 603,167 cases diagnosed in Spain since the start of the coronavirus pandemic. Update of data for # COVID19 in Spain https://t.co/XGRFNdZvR7 Information materials about #coronavirushttps://t.co/3JRZJojRhCpic.twitter.com/SiSZUwHBNE ? Ministry of Health (@sanidadgob) September 15, 2020 The Brazilian Ministry of Health...
    (Bloomberg Opinion) — Prior to the pandemic, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration was the gold standard for American food and pharmaceutical safety. That’s no longer the case, according to Bill Gates. “Historically, just like the CDC was viewed as the best in the world, the FDA had that same reputation as a top-notch regulator,” Gates said in an interview with Bloomberg Television. “But there’s been some cracks with some of the things they’ve said at the commissioner level.” With the election less than two months away, Americans view politics as the main culprit for a steady rise in vaccine hesitancy. In a recent poll by STAT and the Harris Poll, 78% of respondents said they worried the vaccine approval process was being driven more...
    President Donald Trump defended his handling of the coronavirus during a town hall meeting that aired Tuesday night – including from a former supporter who asked him why he threw 'people like me under the bus.' 'Yeah, well I didn't downplay it. I actually, in many ways I up-played it in terms of action,' Trump said early in the town hall program broadcast on ABC.  Trump was responding to a direct question from a voter at the event in Philadelphia.   President Donald Trump faced tough questions from voters at an ABC town hall in Philadelphia that aired Tuesday night “If you believe it's the president's responsibility to protect America, why would you downplay a pandemic that is known to...
    There’s a lot of information coming and going about the coronavirus, and the next steps for vaccines and treatments for COVID-19 — The News Brig even has a newsletter dedicated to it. But how do we assess all this information in a logical way, to prevent confusion, chaos, or something worse? The News Brig’s Nilay Patel, Mary Beth Griggs and Nicole Wetsman talked to Dr. Natalie Dean, assistant professor of biostatistics at the University of Florida, about what we know so far about the timeline of a COVID-19 vaccine, and the best way to evaluate the flood of information coming in every day. “I think if you want reliable information, then let the dust settle a little bit,”...
              Secretary of Health and Human Services Alex Azar told host Michael Patrick Leahy on Tuesday morning’s edition of The Tennessee Star Report – broadcast on Nashville’s Talk Radio 98.3 and 1510 WLAC weekdays from 5:00 a.m. to 8:00 a.m. – that “every part of the Department of Health and Humans Services including even the CDC  [Centers for Disease Control] will be complying with the executive order and the OMB’s directive” banning critical race theory training at all federal agencies. OMB Director Russel Vought issued a directive on September 5 saying, “The President has directed me to ensure that Federal agencies cease and desist from using taxpayer dollars to fund these divisive, un-American propaganda training sessions.”...
    VIDEO4:1904:19Covid-19 pandemic is a crisis that can only be solved with global solutions: Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation CEOSquawk Alley While the world can likely expect an approved Covid-19 vaccine by early next year, it's not clear whether the drug's manufacturing and distribution will be adequate enough to quickly end the global pandemic, said Mark Suzman, CEO of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.  "We're at a critical moment where the research is going well, but we're not clear yet whether we're going to have the manufacturing and distribution we need to really tackle this pandemic," Suzman told CNBC's Meg Tirrell on "Squawk Alley" on Tuesday.  The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation released a new report, called "The Goalkeepers Report,"...
    US regulators are 'very concerned' about the potential side effects of AstraZeneca and Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine and are debating whether or not to allow the trials to resume. Last week, the trial was put on hold when a British participant was rushed to the hospital after suffering a serious reaction that triggered spinal cord inflammation.  On Saturday, the drugmaker announced that trials for the vaccine would continue in the UK, but the America arm has not restarted.  The hold will remain while the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducts an independent investigation as well as the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  US regulators say they are 'very concerned' about AstraZeneca and Oxford University's coronavirus vaccine after the...
    Bill Gates no longer trusts US regulators - and questions whether the Food and Drug Administration's eventual approval of a coronavirus vaccine will mean the shot is safe.  'The FDA lost a lot of credibility,' the billionaire philanthropist told Bloomberg Television, referring to the agency's series of prematurely positive outlook on various COVID-19 treatments, and subsequent retractions.  Confidence in a vaccine from the long-time investor in public health initiatives could help to encourage Americans to get the shot that is likely the world's best hope to combat the pandemic.  But right now, Gates has little confidence that the FDA will sufficiently vet vaccines, and his skepticism is mirrored in the American public.  Meanwhile, Gates's own foundation published a report on Monday...
    A CORONAVIRUS vaccine being developed in China could be ready for use by the public as early as November, Beijing claims. The remarks come as the country continues to face questions about whether it attempted to cover up the outbreak in its earliest stages and allowed the virus to spread around the world. ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates 3A coronavirus vaccine being developed in China could be ready within weeks, an official has claimedCredit: AP:Associated Press 3The pandemic has seen scientists around the world vying to deliver the first effective jabCredit: AFP or licensors The global pandemic has seen scientists in a number of countries vying to be the first to devlier...
    For months, liberals who have fought against all attempts to reopen the economy have insisted that it would be irresponsible to allow any public activity (other than riots) until a vaccine is developed and distributed. Now that it seems possible (albeit unlikely) that such a vaccine may be ready for distribution, many of those same people have shifted gears to say that any vaccine released under the oversight of the Trump administration is not to be trusted anyway — and now Bill Gates has joined the chorus of liberals actively attempting to undermine public confidence in any potential vaccine and thus discourage participation in a vaccination program. In an interview with Bloomberg Television, Gates said that he doesn't...
    Philanthropist Bill Gates has lost confidence in the Food and Drug Administration to regulate coronavirus treatments and vaccines without folding under political pressure. “Historically, just like the [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] was viewed as the best in the world, the FDA had that same reputation as a top-notch regulator,” Gates said in an appearance on Bloomberg Television. “But there’s been some cracks with some of the things they’ve said at the commissioner level.” Gates said that FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn, who has appeared often by President Trump’s side at White House press briefings, hurt the agency’s credibility after echoing Trump about the benefits of convalescent plasma therapy, only to backtrack the following day. “We saw...
    Submit your letter to the editor via this form. Read more Letters to the Editor. What’s Gov. Newsom’s plan for next wildfire season? Gov. Gavin Newsom, you know the quote, “Insanity is doing the same thing over and over, but expecting different results,” which is often attributed to Albert Einstein. The lightning fires produced catastrophic results, and with more lightning on the agenda (climate change), so can you please list what you will be doing differently? How will you spot future fires with satellite “eyes” in the sky (what is your plan), and how will you insert strike teams (what is your plan) to “stomp” out those fires before they become major configurations. How big will be your team of...
    Turning Point: Hispanic Heritage Month is more than a party This Beloved Southern Chain Just Filed for Bankruptcy 5 things to know before the stock market opens Tuesday 1. Wall Street tries to build on recovery from last week U.S. stock futures were pointing to further gains at Tuesday's open as the Federal Reserve begins its two-day September meeting. Optimism toward a coronavirus vaccine sparked a broad market rally Monday after last week's declines. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 327 points or 1.2%. The 30-stock benchmark also closed higher Friday. © Provided by CNBC The S&P 500 was up 1.3% on Monday. The Nasdaq, led by a bounce in tech stocks after last week's rout, was the big...
    (CNN)Dr. Umair Shah remembers the last mass vaccination campaign the US waged. It was in 2009, when the H1N1 "swine" flu broke out in April, right at the end of the regular flu season. "That was very challenging," Shah, who heads the Harris County, Texas, health department, told CNN. "There were a lot of moving pieces. It took several weeks to months to not just organize but to implement and to do safely and effectively. And that was a mild pandemic." This is not a mild pandemic. And while vaccine manufacturers, public health experts and the federal government are all confident one or more of the coronavirus vaccines being tested now will be shown to work safely by the end...
    One of the clearest lessons, perhaps the most obvious, that this fateful year has left us on a platter is that we must be attentive to what is happening in other countries because, sooner rather than later, something similar will happen in ours. New technologies and globalization have made the famous saying “when you see your neighbor’s beard peel off” has accelerated in such a way that, in a few days, what happens in a remote part of the world is already being repeated in the world. other end of the planet. The distances, the cultural diversity or the political ideology of whoever governs matters little, the fundamental thing now is the trends, the data and...
    Bill Gates addresses a virtual Covid-19 conference hosted by the International Aids Society. July 11, 2020International Aids Society Handout Bill Gates doesn't believe any of the coronavirus vaccines currently in development are likely to seek U.S. approval before the end of October — something that would be bad news for President Donald Trump, who has hinted at a viable vaccine to counter the pandemic before the country's November 4 election.  "None of the vaccines are likely to seek approval in the U.S. before the end of October," the billionaire Microsoft-founder-turned-philanthropist told CNBC via video conference last week.  But Gates is more confident on a breakthrough around the end of the year or start of next year — and named one...
    Quest for the Stanley Cup: Scores, schedules in the bubble 11 People Who Should Never Try Intermittent Fasting Bill Gates: The next big question is how to distribute coronavirus vaccines to people in need Bill Gates spoke about the need to distribute coronavirus vaccines more equitably, once they're made available.  The philanthropist and technologist said that it shouldn't be "just the rich countries winning a bidding war."  A new report from Gates' foundation cites modeling from Northeastern University that predicts twice as many people could die from Covid-19 if richer countries hoard the first 2 billion vaccine doses rather than distributing them equitably. © Provided by CNBC Bill Gates Bill Gates expressed confidence that a coronavirus vaccine...
    Bill GatesCNBC Bill Gates expressed confidence that a coronavirus vaccine will be available by 2021. But he remains concerned that doses won't be made available to lower-income groups, particularly in less developed countries.  On a conference call, Gates told reporters that the "next big question" his foundation is thinking through is how to manufacture and distribute the vaccines to those most in need. "It shouldn't just be the rich countries winning a bidding war," he said. "Misallocating the vaccine would cause dramatic additional deaths." Wealthy countries, including the United States, Japan and the United Kingdom, have pre-ordered more than 2 billion doses of coronavirus vaccines, which could leave limited supplies in the coming year. But international efforts are underway to...
    (CNN)President Donald Trump's reelection campaign may be the least truthful and most divisive in modern American history.In recent days, the President has accused Democratic nominee Joe Biden of being mentally "shot" and "on drugs," and implied that the 77-year-old will not be fit to serve within a month of taking office -- a crude attack on a rival only three years his elder. His disparagement of Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris has taken an increasingly racist and sexist tone. And during a riotous campaign swing, he claimed Democrats generally want to "lock law-abiding Americans in their homes." Trump is also escalating false claims that the election will be rigged, claiming that mail-in voting is "unconstitutional" — an outright lie....
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- If you have travel plans that include getting a new passport or renewing the one you have, you need to know that what was once a pretty straightforward process has been changed by the pandemic.Big plans to celebrate a friend's birthday in Mexico sent Fremont's Shirley Ehrlich in search of a new passport."I went on April 30 to the post office, I had all of my forms and documentations ready to go and she said I should get it the first week of August," she told 7 On Your Side.That week has come and gone - and as did the first week of September. Shirley was getting concerned, then this past Thursday her passport arrived in...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- If you have travel plans that include getting a new passport or renewing the one you have, you need to know that what was once a pretty straightforward process has been changed by the pandemic.Big plans to celebrate a friend's birthday in Mexico sent Fremont's Shirley Ehrlich in search of a new passport."I went on April 30 to the post office, I had all of my forms and documentations ready to go and she said I should get it the first week of August," she told 7 On Your Side.That week has come and gone - and as did the first week of September. Shirley was getting concerned, then this past Thursday her passport arrived in...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- If you have travel plans that include getting a new passport or renewing the one you have, you need to know that what was once a pretty straightforward process has been changed by the pandemic.Big plans to celebrate a friend's birthday in Mexico sent Fremont's Shirley Ehrlich in search of a new passport."I went on April 30 to the post office, I had all of my forms and documentations ready to go and she said I should get it the first week of August," she told 7 On Your Side.That week has come and gone - and as did the first week of September. Shirley was getting concerned, then this past Thursday her passport arrived in...
    SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) -- If you have travel plans that include getting a new passport or renewing the one you have, you need to know that what was once a pretty straightforward process has been changed by the pandemic.Big plans to celebrate a friend's birthday in Mexico sent Fremont's Shirley Ehrlich in search of a new passport."I went on April 30 to the post office, I had all of my forms and documentations ready to go and she said I should get it the first week of August," she told 7 On Your Side.That week has come and gone - and as did the first week of September. Shirley was getting concerned, then this past Thursday her passport arrived in...
    Beijing's health chief has said that China will not carry out mass vaccinations on its population because Covid-19 has largely been wiped out in the country.  Director of the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr Gao Fu, said sweeping coronavirus vaccinations would only be needed if there was another major outbreak.  According to the China CDC chief, sweeping vaccinations would be unnecessary in the country while the virus is under control, although he didn't rule out the need for them in the future.  The country recorded 29 new cases and no new deaths overnight, bringing the total numbers to 90,107 infections, and 4,734 deaths.      'This is an issue of balancing risk and return,' Dr...
    It could take another four years to manufacture enough of a coronavirus vaccine to immunise the entire world population, even if one is found in the coming months, experts have warned. One of the world's biggest vaccine producers, the Serum Institute of India, claimed that companies won't be able to produce jabs fast enough to turn one around for the 7.8billion people on Earth before 2024. Dozens of companies and scientific teams around the world are hurtling through research and development to try and create a vaccine that could end the pandemic, which has almost killed a million people since it began spreading in December. There are promising candidates in the works, with early trials suggesting it's possible to build...
    Europe is likely to see a resurgence in coronavirus deaths in October and November, the WHO warned today.  Deaths have remained relatively stable even as cases have surged in many European countries over the summer, but the WHO's Europe director Hans Kluge is expecting a rise in daily fatalities in the autumn.  'It's going to get tougher. In October, November, we are going to see more mortality,' he said.  Kluge also warned that a vaccine breakthrough would not necessarily mean the end of the pandemic - predicting a 'logistical nightmare' if different jabs are needed for different groups of people.  Current infection rates in Europe according to the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC), with Spain and France among...
    (CNN)Though there have been promising developments in the race for a vaccine, public health experts warned that Americans should be skeptical of claims from companies that the United States soon will know if a Covid-19 vaccine is safe."There's a lot of incentive for any corporation to be the first to produce an effective vaccine," epidemiologist and public health expert Dr. Abdul El-Sayed told CNN's Wolf Blitzer Sunday. "To see a CEO get out ahead of the science here I think is something we should all take with a grain of salt."El-Sayed's comments came as Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday that there was a "quite good chance" that the team testing its potential vaccine will...
    The CEO of America's largest pharmaceutical company has said he believes vaccine for COVID-19 could be ready for approval as soon as next month, and for distribution by the end of the year.  Albert Bourla, CEO of New York-based Pfizer, told CBS's Face the Nation on Sunday morning that he was optimistic.  He said there was a 60 per cent chance that his scientists will know by the end of October whether their vaccine was effective, and that, once the green light was given, doses could be produced quickly.  'We have a good chance that we will know if the product works by the end of October,' he said. 'And then, of course, it is regulator's job to issue a...
    Savannah Rychcik September 13, 2020 0 Comments Albert Bourla, CEO of the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, is suggesting it is likely the company will soon determine whether its coronavirus vaccine is successful. “Yes, in our base case, we have quite the good- it’s more than 60% that we will know if the product works or not by the end of October. But of course, that doesn’t mean that it works. It means that we will know if it works,” Bourla told host of CBS’ “Face the Nation” Margaret Brennan. Watch his comments below: When will @Pfizer know if its #Covid19 #vaccine is effective? CEO Albert Bourla to @margbrennan: “In our base case, we will know if the...
    Albert Bourla, PfizerGian Ehrenzeller | Keystone | AP Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine could be distributed to Americans before the end of the year if found to be safe and effective, CEO Albert Bourla said Sunday.  The drugmaker should have key data from its late-stage trial for the Food and Drug Administration by the end of October, Bourla said during an interview on CBS' "Face the Nation." If the FDA approves the vaccine, the company is prepared to distribute "hundreds of thousands of doses," he said.  Because of the pandemic, U.S. health officials and drugmakers have been accelerating the development of vaccine candidates by investing in multiple stages of research even though doing so could be for naught if the vaccine ends up not being effective...
    (CNN) — The AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine trial, halted last week after an unexplained illness in one of the volunteers, will resume, the University of Oxford announced Saturday. The university, which is developing the vaccine with AstraZeneca, did not say when the trial would resume. AstraZeneca said the trial will only resume in the United Kingdom, adding that it’s working with health authorities across the world to determine when other trials can resume. Before the pause, the company was testing its vaccine, dubbed the Oxford vaccine, in the United States as well as in the United Kingdom, Latin America, Asia, Europe and Africa. The university said in a statement that some 18,000 individuals around the world have received study vaccines as part of the...
    Matthew Rozsa September 12, 2020 6:00PM (UTC) Since the start of the novel coronavirus pandemic, a number of pharmaceutical companies and government agencies have rushed to create a vaccine on a timeline greatly accelerated compared to what is normal for the industry. Suffice to say, none of the many vaccine attempts have been widely distributed yet, and there is no clear front-runner; even the ones that have been rushed to production, like the Russian vaccine, come with caveats.  President Donald Trump — who once stated his belief that vaccines could be linked to autism — is determined to rush a vaccine to production, so much so that 62 percent of Americans are concerned he will push one out to the public before it is confirmed to...
    (CNN)The AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine trial, halted last week after an unexplained illness in one of the volunteers, will resume, the University of Oxford announced Saturday.The university, which is developing the vaccine with AstraZeneca, did not say when the trial would resume. AstraZeneca said the trial will only resume in the United Kingdom, adding that it's working with health authorities across the world to determine when other trials can resume. Before the pause, the company was testing its vaccine, dubbed the Oxford vaccine, in the United States as well as in the United Kingdom, Latin America, Asia, Europe and Africa. One of the leading coronavirus vaccine trials is currently paused. Prominent vaccine researchers tell CNN thats unusualThe university said in a...
    (CNN)Vaccine clinical trials are notoriously difficult to conduct.They involve thousands, or even tens of thousands, of participants, and typically go on for years. The chances that one or more of these study volunteers will develop a health issue is quite high.Most of the time, that health problem is not related to the vaccine being investigated, and the trial can continue. But sometimes there is a chance that the issue -- called an "adverse event" in medical parlance -- could be related to the vaccine.In that case, the trial is paused so the incident can be investigated.AstraZeneca pauses coronavirus vaccine trial after unexplained illness in volunteerOn Wednesday, it came to light that pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca had paused its coronavirus vaccine trial...
    As the number of confirmed Covid-19 cases in the United States surpassed 6.43 million and the nation’s death toll topped 192,600, the federal government’s top infectious disease expert warned Friday that life likely won’t return to normal until sometime—perhaps late—in 2021. During a televised interview, MSNBC‘s Andrea Mitchell asked Dr. Anthony Fauci, the longtime director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, about his comments earlier this week that it may not be safe to attend movie theaters or indoor events until a year after the U.S. has a safe, effective vaccine. Fauci said that he remains confident the U.S. could have a vaccine for Covid-19 by the end of this year or early next year, “but by the...
    Loading the player... According to Dr. Anthony Fauci, it could be another year or so before our society gets back to normal. Fauci told Andrea Mitchell of MSNBC on Friday, “if you’re talking about getting back to a degree of normality which resembles where we were prior to COVID, it’s going to be well into 2021, maybe even towards the end of 2021.” WASHINGTON, DC – JUNE 30: Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, speaks during a Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee hearing on June 30, 2020 in Washington, DC. Top federal health officials discussed efforts for safely getting back to work and school during the coronavirus pandemic. (Photo by...
    By Holly Yan | CNN As doctors worry about a coronavirus-and-flu “twin-demic” that could overwhelm the health care system, Americans must contend with another possibility: fighting both viruses at the same time. “You can certainly get both the flu and Covid-19 at the same time, which could be catastrophic to your immune system,” said Dr. Adrian Burrowes, a family medicine physician in Florida. In fact, getting infected with one can make you more vulnerable to getting sick with the other, epidemiologist Dr. Seema Yasmin said. “Once you get infected with the flu and some other respiratory viruses, it weakens your body,” said Yasmin, director of the Stanford Health Communication Initiative. “Your defenses go down, and it makes you vulnerable to...
    ichael Reynolds/CNP via ZUMA Wire For indispensable reporting on the coronavirus crisis, the election, and more, subscribe to the Mother Jones Daily newsletter.Last week, 11 Democratic senators signed on to a letter to Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin demanding the United States impose new sanctions on Russians who attempt to interfere with the 2020 election. “There is virtually no national security threat more serious,” they wrote, “than that posed by those who would undermine confidence in, and the effective operation of, our democratic elections.” After the events of 2016, when Russian hackers attacked the Democratic National Committee and other high-profile Democratic targets, the prospect of a foreign nation again disrupting the presidential election is a real concern. (A Senate report released...